Photographic slide of an aerial view of St Aubin including the harbour.

Reference: P/09/A/863

Date: January 31st 1977 - January 31st 1977

Photographic slide of an aerial view of St Aubin including the harbour - possibly from the Jersey Evening Post in 1960s.

Reference: P/09/A/864

Date: January 31st 1977 - January 31st 1977

The Sixties in Jersey

Reference: P/J/1

Date: 2006

VHS tape: Jodel DR1050 aircraft owned and flown by Squadron Leader Richard Le Brocq (later assistant secretary to the Lieutenant-Governor), 20th September 1965. On board: Ron Wagstaffe (cameraman) and Jim Scriven (later chairman, Jersey Evening Post). Scenes includes south coast of Jersey, Le Hocq, isle of Chausey, landing Dinard Airport. Return flight to Jersey shows lack of reclamation sites. Dogs at Rocqueberg, St Clement (Harrison/Wagstaffe family home). Muriel Wagstaffe (wife of Ron, mother of Nigel) holding Natalie (first child of Nigel and Daphne - born 6/8/65). Nigel with dogs. Wedding of Ronald Arthur Wagstaffe and Muriel Isabel Harrison at Aquila Road Methodist Church 1st September 1937. Scenes include Ernest and Rose Wagstaffe (parents of Ronald); Cecil Harrison (later Bailiff of Jersey); Vernon and Ada Baudains, Beryl Scriven (nee Harrison, sister of Jim Scriven), Noella Harrison, Eileen Walker, Eva Harrison (wife of Cecil Harrison, mother of Jurat Sally Le Brocq), Annie Harrison (nee Guiton - mother of the bride). Arrival of the bride. Newly weds emerge from chapel. Eva, Beryl, Noella. Ernest Wagstaffe and Annie Harrison. Mr Harrison (father of the bride). Jim Scriven's parents and sister. Mary Scriven (as a baby - now Mary Le Brocq). Reception at Rocqueberg, Green Island. Mary Scriven. Rose Wagstaffe (mother of the groom). Bridesmaids: Beryl Scriven, Eileen Walker, Violet Nicolle, Noella Harrison, Eva Harrison, Unknown. Beryl Scriven. Speeches. Airport departure for honeymoon in Austria. Return from honeymoon aboard Jersey Airways de Havilland 86 "Express" airliner La Saline Bay. Note St Peter's Barracks in background (Airport opened 10th March 1937). Greeted by Walkers and Rose Wagstaffe. Eileen Walker and Beryl Scriven holding baby Mary. Renault Fregate car with brother Rupert "Bunty" inside. Jim Scriven, Eileen and Leslie Walker and daughter Anne. Bunty Wagstaffe, Peter Scriven and Frank Walker (later Senator Frank Walker, President Finance & Economics Committee). Muriel Wagstaffe, Ruth and Nigel Wagstaffe (brother and sister) returning from London 1954. Swimming races at Havre des Pas Pool; Ruth in second lane. View towards Rocqueberg from Les Hommets (Wagstaffe family home) mid 1950s. Bunty Wagstaffe in Victoria College Preparatory Sports Day. Jim Scriven and Ron Wagstaffe. Jim Scriven with early aqua lung shortly before the formation of the Jersey Sub Aqua Club. Bunty Wagstaffe on lawn at Les Hommets. This film is located in the Audio Visual Area of the Jersey Archive.

