Jersey Talking Magazine-September 1977 Edition. Introduction by Gordon Young. Pharmacy feature-Molly Perchard-talking about the history of pharmacy. Cooking feature-Margaret Jenkins talking about the use of spices. Gardening feature-Jack Douglas and Alf Ippititimus giving hints on fig trees and summer colds. Nature feature-Frances Le Sueur talking about eating seaweed, using vraic as fertilizers and different kinds of seaweed. Island Administrators-Graeme Pitman interviewing Senator Bill Morvan, Head of the Harbours and Airport Committee about the attractions of the job, the challenges faced by the committee at the airport and harbour, the Jersey Airport as a trading area-self-sufficiency from the tax payer, what happens with the profit from the Airport, the new marina being built, where the money is coming from, charges and the price of air fares. Hint for the blind from Jim Lamy about the use of the telephone. Gordon Young ends the side with a humorous story. End of Side One. Reading from a poem by Reg Grandin on the occupation. Interview with Alan Whicker about his reasons for getting into journalism, his career, getting into television and travel broadcasts, becoming famous, his interviewing style, people he has interviewed, evocative smells, tastes and sounds he has experienced, his interest in the flora and fauna of Jersey and his choice to live in Jersey. Eileen Le Sueur telling a humorous Jersey story in Jersey French.

Reference: R/05/B/11

Date: August 31st 1977 - August 31st 1977

Jersey Talking Magazine-August 1978 Edition. Introduction by Gordon Young. Cooking feature-Margaret Jenkins talking about salads. Local stories feature-Roy Fauvel talking about the custom of the clameur de haro and the history behind it. Nature feature-Frances Le Sueur talking about nightingales including examples of birdsong. Jèrriais feature-Eileen Le Sueur telling a story in Jersey french about how she took her cow to the show. Edgar Fryat reading from Braille a piece about a concert pianist. Ernie Benham, an english reader, telling a humorous story about lawn mowing. End of Side One. Phil Gurdon talking to Jack Herbert about aviation in Jersey before they built the airport, flying from the beach, different airlines that flew to the island, the creation of the Jersey Airways service, the problems with landing on the beach, the weather reports for the aeroplanes, fares and looking for places to build the airport. Humorous story about lawn mowing from Gordon Young. Norah Bryan talking to Lady Guthrie about the gardens at the zoo. Mark, 6½, reading a poem.

Reference: R/05/B/22

Date: July 31st 1978 - July 31st 1978

Jersey Talking Magazine-August Edition. Introduction by Gordon Young. Mark Higgins, a member of St Paul's Cathedral Choir School, who is singing at the royal wedding of Prince Charles and Princess Diana, sings 'I Know that My Redeemer' and talking about how he got into the school, the levels he had to achieve in order to be accepted, how long he spends singing, the amount of boys in the school, the different time he has his holidays, preparing for the royal wedding, the songs they are going to sing at the royal wedding, whether he feels nervous about performing in front of so many people, the other occasions they sing for at the Cathedral, singing outside the Cathedral, making recordings, meeting the Queen Mother and other members of the royal family and sings another song. Norah talking to Jeremy Scriven, a Jersey boy who left the island to climb Mount Kilimanjaro in Tanzania talking about how he decided to climb the mountain, his lack of regrets of going, getting to Tanzania and the difficulty in doing so because the border of Kenya and Tanzania was closed, being arrested for crossing the border into Tanzania without realising and being put into prison for four days, the conditions in the prison, being tried in the court, being allowed free and then expelled into Kenya, managed to go through Uganda in order to get to Tanzania, buying tickets to Kilimanjaro on the black market, encountering violence in Kampala, journeying and climbing Mount Kilimanjaro, spending 4 days climbing, a member of the party suffering altitude sickness, the experience of climbing the mountain, the view from the top of the mountain and how he felt climbing down again. Katina Hervau, a french girl in the island to learn the language, talking about her first impressions of Jersey roads and the island. Horoscope Feature-Diane Postlethwaite talking about the forecast for the year for leo. June Gurdon giving some In Touch tips for the blind about cooking vegetables without water. End of Side One. Gordon Young taking a trip in a hot air balloon describing the balloon, getting into the balloon, taking off, describing the views of Jersey below including town, St Helier Harbour, Elizabeth Castle, Victoria Avenue, St Aubin's Bay, Noirmont and to the Jersey Airport to land. Gordon Young at Government House for a ball for the Royal National Lifeboat Institution describing the gardens of Government House, the food for the occasion, the scene in the marquees, the scene inside Government House. Talking to Sir Peter Whiteley about piloting in the hot air balloon and the ball for the RNLI and to Lady Whiteley about the weather and the amount of people attending the ball. Listening to the band in the marquee. End of Side Two.

