Photographic slide of a car park, hangers and an Aurigny aeroplane at Jersey Airport.

Reference: P/09/A/4326

Date: 1970 - 1990

Photographic slide of an aerial view of Gigoulande Quarry, St Peter's Valley, with St Peter's Village and the Airport in the distance.

Reference: P/09/A/793

Date: June 10th 1977 - June 10th 1977

Photographic slide of an aerial view of the Airport.

Reference: P/09/A/812

Date: June 10th 1977 - June 10th 1977

16mm colour film by George Morley. Shows 1930s Jersey including Corbiere with a boat coming in, the island shoreline, the harbour, Jersey Airways aeroplanes flying in over the sea, coast, houses and landing at the Jersey Airport, flowers, cows in the field, horse ploughing with men. B & w film looking out to coast, showing the flora and birds on the cliffs. Colour film of a woman on the cliffs, people on the beach surfing, Corbiere lighthouse in different moods at different times of the day surrounded by the ocean and the mail boat coming in-14 mins 10 secs

Reference: Q/05/A/135

Date: 1930 - 1939

VHS Tape: 1) Filmed by Roderick Averty in 16mm colour. Film entitled 'Jersey's Other Inhabitants', an amateur film about low water fishing in Jersey. Film includes going by motor boat to Icho Tower, shellfish being uncovered, ormers under rocks, an octopus, crabs, how to catch razor fish, seabirds and eggs being discovered and guillemots on the rocks filmed from a fishing boat at sea. 2) Filmed by Roderick Averty in 16mm colour and black and white. Assembly of Jehovah’s Witnesses, Jersey 1954. Film includes delegates arriving at the Airport and St Helier Harbour, Tantivy coaches lined up, ship arriving in the harbour, a policeman directing traffic and coaches arriving at Springfield stadium and theatre, St Helier. Scenes at the airport including shots of a BEA Dakota, Cambrian Airways Rapide. Delegates handing out The Watchtower in streets of St Helier, starting in Janvrin Road with a man on motorbike. Delegates in Library Place, King Street and Snow Hill. A sequence in black and white of a bakery at work [possibly Bird’s Bakery on corner of New Street and Union Street]. Colour film continues with scenes from Jehovah’s Witnesses’ Assembly including a baptism by full immersion in water, delegates returning to the airport – outside front entrance – then boarding Jersey Airlines Heron G-ANLN, the Heron taking off, delegates arriving outside the airport in VW courtesy bus of Demi des Pas Hotel, delegates leaving by sea on SS St Julian. Shots of family picking flowers on unidentified headland in Jersey. 3) Filmed by George Morley in 16mm colour. Film with processing fault giving mauve cast. Film includes scenes in an English park, the Morley family at La Hauteur, family home on Mont les Vaux, St Brelade, scenes in the tennis court on land above the house. 1937: Tennis players in England including a one-armed boy, a ship approaching Jersey, boys and girls in St Brelade’s Bay and in the sea. 1938: a house in England called Brynford, cricket on the lawn of the house, a tram crossing. 1939: the family in a sail-boat on a lake in England, lawn tennis, family in the kitchen and garden and getting into a car with blackout headlights.

Reference: Q/05/A/140

Date: 1930 - 1954

VHS Tape: 1) 16mm colour film. Southern Railways ship Brittany entering St Helier Harbour, late 1940s. 1949: Havre des Pas Bathing Pool. 1950: historical pageant with characters in medieval costumes at St Ouen’s Manor. 1950: parachute descent over St Aubin’s Bay. 1950: Corbière in a storm. 1951: scenes at the Battle of Flowers, [the first after the Occupation]. 1953: decorations throughout St Helier to mark the coronation of Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth II. 1954: Battle of Flowers on Victoria Avenue. 1954: horse racing at Les Landes, scenes of the tote and spectators. 1954: sea at St Ouen’s Bay. 1956: gathering vraic at St Ouen’s Bay, including scenes of the vraic stacks. 1956: Battle of Flowers. July 1957, visit of the Queen and the Duke of Edinburgh; shows Royal Yacht Britannia arriving off Noirmont, scenes on the Albert Pier and the Queen being driven through streets of St Helier. 1957: good scenes at the sub-aqua club at Rozel and shots at the airport. 1958: scenes at the BSJA [British Show Jumping Association] gymkhana.

