Draft manuscript of Lest We Forget: Escapes and Attempted Escapes from Jersey during the German Occupation 1940 - 1945 by Roy Thomas.

Reference: L/F/341/A/2

Date: 1992 - 1992

Magazine titled The 40th anniversary of the Liberation of Jersey: An historic souvenir of the Liberation of Jersey and programme of celebrations, May 6 - May 12, 1985. Edited by Rob Shipley.

Reference: L/F/341/C/2

Date: May 6th 1985 - May 12th 1985

Digital copy of an article by Mark Lamerton titled Visitors' Book reveals D-Day drama and the Liberation of the Channel Islands. From The Armourer, Issue 52, July-August 2002, pp. 23-25.

Reference: L/F/420/B1/7

Date: July 1st 2002 - August 31st 2002

Programme advertising entertainment being held at the Jersey Opera House throughout the 1983/1984 winter season.

Reference: L/F/445/C/3/13

Date: October 3rd 1983 - January 27th 1984

Sir Peter Crill and Reg Jeune in the grounds of Government House.

Reference: p/03/411/15

Date: June 16th 2000 - June 16th 2000

Jersey Arts Trust. Sir Peter Crill opening the inflatable structure in the Royal Square for Jersey Architecture Week.

Reference: P/03/B197/03

Date: October 13th 2000 - October 13th 2000

Jersey Arts Trust. Sir Peter Crill opening the inflatable structure in the Royal Square for Jersey Architecture Week.

Reference: P/03/B197/07

Date: October 13th 2000 - October 13th 2000

Channel Television video of Channel Report programme of 10 May 1990 on the celebrations of the 45th Anniversary of the Liberation of the Channel Islands. Report includes in Jersey: service of remembrance in the Royal Square including the crew of HMS Jersey with an address given by Leslie Sinel; the opening of Liberation Square by the Bailiff Sir Peter Crill with Brian Rabet; the raising of the Union flag at the Pomme d'Or with some archive footage of the Liberation; the Soviet ambassador in London and others laying wreaths in memory of the Russian slave workers at the Strangers' Cemetery now the crematorium; the party in the Peoples' Park; It's a Knockout competetion at the FB Fields with teams from three local banks; the dedication ceremony of a new lifeboat, the Alexander Coutanche, near the Harbour Office by Jurat John Coutanche with a speech by Don Filleul; the Liberation Fun Walk organised by the Rotary Club with the starting gun fired by Henry Cooper; the launch of 10,000 balloons at Peoples' Park with Dame Vera Lynn In Guernsey: arrival of Princess Alexandra and Angus Ogilvy met by Bailiff; the royal salute and inspection of cadets and the Chelsea in-pensioners; exit from Town Church and walkabout including meeting Mrs Doris Carré; the Liberation procession of historic military vehicles, buses, Rolls Royces and bicycles, the Boys Brigade band, commercial floats and street entertainers 30 mins, colour with sound

