Prisoners register index, includes; date of trial, name of prisoner and offence. Entries for inmates with surname beginning with F have been indexed. To find date and offence open the attached PDF. Further case information can be found in the Magistrates Causes Criminelles registers - D/Y/N4 or the Poursuite Criminelles registers - D/Y/G1

Reference: D/AG/B2/1/F

Date: 1814 - 1936

Newspaper cuttings and photocopies of articles on escapees from Occupied Jersey, 1940-1945. Includes an appreciation of Philip Cotillard, an escapee, order of service's for the interment of Maurice Jay Gould and Peter Denis Hassall, articles on the escape of Barbara Langley, née Hutchings and John Langley, David Blandin, Robert Roger, Donald Le Lievre, Patrick Smith, Peter de Verger and Valentine Goudré, Sir Peter Crill, Roy Mourant and John Floyd, Bernie Turpin and Denis Vibert.

Reference: L/D/25/A/22

Date: October 16th 1944 - May 21st 1999

1) Occupation Part 16: Escapes produced by Beth Lloyd made up of interviews of local people who were in Jersey during the Occupation. Subjects discussed include the escape of Denis Vibert to England in September 1941, tales of different escapes to France by islanders recounted by Eddie Le Corre, Basil Le Brun, Peter Crill, John Floyd, Roy Mourant and their subsequent experiences of interrogations by the Home Forces and arrival in England. 2) Half of the interview with Captain Ed Clarke, an American prisoner of war, talking about his escape with George Haas from the prisoner of war camp in Jersey helped to hide by Bill Bertram and sailing to France 3) Notice about the CIOS Review new issue that celebrates the 40th anniversary of liberation and an interview with Michael Ginns about his article on Operation Nestegg and investigations that took place after liberation 4) Occupation Part 9: From Finance to Farming the Island Keeps Going produced by Beth Lloyd made up of interviews of local people who were in Jersey during the Occupation. Subjects discussed include the occupation currency, depletion of stocks in shops, rationing being introduced, black market and bartering used, farmers being ordered what to grow, the harvest and the inspections made by the Germans, farmers hiding extras from the Germans, investigations into a fuel that would allow tractors to run on something other than petrol-charcoal used, crops that were grown, giving food to others 5) Part 17: D-Day and the Last Terrible Year produced by Beth Lloyd made up of interviews of local people who were in Jersey during the Occupation. Subjects discussed includes the realisation in Channel Islands that D-Day was taking place, aeroplanes going over the island, lack of fuel and food supplies, health in island worsening, Red Cross parcels and the arrival and unloading of the SS Vega, starvation of German soldiers and waiting for liberation.

Reference: L/D/25/L/15

Date: 1985 - 1985

Occupation-BBC Radio Jersey tape. The story of the occupation of Jersey during World War 2 told by the people who lived through it produced by Beth Lloyd. 1) Part 13: The Todt Organisation and their Russian Slave Labourers. Eye witnesses talking about the background of the Organisation Todt, the arrival of the Russians on the island, the condition they were in, the brutality of their overseers, begging and stealing food, concentration camps, the Jersey Communist Party and other people giving shelter, food, clothes, false papers and english lessons with Mrs Metcalfe to escaped prisoners, the story of Louisa Gould, Harold Le Druillenec and Feodor Burrij and the experience of other residents who harboured escapees. 2) Part 14: Entertainment. Eye witnesses talking about the difficulties of the first show during the occupation put on by the Jersey Amateur Dramatics Club, cinemas and the films that were shown, variety entertainment at the Opera House, West's Cinema and out in the parishes, finding musicians, public dances, the Amateur Variety Band, the Green Room Club productions including pantomimes, easter productions and shows, improvisations with costumes and scenery and censorship of the shows. 3) Part 15: We Are At War. Eye witness accounts of feelings of isolation, seeing and hearing British and German aeroplanes, feeling and seeing bombing raids on the coast of France, leaflet raids, members of the royal air force being taken as prisoners of war, commando raid on Egypt, sabotage, the v sign campaign, resistance and reprisals, youth groups against the Germans, the British Patriots group and Norman Le Brocq and Leslie Huelin working with the Free Germany Movement represented by Paul Muelbach calling for a mutiny in the garrison. 4) Occupation Part 16: Escapes produced by Beth Lloyd made up of interviews of local people who were in Jersey during the Occupation. Subjects discussed include the escape of Denis Vibert to England in September 1941, tales of different escapes to France by islanders recounted by Eddie Le Corre, Basil Le Brun, Peter Crill, John Floyd, Roy Mourant and their subsequent experiences of interrogations by the Home Forces and arrival in England. 5) Part 17: D-Day and the Last Terrible Year. Eye witnesses talking about the realisation that D-Day was taking place, aeroplanes going over the island, lack of fuel and food supplies, health in island worsening, Red Cross parcels, the arrival and unloading of the SS Vega, starvation of German soldiers and waiting for liberation. 6) Part 18: Liberation. Eye witnesses including the bailiff talking about the change in the high command of the german administration and listening to Winston Churchill's speech, release of political prisoners, celebrations, surrender of Germans and arrival of royal navy officers. See R/06/4.