Reference: Q/05/A/141

Date: 1949 - 1958

VHS Tape: 1) Filmed by Roderick Averty in 9.5mm black and white-film back to front. Scenes at La Rigondaine with Micky, Margaret, Scally, John Kempster, Bob, Arthur. Breton workers planting tomatoes in field. Picking tomatoes. French workers dancing traditional dances in farmyard. Loading lorries with tomato barrels. Baby in garden and family planting herbaceous border. 2) Filmed by Roderick Averty in 9.5mm black and white. 1933: family scenes showing Doreen, horse-rider over jumps in field. 1935: scenes in St Malo with Owen, Doreen, Tange, Michel Coquenpot, Woggy. Scenes in Jersey including JMT Double-Decker bus on road and a bull nosed Morris car. Men walking on promenade at Havre des Pas. Ship arrives in St Helier Harbour. Small boat full of people. Car draws up and couple get out. Dog on beach at south-east corner. Family gardening at house in England 'Sunneycrest'. Scenes in Trafalgar Square, London. Doreen and Owen arriving at Casa Marina Hotel, St Clement, Jersey. Scenes on beach at Havre des Pas. Boy doffs school cap and plays with dog. 3) Filmed by Roderick Averty in 9.5mm black and white. Man reading Jehovah’s Witness magazine The Watchtower. Boy wearing Victoria College Preparatory uniform. 1947: Yvonne, Brian [aged 7], Grandma, Phyllis and Ian at Belcroute with Austin 10 car (J1389). Scenes at Jersey Airport including de Havilland Rapide G-AGSK. Mowing lawn with ATCO mower at family house, 'Waverley'. Family eating Jersey wonders, boys on bikes and in pedal car. Funfair on the Albert Pier, St Helier Harbour. Fishermen in rowing boat, boys leaving home for school, swings at funfair – possibly Gorey. Children’s party at 'Waverley'. Girls on swing, boy with model boat in the sea. Scenes at the airport showing Rapide G-AGWC, BEA Dakota G-AGYX. Family on airport balcony. BEA Dakota G-AGHJ lands. Shot of Jersey Airlines Rapide G-AKNF.

Reference: Q/05/A/143

VHS Tape: 1) Filmed by Roderick Averty in 9.5mm black and white and colour. 1930s. Brian’s newts in a jam jar. Good shots of Roderick Averty himself. Family picnic on clifftop. Scenes at Devil’s Hole with original model of the Devil. Brian in hospital with oxygen mask. Jersey Airport: takeoff of BEA Dakota. Passengers on Bedford OB coach. Unusual colour 9.5mm film of scenes at the Assembly of Jehovah’s Witnesses, Weymouth. Delegates with sandwich boards handing out The Watchtower. B & W. Isle of Wight and the Needles seen from the air. Picnic on beach at Green Island, Jersey. Colour. Beach scenes at St Clement with Cyril Bird, Joan Bird, Doris Day, Susan and Marilyn, Phil Godel and family. 2) Filmed by Roderick Averty in 9.5mm black and white. Storm at sea. Sand racing on St Ouen’s Bay including cars and motorcycles. Horse riding in hay field. Swimming in a swimming pool on board a ship. 1935: Battle of Flowers at Springfield stadium. 1937: George Kempster in an historical pageant outside the Town Hall. Swimmers in the pool at Havre des Pas. 3) Filmed by Roderick Averty in 9.5mm black and white. Ship in St Helier Harbour. Family in small boat off La Rocque. Boy in tent. Private car, 1.5 Riley J12262 at house called 'Waverley'. Guests arrive, children in garden. Boat being taken away on a lorry. Family at sea in clinker boat and small yacht. Picnic on boat. Man in canoe, Winter scenes at 'Waverley'. Ian on bike. Scenes at the harbour: saying goodbye, boarding ship 'St Helier'. Ship filmed from another boat while at sea. 4) Filmed by Roderick Averty in 9.5mm black and white and colour. 1930s: Rosemary from infancy. Doreen, Gigi, Grandpa Averty, all in the garden of 'Waverley'. Doreen in pram; with typewriter; with father, Roderick; being bathed indoors. 1938: wedding of Allan and Joan at Aquila Road. Guests in top hats. Couple depart from the airport by DH86 airliner of Jersey Airways. Dogs in the gardens. Men on promenade fooling around. 1935: Battle of Flowers at Springfield. Aerials of the mailboat [poor quality]. Roderick Averty rowing on a lake. Du Fay colour: family in garden. Roderick Averty with pipe on promenade at Havre des Pas. Picking tomatoes. Roderick Averty walking. Loading lorry in field. B & W. Snake charmer. Brian and Grandma at 28, St Clement’s Gardens, Greve d’Azette.