Reference: Q/09/1

Date: May 9th 1990 - May 9th 1990

Occupation-BBC Radio Jersey tape. The story of the occupation of Jersey during World War 2 told by the people who lived through it produced by Beth Lloyd. 1) Part 13: The Todt Organisation and their Russian Slave Labourers. Eye witnesses talking about the background of the Organisation Todt, the arrival of the Russians on the island, the condition they were in, the brutality of their overseers, begging and stealing food, concentration camps, the Jersey Communist Party and other people giving shelter, food, clothes, false papers and english lessons with Mrs Metcalfe to escaped prisoners, the story of Louisa Gould, Harold Le Druillenec and Feodor Burrij and the experience of other residents who harboured escapees. 2) Part 14: Entertainment. Eye witnesses talking about the difficulties of the first show during the occupation put on by the Jersey Amateur Dramatics Club, cinemas and the films that were shown, variety entertainment at the Opera House, West's Cinema and out in the parishes, finding musicians, public dances, the Amateur Variety Band, the Green Room Club productions including pantomimes, easter productions and shows, improvisations with costumes and scenery and censorship of the shows. 3) Part 15: We Are At War. Eye witness accounts of feelings of isolation, seeing and hearing British and German aeroplanes, feeling and seeing bombing raids on the coast of France, leaflet raids, members of the royal air force being taken as prisoners of war, commando raid on Egypt, sabotage, the v sign campaign, resistance and reprisals, youth groups against the Germans, the British Patriots group and Norman Le Brocq and Leslie Huelin working with the Free Germany Movement represented by Paul Muelbach calling for a mutiny in the garrison. 4) Occupation Part 16: Escapes produced by Beth Lloyd made up of interviews of local people who were in Jersey during the Occupation. Subjects discussed include the escape of Denis Vibert to England in September 1941, tales of different escapes to France by islanders recounted by Eddie Le Corre, Basil Le Brun, Peter Crill, John Floyd, Roy Mourant and their subsequent experiences of interrogations by the Home Forces and arrival in England. 5) Part 17: D-Day and the Last Terrible Year. Eye witnesses talking about the realisation that D-Day was taking place, aeroplanes going over the island, lack of fuel and food supplies, health in island worsening, Red Cross parcels, the arrival and unloading of the SS Vega, starvation of German soldiers and waiting for liberation. 6) Part 18: Liberation. Eye witnesses including the bailiff talking about the change in the high command of the german administration and listening to Winston Churchill's speech, release of political prisoners, celebrations, surrender of Germans and arrival of royal navy officers.

Reference: R/06/4

Personal View of Bailiff Sir Peter Crill, interviewed by Hamish Marett-Crosby. Has an eclectic musical taste-chosen his records because they are a cross section of music that he likes-he enjoys singing. Used to compete in the Jersey Eisteddfod and now sings in church choirs. Was involved in theatrical productions-started acting at Victoria College-didn't take part during the occupation-didn't want to play to the german soldiers. Took it up again after the war at Oxford University. Helpful to have acted if you want to be an advocate-useful when speaking to a jury. Education suffered during the occupation-there was a shortage of teachers. Pays tribute to the headmaster Mr Tatum who stayed through the occupation. Was moved to Halkett Place Infant School in 1941. Was a teenager so remembers the occupation well-had all night parties despite the curfews. Escaped to France in a boat before the end of the occupation with two friends-between 50-60 did this. Only one real escapee, Denis Vibert, who got to England in 1941. Went to England from France-their information about the hunger in the island and a report by the Bailiff, Lord Coutanche, helped persuade the authorities to allow the red cross ship the SS Vega to come to the island. First Record-Handel's Water Music Suite. Read law at Oxford University-went up in 1945 with the aid of