Mark Steventon, Sue Rodgers, Kezia Le Gresley, Gerrard Le Claire and Mathew Porteous with photography teacher Julia Duquemin members of the City and Guilds Photography Tuesday night group 1999, held at Highlands College, handing in their workbooks.

Reference: P/03/83/05

Date: January 11th 2000 - January 11th 2000

View of Highlands College.

Reference: P/03/B123/14

Date: September 30th 2000 - September 30th 2000

States of Jersey Departments, Education. Highlands Collage.

Reference: p/03/b305/17

Date: December 19th 2000 - December 19th 2000

Laura Dicker (Parenting Programmes Administrator), Nola Hopkins (Parenting Advisor, co-ordinater responsible for all Education Department Parenting Programmes), Amy Prestwood (NNEB year 2 student) and Lauren Hughes (NNEB year 2 student) each holding a computer baby, which simulates a real baby. The babies are used by 13 - 19 year olds at Highlands College, youth clubs, schools and the Brook Advisory Centre.

Reference: p/03/b402/22

Date: September 25th 2000 - September 25th 2000

Photographic slide of a map of St Helier including Highland's College, St Saviour's Road, Val Plaisant, David Place, St Mark's Road, Stopford Road, and the Gas Works site.

Reference: P/09/A/1092

Date: 1970 - 1990

Photographic slide of an aerial view of Highlands College.

Reference: P/09/A/670

Date: June 10th 1977 - June 10th 1977

Photographic slide of an aerial view of Highlands College.

Reference: P/09/A/671

Date: June 10th 1977 - June 10th 1977

Photographic slide of an aerial view of the Hotel de France, Highlands College, St Saviour's School and St Saviour's Church.

Reference: P/09/A/825

Date: June 10th 1977 - June 10th 1977

Jersey Talking Magazine No 4-October 1976. Beth Lloyd taking over as editor and producer-talks about moving to the island, working for the BBC, changing the format of the magazine, Gordon Young becoming regular presenter. Gordon Young interviewed about how he got into television. Gardening feature-talking and giving advice on planting bulbs, cabbages, broad beans, different flowers, the growing of fruit, chestnuts, the collection of seaweed for the vegetables. Cooking feature-Margaret Jenkins presenting-gives tips on uses of cream. Island administrators-interview Island Magistrate-Judge Lawrie Wilde-talks of the difference between UK and Jersey magistrates-acts as prosecution barrister, legal system compromise between English and French system of law, the cases he trys-in the police, petty debts and juvenile courts, is it a depressing job working with criminals-no because a lot of the people aren't guilty. Tips section on lenses, using the telephone for those with poor eyesight. End of Side One. Above the northern outskirts of St Helier stood the St Louis Observatory which was part of the estate of Maison St Louis which incorporated Highlands College and the old Imperial Hotel-now known as the Hotel de France-1886 Jesuits established teaching college-observatory constructed in 1894 with the tower-housed the Jesuits Meteorological Instruments-taken down in 1929 as it was considered unsafe. St Louis Observatory now run by Pere Ray-between 1917-21 a student at the college. Honoured by the french government for his work during the occupation and in education he is a leading expert in the study of seismology-the study of earthquakes. Reverend Peter Manton went to see him and asked him when the island's only seismograph was installed-30th June 1936, strongest and numbers of earthquakes recorded, interpretation of seismographs, how work going to continue after, under head of Met Office, need for continuity, gap in seismology in 1921-father died, goes from 1894, highest and lowest temperatures recorded at the tower, wettest year, earthquake recorder-purpose to study local earthquakes, talks about some of the earthquakes, tour of the observatory to look at the seismograph-explanation of how the seismograph works, Pere Ray during the occupation-at Maison St Louis carried on the meteorological work and allowed to keep the radio, fought to keep going, made crystal radio sets-describes process. Gordon Young tells of how he had been the target for a knife thrower for television a couple of years previously.

