Collection Search

Records of Companies

Reference: L/A/19/A

Formation Documents

Reference: L/A/19/A1

Accounts

Reference: L/A/19/B

Images of paving laying on King Street next to British Home Stores.

Reference: L/A/75/A3/1/695

JEP Photographic Job Number: 1976/695

Date: 2 April 1976

Images of a cracked paving stone near British Home Stores in the shopping precinct, King Street.

Reference: L/A/75/A3/1/2114

Photographer: Peter Mourant

JEP Photographic Job Number: 1976/2114

Date: 29 September 1976 - 30 September 1976

Images of Mrs Stella Auger walking her dogs on King Street, St Helier.

Reference: L/A/75/A3/3/6969

JEP Photographic Job Number: 1978/6969

Date: 1 May 1978

Photographic slide of King Street, St Helier

Reference: P/09/A/3138

Date: 1975

Photographic slide of Don Street, St Helier

Reference: P/09/A/3139

Date: 1975

Personal View of Bill Perchard interview by Beth Lloyd. Talking about how the celebrations of Royal Jersey Agricultural and Horticultural Society last week went, only a bunch of farmers-amazed it went so well-every did their job and there was no bickering and for the two days it was a grand reunion of country folk. The visitors didn't come and so the money wasn't great. Would change a few things if doing it again-would give out less free passes. Worth losing money on it because it did well for the agricultural and horticultural industry. Brought together the agricultural associations. Cattle show-exciting-more entries as usual. Sponsors for the shows-inter-parochial competitions-done 50 years ago-only one parish missing. Mr Cowdrey-the queen's manager and an australian-judging competition. Australian and New Zealand breeder comes to Jersey a lot. No thoughts about having an annual event-possibility of contributing if there was a carnival week with the Battle of Flowers. First Record-Judy Collins and Amazing Grace and his reasons for choosing his song. Went to church and sunday school as a child-had nowhere else to go-met girlfriends at church-social and religious life. Not born in Jersey-parents went to Canada for 6 or 7 years-came back to farm at St Saviour's. Remembers Canada-when he was 2½ years old, remembers meeting cattle for the first time. Always wanted to be a farmer-when he left school learned a trade-worked as a builder-eldest of 14 children. Horn Brothers-in Winchester Street for 10 years-worked as builders labourer-became an apprentice. Bought a motorbike at 17 and took his bosses daughter out and she is now his wife-went out for 6 years before they got married-got married when she was 22. When working for the firm didn't have to help on the farm. Then had dinner at his bosses house-living at Peacock Farm in Trinity. Second Record-Heykens Serenade. Got married at age of 24-felt like a long wait, his father in law bought a house in Victoria Street and they were allowed the top flat-after a year he wanted the country. He wanted to farm-La Chasse-decided to let the farm-father acted as guarantor-that was july-moved in at Christmas. Shock to Winn-who was a town girl-within a month she was looking after the farm. Had a thousand hens-Marion born 3 years later-then did more in the house and then got help in the house and helped outside. 1939-had a dozen animals-WW2 came-no exports-one good thing-had to supply an animal for slaughter-sent the worst cow-after a while had all nice ones in the stable-bought cows in order to provide them for the Germans. Had a decent herd by the end of the war-bought a cow called Keeper's Lass-built up on these during the war-after the war did well. Problem of occupation-fear-could have been deported-no direct orders-told civilian authorities-in trouble if didn't do as you were told. Always said yes and then tried it on afterwards. Spoke a lot of Jersey Norman French-if there were Germans within earshot didn't know what they were talking about-only one of his siblings that could speak Jersey french to his parents. When he first got back from Canada-went to a private school at Five Oaks-he was the only one who couldn't speak Jersey french-learnt it by being with the boys. Later in life-now all in English-thinks it is a dying language. Third Record-Edelweiss in the Sound of Music. Just celebrated his golden wedding anniversary-four children-Marion, Colin, Robin and Rosemary. Three of them interested in farming-Colin never liked the farm-disliked it from 5-didn't enjoy getting the cows in-didn't want the farm-wanted to go to university-went to Liverpool-gave him the money and invested it-graduated and went to work for the British Council-learned Spanish and went to Spain and then went to Uganda, Malawi and then came back to England, India-got married and ill having gone to Bangladesh, South Korea-set up a council. After 3 years went back to London and now is in Zimbabwe. Different from generations of farming in Jersey. After farming for 3 years-landlord said he was thinking of selling the farm-told Mr Whitel he couldn't afford it-put it up for auction-man from Rozel said he'd