Reference: L/D/25/L/44

List of Escapees from Jersey during the German Occupation, with photocopies of letters to the Societe Jersiaise from escapees or their relatives, giving details of the escapes. Compiled by the Societe Jersiaise for the German Occupation Musuem at Le Hougue Bie, June 1948.

Reference: L/D/67/K2/1

Date: May 13th 1948 - June 8th 1948

Original manuscript of Lest We Forget: Escapes and Attempted Escapes from Jersey during the German Occupation 1940 - 1945 by Roy Thomas.

Reference: L/F/341/A/1

Date: 1992 - 1992

Draft manuscript of Lest We Forget: Escapes and Attempted Escapes from Jersey during the German Occupation 1940 - 1945 by Roy Thomas.

Reference: L/F/341/A/2

Date: 1992 - 1992

Occupation-BBC Radio Jersey tape. The story of the occupation of Jersey during World War 2 told by the people who lived through it produced by Beth Lloyd. 1) Part 13: The Todt Organisation and their Russian Slave Labourers. Eye witnesses talking about the background of the Organisation Todt, the arrival of the Russians on the island, the condition they were in, the brutality of their overseers, begging and stealing food, concentration camps, the Jersey Communist Party and other people giving shelter, food, clothes, false papers and english lessons with Mrs Metcalfe to escaped prisoners, the story of Louisa Gould, Harold Le Druillenec and Feodor Burrij and the experience of other residents who harboured escapees. 2) Part 14: Entertainment. Eye witnesses talking about the difficulties of the first show during the occupation put on by the Jersey Amateur Dramatics Club, cinemas and the films that were shown, variety entertainment at the Opera House, West's Cinema and out in the parishes, finding musicians, public dances, the Amateur Variety Band, the Green Room Club productions including pantomimes, easter productions and shows, improvisations with costumes and scenery and censorship of the shows. 3) Part 15: We Are At War. Eye witness accounts of feelings of isolation, seeing and hearing British and German aeroplanes, feeling and seeing bombing raids on the coast of France, leaflet raids, members of the royal air force being taken as prisoners of war, commando raid on Egypt, sabotage, the v sign campaign, resistance and reprisals, youth groups against the Germans, the British Patriots group and Norman Le Brocq and Leslie Huelin working with the Free Germany Movement represented by Paul Muelbach calling for a mutiny in the garrison. 4) Occupation Part 16: Escapes produced by Beth Lloyd made up of interviews of local people who were in Jersey during the Occupation. Subjects discussed include the escape of Denis Vibert to England in September 1941, tales of different escapes to France by islanders recounted by Eddie Le Corre, Basil Le Brun, Peter Crill, John Floyd, Roy Mourant and their subsequent experiences of interrogations by the Home Forces and arrival in England. 5) Part 17: D-Day and the Last Terrible Year. Eye witnesses talking about the realisation that D-Day was taking place, aeroplanes going over the island, lack of fuel and food supplies, health in island worsening, Red Cross parcels, the arrival and unloading of the SS Vega, starvation of German soldiers and waiting for liberation. 6) Part 18: Liberation. Eye witnesses including the bailiff talking about the change in the high command of the german administration and listening to Winston Churchill's speech, release of political prisoners, celebrations, surrender of Germans and arrival of royal navy officers.

