Digital copy of Minutes from a Meeting of the [Brig-y-don Committee] held at Brig-y-don, 10 November 1978. [Some details redacted]. For [Margaret Holley]'s Witness Statement to the Inquiry, dated 15 May 2015, see C/D/AW2/B3/26/WS000575.

Reference: C/D/AW2/A7/33/WD005561

Date: July 8th 1983 - July 8th 1983

Digital copy of Report titled The Children's Section, provided by the Education Committee in relation to the Working Party on the Department of Health and Social Security Report on Child Care Service. For Pauline Vautier's Witness Statement to the Inquiry dated 23 June 2015, see C/D/AW2/B3/33/WS000601.

Reference: C/D/AW2/A7/40/WD005855

Date: December 14th 1981 - December 14th 1981

Digital copy of Exhibit PV1: Report titled The Children's Section, provided by the Education Committee in relation to the Working Party on the Department of Health and Social Security Report on Child Care Service. Used as evidence in relation to Pauline Vautier's Witness Statement to the Inquiry dated 23 June 2015, [C/D/AW2/B3/33/WS000601].

Reference: C/D/AW2/A7/40/WD006032/1

Date: December 14th 1981 - December 14th 1981

Copy of a newspaper cutting of an article published in the Jersey Evening Post, 26 June 1975, titled District nurses reluctant to put subscription up despite inflation. Relates to the annual general meeting of the Jersey District Nursing Association held on 25 June 1975, including details from the annual report for 1974.