buy the farm and Mr Perchard could remain as tenant and he put in electricity. Two years later evacuated-came back in 1946-going to sell the farms-only had a small bit of money-bought the two farms for £1400 with rentes. Robin Perchard-interested in farming-used to help his father-natural farmer. Given up cattle and outside farming-Robin looks after it. Fourth Record-Gracie Fields. First got involved in the RJAHS at christmas 1934-49 years-back for the centenary-went to see the show-interested when he took the farm. After WW2-Carlyle Le Gallais suggested going on the council. Became a committee member for St Martin's Agricultural Society and got in to RJAHS. Went into the States-gave up RJAHS council member-when out of States became vice-president. Enjoyed the States work for 6 years but the second 6 years was hard-was becoming a full time job-good to go back to his farmer friends-became president 6 years ago-finishing at christmas. The society-more important than ever-decided not to import semen-have to handle it right. Danger from outside-don't want open market for cattle outside of island. Fifth Record-Harry Secombe-The Old Ragged Cross and the reason that he chose it. End of Side One. Personal View of Jurat Peter Baker, Constable of St Helier. Seeing himself as a St Helier man. His early days-spent time at the Jersey Swimming Club-had a lot of fun at Havre des Pas Swimming Pool. Outdoor child. Interest in boats-from his mother's side-from the Isles of Scilly. Didn't enjoy going to school-Victoria College-not happiest days of his life. Ambition-to get out and enjoy himself-thought he may be able to go to sea professionally-changed his mind. Went to London at 16-worked at Harrods. First Record-1812 Overture by Tchaikovsky. Whether he plays an instrument, listening to music. His family owned a shop in Queen Street-Frederick Baker and Sons Limited. Harrods ran a student scheme. Joined the armed forces during the second world war and became a major by the end of the war. Joined the Territorial Army whilst in London-went into France in 1939 with the British Expeditionary Force-saw service in Dunkirk, in Northern Ireland and then Africa, Sicily, Italy, South France, Greece and finished career in Palestine. Palestine furthest east he went. Enjoyed being a parachutist-big impact on him-development of spirit in an emergency. Left army and returned to Jersey after liberation. Jersey changed after occupation-exciting atmosphere. Settled down and joined the family business. Honour of being voted Constable of St Helier-always interested in the honorary system-good to put something back. Elected to Welfare Board and then Constable. Second Record-music from Dr Zhivago. Used to be a filmgoer but with television stopped going to the cinema. Cinemas after the war-West's, Forum and New Era at Georgetown. Went straight to Constable in St Helier-not unusual in St Helier-like to vote for businessmen in St Helier-different to country parish. Excess of £3 million in budget-more than all other parishes-being constable of St Helier like running a small business. Spends more time being the Constable of St Helier than running his business-more than a full time job. Family business-sold out, now where Queen's House stands. Family owned Noel & Porter's where British Home Stores now is-that was sold out. President of Chamber of Commerce for 5 years, St Helier Welfare Board, Secretary of Jersey Lifeboat. Lifeboat-secretary virtually runs the boat-doesn't go out on operations-used to launch the boat and call the crew. Now run by the Harbour Office. St Helier Welfare Board-major part of budget of St Helier parish-concerned with individuals-good system in place-some people very difficult to help. Meet as the St Helier Welfare Board once a month-has to decide what to do in difficult situations. Third Record-Oriental Trinidad Steel Band with Jamaica Farewell. Likes hot but not humid climates. Enjoys travelling-visits friends in America. Life as Constable-office as Constable unique-look to Constable to variety of things-Constable not as political as deputy or senator-other duties. No political ambitions beyond Constable of St Helier-would not stand as senator. States work, civic duties and the parochial duties such as welfare that takes up most of his time. Concern about violence in St Helier-believes it may be exaggerated. Relationship between States and Honorary Police good-system difficult but works well in island like Jersey. Important future for honorary police. Fourth Record-Evening Hymn and Last Post by the Royal Military School of Music. Used to sail but doesn't race anymore-good way to learn to sail. Enjoys people, good food and wine and life. His wife and he swims in the sea everyday-good start to the day in the winter-used to swim for the island and Victoria College but now bathes rather than swims-took part in the Jersey Swimarathon. Describes a typical day. Fifth Record-Peter Dawson with Friend of Mine. Is going to decide whether to carry on as Constable of St Helier

