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Images of a man, possibly Police Constable Scholfield, at the police station at Rouge Bouillon with a recovered mass of stolen meat.

Reference: L/A/75/A3/2/3168

Photographer: Reg Cridland

JEP Photographic Job Number: 1977/3168.

Date: 10 February 1977

Raymond Falla OBE, the last surviving member of the States of Guernsey and a key member of the Controlling Commmittee, talking to the Channel Islands Occupation Society at St Clement's Parish Hall. Introduction by the President of the Channel Islands Occupation Society. Talks about preparations before the occupation, forming the Controlling Committee, being put in charge of charge of Agriculture and Horticulture, problems of glasshouses and inability to export tomato and flower crops to England, States taking over the glass houses, evacuating cattle from Alderney, changes in cropping plans and the lack of seeds in the island, request for a Purchasing Commission in France agreed by Germans, Jean Louis Jouault representing Jersey in France, arriving in Granville and setting up base, going around France purchasing items that were short in the Channel Islands and the difficulties involved, their experience in journeying around the country and the purchases they were involved in, difficulties with transportation and loading of goods, sharing of cargo between Jersey and Guernsey, having to pay everything in cash to pay everything in marks, anti-British propaganda seen in France, conditions in France, slaughtering of cattle in Granville described, thieving, tribute to Jean Louis Jouault and others that worked in Granville, recounts humorous experiences and stories from his time in France, run ins with the Germans, morale boosting buying of cosmetics for the ladies, making of soap for the Islands, working in slaughterhouse, what they did with their recreation time and visits to Jersey. Questions on whether Mr Falla kept a diary during the Occupation, trouble in getting petrol in France, what was put in glasshouses after tomatoes removed, Purchasing Commission after D-Day, the situation in Alderney, finance for purchasing, evacuation from Guernsey, distribution of food when in Guernsey, relationship with German soldiers, stealing of food by Germans, a television series Mr Falla involved in concerning the occupation, security in France and the French underground movement.

Reference: L/D/25/L/17

Date: 30 March 1978

Talk by Herbert de Gruchy, Customs Officer at the St Helier Harbour during the occupation, to the Channel Islands Occupation Society. Subjects mentioned include his experiences in the royal navy before the war, moving back to Jersey and becoming a customs officer, being on duty the night before and the day of the evacuations, seeing the air raid on St Helier, the dropping of leaflets and white flags to be hung for the Germans, the arrival of the Germans, being sent to the Agricultural Department because of the lack of ships landing and his duties there, being called back to the Harbour to take up his post once again, defence around St Helier Harbour, experiences had with the germans whilst loading, unloading and transporting goods, his relationship with German soldiers, a storm and its effects at his home at 18, Coastlands, Greve d'Azette, the arrival of Organisation Todt workers, the attempts by the germans at stealing food, german warship coming in after being attacked and bodies being loaded off, unloading of live cattles and being arrested, taken to the Pomme d'Or and interrogated about stealing a cow, arrest of other workers on the Harbour, infestation of rats, his second arrest for stealing when he was found innocent once again, the assistance he was given to stop stealing, the railway in front of the Harbour Office, improvisation in making sugar beat into syrup, the deportations, anonymous informing letters in the Post Office, after the coming of D-Day there were no more ships and so was sent to check tobacco growing, arrival of the SS Vega, the boats to liberate the island and the first mailboat. Questions about the Russians POW, horses used for transportation, importation of French cattle, boats going to St Malo to help in the evacuation, railways and people that Mr de Gruchy knew. Announcements for the Channel Islands Occupation Society.