Reference: Q/05/A/115

Date: 1937 - 1965

VHS tape: Garden at Les Hommets, St Clement (Wagstaffe family home). Midwife, Nurse Gladys Marret holding Nigel Wagstaffe (born 8/5/1940), possibly July 1940. Muriel Wagstaffe with grandmother Rose Wagstaffe holding Nigel. Christening of Nigel Wagstaffe at Aquila Road Methodist Church. Rose Wagstaffe holding Nigel in garden - Leslie Wagstaffe's glasshouses behind. An air-raid shelter was built between them. Ernest and Rose Wagstaffe driven in cart outside Les Hommets. Driver unknown. Nigel Wagstaffe with dog Rufus. All these scenes were filmed during the Occupation. Muriel Wagstaffe with daughter Ruth and Cecil Harrison at the Scriven family home 'Quainton'. Frank Walker at Quainton. Cecil, Eva and Sally Harrison and others in family scenes. Aboard J13 St Clement. This sequence was shot in Belcroute Bay shortly after the end of the Occupation. Two British soldiers, part of the Liberating Force, Jack Cushing (with pipe) and Unknown. Ted Larbalastier (town pilot) aboard the boat. Arriving off Granville. Damaged breakwater at Granville. Ron Wagstaffe took food buyers for Jersey and Guernsey to France: Owen Hall (Jersey) and Louis Guillemette (Guernsey). Landing in Sark - Les Creux Harbour (Maseline being built but not opened until 1949). Ron Wagstaffe and Freddy Averty. International Road Race, Victoria Avenue, Jersey May 1947. Includes shots of cars in pits at West Park. Jack Gallichan aboard J13. Arthur Harrison (Managing Editor, The Evening Post) by mast. Bouley Bay Hill Climb. This film is located in the Audio Visual Area of the Jersey Archive.

Reference: Q/05/A/116

Date: 1940 - 1965

Mr Arthur Harrison, editor of the Evening Post during the occupation, recalls his experiences of those years. Recording originally produced by the Channel Islands Educational Broadcasting Service. Original reference: Res 7. Includes: choice between publishing the paper under heavy censorship or letting the Germans take it over entirely; lack of news; setting up of propaganda office; publishing news from the propaganda office and amusement caused by the bad English of these items; funeral of a German soldier killed in an air raid in France and being prevented from publishing list of people who sent wreaths (German sympathisers); staying one step ahead of the Germans; having to publish the German forces' newspaper; secretly supplying La Chronique de Jersey (a rival newspaper) with paper and allowing them to use the JEP's facilites; rationing of electricity and the difficulties this caused; doubts about whether to continue publishing; exchange and mart column being used to barter; publishing Red Cross messages and local news; story about a child who was seriously injured by treading on a mine, mentioning a Dr Mattas of Bath Street and the way the propaganda officer tried to exploit this; trying to restrict the ammount of column space given to news from the Germans; anecdote about a young German officer who used to send copies of the paper to his wife; refusal to entertain German officer in his home; liberation - saw the British ships arrive from the roof of the States building; buying wheat on the black market to make flour, which was then discovered and confiscated; being sentenced to seven weeks imprisonment at a court martial at a house at Lower King's Cliff; appealing against this and flour being returned. Sound quality slightly muffled.

Reference: R/03/A/10

Date: 1971 - 1971

Jersey Talking Magazine-Battle of Flowers Special Edition with the Radio Lions and the Jersey Talking News/Magazine teams. Gordon Young watching and describing the floats being prepared the night before the battle and talking to people preparing their floats including Beeches' Old Boys Association President Norman Parslow, Peter Blake, Ronald Crane, David Binnington, Susanne Le Quesne with the Green Room Club float, Save the Whale, St John and St Martin's floats described, First Tower School of Dance-paper flower float. David and Chris commentating on the battle of flowers parade, the arrival of the VIPs, the start of the battle with Miss & Mr Battle-June Wilson and Sacha Diestel, description of the parade and floats, talks to Miss Junior Battle of Flowers-Diane, Norah Bryan, winner of the prix d'honneur-St Clement's parish float, people in the audience commenting on the battle. End of Side One. Feature on the finance industry in Jersey-review of where the island is going. Three articles read from the Jersey Evening Post's finance supplement entitled 'Finance in Jersey'-'The Intricacies of the Offshore Fund Market', 'Facts behind the boom in companies' and 'The Future of the Industry'.