Reference: R/05/B/1

Date: October 15th 1976 - October 15th 1976

Personal View of Senator Reg Jeune, President of the Education Committee. Born and brought up in Jersey-remembers difficult days of the late 1920s and 1930s-early life. Remembers a home with little money but very happy. It was a strict methodist home and his parents gave him a good start in life. His father had two hobbies-his garden and prize poultry. He got involved in his father's hobbies-he got involved with prize bantams in the local agricultural show. Has carried methodism throughout his life-has been a methodist local preacher for 40 years starting in 1942. Remembers the weather being nicer in his childhood-spent a lot of time on the beach and cycling around the island. Played tennis, watched cricket matches at the Victoria College Field when some of the top cricketers came to the island. Lived in Don Road and then in Georgetown as a child. He went to the De La Salle College-he was always encouraged to read books. He remembers going to the junior library with his mother where a Miss Priestley worked-never lost that interest. Thought that he may become a teacher but it was difficult getting grants at that time. His parents were ambitious for him-gave him a lot of encouragement. First Record-The Hallelujah Chorus from Handel's Messiah. Used to sing the piece of music in a choir-enjoyed being a chorister. At school-was interested in sport but was never particularly good. Left school to go into a bank-in waiting he went into Hill Street and then fell in love with law and took that up. Many of his fellow pupils went into a bank-it's much easier now. Studying was a struggle-graduated as a solicitor of the Royal Court of Jersey in 1945-a great deal of the examination was in French-was very difficult. Learnt French in order to be a solicitor. He was an office boy in Hill Street at first-used to collect rentes and write out contracts on parchment. Still sees the contracts that he used to write out. The occupation arrived-they were looking after people's affairs who had left the island-he started taking an active interest in cases after the second world war. It could take several years to study to qualify as a lawyer-took 6-8 years. Church took up quite a bit of time-choir and lay preaching. After he'd qualified he married in 1946 to Monica Valpy. Second Record-Flight of the Bumblebee by Rimsky-Korsakov. Hill Street was quiet during the occupation-had little to do-didn't experience hassle from the germans-helped look after people's affairs who had evacuated. He became a partner in a practice with two other men Helier Mourant and Clifford du Feu and created a company called Mourant, du Feu and Jeune-built up a substantial partnership. Started as a family practice until the financial scene came to Jersey-he became involved. It started around the early 1960s-he got interested when he got asked advice and he gradually became interested. He became chairman of the Youth Movement in 1947 and was involved in other organisations such as the Rotary Club-was interested in politics. Has always been interested in education and youth services. At one point thought that he may have gone into the church-if the occupation hadn't come along he may have done. Hadn't travelled much at this time-he'd been to Guernsey in England and that was all-after he qualified the opportunities to travel increased. He has now made many travels including extensively around the United States of America. Third Record-The Grand March from Verdi's Aida. Has been involved as much as possible with his family-his eldest son is a partner with him who has two daughters, his second son is London and has become an actor and his daughter is a jewellery designer who has come back to Jersey. Encouraged his son to read law. Tried to become a States member of St Helier No 2 District in the late 1950s but was unsuccessful. In 1962 he was successful in a by-election of St Helier No 3 District. Wasn't put off going into the States when he didn't get in the first time. Strange to go into the States especially in a by-election-the house was already set. Was nervous and excited the first time he spoke in the States despite having done a lot of public speaking in his job and church. After six months became president of the Public Works Committee-he had attacked the spending of money at the time especially for the tunnel-the money got thrown out and as a result two committees resigned-the Island Development Committee and the Public Works Committee and he became president of the Public Works Committee-he had been president of major committee ever since. Investigated the traffic problems in St Helier and eventually decided there should be a tunnel built under Fort Regent. Fourth Record-Le Rocquier School Band with Rock Around the Clock. Has a great love of music and books-still reads a lot despite working hard. The law firm has grown-he has become detached from the day to day business of the firm-tries to get there as much as possible-misses it. Became involved with the Trustees Savings Bank-joined the local board about 25 years previously and then became chairman of the Jersey Savings Bank, chairman of the Channel Islands Savings Bank and then elected to the board in London. Goes to two meetings a month in London. Received the OBE for his services to the savings banks-was very thrilled. Enjoyed going to Buckingham Palace to receive the award. Wants Jersey to retain its character but not to be insulated-he's