Reference: Q/05/A/144

Date: 1930 - 1939

Jersey Talking Magazine-September 1977 Edition. Introduction by Gordon Young. Pharmacy feature-Molly Perchard-talking about the history of pharmacy. Cooking feature-Margaret Jenkins talking about the use of spices. Gardening feature-Jack Douglas and Alf Ippititimus giving hints on fig trees and summer colds. Nature feature-Frances Le Sueur talking about eating seaweed, using vraic as fertilizers and different kinds of seaweed. Island Administrators-Graeme Pitman interviewing Senator Bill Morvan, Head of the Harbours and Airport Committee about the attractions of the job, the challenges faced by the committee at the airport and harbour, the Jersey Airport as a trading area-self-sufficiency from the tax payer, what happens with the profit from the Airport, the new marina being built, where the money is coming from, charges and the price of air fares. Hint for the blind from Jim Lamy about the use of the telephone. Gordon Young ends the side with a humorous story. End of Side One. Reading from a poem by Reg Grandin on the occupation. Interview with Alan Whicker about his reasons for getting into journalism, his career, getting into television and travel broadcasts, becoming famous, his interviewing style, people he has interviewed, evocative smells, tastes and sounds he has experienced, his interest in the flora and fauna of Jersey and his choice to live in Jersey. Eileen Le Sueur telling a humorous Jersey story in Jersey French.

Reference: R/05/B/11

Date: August 31st 1977 - August 31st 1977

Jersey Talking Magazine-August 1978 Edition. Introduction by Gordon Young. Cooking feature-Margaret Jenkins talking about salads. Local stories feature-Roy Fauvel talking about the custom of the clameur de haro and the history behind it. Nature feature-Frances Le Sueur talking about nightingales including examples of birdsong. Jèrriais feature-Eileen Le Sueur telling a story in Jersey french about how she took her cow to the show. Edgar Fryat reading from Braille a piece about a concert pianist. Ernie Benham, an english reader, telling a humorous story about lawn mowing. End of Side One. Phil Gurdon talking to Jack Herbert about aviation in Jersey before they built the airport, flying from the beach, different airlines that flew to the island, the creation of the Jersey Airways service, the problems with landing on the beach, the weather reports for the aeroplanes, fares and looking for places to build the airport. Humorous story about lawn mowing from Gordon Young. Norah Bryan talking to Lady Guthrie about the gardens at the zoo. Mark, 6½, reading a poem.