Reference: R/05/B/23

Date: July 31st 1978 - July 31st 1978

Jersey Talking Magazine-June 1977 Edition. Introduction by Gordon Young. Nature Feature-Frances Le Sueur talks about wild garlic and the cuckoo with its bird call. Interview by Gordon Young of the television naturalist David Bellamy talking about what drew him into botany, his interest in flowers and the conservation of animals and plants in the garden. Cooking Feature-Margaret Jenkins talking about what recipes you can make with cheese. Beth Lloyd talking to a doctor about the use of vitamin supplements. Island Administrators-Graham Pitman talking to John Lees of Controller of Social Security about the functions of the Social Security Department, the differences between Jersey and the UK, future developments in social security, how awareness is raised of the department's work to the public. Tim giving hints on bath aids for the blind and elderly. End of Side One. June Gurdon reading Reg Grandin's poem 'Little Treasured Joys'. Commander Cruisarr from Guernsey talking about the evolution of Talking Books for the blind. Beth Lloyd talking to Frank Walker, Managing Director of the Jersey Evening Post, about the moving of the newspaper offices from Bath Street to Five Oaks, the printing of the newspaper, going on a tour of the building with descriptions of each room and the printing process. Roy Fauvel tells the history of a gold snuff box recently presented to St Helier by Eric Young which was presented to Edward Nicolle, the Constable of St Helier in the 1820s, who was censured by the States after comments made but received the box as a vote of confidence from the parish. Gordon Young with a story about the muratti.

Reference: R/05/B/8

Date: May 31st 1977 - May 31st 1977

BBC Radio Jersey-Occupation Tapes. Told by the people who lived through it produced by Beth Lloyd. 1) Part 1: Preparing for the Inevitable. Alexander Coutanche talking about the surprise in the island when it was realised the island was not going to be defended and the evacuation was offered to the public. Eye witnesses talking about the panic of evacuation and the dilemma of whether to go or not, queuing to register, worry that the island was to be occupied, putting down of pets, Lord Coutanche being told to stay at his post and simplify the machinery of government, the potential blowing up of public utilities and the air raid on the island. 2) Part 2: The Germans Arrive. Eye witness accounts on seeing German planes flying low over the island and landing at the airport to begin the occupation, sending a message to the bailiff at the airport, meeting the germans for the first time, putting out white flags, demanding surrender, handing over the island, removal of the Union Jack from Fort Regent, BBC radio report on the start of the occupation, first impressions of the soldiers, germans buying food from the shops and the beginning of the paper war. 3) Part 3: Curbs on personal freedom. German orders being read out. Eye witnesses remember the losing of freedom, restrictions on vehicles, use of money paid for comandeered goods on essential supplies from France, orders against the use of coastal areas, changing side of the road to drive on, introduction and the experience of the curfew, life at the Evening Post, permits and other regulations. 4) Part 4: Food or the Lack of It. Poem on hunger. Eye witnesses talking about difficulty of lack of food and the improvisations with food, difficulty of feeding baby, difference between town and country people, suffering of women from malnutrition, children not knowing what food looked like, what people did to get by, food as subject of discussion, problem of lack of sugar and salt, use of potato flour, eating of seaweed, different methods of cooking and fuel, soup kitchens, bartering, farmers trying to get extra meat, getting extra eggs from chickens and keeping rabbits 5) Part 5: The wireless-Jersey's link with the outside world. Report by the BBC. Michael Ginns talking about eventual confiscation of radios. Eye witness accounts of v-signs at Rouge Bouillon, patrolling of district by islanders, confiscation and storage of radios, taking of radios from the parish hall, keeping of radios on threat of death, use of crystal radios sets, listening to the news, spreading of newsheets, the threat of being caught with radios and listening to tunes that had not been heard before the occupation 6) Part 6: Through the Eyes of a Child. Eye witness accounts of children and teenagers suffering a great deal, the fun children had, being hungry and cold, being without parents, relationships with german soldiers, schools continuing, difficulty of shortages of uniform, german lessons, soup kitchens, drilling on Victoria College playing fields, playing of sports, the Caerarean Tennis Club, riding on the german railway, mischief children got up to and scavenging for supplies.