the Howard Davis Trust. He rowed when he was at Oxford in the Head of the River Race. Was called to the Bar in 1949 and called to the Jersey Bar in the same year. Later brought in local examination-there wasn't when he joined. Was on the committee to created the deputy bailiff and became deputy bailiff later. Second Record-Prokofiev's Romeo and Juliet. Reached the conclusion in 1954 to create the post of deputy bailiff-Mr Harrison was the first deputy bailiff, Sir Robert Le Masurier became lieutenant bailiff before becoming bailiff. The second deputy bailiff was Mr Bois [Francis de Lisle] who was appointed in 1963, then Sir Frank Ereaut and then himself. The law has a weight of tradition-he keeps up the tradition but cuts it down, for example, the assize d'héritage-lost its meaning by leaving twice a year-decided to hold it only once a year-added a service and bailiff's reception at the time of the assize d'héritage to add more importance to it. Bailiff performs the role of presiding officer of the States. He was a deputy for 9 years-took a break because his father was ill-has seen it from the benches as well. He was also solicitor and attorney general for 12 years. Finds it difficult to stop speakers repeating themselves-the bailiff has the power to stop members from speaking. There is a need to observe standing orders. There is a rule that speeches should not be read-some people do nonetheless. Third Record-Chopin's Polonaise in C Sharp Minor. Jurats left in 1948 but the constables still sit in the States-wouldn't make a difference if they were elected to the States rather than elected as heads of the parish and sit in the States as virtue of the office. Constables are the oldest members of the States-doesn't want to lose constables as it is a link to the past. The problem with constables sitting in the States is that they are police officers-there's a possible question over the fact that 12 policemen make up a quarter of the States. The country parishes have retained their former way of life more than the urban parishes-in the urban parishes the role of honorary police is much more difficult to maintain. Has noticed a change since the radio started broadcasting the States sittings-more people have started speaking and for longer. Jersey was affected by the French Revolution-progressive parties were formed although it didn't crystallise into definite parties-there was left and right within the States. The States may have been built in a circular so no people were directly facing others in opposition. Fourth Record-A Piece from Aida. The States was also designed so that all of the different groups, senators, deputies, constables, could sit together. There have been groups in the past from the left and right. During the second world war two groups emerged-the Jersey Progressive Party who wanted reform and the Jersey Democratic Movement, who were further to the left. Progressive Party got 17 members in the first post war States-carried out their reforms and then disbanded-they achieved their objective and decided that they did not want to continue as a political party. In the States today he doesn't notice any individual groupings. A difference in degree and not complete opposed political viewpoints. Fifth Record-Bach's Prelude and Fugue in G Minor. Was for 5 years the president of the Société Jersiaise-helped create the Jersey Heritage Trust. The Société wanted to remain as the learned society but could not show all of its collections off properly and in accordance with modern thinking in museums. The Société built an education room but it never got off the ground. When he took over he made it clear that members had a choice-it could remain as a learned society or it could become a trustee of all the acquisitions that they had and receive help-from this the Jersey Heritage Trust was created. The Jersey Heritage Trust was supposed to be a channel of funds from the States to other cultural bodies in the island-believes a grant should be granted to someone like the poet Jeremy Reed. Enjoys music, books, horses, boats and pottering about. Doesn't use a computer now. Does still cycle in the summer. Sixth Record-Gilbert and Sullivan-The Overture to the Gondoliers.