Reference: R/05/B/57

Date: July 31st 1981 - July 31st 1981

Jersey Talking Magazine-April 1977 [March not recorded]. Introduction by Gordon Young and explanation for the reason that there was no March edition. Gardening Feature-walking around the garden and looking at the various vegetables, fruit and flowers that have began sprouting in springtime and in the greenhouse. Nature Feature-Frances Le Sueur discussing the chiff-chaff with an example of its bird song. The history of medicine-a doctor discussing the early history of medicine and the Hippocratic Oath. Cooking Feature-Margaret Jenkins giving a recipe for the making of bread. Island Administrators-Graham Pitman interviewing the Constable of St Helier, Peter Baker-talks about the history and role of the constable, the administration over which he presides, the work of the office and his role in the States of Jersey. Gordon Young talks about Reg Grandin, his experience during the occupation and his writing of the book 'Smiling Through' followed by a reader Mrs Renouf singing the song 'Smiling Through'. End of Side One. Acting out of a German pilot going over the Channel Islands on the 30th June 1940-1st July 1940 on an air reconnaissance and landing at the Jersey Airport linking in to a poem by Reg Grandin read by June Gurdon. Beth Lloyd talking to 17 year old Sarah Patterson, daughter of novelist Harry Patterson, regarding a novel she wrote on the second world war. Talks about whether she always wanted to be a writer, her father's influence, her book about the second world war, the research for her book, her next project and moving to Jersey with her family. The Market in St Helier that was built thanks to a lottery. Di Weber looks around the market talking about the history of markets in Jersey, the building of the markets, the centrepiece of the market, the market during the occupation, the market in 1977, a tour of the market starting in Market Street with a description of the building, stalls and things being sold including flowers, fruit and vegetables, meat, talks to the butcher about his job, talks to Mr Farley about the shop Red Triangle and leaving by Hilgrove Street. Gordon Young tells a humorous story about the market.