Reference: R/06/2

Personal View of Gordon Young, feature writer for the Jersey Evening Post, interviewed by Geraldine des Forges. Was born and bred in Warwickshire in 1933 and got into a choir school at a cathedral. Went on to public school with a bursary-found it difficult because he wasn't allowed to talk to girls. He was thrown out of the school for talking to a girl on the street. Used to get into trouble at school-didn't enjoy academic work but enjoyed sport. There was no freedom in the school so he rebelled. He spent a lot of time singing at school. He played rugby and football and other sports. When he came to Jersey he joined the Jersey Rugby Football Club. He was 6 when the second world war broke out-remembers going through the Birmingham and Coventry blitz. He remembered enjoying the war-going into the woods and finding fragments of bullets-for him it was an adventure whilst his parents were terrified. In those days you were what your parents wanted you to be-they wanted to be a doctor. He started medical school at Birmingham University but gave it up after a year-didn't enjoy studying. He enjoyed the army and had a wonderful time for 5 years. First Record-Ella and Louis with A Foggy Day. Initially when he joined the army he applied to go in to the Gordon Highlanders but he was put in the Black Watch and was sent to Fort George-he liked the army discipline. He was picked out as an officer-went to train as an officer at Eaton Hall. He applied to join the Gurkhas but he was seconded to the King's African Rifles. He loved Africa-all his soldiers were Africans-they were wonderful. Then got sent out to Malaya. It was a tough life but for a bachelor the army was good because you could see the world. The companies he joined had great traditions-he liked the discipline because you knew what you could and couldn't do. He doesn't think national service should be brought back although it is a good experience. He never played the bagpipes as a member of the Black Watch. After he left the army he came to Jersey-he met a girl in England who was coming to Jersey and he followed her over and they got married at Trinity Church. There was very little work in Jersey at the time-he worked in a market garden which got into trouble because of a poor winter. He found another job at the hospital on the Observation Ward where he worked for a couple of years. At that point he heard of a building surveyors job which he got-he loved it and spent 27 years in the business-dealt with the Island Development Committee. Has never regretted not becoming a doctor. Second Record-Kai Winding. Surveying took a lot of training but he learnt by experience. You were never stuck in an office-he surveryed the whole of the Jersey Airport which took about 3 months and St Helier Harbour. Saw the poverty in St Helier-a lot of houses were in awful conditions and had people living inside of them. The buildings in the island have improved but there are still some appalling buildings. Loved the Noel and Porter Building but the British Home Stores building replaced it getting rid of all the beauty-King Street has lost some of its character. Loves buildings with Jersey granite-architects are now doing a good job. Hue Street was a beautiful street and he is glad it is finally being renovated. Loves railways-his father was a transport manager for a steel company. As a child he used to travel a great deal on the railways. Received a clockwork train set as a child and then as an adult bought a model railway and has been building it ever since. Third Record-Jersey Bounce. George Marshman, a cameraman from Channel Television, asked him if he wanted to be on television. He went for an interview with Ward Rutherford and he got the job-for 13 years he did freelance work for Channel Television and worked on every programme they produced. The broadcasts were all live so people saw your mistakes. He then worked for the Jersey Talking Magazine for the blind with Philip Gurdon which he really enjoyed and then Radio Lions with Alastair Layzell. For Radio Lions he did a minimum of five interviews in half an hour and everyone was very good. He thinks it's one of the best things that people can do for the hospital and broadcasters could gain experience from the job. He was keen to try something new and decided to move into journalism full time. His wife worked at the Jersey Evening Post and she told him that the 'Under the Clock' column needed a new author and he went for an interview with Mike Rumfitt and got the job. Loves writing and working at the Jersey Evening Post. He likes to comment on things that people are interested in. He thrives on deadlines and meeting people. He has written a book on rugby for the Jersey Rugby Club-they researched a great deal through the newspaper and it took 10 years to write. It's hard to write a book because it takes such a long time-he needed to take a break from writing but it has now been published. He'd like to write fictional books. He also enjoys painting and reading-he now writes art and book reviews for the newspaper. Fourth Record-Frank Sinatra with New York, New York. Enjoys family life-has had two sons and a daughter who have left the island. His eldest son works at the Jersey General Hospital but is going back to England, his second son works with computers and his daughter is a journalist. He has two grandchildren-Amy and Joshua. Started playing music 2 years ago-took up the trombone and has joined the Jersey Big Band where he plays the bass trombone. Fifth Record-Kid Ory with Oh Didn't he Ramble?.

