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Jersey Talking Magazine, March [1980].

Reference: R/05/B/40

Date: 1 March 1980 - 31 March 1980

Jersey Talking Magazine, October [1981].

Reference: R/05/B/58

Date: 1 October 1981 - 31 October 1981

Jersey Talking Magazine, June [1982].

Reference: R/05/B/64

Date: 1 June 1982 - 30 June 1982

Personal View of Bill Perchard interview by Beth Lloyd. Talking about how the celebrations of Royal Jersey Agricultural and Horticultural Society last week went, only a bunch of farmers-amazed it went so well-every did their job and there was no bickering and for the two days it was a grand reunion of country folk. The visitors didn't come and so the money wasn't great. Would change a few things if doing it again-would give out less free passes. Worth losing money on it because it did well for the agricultural and horticultural industry. Brought together the agricultural associations. Cattle show-exciting-more entries as usual. Sponsors for the shows-inter-parochial competitions-done 50 years ago-only one parish missing. Mr Cowdrey-the queen's manager and an australian-judging competition. Australian and New Zealand breeder comes to Jersey a lot. No thoughts about having an annual event-possibility of contributing if there was a carnival week with the Battle of Flowers. First Record-Judy Collins and Amazing Grace and his reasons for choosing his song. Went to church and sunday school as a child-had nowhere else to go-met girlfriends at church-social and religious life. Not born in Jersey-parents went to Canada for 6 or 7 years-came back to farm at St Saviour's. Remembers Canada-when he was 2½ years old, remembers meeting cattle for the first time. Always wanted to be a farmer-when he left school learned a trade-worked as a builder-eldest of 14 children. Horn Brothers-in Winchester Street for 10 years-worked as builders labourer-became an apprentice. Bought a motorbike at 17 and took his bosses daughter out and she is now his wife-went out for 6 years before they got married-got married when she was 22. When working for the firm didn't have to help on the farm. Then had dinner at his bosses house-living at Peacock Farm in Trinity. Second Record-Heykens Serenade. Got married at age of 24-felt like a long wait, his father in law bought a house in Victoria Street and they were allowed the top flat-after a year he wanted the country. He wanted to farm-La Chasse-decided to let the farm-father acted as guarantor-that was july-moved in at Christmas. Shock to Winn-who was a town girl-within a month she was looking after the farm. Had a thousand hens-Marion born 3 years later-then did more in the house and then got help in the house and helped outside. 1939-had a dozen animals-WW2 came-no exports-one good thing-had to supply an animal for slaughter-sent the worst cow-after a while had all nice ones in the stable-bought cows in order to provide them for the Germans. Had a decent herd by the end of the war-bought a cow called Keeper's Lass-built up on these during the war-after the war did well. Problem of occupation-fear-could have been deported-no direct orders-told civilian authorities-in trouble if didn't do as you were told. Always said yes and then tried it on afterwards. Spoke a lot of Jersey Norman French-if there were Germans within earshot didn't know what they were talking about-only one of his siblings that could speak Jersey french to his parents. When he first got back from Canada-went to a private school at Five Oaks-he was the only one who couldn't speak Jersey french-learnt it by being with the boys. Later in life-now all in English-thinks it is a dying language. Third Record-Edelweiss in the Sound of Music. Just celebrated his golden wedding anniversary-four children-Marion, Colin, Robin and Rosemary. Three of them interested in farming-Colin never liked the farm-disliked it from 5-didn't enjoy getting the cows in-didn't want the farm-wanted to go to university-went to Liverpool-gave him the money and invested it-graduated and went to work for the British Council-learned Spanish and went to Spain and then went to Uganda, Malawi and then came back to England, India-got married and ill having gone to Bangladesh, South Korea-set up a council. After 3 years went back to London and now is in Zimbabwe. Different from generations of farming in Jersey. After farming for 3 years-landlord said he was thinking of selling the farm-told Mr Whitel he couldn't afford it-put it up for auction-man from Rozel said he'd buy the farm and Mr Perchard could remain as tenant and he put in electricity. Two years later evacuated-came back in 1946-going to sell the farms-only had a small bit of money-bought the two farms for £1400 with rentes. Robin Perchard-interested in