Reference: L/D/39/F/11

Date: June 26th 1975 - June 26th 1975

Personal View of Jeremy Mallinson, Director of the Jersey Zoo, interviewed by Beth Lloyd. Lived in Jersey for almost 35 years-came over as a youngster with his parents. His father started a wine and spirits business-when he first left school he went into the wine and spirit business. When he came to Jersey he had started boarding school at King's, Canterbury-enjoyed his school life and holiday life. His father and brother was a cricketer-both members of the Jersey Island Cricket Club-his father was the organising match secretary for 12 years-took part in matches. Remembers Ronnie Postill writing an article complimenting him. Also played hockey and took part with boating with the cadet club at St Aubin's-was voted as cadet secretary. His father bought a 1906 cadillac car and he restored it-used to take part in the Battle of Flowers and St Aubin's Fete-it eventually went to America. Was always interested in animals as a child-used to take part in horse riding and took people's dogs for a walk. Wanted to go to Africa to see the animals. When he left school he went into his father's wine business but he was a bad salesman. Met a person on a cricket tour in Jersey who told him he was going to join the Rhodesia and Nyasaland Staff Corps-decided that he would join in order to see Africa. First Record-Music Maestro Please by Bud Flanagan and Chesney Allen. The Rhodesia and Nyasaland Staff Corps were a small body of trained men that were the regular army of the federation-provided the officers for the Army. His whole objective was to see as many animals as possible. Never can get Africa out of your system. Always had an enthusiasm about animals-was taught by friends in Lusaka. Saw Operation Noah [an operation to save as many animals as possible from an area that was being dammed] in action. Was not a military person-wanted to leave after 3 years although he had enjoyed himself. Was interested in joining the game department but wanted to come back to Jersey and he did in 1958. Second Record-As Time Goes By from Casablanca. Had not heard of Gerald Durrell until his brother gave him 'My Family and Other Animals' in Christmas 1958-was fascinated by the book. Heard Gerald Durrell was going to open a zoo and visited the zoo the second day it opened and wrote to the Superintendent of the Zoo, Kenneth Smith. He was interviewed and given a temporary job during the summer of 1959. He first met Gerald Durrell when he came back from Argentina with his collection on the 9th June 1959. Has gone the whole way through the ranks of the zoo-worked in the bird section for his first 18 months and then the mammals. Important to know what everybody does in a business-good to start at the bottom. The early days of the zoo were exciting and a struggle-had financial difficulty but Gerald Durrell wanted to stay in Jersey. Formed the Trust and gave all of his holdings to it and the proceeds of two books that he had yet to write. He was the founder and director but never got paid for that. Always been interested in primates all the way up to gorillas-his first love at the zoo was Npongo. When a film about gorillas was being shown he took Npongo and held her outside West's Cinema collecting for a mate for her. Third Record-Zambeze. Personal View of Ron Hickman, inventor of the workmate, interviewed by Beth Lloyd. Born in South Africa and he was inventing from an early age. Remembers his first invention was a car that had a bridge over them so cars could travel on the same road. His family thought he was a bit made until he had his first burglar alarm that worked well at the age of 16. Was an outdoor person and he enjoyed music-playing the piano and violin. At 12 he became the local church organist. If he didn't become an inventor wanted to become an engineer. When he was 18 he qualified as an associate of the Trinity College of Music in London. Never got as far with the violin. First Record-Mozart's Piano Sonata in A Minor. When he left school he decided to go into the magistrate's office-moved around in different towns for 6 years-enjoyed the experience. Decided to come to England in order to pursue his desires to be come a car designer. When he first arrived in London he got a job in a music store and studied the organ part time. Talked his way into a job with Ford as a model maker-was rejected several times but eventually gave him a chance. Nine months later was promoted on to the drawing boards as a designer and he stayed with Ford for 3 years. Met Colin Chapman who had created the Lotus Car Company and was hired to help. Soon found himself as chief designer and stayed for 9 years. Got on well with Colin Chapman-respected you if you knew what you were doing. Owns a Lotus now. Bought a 1931 V16 Cadillac the previous year-drives around the Jersey roads in it. Second Record-Windmills Of Your Mind by Noel Harrison. Decided to leave Lotus Cars because of the responsibilities-decided to make a break from car design and tried to invent things. The first two inventions-one was a failure and the other was the workmate. His wife Helen backed him in his decision to leave his job. An inventor's working day is varied-have to have an idea, try it out-it gets a life of itself. Thought up the workmate because he was assembling a wardrobe and cut through a chair. There is a need to patent the invention or it becomes public property. The workmate was rejected by 7 British manufacturers and 3 American manufacturers. Black and Decker turned him down but came back to him 4 years later after he had put it into production himself. Had to put his money into it in order to put it into production. It took 6 years to start making money for him. Third Record-An Die Musik sung by Elizabeth Schwarzkopf. Decided to come to Jersey after he made licensing arrangements with Black and Decker-a nice environment to continue inventing in. Found it easy settling in Jersey-tried to run a Jersey company Techron but it lost money and now he runs it on his own. Is working on two major new inventions but are kept secret. He designed his own house in St Brelade-bought an old house with a good site and then