Reference: R/07/B/19

Date: December 20th 1992 - December 20th 1992

Personal View of Leslie Sinel, former Jersey Evening Post employee and occupation historian. Born in St Helier in 1906. Involved with people around you-knew everybody in the district-different today. His father was a saddler-used to do jobs at different farms-got to love horses. Not many vehicles around-1920 no one on the Jersey Evening Post owned a private car. Newspaper was distributed by horse-1910-got two delivery cars with open sides so delivery people could throw the paper out of the car. Went to the Jersey National School-church school-difficult but accepted it. Jersey french not taught in schools-French was taught-headmistress Miss Bennett was tough but she taught everybody how to read and write. First Record-The Trumpet Voluntary by Jeremiah Clarke-used to listen to it during the occupation on crystal radio sets. Childhood-holidays coincided with the potato season-worked at T & J Moor and the Great Western Railway. At 14 joined the Jersey Evening Post-father got him the job-started as an apprentice printer-Wolfdale printing machines. Newspaper only means of communication at the time. Jersey Evening Post used to be distributed by horses-1910 got first car. Newspaper printed at 3.30 so people could catch the train from Snow Hill to Gorey at 4 o'clock. 1920-took 3 hours to print 7,500 newspapers, today can print 23,000 in three quarters of an hour. Newspapers dropped off at each station both east and west. Exciting to go on the train as a child-sad but inevitable that the railways went when buses were brought in. Tourism in the summer of the 1920s and 1930s-not comparable with today-people used to stay longer. St Brelade popular for tourists. Second Record-the Radetzky March by Strauss. Radio-what he used to listen to. 1930s-became a proof reader at the Jersey Evening Post and wrote some articles-never had an ambition to become a journalist-worked mostly from the printing side. Newspapers today good quality but reporting is 'muck raking' now. Media today-good variety-modern way of life. Spent 15 years as a Constables Officer and Vingtenier in St Saviour and 21 years in St Helier as a churchwarden and on the Welfare Board and on the Battle of Flowers' Association and Jersey Eisteddfod-always involved in something. Honorary policeman-got fed up with job at the time of the prowler-stayed out watching farms at nights. Queen came-did Government House duty all night. Mostly traffic duties. States Police and Honorary Police can work together. Never wanted to leave Jersey-some travelling on the Continent. Has lived in St Helier and St Saviour. Not the same parochialism today. First buses here-used to run through Bagot-used to call it the 'Orange Box'. The JMT and Red Band Bus-opened up the island-created more movement in the island. 1925-1930s-motor cars increased in number. Third Record-Zadoc the Priest from the Coronation Anthem. Second world war-Germans swept across France getting closer to Jersey-hoped nothing would happen but thought it would. Government realised it was impossible to defend and pulled out. Germans took the island-no alternative-no question of resistance-couldn't have sabotage during the occupation-where could you go? Repercussions on other islanders. Had a guilt complex-felt if he'd gone away he may have been able to do something but if everybody had left the island it would have been destroyed. Decided against evacuation-two of his family left but the rest stayed. Continued to work at the Jersey Evening Post-censored by the Germans but the staff used to resist. On the surface looked to be agreeing with them but were resisting. Was asked to put an article in the newspaper but he took three days off and burned it. Fourth Record-Vidor's Toccata and Fugue. During the occupation worked on a farm in the afternoon-used to get some extra food-learned how to make sugar beet syrup. Meat was scarce-used to get some on the black market-used to be expensive but nothing on the price today. Used to listen to the radio every morning-every hour on the hour-would listen until 9 in the morning-used to leave the house and people would tell him the news-everybody knew it. Used to type out 3 copies of the news-took one to Captain Robin of Petit Menage, one