Reference: R/05/B/22

Date: July 31st 1978 - July 31st 1978

Jersey Talking Magazine-August Edition. Introduction by Gordon Young. Mark Higgins, a member of St Paul's Cathedral Choir School, who is singing at the royal wedding of Prince Charles and Princess Diana, sings 'I Know that My Redeemer' and talking about how he got into the school, the levels he had to achieve in order to be accepted, how long he spends singing, the amount of boys in the school, the different time he has his holidays, preparing for the royal wedding, the songs they are going to sing at the royal wedding, whether he feels nervous about performing in front of so many people, the other occasions they sing for at the Cathedral, singing outside the Cathedral, making recordings, meeting the Queen Mother and other members of the royal family and sings another song. Norah talking to Jeremy Scriven, a Jersey boy who left the island to climb Mount Kilimanjaro in Tanzania talking about how he decided to climb the mountain, his lack of regrets of going, getting to Tanzania and the difficulty in doing so because the border of Kenya and Tanzania was closed, being arrested for crossing the border into Tanzania without realising and being put into prison for four days, the conditions in the prison, being tried in the court, being allowed free and then expelled into Kenya, managed to go through Uganda in order to get to Tanzania, buying tickets to Kilimanjaro on the black market, encountering violence in Kampala, journeying and climbing Mount Kilimanjaro, spending 4 days climbing, a member of the party suffering altitude sickness, the experience of climbing the mountain, the view from the top of the mountain and how he felt climbing down again. Katina Hervau, a french girl in the island to learn the language, talking about her first impressions of Jersey roads and the island. Horoscope Feature-Diane Postlethwaite talking about the forecast for the year for leo. June Gurdon giving some In Touch tips for the blind about cooking vegetables without water. End of Side One. Gordon Young taking a trip in a hot air balloon describing the balloon, getting into the balloon, taking off, describing the views of Jersey below including town, St Helier Harbour, Elizabeth Castle, Victoria Avenue, St Aubin's Bay, Noirmont and to the Jersey Airport to land. Gordon Young at Government House for a ball for the Royal National Lifeboat Institution describing the gardens of Government House, the food for the occasion, the scene in the marquees, the scene inside Government House. Talking to Sir Peter Whiteley about piloting in the hot air balloon and the ball for the RNLI and to Lady Whiteley about the weather and the amount of people attending the ball. Listening to the band in the marquee. End of Side Two.

Reference: R/05/B/57

Date: July 31st 1981 - July 31st 1981

Jersey Talking Magazine-April 1977 [March not recorded]. Introduction by Gordon Young and explanation for the reason that there was no March edition. Gardening Feature-walking around the garden and looking at the various vegetables, fruit and flowers that have began sprouting in springtime and in the greenhouse. Nature Feature-Frances Le Sueur discussing the chiff-chaff with an example of its bird song. The history of medicine-a doctor discussing the early history of medicine and the Hippocratic Oath. Cooking Feature-Margaret Jenkins giving a recipe for the making of bread. Island Administrators-Graham Pitman interviewing the Constable of St Helier, Peter Baker-talks about the history and role of the constable, the administration over which he presides, the work of the office and his role in the States of Jersey. Gordon Young talks about Reg Grandin, his experience during the occupation and his writing of the book 'Smiling Through' followed by a reader Mrs Renouf singing the song 'Smiling Through'. End of Side One. Acting out of a German pilot going over the Channel Islands on the 30th June 1940-1st July 1940 on an air reconnaissance and landing at the Jersey Airport linking in to a poem by Reg Grandin read by June Gurdon. Beth Lloyd talking to 17 year old Sarah Patterson, daughter of novelist Harry Patterson, regarding a novel she wrote on the second world war. Talks about whether she always wanted to be a writer, her father's influence, her book about the second world war, the research for her book, her next project and moving to Jersey with her family. The Market in St Helier that was built thanks to a lottery. Di Weber looks around the market talking about the history of markets in Jersey, the building of the markets, the centrepiece of the market, the market during the occupation, the market in 1977, a tour of the market starting in Market Street with a description of the building, stalls and things being sold including flowers, fruit and vegetables, meat, talks to the butcher about his job, talks to Mr Farley about the shop Red Triangle and leaving by Hilgrove Street. Gordon Young tells a humorous story about the market.