chairman of the Executive Committee of the Commonwealth Parliamentary Association and involved with the French side of the parliamentarians. Fifth Record-Treorky Male Voice Choir. Has been involved in bringing an ombudsman into the States-succeeded-there is now a Review Tribunal. Doesn't have many more great ambitions in the States-is at the service of the States. Thinks it would be almost impossible to set higher education up in Jersey-Highlands College and what it offers with further education is about the limit that Jersey can expect. End of Side One. Personal View of Senator Ralph Vibert, interviewed by Beth Lloyd. Is the father of the house and president of the Finance Committee. At school-pictures that he would be a teacher-went to Victoria College in the 1920s-was captain of the football and head prefect. Didn't get a scholarship to Oxford University-Lord Coutanche was reorganising the States departments and set up the Law Officers-he became a secretary for the Attorney General-decided to become a lawyer. Was secretary to Lord Coutanche during the day and studied law in the evening. Was called to the bar in 1933/34-set up a private practice on his own. First Record-Welcome Song of the Maori People of New Zealand. Has not been to New Zealand but his daughter has. Has travelled a great deal-enjoys it. Had a law practice in Hill Street in the 1930s-business was quite slow-people paid on time. His first client was the late Senator Edward Le Quesne who was trying to get compensation from a shipping company when a boat broke down travelling to France. In the 1930s became interested in the movement of Moral Rearmament-was given a new conception of Christianity-it enables Christians to work with other people of faith throughout the world. Moral Rearmament took part in the bringing of democracy to Zimbabwe. Second Record-Unofficial National Anthem of all of Africa. He is well known in the Swiss village of Caux because it is the world conference centre of Moral Rearmament. Believes that when people work together good things come of it. His wife and he went to Zimbabwe to help friends-they had met Alec Smith-the son of a prime minister and a drug addict-through the attention of Kit Prescott, a friend, he stopped being an addict and became a leading statesman. During the occupation he evacuated in order to enlist-his wife was undecided-in the end she decided to leave. His wife had a baby and he joined up-got into a school of cipher breaking-60 pupils were in the first ever course held on this and only 3 were good enough-he didn't make the grade but they wanted people who could speak french and could teach ciphers to people in the field who were behind enemy lines. Later moved to India to become instructor training people to work behind enemy lines. Worked for the Special Operations Executive-met Maurice Buckmaster who was head of the French Section. His brother Denis escaped to England during the occupation and then joined the Royal Air Force. Third Record-Beethoven's Fifth Symphony. When the war was finished he helped clear up with the courts and then he got back in late 1946. Went back into his law practice. He became solicitor-general in 1948 until 1955-decided not to continue to become bailiff-had differences with the attorney-general Cecil Harrison and decided to leave. Believes those years were wasted years-he could have built up a practice at that time. Went back into private practice with his younger brother. Decided to go into politics because he wanted a hand in running the island. Fourth Record-Mozart's Piano Sonata No 11. His wife, Muriel Vibert, née Le Gros, has been a big support all his life. Became a deputy for St Brelade in 1955 and 2 years later became a senator in an uncontested by-election. Has always been invited onto committees-the sudden death of George Troy led him to become President of Defence, the collapse of the Establishment Committee led to him taking it on and the sudden death of Cyril Le Marquand led to him being President of Finance. Also was President of the Common Market Committee. Constant change of personnel in the States-new wave of people coming to the States typified by Senator Shenton who have brought new life to the States and a desire to do things quickly. Thinks more businessmen should be in the States but it's difficult as they are often too busy to get to States sittings. Dislikes important decisions being rushed through without due consideration. Likes the Jersey system-believes it's a very democratic system. Likes the tradition of the honorary system. Instigated the concept of a minimum income for States members-people could become members of the States without fear of financial difficulties-wouldn't like to see all the States members becoming professionals. Believes the parishes should keep their autonomy. Fifth Record-Manhattan Beach by Sousa. As a hobby he enjoyed playing tennis, likes to garden and play with the grandchildren. One of his daughters is a freelance photographer-became interested in photography. Was awarded the OBE in 1977 and became father of the house in 1980-has no more political ambitions. Believes Jersey's political future should be secure. Sixth Record-An Anglican Hymn. Commentary on the Battle of Britain Red Arrow display by Squadron Leader Henry Ploszek. Talks about the distance that the Red Arrows stay away from each other in the display, the training for formation flying, as manager he organises the administrative duties. End of Side Two.