to the Jersey Evening Post and kept one. Many people listened to the radio-he would have been prosecuted for disseminating the news. Used to find out news from German soldiers. Fifth Record-To be a Pilgrim. Liberation-can't talk about it without emotion. Enjoyed life since the war-is retired but very active. Enjoys writing-historical and local events. Would have liked to have been a teacher. End of Side One. Personal View with Jack(John) Herbert interviewed by Beth Lloyd, the war time Airport Commander. Enjoyed working at the Jersey Airport. Was born in Bath and went to Green Park College in Bath. Was part of the choir in Bath but gave up his music-difficult to choose music for the programme. Came over to Jersey at 11-his father was an engineer on a ship-his mother wanted him to stay on shore. Worked in Bath and the Piers and Harbours Committee of 1923 advertised for a harbour engineer. Was learning about law but ended up sailing instead- helped the fishermen Tommy and Charlie King and helped the pilots in St Helier Harbour. First Record-Underneath the Arches by Flanagan and Allen. After leaving school joined his father at the Harbour Office. Worked as clerk dealing with harbour dues-counted the passengers coming in. On the Albert Pier with Captain Furzer-a ship collided with the Albert Pier-harbour had to be dredged. Mr Bill Thurgood visited the island-decided to set up an aeroplane route-administration of the aeroplanes were placed under the auspices of the Piers and Harbour Committee-staff had to check beach. First flight took place on the 18th December 1933 from Jersey to Portsmouth. The beach was cleared of people-a great local event. Had a refueler and a coach for the office work. Had to be an English customs officer, Bill Ivy, and a Jersey customs officer, Harold Robins. No aeroplane dues-the aeroplanes used to pay harbour dues. Aeroplane had a tragic accident-a little boy was sitting on the beach and was killed and a coach got trapped on the beach and was swamped by the sea. Second Record-Stranger on the Shore. Used to create a weather report at the Harbour Office by letting a balloon go into the air and timing it going in to cloud cover. Sites inspected to build Jersey Airport-a site at Grosnez turned down. Site at St Peter decided-problem with fog. No other suitable place in the island for it. Jersey Airport-Piers and Harbour Committee was put in charge of the Airport being built-plans were approved-there were four runways-Jersey Airways ran from Jersey to Portsmouth and Jersey to Heston. Air France went from the Jersey Airport. Third Record-Glenn Miller and American Patrol. Second world war-all messages came in code. Bill Lawford-an air traffic control officer came over. Had to camouflage the airport. Jersey Airways staff evacuated-was in charge of the evacuation-no panic at the Airport to get off the island-between 400-600 left by the Airport. Was ordered to stay at his post, Chris Phillips, an air traffic controller, was called back to the royal navy. Late May some French air force plane with two highly ranked officers and a ground crew. The morning of the 1st June in his office when he saw a german plane fly over and dropped a container-it was addressed to the Bailiff of Jersey. German landed and spoke to the Bailiff-wanted the island to be handed over later that afternoon-put up white flags. Jack Herbert told to cut off the electricity supply-had shipped all their radios to Bristol. Fourth Record-Luftwaffe March. Jack Herbert was transferred to the Transport Office in Bond Street during the occupation-converted some vehicles to use gas as fuel-had to improvise to create fuel as it was in such short supply. Fifth Record-It Must be Him by Vikki Carr. Liberation-transferred back to the Jersey Airport on May 10th 1945-airfields were mined and booby traps-were cleared. German officer detailed to cut the grass at the Airport. Royal air force officer was in charge of Airport and it was handed over 2nd October 1945. Civil aviation picked up between 1948 and 1952. The airport was tarmacked in 1952-the material came from the excavation of the Jersey Underground Hospital. The Jersey Airport became the second busiest airport in Britain in the 1960s. Was presented with an MBE by the Queen in 1974 and retired in 1975.