farming-used to help his father-natural farmer. Given up cattle and outside farming-Robin looks after it. Fourth Record-Gracie Fields. First got involved in the RJAHS at christmas 1934-49 years-back for the centenary-went to see the show-interested when he took the farm. After WW2-Carlyle Le Gallais suggested going on the council. Became a committee member for St Martin's Agricultural Society and got in to RJAHS. Went into the States-gave up RJAHS council member-when out of States became vice-president. Enjoyed the States work for 6 years but the second 6 years was hard-was becoming a full time job-good to go back to his farmer friends-became president 6 years ago-finishing at christmas. The society-more important than ever-decided not to import semen-have to handle it right. Danger from outside-don't want open market for cattle outside of island. Fifth Record-Harry Secombe-The Old Ragged Cross and the reason that he chose it. End of Side One. Personal View of Jurat Peter Baker, Constable of St Helier. Seeing himself as a St Helier man. His early days-spent time at the Jersey Swimming Club-had a lot of fun at Havre des Pas Swimming Pool. Outdoor child. Interest in boats-from his mother's side-from the Isles of Scilly. Didn't enjoy going to school-Victoria College-not happiest days of his life. Ambition-to get out and enjoy himself-thought he may be able to go to sea professionally-changed his mind. Went to London at 16-worked at Harrods. First Record-1812 Overture by Tchaikovsky. Whether he plays an instrument, listening to music. His family owned a shop in Queen Street-Frederick Baker and Sons Limited. Harrods ran a student scheme. Joined the armed forces during the second world war and became a major by the end of the war. Joined the Territorial Army whilst in London-went into France in 1939 with the British Expeditionary Force-saw service in Dunkirk, in Northern Ireland and then Africa, Sicily, Italy, South France, Greece and finished career in Palestine. Palestine furthest east he went. Enjoyed being a parachutist-big impact on him-development of spirit in an emergency. Left army and returned to Jersey after liberation. Jersey changed after occupation-exciting atmosphere. Settled down and joined the family business. Honour of being voted Constable of St Helier-always interested in the honorary system-good to put something back. Elected to Welfare Board and then Constable. Second Record-music from Dr Zhivago. Used to be a filmgoer but with television stopped going to the cinema. Cinemas after the war-West's, Forum and New Era at Georgetown. Went straight to Constable in St Helier-not unusual in St Helier-like to vote for businessmen in St Helier-different to country parish. Excess of £3 million in budget-more than all other parishes-being constable of St Helier like running a small business. Spends more time being the Constable of St Helier than running his business-more than a full time job. Family business-sold out, now where Queen's House stands. Family owned Noel & Porter's where British Home Stores now is-that was sold out. President of Chamber of Commerce for 5 years, St Helier Welfare Board, Secretary of Jersey Lifeboat. Lifeboat-secretary virtually runs the boat-doesn't go out on operations-used to launch the boat and call the crew. Now run by the Harbour Office. St Helier Welfare Board-major part of budget of St Helier parish-concerned with individuals-good system in place-some people very difficult to help. Meet as the St Helier Welfare Board once a month-has to decide what to do in difficult situations. Third Record-Oriental Trinidad Steel Band with Jamaica Farewell. Likes hot but not humid climates. Enjoys travelling-visits friends in America. Life as Constable-office as Constable unique-look to Constable to variety of things-Constable not as political as deputy or senator-other duties. No political ambitions beyond Constable of St Helier-would not stand as senator. States work, civic duties and the parochial duties such as welfare that takes up most of his time. Concern about violence in St Helier-believes it may be exaggerated. Relationship between States and Honorary Police good-system difficult but works well in island like Jersey. Important future for honorary police. Fourth Record-Evening Hymn and Last Post by the Royal Military School of Music. Used to sail but doesn't race anymore-good way to learn to sail. Enjoys people, good food and wine and life. His wife and he swims in the sea everyday-good start to the day in the winter-used to swim for the island and Victoria College but now bathes rather than swims-took part in the Jersey Swimarathon. Describes a typical day. Fifth Record-Peter Dawson with Friend of Mine. Is going to decide whether to carry on as Constable of St Helier