Reference: R/07/B/11

Date: 1982 - 1982

Alfred Pierre Laurent, a social reformer and basket-maker, talks about his Norman father who was known as one of the finest workers in Jersey-there was only one other person who was up to his standard and workmanship of basket-making-Mr Le Cornu. He could do anything in basket-making. He was very quick tempered-once some six pences went missing-his younger brother had taken them. His father said he'd prefer to see his children dead than dishonest. Feared his father-he spoke French-his father wouldn't allow him to speak jèrriais. His father loved the British people but he wouldn't allow his children to speak jèrriais or english. He came from a large family-life was hard-his mother was a good cook and could make a good meal out very little. His mother was a breton and his father a Norman-it was unusual for the two to marry. He lived in town as a child-used to be drinking problems in town-used to charge 1d a pint. You had to make do when you were poor-he had his first cup of tea when he worked at Averty's the butcher when he was 9. A lot of children worked then-used to eat a lot of meat. In his spare time used to read second hand books and newspapers-spent all his money in book. Didn't enjoy school-some of the teachers were not very nice-children used to be beaten with a leather strap. Remembers the start of the soup kitchens in Victoria Street-a lady was making porridge in a tureen-remembers seeing Dean Falle who helped make the kitchens possible and thinking that he was God. In the age that he was brought up in there was more cruelty and interest in money-good people suffered and the richer people often took advantage. Today he thinks it has gone too far the other way-there is a lack of discipline. Ada Prouten [with a Jersey accent] lived in St Ouen all her life in later years at Ville Bagot where her husband farmed for many years. She was born Ada England 81 years ago when her father leased a farm at Vinchelez and she and her sister went to Les Landes School but she was expecting to do her bit on the farm when they got home each day. She used to pick potatoes in the summer and in the winter used to scrape the roots for the cows. On Saturdays they had extra work to do as nobody worked on Sundays. Life was hard for her mother-there were two days butter making a week, one wash day, a baking day on Friday. All the people her father employed ate at the same table as the family did. Had lunch at 9.30 in the fields, 12.30 had dinner and in the afternoon had coffee and cake in the field and at the end of the day had tea. In October her sister and her worked until 10 o'clock in the lofts. Her mother made jam, bread and cakes-never bought anything. Wash day-used to put the clothes to soak the day before, would boil water in a bath on a tripod, would then hang the clothes up. Hard work cleaning the house-there were no hoovers. Reused flour bags for various purposes including for pillow cases and aprons. Went to Les Landes School-enjoyed school-was always near the top of the class. When they were putting up St George's Church they were told not to go to the Church-she climbed up to the top of the church-she got in trouble with her teacher. Left school at 15 when the teacher was told a false story about her and when she didn't believe her she left school. Decided to help her father on the farm and used to go vraicing down at L'Etacq. Used to lease the farm-the lease was finished at 12 o'clock on christmas day-could be hard. Her sister and her were not paid-they had money when they wanted some and clothes when they wanted some. Her husband and her didn't have a very large farm. Had her first daughter a year after she was married but coped with it well-had to do your own work because you couldn't pay for anything else. She enjoyed her young life-people were friendlier in her childhood. Philip Le Troquer was born in 1896 at Le Pont, St Martin-when he was 4 his mother died-remembers being called to his mother's deathbed and her final words were 'carry on being a good boy'. Six years later his father died leaving 4 children under 10 as orphans-they went to Sacre Coeur Orphanage. His father died in April 1906 and he entered the orphanage as a 10 year old in May. He had a sister Selina and two brothers John and Frank. Life was nice but disciplined at Sacre Coeur-went to a church service first thing in the morning, had breakfast and went to school for 9 o'clock. Went to St Thomas' School-had their three meals at the orphanage. After school did his homework and cleaned the orphanage-had a rota for cleaning. The nuns were good to him. Had an uncle still alive-they were allowed out on their own once every quarter and they would go and visit him at that time. Used to visit his aunt in St Aubin once a year. Had to be back by 6 o'clock on the days they were allowed out. He left school at 13 and he decided he wanted to become a gardener. Used to have lessons from Mr Nouvel from Highlands College every night throughout the winter. Was always interested in gardening-Sacre Coeur Orphanage had a large garden. It was good training to become a gardener-trained for 4 winters. Received a certificate for finishing the course. When he finished training the first world war started-he was mobilised-was drafted to India and went through South Africa. There were about 20 boys from Jersey-stayed in India for 3-4 months then went through the Persian Gulf towards Turkey. When he returned he visited Reverend Le Grand and talked to him about his experiences-he was like a father to him. He has now worked 60 years as a gardener without a break. Enjoyed his time in the orphanage. Frank Noel [with a Jersey accent], 86 this year, has lived in Gorey all his life and is a plumber. His father worked on big racing cutters for Miles Kennedy. Frank did some work on TB Davis' yacht Westward. His father worked on the Southern Railway mailboats but they never moved from Gorey and he still lives in the same house as he moved to when he was 10 in 1908. Life in Gorey Village was quiet, some fishing took place. Gorey Pier was busy with sailing cutters but not as busy as today. Coal was brought in to Gorey by schooners for the Farmers Union that had a stall in Gorey. There was a windmill at Gorey to pump water for the train. As a child used to go to town on christmas eve as a treat and had Marett's sausages. Used to go on sunday school outings on horses and carts. Used to transport vraic using carts. After school and on Saturday he delivered beer for a shop in Gorey Village. Left school at 15 and went to Grandins to work as a plumber. He had wanted to go to sea but his father told him to learn a trade. Used his bicycle to get into work bought his mother. Joined up in the first world war-his parents were upset but proud. Landed back in Jersey on a Sunday morning-waited for the 1 o'clock train and when he got home it was one of the greatest days of his life. The first world war was frightening-not like the movies. Fought in the trenches and mountains-the worst was Belgium. Went back to Jersey on leave during the war-most of the boys in Gorey joined up. Loves low water and boat fishing-caught a 9lb lobster low water fishing and caught a conger of 40lb-it was hiding in a shipwreck. Professor Albert Messervy was a vet in Jersey for many years before, in 1953, he was invited to the chair