Reference: R/07/B/3

Date: 1982 - 1982

Personal View of Jurat Barbara Myles, the first woman jurat in Jersey and doctor, interviewed by Beth Lloyd. Talking about her early childhood. Education-went to nursery school, a foundations school-interrupted by the second world war which led to her going to three different grammar schools. Her father was a doctor of philosophy-worked in insecticides during the war. Her father came over to Jersey after the war to sort out the Colorado beetle problem. Always wanted to be a doctor and was encouraged. First Record-Little Sir Echo-released when the world changed. Almost got sent to America for safety but stayed. Until 1945/46 lived in Maidenhead and then moved to Kent to school. Tried to get in to train as a doctor but was rejected and then worked in a laboratory. Got a place at Trinity College, Dublin as a medical student-ended with 20 women students. Recalls a disruptive patient. Specialists-were some characters and difficult people. Second Record-Ring of Bright Water sung by Val Doonican. After finishing her medical training came to Surrey near where her parents were living to work in anaesthetics-worked in St Peter's Hospital, Cherstey. Met her husband there who was a surgeon. Worked with him in the casualty department. Got married and started working part time locum work. Had her child Caroline in the autumn of 1960 just after they'd moved house. Was in the house 4 or 5 months when a chance for a job in Jersey came up-decided to move across-had no doubts. Worked in a few locum jobs in anaesthetics in the early 1960s. Had more children-second daughter-1962, third daughter-65, son 68. It was fun but hard work-lived at La Rocque. Third Record-Misalliance sung by Flanders and Swan. Offered work-Jersey Family Welfare Association-needed doctors for their clinics-worked with Dr Crill. Now does 2 half days a week. Got involved with the Jersey College for Girls-was asked to teach health education to the students. Got involved with the Jersey College for Girls Parent Teacher Association-was the president. 1970-asked to work on the Juvenile Court-12 lay members sat with a magistrate-was trained in it. Working in the juvenile court was distressing-difficult to try and change a child's background. There are no easy answers to help the children-have to get the children at an early age. Fourth Record-Mozart's Symphony No 40. Decided to stand for jurat because of the lack of women in the Royal Court. When the time came at the end of her time in the Juvenile Court was asked to become a jurat by Jurat Hamilton. Stood for jurat but did not get in the first time. Decided to stand again because of the support she received. Was nervous when she became a jurat. Jurats sit in the Royal Court as the Inferior and Superior Number, work on the licensing bench, overseeing the job of curator for people who can't manage their own affairs. When trying a criminal case-can worry her-have to work out what you believe. Retirement of Lester Bailhache there are now no lawyers as jurats-thinks there is a case to have lawyers as jurats. Jurats get together to discuss law changes. Nothing had to change when she became the first woman jurat-big change for the other jurats. Fifth Record-Menuhin and Grapelli with Jealousy. Hobbies-sailing-likes to have a break from the island-visits the Ecréhous and the South of Brittany. Ambitions-would like to write. Used to sing in a quartet. Sixth Record-Vera Lynn with When I Grow too Old to Dream. End of Side One. Personal View with Betty Brooke. Started writing a column for the Evening Post in 1966. Asked by Jim Scriven, the editor of the time, to write a column to interest people in island politics. Considered standing for election-is not a committee person. Has more power as a writer than as a politician. Was born and raised in Aberdeen and when the second world war came she became a wren where she met her husband who was a navy chaplain. Wrote and edited for ship's magazines. Her husband retired from the royal navy in 1957 and came to Jersey to a church. Liked the States of Jersey because the people could make a difference. Started as a signals wren, trained at Rosyth and then moved to Liverpool-difficult time-worked 72 hours a week-lost many friends. Became an instructor in London and trained people for D Day. Was going to marry somebody else and he was supposed to conduct the ceremony before they realised they loved each other. First Record-Kathleen Ferrier with Blow the Wind Southerly. Became a naval chaplain's wife-stationed at HMS Royal Arthur and then moved to Leigh on Solent and then to Malta for 4 years. Became a snooker player of some repute. Became a sort of surrogate mother to the naval recruits. Had to move on after 4 years-adopted a baby at this time. Posted to Devenport and after two years retired and was invited to move to the Aquila Road Methodist Church-became a methodist lay preacher soon after she was married. Second Record-Mozart's Ave Verum. Impressions of Jersey-had always wanted to come to the Channel Islands-had organised to come to Jersey and as they were organising it had an invitation from Aquila Road Church to come and preach. Simon, her son was 3, and they lived at West Park Avenue in The Manse. Loved living in Jersey especially the Jersey people-warmth and friendship. Preached in the methodist churches-in 1966 Barry, her husband, collapsed in the pulpit and died. Life changed dramatically-was widowed with a 12 year old son-was necessary to look at life again. Continued in the church for 11 months until another minister was appointed. Grieved with the congregation. Third Record-Frankie Lane with Do Not Forsake Me from High Noon. In 1966 her life took a new turn-had to work-worked as a freelance journalist-wrote two columns for the Jersey Evening Post. Wrote articles for the Daily Telegraph and for women's magazines. Was correspondent for the South West region in Jersey before Radio Jersey was set up and interviewed people for Channel Television. Fourth Record-Mozart's Violin Concerto. Never felt she wanted to publish a permanent record of her thoughts-has written two books-a thriller and her autobiography-may publish it at some point. Doesn't travel a lot but has relatives in America and loves France. Fifth Record-Pie Jesu. Doesn't like to plan for the future-lives for the present. Would like the prosperity of Jersey to continue. Sixth Record-Nat King Cole with Ramblin' Rose. End of Side Two.