Reference: R/07/B/2

Date: 1982 - 1983

Personal View of Leslie Sinel, former Jersey Evening Post employee and occupation historian. Born in St Helier in 1906. Involved with people around you-knew everybody in the district-different today. His father was a saddler-used to do jobs at different farms-got to love horses. Not many vehicles around-1920 no one on the Jersey Evening Post owned a private car. Newspaper was distributed by horse-1910-got two delivery cars with open sides so delivery people could throw the paper out of the car. Went to the Jersey National School-church school-difficult but accepted it. Jersey french not taught in schools-French was taught-headmistress Miss Bennett was tough but she taught everybody how to read and write. First Record-The Trumpet Voluntary by Jeremiah Clarke-used to listen to it during the occupation on crystal radio sets. Childhood-holidays coincided with the potato season-worked at T & J Moor and the Great Western Railway. At 14 joined the Jersey Evening Post-father got him the job-started as an apprentice printer-Wolfdale printing machines. Newspaper only means of communication at the time. Jersey Evening Post used to be distributed by horses-1910 got first car. Newspaper printed at 3.30 so people could catch the train from Snow Hill to Gorey at 4 o'clock. 1920-took 3 hours to print 7,500 newspapers, today can print 23,000 in three quarters of an hour. Newspapers dropped off at each station both east and west. Exciting to go on the train as a child-sad but inevitable that the railways went when buses were brought in. Tourism in the summer of the 1920s and 1930s-not comparable with today-people used to stay longer. St Brelade popular for tourists. Second Record-the Radetzky March by Strauss. Radio-what he used to listen to. 1930s-became a proof reader at the Jersey Evening Post and wrote some articles-never had an ambition to become a journalist-worked mostly from the printing side. Newspapers today good quality but reporting is 'muck raking' now. Media today-good variety-modern way of life. Spent 15 years as a Constables Officer and Vingtenier in St Saviour and 21 years in St Helier as a churchwarden and on the Welfare Board and on the Battle of Flowers' Association and Jersey Eisteddfod-always involved in something. Honorary policeman-got fed up with job at the time of the prowler-stayed out watching farms at nights. Queen came-did Government House duty all night. Mostly traffic duties. States Police and Honorary Police can work together. Never wanted to leave Jersey-some travelling on the Continent. Has lived in St Helier and St Saviour. Not the same parochialism today. First buses here-used to run through Bagot-used to call it the 'Orange Box'. The JMT and Red Band Bus-opened up the island-created more movement in the island. 1925-1930s-motor cars increased in number. Third Record-Zadoc the Priest from the Coronation Anthem. Second world war-Germans swept across France getting closer to Jersey-hoped nothing would happen but thought it would. Government realised it was impossible to defend and pulled out. Germans took the island-no alternative-no question of resistance-couldn't have sabotage during the occupation-where could you go? Repercussions on other islanders. Had a guilt complex-felt if he'd gone away he may have been able to do something but if everybody had left the island it would have been destroyed. Decided against evacuation-two of his family left but the rest stayed. Continued to work at the Jersey Evening Post-censored by the Germans but the staff used to resist. On the surface looked to be agreeing with them but were resisting. Was asked to put an article in the newspaper but he took three days off and burned it. Fourth Record-Vidor's Toccata and Fugue. During the occupation worked on a farm in the afternoon-used to get some extra food-learned how to make sugar beet syrup. Meat was scarce-used to get some on the black market-used to be expensive but nothing on the price today. Used to listen to the radio every morning-every hour on the hour-would listen until 9 in the morning-used to leave the house and people would tell him the news-everybody knew it. Used to type out 3 copies of the news-took one to Captain Robin of Petit Menage, one to the Jersey