Reference: R/07/B/10

Date: July 11th 1982 - July 11th 1982

'Lunch break'-an interview of Sir Peter Crill, the former Bailiff of Jersey, by Michelle Cuthbert on his retirement from office. Talks about his childhood-had a stable, happy childhood. His grandfathers on both sides were farmers. His great grandfather on his mother's side was farming in St Helier and was a victim of two bank crashes at the end of the nineteenth century. His father had a farming background and he went into his uncle's office who was a solicitor, George Philip Crill. He later became a Jurat and had to go the Privy Council to be sworn in because there was a row after he was elected over a previous case that he had tried. Was sworn in 1913 and was later made president of the Education Committee. His father had gone into the office-he was in the militia-his father met his mother and wooed her for 10 years as she went off to America as her father emigrated to Australia. She told him that he'd need to qualify for her to marry him and he qualified and went to marry her in America in 1913. His father was constable of St Clement from 1916 until 1958. He had 2 brothers and 2 died in child birth. He was born in London as his mother went over to be careful. His eldest brother joined the firm in 1939 and was later thrown out of the army because he was going deaf. He transferred to civil affairs and was killed in his bed because he didn't hear the air raid warnings and died in Paris in 1944. He grew up spoilt and indulged. He was a lazy child-liked reading but also liked exploring the countryside of St Clement. Had a country upbringing. Remembers the railway especially using it to get into town when he was 4 without telling his parents. Great Uncle George found him and put him back on the train. Did a lot of bicycle riding and a small boat. Someone suggested he should go to the sail maker of the Westward, TB Davis' yacht and he did and got the sail designed by him, Mr Bridges. From 1937 until the war he kept her at La Hocq and got to know all of the channels in the area. Had great fun with the boat. He went to St Clement's Church. Church was an important part of his life. He started at the Dame School of Miss Le Brocq. She gave him a good grounding and then he went to Victoria College Prep where he fell under the influence of Miss Aubrey. She was a great teacher-has her reports on him and it was said that he talked too much. The Prep was in an old house called Mount Pleasant. Started with Miss Bunnett as headmistress-remembers her being scary. He was a spoilt boy who got fat. Wasn't fond of ball games although he liked swimming. Went up to Victoria College in 1935 aged 10 where he stayed until 1943. Had good masters before the war. The boarding house was big in those days-a nucleus of boys lived at the boarding house. At school he was somewhat idle-he was at least a year below the average age of the form-found it difficult. Managed to get his school certificate before he was 15. When occupation came he wasn't evacuated with the school certificate group. Stayed because his mother met the then Bailiff, Lord Coutanche, in St Helier and he told her to keep him in Jersey as the occupation wouldn't last. One of his oldest friends is Roy Mourant who he escaped with. He used to have all night parties to avoid the curfew. Had one at St James' Vicarage with boys and girls in the dormitories. Decided to escape because it became clear in the summer of 1944 that Jersey was not to be liberated. During August a few people tried to escape on a float but failed. Had to plan if you were going and so they did. In 1942 all boats had to be put into store. He kept his in the parish quarry at the top of La Hocq Hill and then put his into Norman's in Commercial Buildings. Recruited John Floyd with Roy Mourant in the plan. They had to get the boat out of Commercial Buildings. They borrowed a furniture removal van and pretended to be removal men and took the boat from Commercial Buildings. Borrowed a key from his father of a property of somebody who had left. Put his boat in the garage of the house and got his boat decked over. His parents only knew about it towards the end. They were lucky when they escaped-they made a lot of noise and were seen off by a number of people. Spent 17 hours in the boat. When they arrived in France they had taken some brandy with them which he drank and promptly fell out the boat. They went up the beach and gave themselves up to a Frenchman who kept them for the night until the Americans were due to arrive the next day. He later sold the boat and they spent 10 days in Cherbourg before being transferred to London. He planned to join up when he was in London and phoned his cousin who was in the army who told him about his brothers death. Was given 6 months rest and recreation before joining up and his elder brother told him to use it. He then met Professor Laurie Bisson, a Jerseyman, who was at Pembroke College, Oxford who persuaded him to join the University. Went to Oxford having been sponsored by Lord du Parcq and gained a scholarship. Spent two terms in the Spring and Summer of 1945 in the Officers Training Corps but before he was able to join up the war ended. Had law in his blood. Near the end of the occupation he did some local preaching in the anglican church-was licenced by the dean to take matins and even song. Had planned to become ordained but decided his father needed him to help in the family business. Went to London to take the Bar Exams and came back to Jersey in 1949 and joined his father's firm of Crill-Benest. In his approach to law Lord Denning was influential. Relied on his father's knowledge at the beginning as there weren't any advocates exams when he came back. He was the one who introduced the exam in 1954 when he was the President of Legislation in the States. He admired how Lord Coutanche ran his court. Also admired Advocates Vibert and Valpy. A learned advocate was Advocate Peter Giffard. Became a Deputy from 1951-58 and a Senator from 1960-62 before becoming solicitor general. Missed meeting clients in the private practice and had to acquire conversational skills. People unsure of how to address him when he became bailiff. Sang from 1957 in St Helier's Church Choir and later Trinity Church. Decided that the Catholic Church was the church he wanted to join and was received into the church in July 1995. Looked back with pleasure at his time as solicitor general and deputy bailiff as he was under people and was learning on the job. As attorney-general he prosecuted the Beast of Jersey, Edward Paisnel. Originally the deputy-bailiff was intended to be an alter-ego of the bailiff but it didn't work that way as there needed to be a leader of the States. Is unsure whether the bailiff would ever leave the States-it would change the constitution radically. Talks about the bailiff's role. Feels his greatest achievement was being appointed bailiff. Enjoyed the royal visit in 1989. The Bailiff of Jersey and Guernsey were invited to the Commonwealth Lawyers Conference of Presiding Officers of the Commonwealth in 1988 in London which he enjoyed. Satisfied by the judgement in the Waterworks Case on the rating assessment by the Parish of Grouville. His darkest hour was the trouble 3 years previously. For hobbies he reads, walks and gardens. Has joined a livery company in London and has been asked to be the President of the Jersey Scout Association. His unfulfilled pleasure would have been to charter a boat in the West Indies and sail around. Finishes with a piece of music.