designed his house with his wife and the architect. Have many inventions in the house-all for practical use. Created a fault reporting panel and an error took place without being reported-he discovered it was the fault reporting panel that had gone wrong. His most useful invention is a panel that tells him what doors and windows have been left open. Fourth Record-Morning in Cornwall by James Last. End of Side One. Personal View of Colonel Bill Hall, the Island Commissioner of Scouts who is about to retire, interviewed by Beth Lloyd. He was a scout as a boy-started in 1930. Had an older brother but he wasn't a scout. Joined at 13 and was very enthusiastic. He became involved with the troop after he left school-he was allowed to run the meetings-progressively wanted to start a troop. He persuaded his headmaster to let him run a troop in opposition to the school's troop run by the old boys. Has kept in touch with old boys from the troop. The troop was set up in 1937-he had joined the Territorial Army because he could tell war was coming. In 1938 the scouts were evacuated and when he went off to war the boys carried on running the scout group. Never thought of a career other than scouting-went to a stockbroker's office after finishing school. First Record-Colonel Bogie's March. Was an officer of the Royal Army Service Corps of the Army. Was a captain at the start of the war at the age of 22-was responsible for the supply of ammunition of the defences of the Thames. Later went into the Western Desert-was responsible for carrying ammunition in the second line. The Western Desert was a good place to fight the war-wide open spaces. Met General Charles de Gaulle in Damascus. Later had a similar job in Western Europe-went to Malta for a while and later to France after D-Day. Second Record-The Slave's Chorus from Nabucco. After the war had ended-came out in the Spring of 1946-was given an office in Phillips and Drew and worked there for 25 years. Rejoined the Scouts and became a Commissioner in Camberwell and rejoined the Territorial Army. Got married in 1953. His role as a stockbroker was to advice people what to do with their money. Was involved in magistrate's court and the youth court in London-became a JP. In a court if a punishment is imprisonment they can challenge the decision in a higher court. Realised that deprived children often suffered from a lack of parental control. Third Record-Music recorded at a Greek jamboree. Has been on two jamborees-a jamboree in Greece was exciting-took on the task of a World Jamboree in Marathon, Greece-helped organise the camp, had good fun, Prince Constantine opened the Jamboree. Went to Corfu after the Jamboree. Personal View of Dr Anthony Essex-Cater, Jersey's Medical Officer of Health, interviewed by Beth Lloyd. The role of Medical Officer of Health is looking at the community from a preventative point of view-establish the patterns and causes of diseases. The doctors don't come under his jurisdiction-their help is important to him in his work and vice versa. Medical Officers of Health are long established appointments-go back a 100 years-dropped the name in England in the 1970s reforms. Jersey decided to stick to the old title. Didn't always want to study medicine-his father was a writer and journalist but he also had an interest in medicine and decided to go into that area of work. He was at school during the war and had to make the decision whether to continue. Originally thought of going on a short service commission to Oxford and was interviewed by Wing Commander Cecil Wright who suggested to learn medicine. First Record-A Symphonic Study by Elgar. Was in London at the end of the war studying to be a doctor-was interested in sport, played a lot of rugby. Was a general course for training so didn't have to decide a speciality until later but was interested in paediatrics. Before he qualified he got married-his wife Jane was a student nurse at Charing Cross Hospital and because she married him she was forced to leave the hospital as it was not allowed. He went into the Royal Air Force Medical Branch for 18 months and was stationed in Wiltshire. When he left he got a job in a hospital in Bath. He joined up as part of his national service. His role at Bath was as a house officer and then he moved to London to a paediatric hospital. When he was in London he did a diploma in Child Health. Decided to move from child health to public health because of the lack of prospects in paediatrics. Got a public health job in Croydon. Needed to get further qualification-gained a scholarship for the London School of Hygiene at the University of London. Was there for a year and also studied occupational health. After that year had to refuse an opportunity to go to Harvard University. Second Record-Prelude No 1 by Villa Lobos. Left Croydon and went to Swansea where he was Deputy Medical Officer of Health-very pleasant place to live. His 3 children enjoyed living in Swansea-stayed for 5 years. He then moved to Birmingham in order to progress-began to lecture at the Children's Hospital in Birmingham about the health of children. Interest in anthropology-has been a fellow of the Royal Anthropological Institute of Great Britain for nearly 40 years. Has an interest in races-now medical anthropology is now recognised as an important discipline. Then moved to Manchester to become Deputy Medical Officer of Health-enjoyed the theatre of music of Manchester-the problems were similar to those in Birmingham. He was awarded a Council of Europe Medical Fellowship-gave him an opportunity to travel in Scandinavia to study their health system-looked at port health and child health. After Manchester went to Monmouthshire. He was only one of three Medical Officer of Health in a 90 year period. In 1974 took part in the reorganisation of the National Health Service-he was appointed a Member of the Steering Committee for Wales to work out the details of the reorganisation. Felt there was a failure by the government to listen to the steering committee. Fourth Record-Weber's Clarinet Quintet in B Flat Major

Reference: R/07/B/9

Date: 1983 - 1985

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