Reference: R/05/B/6

Date: March 31st 1977 - March 31st 1977

Jersey Talking Magazine-December Edition. Introduction by Gordon Young. Joan Stevens taking a tour of St Peter talking about the size of the parish with the sea on two sides, St Peter's Church which is mentioned in records before 1066, in 1053 it is referred to as St Pierre don la dessert because of the exposed sandy soil. Where Jersey Airport is now used to be rich corn land with massive harvests. Down near St Ouen the sand dunes are with diverse wildlife-Les Mielles is being preserved as a result. St Peter's Church-tallest spire in the island and has been hit by lightning at least 3 time, it dates from 1400s and there are some initials on some of the stones. In the church an incised tombstone has been built into the wall-marks of a blacksmiths grave. Over 100 years ago the church was too small for congregation-an extra knave was built as a result of the garrison being stationed at St Peter's Barracks. Barracks built in 1811 until 1927-they were removed to make way for Airport. Bell in church has a name incised on it, a piscina in the church was found in Les Bois when it was knocked down and was installed in church. A priory in St Peter was on land called La Flocquetterie-now Philadelphie Chapel stands on it. On the corner by Oak Walk there was a leper house. St Anastase-in Coin Varin-was a school house which was founded in 1496. Children attended from 6am-6pm and had lessons in latin and were taught latin, the classics and divinity. La Hague Manor-now changed to school, the colombiers was changed into the school library. The house itself was built in 1634, rebuilt in 1733 and in 1871 by Colonel Le Cornu. St Peter's House-originally home of Robin Family-burnt in 1754 and rebuilt-greatly altered since-used to be home of Sir William Venables Vernon-bailiff. The Rectory-moved 3 times in the parish-used to be next to La Hague Manor then moved nearer church to north of La Flocquetterie-1800s and then moved beside there and then modern rectory moved close by church. Mills-more mills than every other parish-Quetteville has been restored by the National Trust for Jersey-working mill, Tostain Mill-did belong to a lame priest. St Peter had a windmill in 1837-turned into restaurant. Parish gun-1551 at Beaumont Hill-all parishes had guns-only one that survived-made by John Owen and inscribed, in 1839-Sir John le Couteur found it in England and returned it to the parish. St Ouen's Bay-a great deal of it in St Peter-famous battle-commonwealth defeated royalists during civil war-Sir George Carteret defeated by Admiral Blake-Carteret fled to Elizabeth Castle. Jersey Airport-started 1937-extensions since. Germans dug into St Peter almost more than any other parish-headquarters at Panigo [?]-underground constructions and strongpoints in the parish. Beautiful houses in St Peter. St Peter's Valley-crowning glory of parish-Queen Victoria-visit in 1859 taken by Sir John Le Couteur for a drive there. Rachel Pirouet singing a song that she sang in the Jersey Eisteddfod followed by the presentation of the John Lobb memorial goblet to the Jersey Eisteddfod. Phil Gurdon talks to Beryl Jordan about how the Jersey Eisteddfod was going, the judge of the competition, the number of people who had entered, no class for the Jersey Norman French, how long the Eisteddfod had been going in Jersey and when they start preparing for the next years competition. Pat Dubras and Brian Le Breton singing a duet from the play 'Free as Air' performed at the Jersey Opera House. Beth Lloyd paying tribute to David Scott-Blackwell who used to present In Touch tips for the blind including quotations fro his poetry. End of Side One. Chris and David at a steam fair in Trinity in the sheds of Lyndon Charles Pallot with a steam engine threshing corn describing the scene and how the engine and the threshing machine works, what the engine is used for, looking at the steam machines in the shed, hand threshing being shown and the man being interviewed [with a Jersey accent] about the process, the threshing machine, when it would have been last used and a corn measure. A man being interviewed about bread being made and the process involved, cabbage loaves and how they are made. Description of a petrol engine and a smaller threshing machine with the noise of the machine and interviews about the machine including with Jim Purvis, description of a tractor, interview about a machine that rolls oats for the horses. Describing model steam engines made by Harold Taylor of St Ouen with the noise of the engines. Mr Pallot talking about the different machines that he owns, working with them and the steam fair. Description of different engines on display. Cynthia Reed interviewing Robert Farnon, a composer and arranger who lives in Guernsey, asking whether he came from a musical family, what musical instruments he played when he was young, having professional training, when he wrote his first piece of music, his first job in the professional world-playing in his brother's band, how he starts composing music, conducting, when he moved to Guernsey, his favourite piece of music he wrote, how much he enjoys arranging music, the music he listens to, his favourite artist to work with -Tony Bennett and what he is doing next in his career. James Clayton reading a story about 'Dinah-the Dog with a Difference'. End of Side Two.

