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Definition of terms: butter, sugar, cooking fats and meat

Reference: B/A/W31/1/2

Date: July 5th 1940

Payment of interpreter Heinz Huyssen

Reference: B/A/W43/2

Date: October 8th 1940 - October 26th 1940

1) Programme entitled 'Summer 1940-Part Three: Occupation June 29th-July 5th' broadcast by Channel Television presented by Alastair Layzell. Talks about the effect the air raid had on the islanders, the fact that the air raid confirmed to the Germans fact that the islands were undefended, the population being in fear of more air raids, Philip Warder, who wroked for the Post Office, waiting for instructions to sever the cable between Jersey and England, the Guernsey Controlling Committee running island and Raymond Falla talking about his experiences, the landing of the Germans in Guernsey on June 30th and met by Ambrose Sherwill, proclamations being put up and anger at Raymond Falla because cows were on the runway at Guernsey Airport, July 1st the Germans invaded Jersey and dropped an ultimatum which was taken to the bailiff, it told that white flags had to put up, the States agreed to comply, an aeroplane landed at the Jersey Airport the next day and sent a message that the island was to be occupied fom 3pm that day when the bailiff, government secretary and attorney general met the Germans, Leslie Sinel went to cinema at The Forum and when he came out Germans were walking on the streets, the Germans soon looked at the essential services, at the Post Office Philip Warder was arrested for no reason and offered resistance for the rest of war by destroying letters sent to the commandant and the Evening Post came under the eyes of the german censor. First impressions of the german soldiers was them buying up of goods from shops. Jack Herbert took germans to the generating station at the airport and had to watch as Germans defused bombs left at the airport, tomato growers realised their income had stopped, the Controlling Committee took the glass houses over to plant other crops, Alderney was taken over and headquarters were established, July 4th a party crossed to Sark and met with Sybil Hathaway showing her respect but brought her list of orders. Captain Gussek was the first commandant and with him Coutanche worked out a proclamation for the local government to continue. Overall the Germans were friendly, morale was high and they believed the islands were a stepping stone to England. 2) A brief account of the German Occupation of Jersey from the BBC Schools Broadcast produced in Jersey by Joe Jackson and Graham Simms. Report on the origins and development of the second world war. July 1st 1940 occupation of Jersey begins. The responsibility for the island was on Sir Alexander Moncrieff Coutanche and the programme shows how he shouldered the burden. He remembers the arrival of the Germans and the affect it had on his position in the islands. Bob Le Sueur remembers the uncertainty and the speech by the bailiff in the Royal Square giving instructions to fly the white flag. Mrs Perkins remembers Germans bombing the harbour and their arrival with the orders received by the islanders. They remember Germans thinking they could get to London very easily, the introduction of a curfew, the surprise at the discipline of the Germans, the scarcity of money and schemes to raise some, the scarcity of food and improvisation with different ingredients. A poem written during the occupation about the scarcity of food is sung. After D-Day food supplies were cut off and after protests from the governments the red cross ship the SS Vega arrived. The liberation came with the arrival of the HMS Beagle and Coutanche got a message to go to the Pomme d'Or Hotel from where he was taken to the ship to witness the surrender. The programme looks at his life before and after the occupation and the award of his knighthood and peerage.

Reference: L/D/25/L/58

Date: November 7th 1974 - July 3rd 1980

Alexander Coutanche talks of his duties as Bailiff during the German occupation. Recording originally produced by the Channel Islands Educational Broadcasting Service. Original Reference: Res 1. Includes: concerns that war was building during the years 1935-1939; Home Office committee dealing with the Channel Islands, presided over by Norman Brook; suspension of normal government and institution of the Superior Council; proclamations for the government of the island issued on the arrival of the German forces; mentions different German officers in command of the island; initial expectations of German officers that they would soon be moving on to an occupied England; mentions Mr Prime, his interpreter; daily duties in dealing with the correspondence from the occupying forces; creation of the German field command at Victoria College House, and headquarters for the occupying forces in all the Channel Islands at Roseville Street; regular council meetings; protesting about things he objected to; setting up the Bailiff's News Office to deal with correspondence sent through the Red Cross; changes in island agriculture to become self-sufficient; supplies from France and requisition of cars to pay for this; Summerland knitwear factory set up to provide clothing; effects of D-Day; changes in the German chain of command; relief of the Red Cross ship Vega; deportations; meeting with German commanding officers immediately prior to liberation; surrender of the German forces on the HMS Beagle, and liberation; difficulties of getting the island back on its feet after the war. Recorded in 1971 by Sheila Sibson. Duration 43 minutes.

Reference: R/03/A/5

Date: 1971