Reference: R/05/B/6

Date: March 31st 1977 - March 31st 1977

Jersey Talking Magazine-December Edition. Introduction by Gordon Young. Joan Stevens taking a tour of St Peter talking about the size of the parish with the sea on two sides, St Peter's Church which is mentioned in records before 1066, in 1053 it is referred to as St Pierre don la dessert because of the exposed sandy soil. Where Jersey Airport is now used to be rich corn land with massive harvests. Down near St Ouen the sand dunes are with diverse wildlife-Les Mielles is being preserved as a result. St Peter's Church-tallest spire in the island and has been hit by lightning at least 3 time, it dates from 1400s and there are some initials on some of the stones. In the church an incised tombstone has been built into the wall-marks of a blacksmiths grave. Over 100 years ago the church was too small for congregation-an extra knave was built as a result of the garrison being stationed at St Peter's Barracks. Barracks built in 1811 until 1927-they were removed to make way for Airport. Bell in church has a name incised on it, a piscina in the church was found in Les Bois when it was knocked down and was installed in church. A priory in St Peter was on land called La Flocquetterie-now Philadelphie Chapel stands on it. On the corner by Oak Walk there was a leper house. St Anastase-in Coin Varin-was a school house which was founded in 1496. Children attended from 6am-6pm and had lessons in latin and were taught latin, the classics and divinity. La Hague Manor-now changed to school, the colombiers was changed into the school library. The house itself was built in 1634, rebuilt in 1733 and in 1871 by Colonel Le Cornu. St Peter's House-originally home of Robin Family-burnt in 1754 and rebuilt-greatly altered since-used to be home of Sir William Venables Vernon-bailiff. The Rectory-moved 3 times in the parish-used to be next to La Hague Manor then moved nearer church to north of La Flocquetterie-1800s and then moved beside there and then modern rectory moved close by church. Mills-more mills than every other parish-Quetteville has been restored by the National Trust for Jersey-working mill, Tostain Mill-did belong to a lame priest. St Peter had a windmill in 1837-turned into restaurant. Parish gun-1551 at Beaumont Hill-all parishes had guns-only one that survived-made by John Owen and inscribed, in 1839-Sir John le Couteur found it in England and returned it to the parish. St Ouen's Bay-a great deal of it in St Peter-famous battle-commonwealth defeated royalists during civil war-Sir George Carteret defeated by Admiral Blake-Carteret fled to Elizabeth Castle. Jersey Airport-started 1937-extensions since. Germans dug into St Peter almost more than any other parish-headquarters at Panigo [?]-underground constructions and strongpoints in the parish. Beautiful houses in St Peter. St Peter's Valley-crowning glory of parish-Queen Victoria-visit in 1859 taken by Sir John Le Couteur for a drive there. Rachel Pirouet singing a song that she sang in the Jersey Eisteddfod followed by the presentation of the John Lobb memorial goblet to the Jersey Eisteddfod. Phil Gurdon talks to Beryl Jordan about how the Jersey Eisteddfod was going, the judge of the competition, the number of people who had entered, no class for the Jersey Norman French, how long the Eisteddfod had been going in Jersey and when they start preparing for the next years competition. Pat Dubras and Brian Le Breton singing a duet from the play 'Free as Air' performed at the Jersey Opera House. Beth Lloyd paying tribute to David Scott-Blackwell who used to present In Touch tips for the blind including quotations fro his poetry. End of Side One. Chris and David at a steam fair in Trinity in the sheds of Lyndon Charles Pallot with a steam engine threshing corn describing the scene and how the engine and the threshing machine works, what the engine is used for, looking at the steam machines in the shed, hand threshing being shown and the man being interviewed [with a Jersey accent] about the process, the threshing machine, when it would have been last used and a corn measure. A man being interviewed about bread being made and the process involved, cabbage loaves and how they are made. Description of a petrol engine and a smaller threshing machine with the noise of the machine and interviews about the machine including with Jim Purvis, description of a tractor, interview about a machine that rolls oats for the horses. Describing model steam engines made by Harold Taylor of St Ouen with the noise of the engines. Mr Pallot talking about the different machines that he owns, working with them and the steam fair. Description of different engines on display. Cynthia Reed interviewing Robert Farnon, a composer and arranger who lives in Guernsey, asking whether he came from a musical family, what musical instruments he played when he was young, having professional training, when he wrote his first piece of music, his first job in the professional world-playing in his brother's band, how he starts composing music, conducting, when he moved to Guernsey, his favourite piece of music he wrote, how much he enjoys arranging music, the music he listens to, his favourite artist to work with -Tony Bennett and what he is doing next in his career. James Clayton reading a story about 'Dinah-the Dog with a Difference'. End of Side Two.