of veterinary surgery at the University of Bristol. He was one of 6 children brought up in Trinity where his father was a farmer. He was 6 years old when the first world war broke out but he can remember the day. His brother and he were living at Stonewall, Mont au Prêtre with his Aunt Martha because his mother was seriously ill. They used to go to school in Trinity but on thought morning his Uncle George came in and said that war had been declared-he was horrified because their sunday school was due to have tea at Trinity Manor the next day but that had to be abandoned. Remembers in 1912 when the aircraft came from Dinard to Jersey in a race and was at West Park-remembers the pilot-on their way back to Trinity it started to thunder and lightning and somebody sheltering under a tree at Oaklands, St Saviour was killed when it collapsed on him. In 1915 they made some black butter-remembers the different kinds of apples added-in the evening a chimney caught fire-a photograph was taken which is now in Jersey Through the Lens. Was always interested in animals-especially horses. Fed ducklings foxgloves once not knowing that they were poisonous and when they died they got disciplined by their father-12 years later when he was studying to be a vet he was asked about in an examination about the effect of foxgloves on animals and he was able to answer fully. Also had a goat which had twins but she died choking on the afterbirth. The goats used to run into the house. During his childhood there was a fire at Trinity Manor-remembers horses pulling the fire engine to the manor. At the end of the first world war there was a Peace Fete which he managed to go to-his uncle bought fireworks from G D Laurens and Company-some of the fireworks didn't work properly. Jersey suffered little during the first world war-was some rationing of sugar and tea but it had no effect. After the war the farming community was hit-a depression took place and some people emigrated to find work. End of Side One. Personal View of Jurat Clarry Dupré who spent 24 years in the States of Jersey. Is retired but keeps the name jurat. Is enjoying his retirement. Was born in Jersey in 1914-had a happy childhood. Was born in Simon Place and at 6 years old he moved to Beresford Street where his father ran a fish and poultry business and lived there for the next 60 years. His father had 4 brothers and 1 sister but he only had one brother who he has worked with in the fish and poultry business for 40 years. He went to De La Salle College at 6 to 16 and then he spent a year in London learning about the fish and poultry business. After that he worked in Beresford Street from 17 to 24 until the time of the occupation when joined up with the army. He and his family are roman catholics. Played a lot of sport at school. Was the Jersey squash champion in 1938 and played for the Junior Muratti football in 1930 and 1931. First Record-Vera Lynn's 'We'll Meet Again'. When the second world war broke out he was 23/24-he evacuated from the island in June 1940 ad joined up as soon as he got into Weymouth. He was attached to the 11th Battalion of the Hampshire Regiment-he went to the Royal Military Academy at Sandhurst from where he was commissioned to the Middle East with the Cheshire Regiment. Saw active service from Alamein to Tunisia, Egypt to Sicily for the D-Day landings in Sicily. Returned to England in 1943 ready for D-Day in Normandy. Went to Sandhurst for 7 months and left as a second lieutenant and he eventually became a major. He was awarded a military cross-felt he was in the right place in the right time. Was not married when he left the island-left his fiance in Jersey and they got married in July 1945. His brother joined up and spent 4 years of his service in Malta. After he got married in 1945 he signed back with the army for two years and was stationed in the Middle East at Palestine. When he came back his son was 10 months old. Second Record-Lily Marlene with 'The Girl Underneath the Lantern'. Came out of the army in 1947 and worked with his brother for 10 years until 1957 when he went into the States. Entered as a deputy in St Helier No 1 District-was elected unopposed but three years later came second in the election and went into the States-Terry Sowden was first. A year later he stood for senator in a by-election against Senator John Venables but lost and a year after that he stood for election for senator and topped the polls and was a senator for nine years before being re-elected for six years and then losing the election as senator but became a deputy in St Helier No 1 District again before not being re-elected and retiring from politics. After not being returned as a senator decided he would stand as a deputy and was elected as the President of Tourism making it 21 years. He was also Vice-President of the Defence Committee and Finance Committee. Follows the States on Radio Jersey-felt he was getting too old for the States. Believes people are still out there who could be politicians-wouldn't like to see party politics. Wouldn't like to see States members paid. Has served on the Tourism Committee for 24 years and as President for 21 years-it has increased massively in that time. He was elected on to the Executive of the Commonwealth Parliamentary Association-saw over 20 different countries on conferences as a result. As President of the Tourism Committee was always a great supporter of the Battle of Flowers and when he retired he was made an honorary Vice-President of the Battle of Flowers' Association-hasn't missed a Battle of Flowers in 30 years. Used to go to Battersea Park and run an exhibit in the park. Third Record-Stuart Gillies with Amanda. Stuart Gillies spent many seasons in Jersey-is a character. When he retired from the States he became a jurat-had been out of the States for only 6 months and he was asked to fill a vacancy-he filled the vacancy for 4 years until he had to retire because of his age. You keep the title of jurat for the rest of your life. Jurats sits with the bailiff in the court-they are judges of fact-they decide on the sentences-they also sit on various boards-he sat on the Prison Board for 4 years. Didn't enjoy going to the prison but found it worthwhile. Jurats are responsible in the parish for elections. Attended the assize d'héritage and the swearing in of new jurats and advocates. Still goes to the honorary occasions such as the swearing in of new people but doesn't have the power of jurats anymore. Used to wear robes as a jurat and now hats are worn. Still worked in the fishmonger because it was early mornings-especially Friday and Saturday. The business was opened by his father in Beresford Street in 1921and he closed it 2 years after his brother died 4 years previously. His father died in 1924-when he was 10-his mother ran the business until he joined it. He has never done any fishing. Enjoyed meeting people in the business. Was a very small business-had 5 staff and 2 girls in the office-there was some competition with the fish market. They didn't do any wholesaling. Fourth Record-Pretty Woman by Roy Orbison. Has an understanding wife for 41 years of marriage-has one son and two granddaughters. Used to play squash until his 40s but didn't really have many hobbies. Feels he's been very lucky-doesn't regret anything. Fifth Record-Walking in the Air with Aled Jones.