Reference: L/D/25/L/22

Occupation-BBC Radio Jersey tape. The story of the occupation of Jersey during World War 2 told by the people who lived through it produced by Beth Lloyd. 1) Part 13: The Todt Organisation and their Russian Slave Labourers. Eye witnesses talking about the background of the Organisation Todt, the arrival of the Russians on the island, the condition they were in, the brutality of their overseers, begging and stealing food, concentration camps, the Jersey Communist Party and other people giving shelter, food, clothes, false papers and english lessons with Mrs Metcalfe to escaped prisoners, the story of Louisa Gould, Harold Le Druillenec and Feodor Burrij and the experience of other residents who harboured escapees. 2) Part 14: Entertainment. Eye witnesses talking about the difficulties of the first show during the occupation put on by the Jersey Amateur Dramatics Club, cinemas and the films that were shown, variety entertainment at the Opera House, West's Cinema and out in the parishes, finding musicians, public dances, the Amateur Variety Band, the Green Room Club productions including pantomimes, easter productions and shows, improvisations with costumes and scenery and censorship of the shows. 3) Part 15: We Are At War. Eye witness accounts of feelings of isolation, seeing and hearing British and German aeroplanes, feeling and seeing bombing raids on the coast of France, leaflet raids, members of the royal air force being taken as prisoners of war, commando raid on Egypt, sabotage, the v sign campaign, resistance and reprisals, youth groups against the Germans, the British Patriots group and Norman Le Brocq and Leslie Huelin working with the Free Germany Movement represented by Paul Muelbach calling for a mutiny in the garrison. 4) Occupation Part 16: Escapes produced by Beth Lloyd made up of interviews of local people who were in Jersey during the Occupation. Subjects discussed include the escape of Denis Vibert to England in September 1941, tales of different escapes to France by islanders recounted by Eddie Le Corre, Basil Le Brun, Peter Crill, John Floyd, Roy Mourant and their subsequent experiences of interrogations by the Home Forces and arrival in England. 5) Part 17: D-Day and the Last Terrible Year. Eye witnesses talking about the realisation that D-Day was taking place, aeroplanes going over the island, lack of fuel and food supplies, health in island worsening, Red Cross parcels, the arrival and unloading of the SS Vega, starvation of German soldiers and waiting for liberation. 6) Part 18: Liberation. Eye witnesses including the bailiff talking about the change in the high command of the german administration and listening to Winston Churchill's speech, release of political prisoners, celebrations, surrender of Germans and arrival of royal navy officers. See R/06/4.

Reference: L/D/25/L/44

Occupation-BBC Radio Jersey tape. The story of the occupation of Jersey during World War 2 told by the people who lived through it produced by Beth Lloyd. 1) Part 15: We Are At War. Eye witness accounts of feelings of isolation, seeing and hearing British and German aeroplanes, feeling and seeing bombing raids on the coast of France, leaflet raids, members of the royal air force being taken as prisoners of war, commando raid on Egypt, sabotage, the v sign campaign, resistance and reprisals, youth groups against the Germans, the British Patriots group and Norman Le Brocq and Leslie Huelin working with the Free Germany Movement represented by Paul Muelbach calling for a mutiny in the garrison. 2) Part 10: There's Good and Bad in all Races. Eye witnesses talking about collaborators, Jerry Bags, informers, the actions of the Post Office to destroy anonymous denunciation letters or warn those who had been denounced, searches by german soldiers to follow up anonymous letters, relationships with and attitudes of the german soldiers. 3) Part 11: Government and God, How the States and the Church Survived. Eye witnesses talking about dissatisfaction with the local authorities, the difficulties faced by the bailiff Alexander Coutanche, confirming legislation in Jersey, rectors and Jurats members of the States, meetings of the States, rectors remaining in the parishes and services continuing, Canon Cohu being taken by the Germans for passing on the news from the radio, praying for the men who were fighting, banning of the Salvation Army and Jehovah Witnesses. 4) Part 12: Brushes with the German Authorities. Eye witnesses talking about being interrogated at Silvertide, experiences of confrontations with the german soldiers, being arrested and beaten, court martials and trials of local residents, listening to the radio and experiences in the prison at Gloucester Street. 5) Part 13: The Todt Organisation and their Russian Slave Labourers. Eye witnesses talking about the background of the Organisation Todt, the arrival of the Russians on the island, the condition they were in, the brutality of their overseers, begging and stealing food, concentration camps, the Jersey Communist Party and other people giving shelter, food, clothes, false papers and english lessons with Mrs Metcalfe to escaped prisoners, the story of Louisa Gould, Harold Le Druillenec and Feodor Burrij and the experience of other residents who harboured escapees. 6) Part 14: Entertainment. Eye witnesses talking about the difficulties of the first show during the occupation put on by the Jersey Amateur Dramatics Club, cinemas and the films that were shown, variety entertainment at the Opera House, West's Cinema and out in the parishes, finding musicians, public dances, the Amateur Variety Band, the Green Room Club productions including pantomimes, easter productions and shows, improvisations with costumes and scenery and censorship of the shows.