Evening Post and kept one. Many people listened to the radio-he would have been prosecuted for disseminating the news. Used to find out news from German soldiers. Fifth Record-To be a Pilgrim. Liberation-can't talk about it without emotion. Enjoyed life since the war-is retired but very active. Enjoys writing-historical and local events. Would have liked to have been a teacher. End of Side One. Personal View with Jack(John) Herbert interviewed by Beth Lloyd, the war time Airport Commander. Enjoyed working at the Jersey Airport. Was born in Bath and went to Green Park College in Bath. Was part of the choir in Bath but gave up his music-difficult to choose music for the programme. Came over to Jersey at 11-his father was an engineer on a ship-his mother wanted him to stay on shore. Worked in Bath and the Piers and Harbours Committee of 1923 advertised for a harbour engineer. Was learning about law but ended up sailing instead- helped the fishermen Tommy and Charlie King and helped the pilots in St Helier Harbour. First Record-Underneath the Arches by Flanagan and Allen. After leaving school joined his father at the Harbour Office. Worked as clerk dealing with harbour dues-counted the passengers coming in. On the Albert Pier with Captain Furzer-a ship collided with the Albert Pier-harbour had to be dredged. Mr Bill Thurgood visited the island-decided to set up an aeroplane route-administration of the aeroplanes were placed under the auspices of the Piers and Harbour Committee-staff had to check beach. First flight took place on the 18th December 1933 from Jersey to Portsmouth. The beach was cleared of people-a great local event. Had a refueler and a coach for the office work. Had to be an English customs officer, Bill Ivy, and a Jersey customs officer, Harold Robins. No aeroplane dues-the aeroplanes used to pay harbour dues. Aeroplane had a tragic accident-a little boy was sitting on the beach and was killed and a coach got trapped on the beach and was swamped by the sea. Second Record-Stranger on the Shore. Used to create a weather report at the Harbour Office by letting a balloon go into the air and timing it going in to cloud cover. Sites inspected to build Jersey Airport-a site at Grosnez turned down. Site at St Peter decided-problem with fog. No other suitable place in the island for it. Jersey Airport-Piers and Harbour Committee was put in charge of the Airport being built-plans were approved-there were four runways-Jersey Airways ran from Jersey to Portsmouth and Jersey to Heston. Air France went from the Jersey Airport. Third Record-Glenn Miller and American Patrol. Second world war-all messages came in code. Bill Lawford-an air traffic control officer came over. Had to camouflage the airport. Jersey Airways staff evacuated-was in charge of the evacuation-no panic at the Airport to get off the island-between 400-600 left by the Airport. Was ordered to stay at his post, Chris Phillips, an air traffic controller, was called back to the royal navy. Late May some French air force plane with two highly ranked officers and a ground crew. The morning of the 1st June in his office when he saw a german plane fly over and dropped a container-it was addressed to the Bailiff of Jersey. German landed and spoke to the Bailiff-wanted the island to be handed over later that afternoon-put up white flags. Jack Herbert told to cut off the electricity supply-had shipped all their radios to Bristol. Fourth Record-Luftwaffe March. Jack Herbert was transferred to the Transport Office in Bond Street during the occupation-converted some vehicles to use gas as fuel-had to improvise to create fuel as it was in such short supply. Fifth Record-It Must be Him by Vikki Carr. Liberation-transferred back to the Jersey Airport on May 10th 1945-airfields were mined and booby traps-were cleared. German officer detailed to cut the grass at the Airport. Royal air force officer was in charge of Airport and it was handed over 2nd October 1945. Civil aviation picked up between 1948 and 1952. The airport was tarmacked in 1952-the material came from the excavation of the Jersey Underground Hospital. The Jersey Airport became the second busiest airport in Britain in the 1960s. Was presented with an MBE by the Queen in 1974 and retired in 1975.