Reference: R/05/B/60

Date: November 30th 1981 - November 30th 1981

Jersey Talking Magazine-April Edition. Introduction by Gordon Young. Philip Gurdon interviewing David Watkins, a private investigator, talking about whether there was any need for a private investigator in Jersey, finding evidence of fraud, the difficult aspects of the job, tracing people who have disappeared, the reasons people disappear, training for the job as a member of the police, cooperation with the police force, the line between police and private investigation work, kidnappings, getting involved in situations outside of Jersey-has an office in London and travelling across the world to carry out investigations. Margaret Jenkins talking about the sense of smell. John Bouchere talking about Jersey and the Royal Mail including details of the Channel Islands, the transport of mail by aeroplanes and mail boats, the signalling of the arrival of the mail boat in former days, the transport of the mail by horse drawn car by Mr Le Couteur, the maintenance of the mail carts, the first real mail van in 1929, carrying the mail to Gorey Village, 1933 saw mail coming by air with the aeroplanes landing on West Park beach, Jersey Airport built in 1937 and a daily service was inaugurated, 1940-arrival of the occupation and the air force raids and the stopping of post between the UK and Jersey, use of bicycles instead of the vans, a telegraph messenger, Eric Hassall was sent to College House and received salutes as he was in uniform, Len Godel-collided with a sand laden german lorry and was charged with sabotage but was released, sometimes the bags of mail from Guernsey were opened for investigation, postal services resumed after the occupation, wide variety of mail received by farmers and the difficulty of finding different addresses in Jersey and driving in the country lanes. Beth Lloyd giving In Touch tips for the blind. End of Side One. Composition called 'Dead in Tune' written for narrator and orchestra and recorded by Channel Television featuring the Jersey Youth Orchestra and Alastair Layzell. End of Side Two.

Reference: R/05/B/63

Date: March 31st 1982 - March 31st 1982

Jersey Talking Magazine-Christmas Edition. Introduction by Gordon Young with christmas carols throughout by St John's Church Choir and Les Conteurs Singers. Poem by Gladys Rogers. Jennifer Grundy at the Met Office being interviewed, talking about what happens over christmas, the number of people on duty for shifts and keeping busy with different duties including weather forecasts. Mr Wileman, the general manager of the L'Horizon Hotel, talking about the hotel over christmas, who stays over Christmas, people going swimming in the sea, Christmas trees in the hotel, guests getting Christmas presents for christmas, going to de Gruchy after it is closed and choosing the presents and staff wrap the presents at a christmas party. David Killip at La Collette Power Station who is in charge on Christmas day describing what he has to do on christmas day, when it will be at is busiest, the number of staff in on christmas day and if there were any power cuts in the past on Christmas day. BBC Radio Jersey producer Peter Gore talking about what will be happening on the station on Christmas day-a Christmas morning programme, messages from the bailiff, the dean and the lieutenant governor on the show, getting in at 6.30, how he is spending the rest of the day and his favourite Christmas record. Quentin Bloxham, curator of reptiles at Jersey Zoo talking about what they do on Christmas day, amusing experiences on Christmas day-pythons go into the public area and his favourite Christmas carol. David Guy-Station Officer with the States of Jersey Ambulance Service-talking about working on christmas day, the staff working at the station on Christmas day, the duties carried out-checking the equipment and vehicles, having breakfast and waiting for call outs. Poem by Colin Plummer read by Pat Dubras. Beth Lloyd interviewing Joan Le Miere, at the telephone exchange, talking about the change in the telephone system, previous years when people had to book times to have a telephone call, if people are more patient on Christmas day, the number of people working on Christmas day and looking after the Christmas day. Gordon Young talking about cooking Christmas dinner. End of Side One. General Sir Peter Whiteley, lieutenant governor, with a Christmas message for the readers of the Jersey Talking Magazine. Harbour Master, Captain Bullen talking about the harbour on Christmas day, the number of people on duty including Jersey Radio, the people at the pierhead, the marina staff, the staff at Fort Regent and the police. The Islander magazine-an article written by Sonia Hillsdon called 'Christmas Past' about christmas in Jersey in previous years. Living in Jersey in past-second half of the 16th Century-islanders were not encouraged to celebrate Christmas because of Ccalvinism-worked as a normal day. 1726 a dead whale was washed up at La Pulec, St Ouen-77 foot long-declared as his by the of Seigneur of Vinchelez de Bas-two jaw bones of the whale was attached to his manor house. 1790-theatre-magic lantern show-shown by Mr Belon from France. 1799-over 6000 Russian soldiers-found all over the island-allies against the French. 19th Century-Christmas came into own-1834-a whole week of Christmas and merry making-Christmas dinner followed by cards. Used to ring the Christmas bells from midday Christmas night to midnight on Christmas day-in St Mary it got out of hand-in the 1850s Reverend Le Couteur Balleine tried to put a stop to it. In 1858 he removed the bell clapper, bell rope and the ladder to the bells and changed the locks on the church doors. A hand bell was circulated-while the door was being kicked in they got replacements for the rope clappers and managed to get in. There was no support from the parish assembly for the rector. Trevor Barette, dairy farmer of St Mary, talking about his Christmas day-milking, feeding, cleaning the cows, the cows going outside, a few hours off and then the feeding and milking the cows again and amusing experiences at Christmas. Tug Wilson, a fireman, talking about the hours he will be working on Christmas day, the duties on Christmas day and emergencies on past Christmases. Alan, a taxi driver, talking about what he does on Christmas day. Chris, an air traffic controller, talking about what he may be doing on Christmas day, being on call and trying to close the Jersey Airport. Sister Moulin, a nurse at the Jersey Maternity Hospital, talking about what she does on Christmas day, mothers, former staff and doctors bring their Christmas babies back, whether people like having Christmas babies, a special crib for a Christmas baby and a favourite Christmas carol. Michel Le Troqueur, a policeman, talking about being on duty over christmas, how he celebrates Christmas, crime over Christmas and a relaxed attitude over Christmas. End of Side Two.