Reference: R/07/B/13

Date: 1984 - 1987

Personal View of Bob Le Brocq, Constable of St Helier, interviewed by Geraldine des Forges. His family history goes back to 1480 on a direct line and back to 1097 before that on Jersey. He was born at Millbrook Nursing Home but his family farmed at Spring Valley, St Ouen. There were eight boys and one girl in the family-he has a twin brother Lester Le Brocq. His parents separated and he came to live in St Helier with his mother in 1940 with a sister and two of his brothers. They lived in Great Union Road for 18 months and then to New Street and St Saviour's Road. During the second world war he was taken to Brighton Road School-his first taste was to get an injection which put him off. Remembers coming in to town and the area around Great Union Road, New Street and St Saviour's Road-remembers playing on the steps of number 84 with his twin brother. The occupying forces had the Woodville Hotel and they used to use a wagon and two horses and the person who was controlling the two horses collided with their railings. Remembers collecting wood from Victoria College, sea water at Havre des Pas, collecting tar from the gas works. It was a hard time-in the summer he spent all his time on the beach. Went to a variety of schools from Brighton Road School he went to Halkett Place Infants, St James' School, La Motte Street and St Helier Boys. As they moved across the town he moved to different schools-it upset his schooling. During the occupation he wasn't frightened of the german soldiers. He remembers a german soldier called Pierre Schumacher going rabbiting with his brothers in St Ouen. Remembers the liberation-a week before liberation in Simon Place the residents helped themselves from a german store of charcoal. Never knew anything else when he experienced the occupation-is now very careful of his belongings. He went to La Motte Street School as a child and did enjoy some subjects especially mathematics and geography. First Record-Killing me Softly performed by the Mantovani Orchestra. Remembers liberation day and the rushign around that took place-he went down to the Pomme d'Or Hotel. Remembers a person going across a wooden bridge by Commercial Buildings and it giving way and him breaking both his legs. Remembers going around to Pier Road and seeing the North African prisoners of war celebrating liberation. Still celebrates liberation every year. He left school at 15 and started to learn the building trade with Horn Brothers in Winchester Street. He moved on to other firms-he was working for a firm that collapsed and found himself out of work at 18 and took the first job that came along-he worked for 2 months as a kitchen porter in a hotel. He originally wanted to go into farming but his mother wanted him to learn a trade. From the hotel he joined the Telephone Department for 5½ as a cable jointer. He met his wife Eileen, who was a nurse at Overdale Hospital, while his mother was in isolation. They met in Christmas 1958 and got married in November 1959. Life was hard when they first got married-had to work 80-90 hours a week. He has two children Juliet and Carl and would have liked to have spent more time with them. Second Record-La Mere. Later he opened a guest house in St Helier after having moved from St Ouen. Took a 2 year course at Highlands College in catering and hotel management. After 10 years they moved to St John's Road, Mont à L'Abbé and then St Brelade-he has lived in 6 parishes in Jersey. When he was in a guest house he stood as deputy for St Helier No 1 District twice but didn't get in. He then served as a constables officer for 3 years and then centenier for 9 years-he enjoyed working with youngsters and helping them. Being a parent stood him in goodstead. He likes giving something back to the community. Third Record-Cherish by Kool and the Gang. He decided he would like to stand as Constable of St Helier and was successful. It's a demanding job and he's getting used to it-he hopes for a freer atmosphere in the island. Has various duties-normally starts about 8.30/9-answers enquiries, serves on committees including the Public Services Committee, Defence Committee, État Civil, the Working Party on Need, Joint Manual Workers Council and the Occupation and Liberation Committee. The Occupation and Liberation Committee is getting ready for the 50th anniversary of liberation. Battle of Flowers causes a lot of work for the parish but not for him-officials from St Helier attend the meetings for him. The job encroaches on his personal life-he has a 5 year old grandson who he plays with. He enjoys goong out for lunch with friends. He enjoys travelling-in 1973 and 1976 he went to Kenya with his children and wife, he's been to Italy, Germany, America four times, Singapore, Thailand and Hong Kong. Likes the Far East. Would like to visit New Zealand and Hawaii. Would like to see life in St Helier freer in the future and that people were more positive in Jersey. Has worked hard on the attractiveness of St Helier-thinks it has improved and hopes to make it even cleaner. Feels he has had a rewarding life with a good family-would not want to change anything. Fourth Record-Key Largo by Bertie Higgins.