Reference: R/07/B/3

Date: 1982

Personal View of Deputy Jean Le Maistre interviewed by Malcolm Gray. Was born in Millbrook at the maternity hospital and lived most of his life in St Ouen. He is called Jean and his brothers have French names-François and Edouard. His family took part in farming. Had a fortunate and happy childhood-had lots of space to play and a good community and family spirit. St Ouen has a strong community spirit but so do the other parishes. His father's life has been devoted to the recording of the Jersey language-was brought up speaking jèrriais. Went to school at the age of 5 not knowing a word of english. Jèrriais is a dying language-is a shame because it's part of our identity. There are parish variations of the language-have evolved over the centuries-the language is very rich. First Record-'Going Home' by The Shadows. Got involved in youth club work-was a member of a youth club at St George's Church. Moved on to help in youth clubs-became a youth leader in St Ouen at 17 and then moved to youth work in town at the Cellar Club in Hope Street-worked there for about 5 years-led on to his involvement in the Jersey Youth Movement-became statutory in 1973 and became its first chairman. The Jersey Youth Movement was the precursor to the Jersey Youth Service. At that point there was a lack of facilities. Got to know Cliff Richard through his church work-met him in 1969-came to his wedding. Met him in Israel in 1972 through his overseas aid work. Second Record-'Help it Along' by Cliff Richard. Religion has played a large part in his life-never considered becoming a minister but has always been involved in the church. Believes you should go to church to be a christian-you need to share your faith. Lay people are more involved in services now-he has taken part in some services but doesn't believe that is his role-was an almoner at St George's for 17 years. Second Record-Roy Castle with 'The Bread of Life'. Has travelled a great deal-had a prayer breakfast with Ronald Reagan in Washington. Has visited the Middle East especially Israel-Israel is a very enjoyable place-has organised trips to Israel-has been 14 or 15 times. Israel has had problems but he is quite happy to go because he feels safe. Third Record-'We Have Brought You Greetings'-a traditional jewish greeting song. Has been in the States of Jersey for 15 years-has enjoyed being in the States-wanted to get into the States to help with the youth service and agriculture. Agriculture has been in a difficult state-served on the Agriculture Committee for 6 years under Senator Binnington. Has been President of the Postal Committee and served on the Education Committee. Working in the States takes up a lot of time-your family have to be understanding. Is worried about the States members workload-has lodged a proposition to try and solve this. Wants to keep the honorary system but wants it to be easier for people to come forward and stand. Was born in St Ouen but has always represented St Helier as a deputy-has always worked in St Helier and has served No 3 District where he lived for 8 years. Has not thought about coming a senator at the moment. Fourth Record-Tune from a visiting African choir. Has been president of the Overseas Aid Committee for about 9 years-important to send money and good will. Loves Africa and the African people-they suffer difficulties not of their making-couldn't help but feel emotionally affected. Took the media on a trip in order to experience the conditions in Africa. Fifth Record-Born Free. End of Side One. Personal View of Deputy Jack Roche interviewed by Malcolm Gray in his garden and at Fort Regent. Was born in Jersey in 1924 in Providence Street. Had one brother and three sisters-lived in Charles Street for many years-had a brother Lewis who has passed away and three sisters called Ena, Mavis and Dorothy. His father died 6 months after he was born-was a financial struggle-his mother used to run a shop in Charles Street. Schooled at St Mark's at La Motte Street-one of the teachers was Deputy Arthur Carter. Left school at 14 and then about a year later they evacuated as war broke out. First Record-String of Pearls. His first job was at Bisson Cycle Shop which was then in Halkett Place-worked there for 12 months when the evacuation took place. Travelled as a family except his brother who had just started a business-mainly cargo boats took them across-the journey from Jersey to Weymouth took about 36 hours-it was a very difficult journey. They moved to Bury, went into some brand new houses and they were treated very kindly by the people of the north. Spent the rest of the work years in Bury-got into a reserved occupation-he joined the Air Training Corps and then the war ended. Six weeks after the island was liberated he came back home. Second Record-'A Man and a Woman'. Worked with his brother after liberation-was an electrician by trade but during the war he had invented a machine to process tobacco so he started to work on that. Once commercial cigarettes started coming into the island he was offered a job by W A Nichollas on Commercial Buildings-started work on 3rd February 1946-still with them-started as an office boy and is now the boss. Has become the Jersey Coal Distributors-used to store coal at Fort Regent-he is now the President of the Fort Regent Development Committee. His brother used to work from home in St Clement. The States of Jersey wanted Fort Regent back so a number of companied decided to build a coal store and from this they became one company. Met his wife Joan Norman at the office when he joined in 1946-they were married in 1950 and have one daughter Patricia and one granddaughter Rebecca. Decided to go into the States after getting rid of the business at Commercial Buildings-at first he spent a lot of time gardening. An opportunity came when Len Nightingale retired from the district and he and John Le Gallais, his next door neighbour, decided to stand and both got in. States work takes up enough time as members allow it-if you have spare time you can fill it in the States but if you work you can work it to fill your schedule. He sits on Finance and Economics Committee, the Prison Board, vice-President of the Housing Committee and President of the Fort Regent Development Committee. Is also a States appointed director of the Jersey New Waterworks Company and is chairman of the Joint Advisory Council. Has been vice-president of the Public Works Committee under Senator John Le Marquand Public Health Committee under Senator Gwyneth Huelin. Was Vice-President and then President of Jersey Telecoms, President of the Gambling Control Committee and Etats Civil. During his nearly 12 years he has sat on Agriculture and Fisheries, Tourism, Legislation, Establishment, Broadcasting, was a member of the Executive Committee of the Commonwealth Parliamentary Association. Before joining the States sat on the Agricultural Loans Board. In 12 years he has sat on a number of committees-believes members should move around as much as possible in order to see the way the States run. People are invited onto a committee by the president but they can express a desire to go onto that committee. Believes that people who work in the States from businesses will be able to cope with the work and that employers should be sympathetic. Some people would be able to become a full time member of the States in the future. Believes in the honorary system-thinks it could be problematic if people give up their jobs and don't get elected and as a result get in financial difficulty. Third Record-The Waltz from Masquerade by Khachaturian. Jack Roche and Malcolm Gray go to Fort Regent and are greeted by Humphrey, the mascot of Fort Regent. Go into the Rotunda of the Fort-he has been President of the Fort Regent Development Committee for 4 years-appointed a new chief officer Graeme Pitman. Fort Regent has been renovated in the piazza and the funfair and now in the rotunda. Great shows have been put on in the piazza. Fort Regent is sports orientated. Some big names have performed in the Gloucester Hall. Used to use the parade ground as a coal store and he has now gone in a complete circle and finds himself as the president of the facility as a whole. People's attitudes have changed towards the centre-there are 18,000 members. Fourth Record-Shirley Bassey singing Goldfinger. When the rotunda is completed it will become a multi purpose hall for sport and entertainment. There is more than one level in the rotunda-the roof covers 3 acres in total. The cost of the refurbishment will be £1.8 million for the rotunda. Have recently had the 10 millionth visitor to Fort Regent. Fifth Record-Tchaikovsky's 1812 Overture.

Reference: R/07/B/12

Date: 1987