Reference: L/D/25/L/47

Talk by Mr Sam Renouf to the Channel Islands Occupation Society on beekeeping during the occupation. Introduction by a member of the CIOS. Talks about the Jersey Beekeepers Association which was founded during the First World War by the Société Jersiaise, the industry's development, the lessening opportunities for beekeeping now as a result of the lessening of the agriculture industry, methods of extracting honey from hives, people who used to keep bees in Jersey, starting beekeeping as a hobby after the Great War and the equipment he used, advantage of keeping bees during the occupation, how hives were made during the occupation and the improvisation was necessary, being short of beeswax, methods of encouraging bees, a great deal of stealing by german soldiers and russian prisoners of war, attempts to prevent stealing by various methods including camouflage, putting it on the roof and in somebody's bedroom, deaths of bees due to gunfire, lack of honey due to trees being cut down for fuel, his allowance of petrol, looking after other people's hives, handing over honey for hospitals and the sick in place of medicine, trees that bees like, making of mead which was kept for liberation, improvisation with food, different places that he kept bees, keeping and making crystal radio sets, requisition of tyres by the germans but Mr Renouf kept his, inspections by the germans of his vehicles, requests by the germans for honey, moving bees, supplying bees for different people, experiences of being shelled whilst fishing, getting salt from the sea at Le Fret, needing sugar for the hives, reproduction and numbers of bees, how long bees live for, what bumble bees are, the treating of wounds with honey and pollen, value of honey and pollen, his experience of a trip to Russia for a beekeeping conference and the different techniques of beekeeping in Russia.

Reference: L/D/25/L/53

Date: 6 January 1982

Talk by Mr T Riley to the Channel Islands Occupation Society. (Very faint at some points) Talks about his experiences during the occupation and the different jobs he undertook including working at George D Laurens shop in Queen Street, being called up by Theodor Elsch to help build sea walls at La Braye slip wall but refusing to work, being put into prison in Gloucester Street for not complying, given a month in prison, when he got out was put to work on the sea walls but started registering in the morning and then going home, put to work on the German Hospital in St Peter's Valley but stopped going after a rock fall, got sent down the Victoria Pier cleaning the walls of tanks but didn't want to work there either, put to work in a german store but was eventually arrested, interrogated by the police at Silvertide, Havre des Pas and was offered the choice of doing 5 months prison in France or 5 weeks solitary confinement in Jersey, decided on staying in Jersey, was classed as an 'undesirable', talks about the reduced rations they received in prison, a plan whereby he got increased rations, a job at the Homestead in Vallée des Vaux when he was released, got extra beer by delivering beer from Ann Street Brewery, getting a letter saying he was to be deported but avoiding it as his name was late in the alphabet, becoming friendly with a german he was living next to and being allowed off the next deportations, working for the States down St Helier Harbour unloading supplies, the stealing that used to take place of German goods, being arrested by the Germans for stealing and being sentenced by the local police court as it was States goods to four weeks hard labour, breaking stones in the prison, getting shingles in prison and was given light duties, got married and was living in town, got a job looking after and grave digging at the Stranger's Cemetery, got fired for only going to work every other day and pulling down a hut to burn for fuel, sent to Midvale Road to work in OT offices as a cleaner, taking fuel from the offices, picking berries from a mountain ash for his boss who lived in Clarendon Road to distill into alcohol, opening a room at the office which had a great deal of food inside and taking supplies, moved to St Brelade and worked at knocking down trees for people's fuel, used to fill bins with sea water and extracted the salt, taking weapons and binoculars from a store and looking in the bunker at La Pulente and finding a motorbike. Comments made by the audience about their dealings with the germans at the Harbour and taking food, the need for policemen as so much was being taken. Riley tells how he was caught out after curfew 52 times, he had to go to Bagatelle House to explain himself, dealing on the blackmarket for an old lady who lived in Colomberie, the ships that transported essential commodoties the SS Normand and SS Spinel their captains, the arrival of the Russian POWs, taking butter from the germans, the arrival of the SS Vega and the red cross parcels, the fact that things for babies were never touched and how they always tried to steal from the Germans. Questions asked and comments made concerning his arrests and whether it was recorded in the press, the Painters, listening to radios and an American airman who crashed and was saved by John de la Haye.