Reference: R/07/B/20

Date: April 24th 1994 - April 24th 1994

Personal View of the Reg Jeune, recorded a week after his retirement from the States of Jersey after 35 years, interviewed by Hamish Marett-Crosby. He had good parents although they were not wealthy. It was a strict methodist upbringing-the only liqueur in the house was for the christmas pudding or for medicine. Remembers that he wanted to go and swim on a Sunday and he was forbidden to do that. He went to a Dame School in Vauxhall run by Miss Le Sauteur-she was a great disciplinarian but she was a good teacher. Miss Le Sauteur used a ruler on your knuckles-years later he became her lawyer and when he visited her she told him that she was terrified by the visit of her lawyer and he replied that the roles were reversed from years ago. He started as a solicitor's clerk-his parents couldn't afford further education after he left De La Salle College at 15½. The intention was for him to go into Lloyds Bank like many of his contemporaries but he went into the offices of Crill and Benest and after the occupation he moved to Oliver Mourant's office. First Record-Guide Me O Thou Great Jehovah. He went to De La Salle, a Catholic school, despite being a strict metodist and he married into an anglican family and he is proud that he is now Vice Chairman of the Governing Body. He is a lay brother of the De La Salle Order-he believes in the ecumenical movement and hopes the churches continue to get closer together. He met his wife Monica at the Food Office. Her father farmed at Rozel and he used to ride up there from town. They were engaged in 1943-she worked as secretary to the Medical Officer of Health and he wrote a presciption for some alcohol for the to celebrate. He started to get involved in a society called Toc H which encouraged public service. They moved to Bagot and he got involved in Georgetown Methodist Church becoming the superintendent of the sunday school and after the war he became chairman of the Jersey Youth Movement. At that stage people were rebuilding and weren't thinking about helping individuals. Harold Stephens and he started to visit the prison to entertain the prisoners. He became a lawyer without qualifications but he learned a great deal through experience. On the 1st January 1947 Mourant, du Feu and Jeune was set up with 39 articles of partnership. He stood in No 2 District unsuccessfully in the late 1950s but he lost. Second Record-Jacqueline du Pré playing Elgar's Cello Concerto. He stood in a by-election in St Helier District No 3 after much persuasion. His main opponent was Norman Le Brocq and he won comfortably and stayed as deputy in No 3 District for 10 years. He was stirred to stand because of the bad housing situation in St Helier. He thought the priorities were in the wrong place like spending money on the tunnel-he brought down two committees at the time. He took on the Presidency of Public Works and decided that the traffic meant that the tunnel was needed. Third Record-The Beatles with It's been a Hard Days Night. In the 1960s he was involved in the baking world and became chairman of the Royal Trust Company of Canada and TSB and the Jersey Savings Bank as it was known then. He finds life fascinating and like to be involved in things. He will carry on working rather than retire. He pushed for an ombudsman when he came into the States because there wasn't an appeal process-eventually a process was brought in. He thinks that the panel should now be made up from people who aren't in the States and it has been approved that he be the first chairman of the body now he has left the States. He once stood for constable of St Saviour when he was deputy of St Helier but Gordon Le Breton, a centenier, won the seat. He enjoyed working on the Education Committee for 15 years and he helped bring in Highlands College, the 14 plus transfer, Le Rocquier School was built and Grainville was bought. Highlands College has pushed on further education. He was worried that Hautlieu was going to be changed from a 14 plus transfer system and still believes in the system. At the start of his presidential career in the States he saw the end of the big politicians from 1948. He has remained a methodist lay preacher-at the beginning of the war he was singing in the choir of the methodist church. Fourth Record-Hallelujah Chorus. Believes in the importance of the Commonwealth Parliamentary Association-he went on his first conference to Canada in 1966. It is one of the few organisations in the world where everybody is equal-he was asked to join the finance committee in London and subsequently they elected him to be the International Treasurer. When he gave up being Treasurer he was one of the Trustees of their investment funds. The value for Jersey going to the conferences are the contacts made, the States members getting a wider perspective of life. He learned that the same kind of problems exist in other jurisdictions. People visit the island in association with the CPA. Wilfred Krichefski and Clarry Dupré were the only people prior to himself who were President of the CPA. Fifth Record-Music of the Night from Phantom of the Opera. Doesn't know what Jersey would have been like if the finance industry hadn't come to the island-in 1962 his first budget was £6 million income and £5 million expenditure-a tight hold were kept on finances. The budgets took time to debate and balance. He is happy with the creation of the Policy and Resources Committee. He implemented the idea of zero job growth in order to lower immigration. Has tried to persuade the States committees to think corporately but hasn't been entirely successful. Fifth Record-St Michael's Choir with 'What a Wonderful World'.