Reference: R/06/4

'Lunch break'-an interview of Sir Peter Crill, the former Bailiff of Jersey, by Michelle Cuthbert on his retirement from office. Talks about his childhood-had a stable, happy childhood. His grandfathers on both sides were farmers. His great grandfather on his mother's side was farming in St Helier and was a victim of two bank crashes at the end of the nineteenth century. His father had a farming background and he went into his uncle's office who was a solicitor, George Philip Crill. He later became a Jurat and had to go the Privy Council to be sworn in because there was a row after he was elected over a previous case that he had tried. Was sworn in 1913 and was later made president of the Education Committee. His father had gone into the office-he was in the militia-his father met his mother and wooed her for 10 years as she went off to America as her father emigrated to Australia. She told him that he'd need to qualify for her to marry him and he qualified and went to marry her in America in 1913. His father was constable of St Clement from 1916 until 1958. He had 2 brothers and 2 died in child birth. He was born in London as his mother went over to be careful. His eldest brother joined the firm in 1939 and was later thrown out of the army because he was going deaf. He transferred to civil affairs and was killed in his bed because he didn't hear the air raid warnings and died in Paris in 1944. He grew up spoilt and indulged. He was a lazy child-liked reading but also liked exploring the countryside of St Clement. Had a country upbringing. Remembers the railway especially using it to get into town when he was 4 without telling his parents. Great Uncle George found him and put him back on the train. Did a lot of bicycle riding and a small boat. Someone suggested he should go to the sail maker of the Westward, TB Davis' yacht and he did and got the sail designed by him, Mr Bridges. From 1937 until the war he kept her at La Hocq and got to know all of the channels in the area. Had great fun with the boat. He went to St Clement's Church. Church was an important part of his life. He started at the Dame School of Miss Le Brocq. She gave him a good grounding and then he went to Victoria College Prep where he fell under the influence of Miss Aubrey. She was a great teacher-has her reports on him and it was said that he talked too much. The Prep was in an old house called Mount Pleasant. Started with Miss Bunnett as headmistress-remembers her being scary. He was a spoilt boy who got fat. Wasn't fond of ball games although he liked swimming. Went up to Victoria College in 1935 aged 10 where he stayed until 1943. Had good masters before the war. The boarding house was big in those days-a nucleus of boys lived at the boarding house. At school he was somewhat idle-he was at least a year below the average age of the form-found it difficult. Managed to get his school certificate before he was 15. When occupation came he wasn't evacuated with the school certificate group. Stayed because his mother met the then Bailiff, Lord Coutanche, in St Helier and he told her to keep him in Jersey as the occupation wouldn't last. One of his oldest friends is Roy Mourant who he escaped with. He used to have all night parties to avoid the curfew. Had one at St James' Vicarage with boys and girls in the dormitories. Decided to escape because it became clear in the summer of 1944 that Jersey was not to be liberated. During August a few people tried to escape on a float but failed. Had to plan if you were going and so they did. In 1942 all boats had to be put into store. He kept his in the parish quarry at the top of La Hocq Hill and then put his into Norman's in Commercial Buildings. Recruited John Floyd with Roy Mourant in the plan. They had to get the boat out of Commercial Buildings. They borrowed a furniture removal van and pretended to be removal men and took the boat from Commercial Buildings. Borrowed a key from his father of a property of somebody who had left. Put his boat in the garage of the house and got his boat decked over. His parents only knew about it towards the end. They were lucky when they escaped-they made a lot of noise and were seen off by a number of people. Spent 17 hours in the boat. When they arrived in France they had taken some brandy with them which he drank and promptly fell out the boat. They went up the beach and gave themselves up to a Frenchman who kept them for the night until the Americans were due to arrive the next day. He later sold the boat and they spent 10 days in Cherbourg before being transferred to London. He planned to join up when he was in London and phoned his cousin who was in the army who told him about his brothers death. Was given 6 months rest and recreation before joining up and his elder brother told him to use it. He then met Professor Laurie Bisson, a Jerseyman, who was at Pembroke College, Oxford who persuaded him to join the University. Went to Oxford having been sponsored by Lord du Parcq and gained a scholarship. Spent two terms in the Spring and Summer of 1945 in the Officers Training Corps but before he was able to join up the war ended. Had law in his blood. Near the end of the occupation he did some local preaching in the anglican church-was licenced by the dean to take matins and even song. Had planned to become ordained but decided his father needed him to help in the family business. Went to London to take the Bar Exams and came back to Jersey in 1949 and joined his father's firm of Crill-Benest. In his approach to law Lord Denning was influential. Relied on his father's knowledge at the beginning as there weren't any advocates exams when he came back. He was the one who introduced the exam in 1954 when he was the President of Legislation in the States. He admired how Lord Coutanche ran his court. Also admired Advocates Vibert and Valpy. A learned advocate was Advocate Peter Giffard. Became a Deputy from 1951-58 and a Senator from 1960-62 before becoming solicitor general. Missed meeting clients in the private practice and had to acquire conversational skills. People unsure of how to address him when he became bailiff. Sang from 1957 in St Helier's Church Choir and later Trinity Church. Decided that the Catholic Church was the church he wanted to join and was received into the church in July 1995. Looked back with pleasure at his time as solicitor general and deputy bailiff as he was under people and was learning on the job. As attorney-general he prosecuted the Beast of Jersey, Edward Paisnel. Originally the deputy-bailiff was intended to be an alter-ego of the bailiff but it didn't work that way as there needed to be a leader of the States. Is unsure whether the bailiff would ever leave the States-it would change the constitution radically. Talks about the bailiff's role. Feels his greatest achievement was being appointed bailiff. Enjoyed the royal visit in 1989. The Bailiff of Jersey and Guernsey were invited to the Commonwealth Lawyers Conference of Presiding Officers of the Commonwealth in 1988 in London which he enjoyed. Satisfied by the judgement in the Waterworks Case on the rating assessment by the Parish of Grouville. His darkest hour was the trouble 3 years previously. For hobbies he reads, walks and gardens. Has joined a livery company in London and has been asked to be the President of the Jersey Scout Association. His unfulfilled pleasure would have been to charter a boat in the West Indies and sail around. Finishes with a piece of music.

Reference: R/07/B/26

Date: 1995 - 1995

BBC Radio Jersey-Occupation Tapes. Told by the people who lived through it produced by Beth Lloyd. Part 16: Escapes. Subjects discussed include the escape of Denis Vibert to England in September 1941, tales of different escapes to France by islanders recounted by Eddie Le Corre, Basil Le Brun, Peter Crill, John Floyd, Roy Mourant and their subsequent experiences of interrogations by the Home Forces and arrival in England. See R/06/4.

Reference: R/07/F1/16

Date: July 29th 1990 - July 29th 1990

JEP cutting: Occupation memories being broadcast on Radio 4 show

Reference: US/1226

Date: 2013 - 2013
7 Sept 2013

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