Reference: L/D/25/L/54

Date: 8 April 1981

Jersey Talking Magazine, May 1978.

Reference: R/05/B/19

Date: May 1978

Occupation-BBC Radio Jersey tape. The story of the occupation of Jersey during World War 2 told by the people who lived through it produced by Beth Lloyd. 1) Part 13: The Todt Organisation and their Russian Slave Labourers. Eye witnesses talking about the background of the Organisation Todt, the arrival of the Russians on the island, the condition they were in, the brutality of their overseers, begging and stealing food, concentration camps, the Jersey Communist Party and other people giving shelter, food, clothes, false papers and english lessons with Mrs Metcalfe to escaped prisoners, the story of Louisa Gould, Harold Le Druillenec and Feodor Burrij and the experience of other residents who harboured escapees. 2) Part 14: Entertainment. Eye witnesses talking about the difficulties of the first show during the occupation put on by the Jersey Amateur Dramatics Club, cinemas and the films that were shown, variety entertainment at the Opera House, West's Cinema and out in the parishes, finding musicians, public dances, the Amateur Variety Band, the Green Room Club productions including pantomimes, easter productions and shows, improvisations with costumes and scenery and censorship of the shows. 3) Part 15: We Are At War. Eye witness accounts of feelings of isolation, seeing and hearing British and German aeroplanes, feeling and seeing bombing raids on the coast of France, leaflet raids, members of the royal air force being taken as prisoners of war, commando raid on Egypt, sabotage, the v sign campaign, resistance and reprisals, youth groups against the Germans, the British Patriots group and Norman Le Brocq and Leslie Huelin working with the Free Germany Movement represented by Paul Muelbach calling for a mutiny in the garrison. 4) Occupation Part 16: Escapes produced by Beth Lloyd made up of interviews of local people who were in Jersey during the Occupation. Subjects discussed include the escape of Denis Vibert to England in September 1941, tales of different escapes to France by islanders recounted by Eddie Le Corre, Basil Le Brun, Peter Crill, John Floyd, Roy Mourant and their subsequent experiences of interrogations by the Home Forces and arrival in England. 5) Part 17: D-Day and the Last Terrible Year. Eye witnesses talking about the realisation that D-Day was taking place, aeroplanes going over the island, lack of fuel and food supplies, health in island worsening, Red Cross parcels, the arrival and unloading of the SS Vega, starvation of German soldiers and waiting for liberation. 6) Part 18: Liberation. Eye witnesses including the bailiff talking about the change in the high command of the german administration and listening to Winston Churchill's speech, release of political prisoners, celebrations, surrender of Germans and arrival of royal navy officers.

Reference: R/06/4