Reference: R/07/B/2

Date: 1982 - 1983

Personal View of Gordon Young, feature writer for the Jersey Evening Post, interviewed by Geraldine des Forges. Was born and bred in Warwickshire in 1933 and got into a choir school at a cathedral. Went on to public school with a bursary-found it difficult because he wasn't allowed to talk to girls. He was thrown out of the school for talking to a girl on the street. Used to get into trouble at school-didn't enjoy academic work but enjoyed sport. There was no freedom in the school so he rebelled. He spent a lot of time singing at school. He played rugby and football and other sports. When he came to Jersey he joined the Jersey Rugby Football Club. He was 6 when the second world war broke out-remembers going through the Birmingham and Coventry blitz. He remembered enjoying the war-going into the woods and finding fragments of bullets-for him it was an adventure whilst his parents were terrified. In those days you were what your parents wanted you to be-they wanted to be a doctor. He started medical school at Birmingham University but gave it up after a year-didn't enjoy studying. He enjoyed the army and had a wonderful time for 5 years. First Record-Ella and Louis with A Foggy Day. Initially when he joined the army he applied to go in to the Gordon Highlanders but he was put in the Black Watch and was sent to Fort George-he liked the army discipline. He was picked out as an officer-went to train as an officer at Eaton Hall. He applied to join the Gurkhas but he was seconded to the King's African Rifles. He loved Africa-all his soldiers were Africans-they were wonderful. Then got sent out to Malaya. It was a tough life but for a bachelor the army was good because you could see the world. The companies he joined had great traditions-he liked the discipline because you knew what you could and couldn't do. He doesn't think national service should be brought back although it is a good experience. He never played the bagpipes as a member of the Black Watch. After he left the army he came to Jersey-he met a girl in England who was coming to Jersey and he followed her over and they got married at Trinity Church. There was very little work in Jersey at the time-he worked in a market garden which got into trouble because of a poor winter. He found another job at the hospital on the Observation Ward where he worked for a couple of years. At that point he heard of a building surveyors job which he got-he loved it and spent 27 years in the business-dealt with the Island Development Committee. Has never regretted not becoming a doctor. Second Record-Kai Winding. Surveying took a lot of training but he learnt by experience. You were never stuck in an office-he surveryed the whole of the Jersey Airport which took about 3 months and St Helier Harbour. Saw the poverty in St Helier-a lot of houses were in awful conditions and had people living inside of them. The buildings in the island have improved but there are still some appalling buildings. Loved the Noel and Porter Building but the British Home Stores building replaced it getting rid of all the beauty-King Street has lost some of its character. Loves buildings with Jersey granite-architects are now doing a good job. Hue Street was a beautiful street and he is glad it is finally being renovated. Loves railways-his father was a transport manager for a steel company. As a child he used to travel a great deal on the railways. Received a clockwork train set as a child and then as an adult bought a model railway and has been building it ever since. Third Record-Jersey Bounce. George Marshman, a cameraman from Channel Television, asked him if he wanted to be on television. He went for an interview with Ward Rutherford and he got the job-for 13 years he did freelance work for Channel Television and worked on every programme they produced. The broadcasts were all live so people saw your mistakes. He then worked for the Jersey Talking Magazine for the blind with Philip Gurdon which he really enjoyed and then Radio Lions with Alastair Layzell. For Radio Lions he did a minimum of five interviews in half an hour and everyone was very good. He thinks it's one of the best things that people can do for the hospital and broadcasters could gain experience from the job. He was keen to try something new and decided to move into journalism full time. His wife worked at the Jersey Evening Post and she told him that the 'Under the Clock' column needed a new author and he went for an interview with Mike Rumfitt and got the job. Loves writing and working at the Jersey Evening Post. He likes to comment on things that people are interested in. He thrives on deadlines and meeting people. He has written a book on rugby for the Jersey Rugby Club-they researched a great deal through the newspaper and it took 10 years to write. It's hard to write a book because it takes such a long time-he needed to take a break from writing but it has now been published. He'd like to write fictional books. He also enjoys painting and reading-he now writes art and book reviews for the newspaper. Fourth Record-Frank Sinatra with New York, New York. Enjoys family life-has had two sons and a daughter who have left the island. His eldest son works at the Jersey General Hospital but is going back to England, his second son works with computers and his daughter is a journalist. He has two grandchildren-Amy and Joshua. Started playing music 2 years ago-took up the trombone and has joined the Jersey Big Band where he plays the bass trombone. Fifth Record-Kid Ory with Oh Didn't he Ramble?.

Reference: R/07/B/19

Date: 20 December 1992