Comments

Jersey Talking Magazine-December Edition. Introduction by Gordon Young. John Boucheré talking about camping describing what camping is today, what he likes about camping, the monthly meeting of a camping club, advice for the novice camper, meeting people in the camp sites and bad weather camping. Alastair Layzell interviewing Michael Nicholson, the television journalist who covered the Falklands War for ITN, about the Falklands War, the interest in the War, protesting after the war about the lack of cooperation from the Ministry of Defence, the lack of uniforms and equipment for the troops, communication from the ships, finding out for a soldier whether he had a child from HMS Hermes, how journalism has affected his life and how his family feel about him not reporting on any other wars. Joan Stevens talking about early Jersey doctors-no doctors in the earliest records. Gift of healing-became known throughout the community. A rector became known for this-Samuel de la Place-Rector of St Ouen in 1590-died 1651-came of a french refugee family-his services were paid in kind including by wheat, lamb, pork and other food and goods. Cures-purge used a great deal, a plaster for a child, bleeding and vomit. Unknown Account-from Linden Hall, Mont au Prêtre-c1630-probably from the Messervy family-list of cures written in english-different cures read out. Condition in the island-Camden wrote in 1586-that the inhabitants were in good health-no physicians in the island. Beth Lloyd with In Touch tips for the blind. End of Side One. Gordon Young on the train from Paris to Munich-commentating on the train journey with the sound of the train and talking about the other passengers on the train. Arriving in Munich for the beer festival describing the fairground at the festival, going on the ghost train and describing other rides and attractions. Sue Mackin talking to David Langlois, who during a three month stay in South Africa joined an American adventure excursion going down the rapids of the River Zambezi on an inflatable dinghy, describing how the trip started, looking at the first rapids, seeing the Victoria Falls, the guides, the boats, the work they had to do in order to help sail the boat, the requirements for the trip, shooting seventeen rapids and riffles, whether it got easier as the days went on, the different rapids and their difficulties, the feeling of elation once he had finished the rapid, being able to name a rapid, the different names of the rapids, camping at nights, the different animals that they saw, travelling down 105 miles in 7 days, staying on beaches by the river, encounters with crocodiles, defences against crocodiles, other animals they saw on their expedition, going around a waterfall, the number of boats and guides, his travelling companions and unrest between the two different countries-Zimbabwe and Zambia. Cooking Feature-Margaret Jenkins giving recipes for vegetables. End of Side Two.

Reference

R/05/B/67

Date

November 30th 1982 - November 30th 1982

Names

Mackin, Sue
Langlois, David
Lloyd, Beth
de la Place, Samuel
Camden, Mr
Messervy family
Stevens, Joan
HMS Hermes
Ministry of Defence
Layzell, Alastair
Nicholson, Michael
Bouchere, John
Young, Gordon
Jersey Talking Magazine
Gurdon, Philip

Keywords

recipes | Food | Cooking | vegetables | expeditions | crocodiles | Beaches | rapids | Waterfalls | Boats | dinghies | Rivers | Fairs | fairgrounds | Beer | Festivals | visits | trains | health | diseases | medicines | rectors | doctors | reports | Communications | Ships | uniforms | equipment | troops | Wars | journalists | televisions | Camps | camp sites | clubs | Camping | interviews | sound | news | Blind | sound recordings | radios | Zambia | Zimbabwe | Victoria Falls | River Zambezi | South Africa | Munich | Paris | Linden Hall, Mont au Prêtre | Falkland Islands

Dimensions

1 sound cassette

Language

English

Level of description

file

Access Restriction

Master Copy-Needs to be Copied

Closed until

2100

Context:

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