Reference: R/07/B/5

BBC Radio Jersey-Occupation Tapes. Told by the people who lived through it produced by Beth Lloyd. Part 3: Curbs on personal freedom. German orders being read out. Eye witnesses remember the losing of freedom, restrictions on vehicles, use of money paid for comandeered goods on essential supplies from France, orders against the use of coastal areas, changing side of the road to drive on, introduction and the experience of the curfew, life at the Evening Post, permits and other regulations. See R/06/2.

Reference: R/07/F1/3

Date: April 29th 1990 - April 29th 1990

BBC Radio Jersey-Occupation Tapes. Told by the people who lived through it produced by Beth Lloyd. Part 7: Deportation. BBC Report on the deportations from the Channel Islands. Alexander Coutanche's difficulty in having to accept the order. Eye witnesses reports of discovering the order for the deportations in the Evening Post, discovery that some deportee's houses being looted, preparations for deportation, being served deportation notices, deciding what to take, going to the Weighbridge, people being turned back because the ships were full, the crowd singing the ships off, the journey to St Malo, fighting at the third deportation leading to arrests. See R/06/3.

Reference: R/07/F1/7

Date: May 27th 1990 - May 27th 1990

Jersey Evening Post supplement relating to the re-development of Jersey Airport

Reference: US/09

Date: June 22nd 1897 - June 22nd 1897

Jersey Evening Post - St Helier Street Gallery Photographic Guidebook produced to celebrate 125 years of the JEP. A brief history of the paper together with a walking tour of St Helier to locate the 30 photographs produced in the booklet.

Reference: US/1371

Date: 2015

Jersey Evening Post Article : A time capsule containing money and newspapers from 1891 was found buried in the walls of an outbuilding at Bushy Farm, St Helier. Farmer Hugh de la Haye, who was responsible for introducing the first Jersey Royal seed potato, buried the glass bottle following a fire at his farm in 1891.

Reference: US/1405

Date: June 4th 2016

Jersey Evening Post Newpaper article : 'Faces and Places' - Stories from the JEP Photo Archive. The public are asked to put a name to the face.

Reference: US/1463

Date: June 8th 2019

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