Reference: R/05/B/60

Date: November 30th 1981 - November 30th 1981

Jersey Talking Magazine-April Edition. Introduction by Gordon Young. Philip Gurdon interviewing David Watkins, a private investigator, talking about whether there was any need for a private investigator in Jersey, finding evidence of fraud, the difficult aspects of the job, tracing people who have disappeared, the reasons people disappear, training for the job as a member of the police, cooperation with the police force, the line between police and private investigation work, kidnappings, getting involved in situations outside of Jersey-has an office in London and travelling across the world to carry out investigations. Margaret Jenkins talking about the sense of smell. John Bouchere talking about Jersey and the Royal Mail including details of the Channel Islands, the transport of mail by aeroplanes and mail boats, the signalling of the arrival of the mail boat in former days, the transport of the mail by horse drawn car by Mr Le Couteur, the maintenance of the mail carts, the first real mail van in 1929, carrying the mail to Gorey Village, 1933 saw mail coming by air with the aeroplanes landing on West Park beach, Jersey Airport built in 1937 and a daily service was inaugurated, 1940-arrival of the occupation and the air force raids and the stopping of post between the UK and Jersey, use of bicycles instead of the vans, a telegraph messenger, Eric Hassall was sent to College House and received salutes as he was in uniform, Len Godel-collided with a sand laden german lorry and was charged with sabotage but was released, sometimes the bags of mail from Guernsey were opened for investigation, postal services resumed after the occupation, wide variety of mail received by farmers and the difficulty of finding different addresses in Jersey and driving in the country lanes. Beth Lloyd giving In Touch tips for the blind. End of Side One. Composition called 'Dead in Tune' written for narrator and orchestra and recorded by Channel Television featuring the Jersey Youth Orchestra and Alastair Layzell. End of Side Two.