Reference: R/07/B/24

Date: 1997 - 1997

Microfiche of the 1901 Census for Jersey, Public Record Office reference 2+ RG13/5309. St Saviour - Part of District 7 - Bounded on the North by District No 6 on the South by St Clements Parish, the West by District No 8 by the East by Grande Longueville From Grande Longueville boundary on the Grouville Main Road all of the houses to the south of the main road as far as Gautier's Public House passing between the above mentioned Inn and Mrs Bathford Vineries as far as St Clement's Parish including all of the houses at Petite Longueville to the South and East of the above mentioned boundaries. St Saviour - District 8 - Bounded on the South by St Clements Parish and the shore on the West and on the North by District No 9 and on the East by district No 7 South Eastern part of Petite Longueville Vingtaine from the shore up Beach Road to Plaisance Road along the latter mentioned road to Elizabeth Street then also on Don Road to Gautiers Public House, then along the Road East of the said Inn and all the houses to the East and South of the above mentioned boundaries. St Saviour - District 9 - Bounded on the South by District 8 and the shore. On the west by St Heliers Parish on the North by Sous L'Eglise Vingtaine and on the east by Districts 7&8. From the shore at Beach Road to Plaisance Road along the latter metioned road and Elizabeth Lane all the Houses of Petite Longueville to the West & North of the above mentioned boundaries. St Saviour - District 10 - Bounded on the West by St Helier's Parish on the North by District No 12 or North West part of Sous L'Eglise Vingtaine on the East by District No 6 or East of Petite Longueville on the South by District No 9 or West of 10. Part of Civil and Ecclesiastical parish of St Saviour from Bagatelle Road, Heathfield and Clifton House down Wellington Road embracing the houses on both sides, Stopford Road and St Marks Road included. St Saviour - District 11 - Bounded on the East by Les Pigneaux Vingtaine, on the west by District No 13, on the North by District no 12 and on the South by La Petite Longueville Vingtaine. From Bagatelle Main Road taking a Northern direction towards ?? St Saviours Church along St Saviours Main Road to Five Oaks, including all the houses along the said roads and to the east and south of the above named boundary forming part of the Vingtaine of Sous L'Eglise. St Saviour - Part of District 12 - Bounded on the North and West by St Heliers Parish and on the South by district No 10 and on the east by district nos 11 and 13. Commencing at Waverley house on the St Saviours Main Road turning to the left to Springfield Road, Falles Cottage , the Vaux as far East as Les Vaux house up to D'Hautree including Highlands and La Maison de St Louis late Imperial Hotel.

Reference: S/07/A/2

Date: 1901 - 1901

Microfiche of the 1901 Census for Jersey, Public Record Office reference 3+ RG13/5309. St Saviour - Part of District 12 - Bounded on the North and West by St Heliers Parish and on the South by district No 10 and on the east by district nos 11 and 13. Commencing at Waverley house on the St Saviours Main Road turning to the left to Springfield Road, Falles Cottage , the Vaux as far East as Les Vaux house up to D'Hautree including Highlands and La Maison de St Louis late Imperial Hotel. St Saviour - District 13 - Bounded on the East by the Pigneaux and Maufant Vingtaines, on the West by District no 12, on the North by St Helier's Parish and on the South by 11, from Five Oaks Villa in a South Westerly direction along St Saviours Main Road to Mr Thomas Mourants house, the Rectory, Langley House, ??house, Les Vaux including all the houses to the North and East of the above named boundary forming part of the Vingtaine of Sous L'Eglise. St Saviour's Lunatic Asylum. St Clement - District 1 - Part of the Grande Vingtaine starting from the boundaries dividing the parishes of St Clement and Grouville and extending to as far as the Parish Hall on the St Clement's Main Road and to the Pontac slipway on the Coast Road including all houses and roads within the boundaries. St Clement - District 2 - From Pontac House to Le Hocq Tower and from Lumina Hill to the Parish Hall. Part of Grande Vingtaine and the whole of Vingtaine du Roquiee(?), commencing and including Pontac House on the St Clement's Main Road, including the Rue de Jambast, the Rue de Hocq and all other roads and houses within the above mentioned limits. St Clement - District 3 - Maitland Villa, Le Samares Road ? to Rocque Bay slipway, from said slipway to Old?? Slip and also the Grouville Coast Road to Constantin Lodge. All that part of the Vingtaine de Samares extending from Le Hocq Tower to Rocque Bay slipway on the Coast Road and from Maitland Villa to the Rue de Samares on the St Clements Main Road including the Rue de Samares, the Rue de Roulletaut(?) And all other roads and houses within those limits. St Clement - Part of District 4 - From the Green Island to the Grande Charriere and from the Plat Douet to the Rue de Samares. Part of the Vingtaine de Samares extending from Rocque Bay Slipway to the Grande Charriere to the Coast Road and from the Plat Douet by the Blinerie(?) to the Rue de Samares and St Clement's Main Road from the Rue de Samares to the Grande Charriere Road including the Montpertuis [Maupertuis?] and all houses within those limits.

Reference: S/07/A/3

Date: 1901 - 1901

JEP Newscuttings - Catholicism and Jersey, 17.03.1995

Reference: US/162

Date: 1995 - 1995

Article about the Cavaille-Coll Organ which is in the Great Hall at Highlands College - 16/10/2008

Reference: US/657

Date: 2008 - 2008

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