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Talk by Dr Hill, a British prisoner of war during the second world war in Germany and a translator for the Nuremberg Trials, to the Channel Islands Occupation Society. Talks about his background in languages, his experience as a prisoner of war, being examined by the intelligence corps to see how good his languages were, being sent to the British War Crimes Executive in Paris, in Paris was promoted and charged with going around Germany looking for documents to indict war criminals, starting in Hamburg, sending reports on the documents that were found, being sent to Nuremberg for the trials, living with the Germans, being asked to set up a translating and interpreting department to liaise with all the delegations, preparing for the trials, security in the courthouse, description of his team and the jobs they had to undertake, the skill of translating, going to the court room and describing the lay out of the court along with the procedures and translation, the treatment of defendants, the importance and difficulty of interpreting, social life in Nuremberg, jobs he undertook and the understanding of Nazi jargon, different countries opinions on the trials, the difficulties of the trial and books written about the trials. Questions about the books he just mentioned, how long the trials lasted, the verdicts reached, contact with and impressions of the war criminals, instigators of the war trials, defense strategies, views on pre-war Germany, personal views on trials, the problems of translation, choosing of the defense counsel, Japanese war criminals, the Dutch system, the Russians reactions, length the prosecution went to charge people, treatment of prisoners by the Russians, treatment of prisoners of war, difficulty in not being bias in translation, availability of the trials in hard copy, mention of the Channel Islands in the trials, feelings today about Germans and Japanese, making of sound recordings, showings of film in trial and the showing of remorse and who made the final judgement, .

Reference L/D/25/L/25
Date December 4th 1978
Names Hill, Doctor
British War Crimes Executive
Channel Islands Occupation Society (Jersey)
Keywords interpreters | courts | trials | war criminals | prisoner of war camps | Prisoners of war | intelligence | war crimes | Second World War | sound | sound recordings
Category L/D-Societies and associations
Places Nuremberg, Hamburg
Dimensions 2 sound cassette
Language English
Level of description File
Access restrictions Master Tape Only-Needs to be Copied
Closed until 2100

Context:

L/D/25/L/25This item»

Talk by Dr Hill, a British prisoner of war during the second world war in Germany and a translator for the Nuremberg Trials, to the Channel Islands Occupation Society. Talks about his background in languages, his experience as a prisoner of war, being examined by the intelligence corps to see how good his languages were, being sent to the British War Crimes Executive in Paris, in Paris was promoted and charged with going around Germany looking for documents to indict war criminals, starting in Hamburg, sending reports on the documents that were found, being sent to Nuremberg for the trials, living with the Germans, being asked to set up a translating and interpreting department to liaise with all the delegations, preparing for the trials, security in the courthouse, description of his team and the jobs they had to undertake, the skill of translating, going to the court room and describing the lay out of the court along with the procedures and translation, the treatment of defendants, the importance and difficulty of interpreting, social life in Nuremberg, jobs he undertook and the understanding of Nazi jargon, different countries opinions on the trials, the difficulties of the trial and books written about the trials. Questions about the books he just mentioned, how long the trials lasted, the verdicts reached, contact with and impressions of the war criminals, instigators of the war trials, defense strategies, views on pre-war Germany, personal views on trials, the problems of translation, choosing of the defense counsel, Japanese war criminals, the Dutch system, the Russians reactions, length the prosecution went to charge people, treatment of prisoners by the Russians, treatment of prisoners of war, difficulty in not being bias in translation, availability of the trials in hard copy, mention of the Channel Islands in the trials, feelings today about Germans and Japanese, making of sound recordings, showings of film in trial and the showing of remorse and who made the final judgement, .

L/D/25/L/25

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