Reference: R/05/B/63

Date: March 31st 1982 - March 31st 1982

Jersey Talking Magazine-Christmas Edition. Introduction by Gordon Young with christmas carols throughout by St John's Church Choir and Les Conteurs Singers. Poem by Gladys Rogers. Jennifer Grundy at the Met Office being interviewed, talking about what happens over christmas, the number of people on duty for shifts and keeping busy with different duties including weather forecasts. Mr Wileman, the general manager of the L'Horizon Hotel, talking about the hotel over christmas, who stays over Christmas, people going swimming in the sea, Christmas trees in the hotel, guests getting Christmas presents for christmas, going to de Gruchy after it is closed and choosing the presents and staff wrap the presents at a christmas party. David Killip at La Collette Power Station who is in charge on Christmas day describing what he has to do on christmas day, when it will be at is busiest, the number of staff in on christmas day and if there were any power cuts in the past on Christmas day. BBC Radio Jersey producer Peter Gore talking about what will be happening on the station on Christmas day-a Christmas morning programme, messages from the bailiff, the dean and the lieutenant governor on the show, getting in at 6.30, how he is spending the rest of the day and his favourite Christmas record. Quentin Bloxham, curator of reptiles at Jersey Zoo talking about what they do on Christmas day, amusing experiences on Christmas day-pythons go into the public area and his favourite Christmas carol. David Guy-Station Officer with the States of Jersey Ambulance Service-talking about working on christmas day, the staff working at the station on Christmas day, the duties carried out-checking the equipment and vehicles, having breakfast and waiting for call outs. Poem by Colin Plummer read by Pat Dubras. Beth Lloyd interviewing Joan Le Miere, at the telephone exchange, talking about the change in the telephone system, previous years when people had to book times to have a telephone call, if people are more patient on Christmas day, the number of people working on Christmas day and looking after the Christmas day. Gordon Young talking about cooking Christmas dinner. End of Side One. General Sir Peter Whiteley, lieutenant governor, with a Christmas message for the readers of the Jersey Talking Magazine. Harbour Master, Captain Bullen talking about the harbour on Christmas day, the number of people on duty including Jersey Radio, the people at the pierhead, the marina staff, the staff at Fort Regent and the police. The Islander magazine-an article written by Sonia Hillsdon called 'Christmas Past' about christmas in Jersey in previous years. Living in Jersey in past-second half of the 16th Century-islanders were not encouraged to celebrate Christmas because of Ccalvinism-worked as a normal day. 1726 a dead whale was washed up at La Pulec, St Ouen-77 foot long-declared as his by the of Seigneur of Vinchelez de Bas-two jaw bones of the whale was attached to his manor house. 1790-theatre-magic lantern show-shown by Mr Belon from France. 1799-over 6000 Russian soldiers-found all over the island-allies against the French. 19th Century-Christmas came into own-1834-a whole week of Christmas and merry making-Christmas dinner followed by cards. Used to ring the Christmas bells from midday Christmas night to midnight on Christmas day-in St Mary it got out of hand-in the 1850s Reverend Le Couteur Balleine tried to put a stop to it. In 1858 he removed the bell clapper, bell rope and the ladder to the bells and changed the locks on the church doors. A hand bell was circulated-while the door was being kicked in they got replacements for the rope clappers and managed to get in. There was no support from the parish assembly for the rector. Trevor Barette, dairy farmer of St Mary, talking about his Christmas day-milking, feeding, cleaning the cows, the cows going outside, a few hours off and then the feeding and milking the cows again and amusing experiences at Christmas. Tug Wilson, a fireman, talking about the hours he will be working on Christmas day, the duties on Christmas day and emergencies on past Christmases. Alan, a taxi driver, talking about what he does on Christmas day. Chris, an air traffic controller, talking about what he may be doing on Christmas day, being on call and trying to close the Jersey Airport. Sister Moulin, a nurse at the Jersey Maternity Hospital, talking about what she does on Christmas day, mothers, former staff and doctors bring their Christmas babies back, whether people like having Christmas babies, a special crib for a Christmas baby and a favourite Christmas carol. Michel Le Troqueur, a policeman, talking about being on duty over christmas, how he celebrates Christmas, crime over Christmas and a relaxed attitude over Christmas. End of Side Two.