Reference: R/07/B/26

Date: 1995 - 1995

BBC Radio Jersey-Occupation Tapes. Told by the people who lived through it produced by Beth Lloyd. Part 16: Escapes. Subjects discussed include the escape of Denis Vibert to England in September 1941, tales of different escapes to France by islanders recounted by Eddie Le Corre, Basil Le Brun, Peter Crill, John Floyd, Roy Mourant and their subsequent experiences of interrogations by the Home Forces and arrival in England. See R/06/4.

Reference: R/07/F1/16

Date: July 29th 1990 - July 29th 1990

Dramatisation of Lillie Langtry looking back on her life and telling her servant Mathilde about it. Part 4-'The Lover', follows her return to Jersey for a visit and meeting her father again, her affair with the Prince, being presented at Court to the Queen, her meeting with Lieutenant Louis Battenberg [Louis Mountbatten] and falling in love with him, the breaking down of her relationship with the Prince and discovering she's pregnant. John Nettles as Bertie, Prince of Wales, Tessa Coleman as Lillie Langtry, Philip Forster as Edward Langtry, Gillian Thomas as Old Lillie, Peter Crill as the Dean of Jersey, Richard Pedley as Prince Louis Battenberg, Peter Le Breuilly as Oscar Wilde, Rachel Dickinson as Patsy Cornwallis-West, Annette Laffoley as Princess Alexandra, Lorraine Falle as Mathilde, Marian Miles as Lillie's Mother, Chris Stone as Crown Prince Rudolf, Roy Thomas as Sir Alan Young, Carol Owens as Dominique, Kieron Sheehan as Prince Edward, Craig Stuart as Prince George, Graham Drummond as Lord Beresford. Production Assistant-Jackie Monkman, Sound Effects-Claire Stanley, Original Music-Roger Bara, Produced and Directed by Cathy Keir. Duration-30.48 minutes.

Reference: R/07/H1/4

Date: January 30th 1997 - January 30th 1997

Jersey Evening Post Newspaper feature : Portraits of former Bailiffs of Jersey

Reference: US/1423

Date: January 26th 2015

Jersey Evening Post Newspaper picture article : A supplement celebrating Her Majesty the Queen's 90th Birthday. A collection of photographs taken during the Queen's various visits to Jersey ove the years.

Reference: US/1471

Date: June 9th 2016

Jersey Evening Post Newspaper article : Jersey Heritage's outreach curator, Lucy Layton, explores the Resistance Trail where people can discover sites of civilian wartime protest and defiance in Occipied Jersey

Reference: US/1574

Date: November 13th 2020

JEP Newscutting - Article on the role of the Bailiff - 14.08.1996

Reference: US/217

Date: 1996 - 1996

Temps Passe - Photo of the Weighbridge just after the Occupation - 26/11/2007

Reference: US/355

Date: 2007 - 2007

JEP Newscutting: Souvenir supplement of the Queen's Diamond Jubilee detailing Her Majesty's six visits to Jersey during her reign - June 2012

Reference: US/994

Date: 2012 - 2012

Search query time: 0.398397 seconds • Page build time: 0.15010668436686 seconds