Reference: R/05/B/68

Date: December 25th 1982 - December 25th 1982

Jersey Talking Magazine-October 1983. Introduction by Gordon Young. Beth Lloyd went to the Jersey Airport the day before the Battle of Britain air display to talk to some of the pilots of the aeroplanes. Tony Hogg talks about what he is doing with his helicopter in the display and how the weather will affect the display. The sound of the red arrows and talking to John Blackwell of the Red Arrows about what they will be doing in the air display, when they have time to come up with new displays, the difficulty of thinking up new ideas, how long the team are together-three pilots being changed each year. Flight Lieutenant Rick Watts, the training pilot for the VIP Andover talking about why he is in Jersey for the air display, what he will be doing in the air display, which VIPs are flown around and whether he has been to Jersey before. Chris Topham talking about his solo aerobatics display, winning the Aerobatics Trophy, what is in the display, how he feels when he is taking part in the display, if her feels scared before take off, what he is doing next in his RAF career, taking part in the Krypton Factor on television. Dave Morgan, the pilot of the sea harrier, talking about why a RAF pilot is flying a royal navy plane, being awarded the distinguished service cross for his courage in the Falklands War, being featured on British Heart Foundation advertisements because of his success after being born with a hole in his heart, what he is going to be doing in the display and what he thinks of the sea harrier. Gordon Young interviewing Leonard Cheshire who saw the dropping of the atom bomb and as a result decided to set up the Cheshire Home Foundation for disabled people. Talks about how many Homes have been opened, what started the idea to set up the Cheshire Homes, the help that he gets from local people-voluntary help, whether the Homes will continue to grow, trying to help the process of disabled people living at home and moving out into the community-independent living, the need for residential living and what happens when the Home becomes full-the ideas for extension. Margaret Jenkins with a descriptive piece about autumn. End of Side One. Norah Bryan talking to Mrs Palmer and Janey her daughter, Australians who own a large sheep farm, about the problem of having no rain for four years, living between Sydney and Brisbane in Australia, owning 4000 acres of land and 10,000 sheep, a creek that runs through the land, how the sheep get water, feeding the sheep, how people who don't have water cope with animals on the land, how they manage to fertilise the land-using an aeroplane, going up in the plane to see what the land looks like. Janey talking about flying a plane, shearing the sheep, tar used to stop cuts caused by shearing, how the shearing is organised, when the sheep are sold, keeping track of the sheep and the sheep in Jersey. Beth Lloyd interviewing Harry Hurst, a hypno and psycho therapist who has published a book about reincarnation called 'The Thousand Year Memory', talking about what persuaded him to write the book, the idea of people regressing into past lives, choosing five subjects and his findings from the tests, how far back people regressed, what makes him believe that they are regressing to a previous life and his belief in reincarnation. Joan Stevens talking about early local doctors in the 1800s. Dr George Symes Hooper-equivalent of the Medical Officer of Health nowadays-in charge whilst the cholera epidemic of 1832 took place. Through him and his account we know about the epidemic-we know less about the cholera epidemics of the 1860s. Cholera epidemics-people did now know what caused it-Dr Hooper realised it was down to bad drains, poverty, hunger and drunkenness. He concluded that it was introduced via St Malo and was made worse by a prolonged drought before it came about. Thought there was more drunkenness in Jersey than anywhere else in the world. Plans for drainage in St Helier-in discussion-after outbreak urged authorities forward. The outbreak was partly caused by the lie of the land-lower parts of land getting all of the drainage from all parts of the land. Outbreak started in Cabot's Yard, Sand Street. It was so bad town was divided into 12 districts with different doctors for each, all markets were closed and traffic between St Aubin and St Helier was reduced to a minimum. Cases where population dense were hit worst-St Mary and St Aubin escaped from disease. It was a mystery how St Aubin escaped-speculation that it was because it was richer, thriving and there were less people. Bad outbreaks-south and east of town, St Saviour, St Clement and Grouville-built up areas. North of island almost escaped. 341 fatalities out of 806 case of a population of 36,000-high incidence of deaths. According to the diaries of Sir John Le Couteur he believed the prime cause was the bad water where some of the privies drained. 1849-300 died and 1867 another outbreak-improvements in drainage didn't come immediately-improved after 1867. 1849 epidemic-an entry in a diary of people contracting cholera but not dying displays that not everybody died. Dr Joe Dixon-rhyme written about him. Treatment in 1851 recorded in the diaries of Sir John Le Couteur. He had to get from First Tower to Millbrook with his troops for a militia inspection. At Mont Félard Sir John Le Couteur got kicked by a horse in his ankle but carried on with his review of the militia. When he got home Dr Dixon was called-gave 12 leaches and a purge to the ankle, linseed poultices were put on but the wound went septic. He went to a doctor in England-Dr Brody told him to put on lead ointment and keep living well. Joan Stevens comments that treatments have improved a great deal today. End of Side Two.

Reference: R/05/B/70

Date: September 30th 1983 - September 30th 1983

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