Reference: R/05/B/68

Date: December 25th 1982 - December 25th 1982

Jersey Talking Magazine-October 1983. Introduction by Gordon Young. Beth Lloyd went to the Jersey Airport the day before the Battle of Britain air display to talk to some of the pilots of the aeroplanes. Tony Hogg talks about what he is doing with his helicopter in the display and how the weather will affect the display. The sound of the red arrows and talking to John Blackwell of the Red Arrows about what they will be doing in the air display, when they have time to come up with new displays, the difficulty of thinking up new ideas, how long the team are together-three pilots being changed each year. Flight Lieutenant Rick Watts, the training pilot for the VIP Andover talking about why he is in Jersey for the air display, what he will be doing in the air display, which VIPs are flown around and whether he has been to Jersey before. Chris Topham talking about his solo aerobatics display, winning the Aerobatics Trophy, what is in the display, how he feels when he is taking part in the display, if her feels scared before take off, what he is doing next in his RAF career, taking part in the Krypton Factor on television. Dave Morgan, the pilot of the sea harrier, talking about why a RAF pilot is flying a royal navy plane, being awarded the distinguished service cross for his courage in the Falklands War, being featured on British Heart Foundation advertisements because of his success after being born with a hole in his heart, what he is going to be doing in the display and what he thinks of the sea harrier. Gordon Young interviewing Leonard Cheshire who saw the dropping of the atom bomb and as a result decided to set up the Cheshire Home Foundation for disabled people. Talks about how many Homes have been opened, what started the idea to set up the Cheshire Homes, the help that he gets from local people-voluntary help, whether the Homes will continue to grow, trying to help the process of disabled people living at home and moving out into the community-independent living, the need for residential living and what happens when the Home becomes full-the ideas for extension. Margaret Jenkins with a descriptive piece about autumn. End of Side One. Norah Bryan talking to Mrs Palmer and Janey her daughter, Australians who own a large sheep farm, about the problem of having no rain for four years, living between Sydney and Brisbane in Australia, owning 4000 acres of land and 10,000 sheep, a creek that runs through the land, how the sheep get water, feeding the sheep, how people who don't have water cope with animals on the land, how they manage to fertilise the land-using an aeroplane, going up in the plane to see what the land looks like. Janey talking about flying a plane, shearing the sheep, tar used to stop cuts caused by shearing, how the shearing is organised, when the sheep are sold, keeping track of the sheep and the sheep in Jersey. Beth Lloyd interviewing Harry Hurst, a hypno and psycho therapist who has published a book about reincarnation called 'The Thousand Year Memory', talking about what persuaded him to write the book, the idea of people regressing into past lives, choosing five subjects and his findings from the tests, how far back people regressed, what makes him believe that they are regressing to a previous life and his belief in reincarnation. Joan Stevens talking about early local doctors in the 1800s. Dr George Symes Hooper-equivalent of the Medical Officer of Health nowadays-in charge whilst the cholera epidemic of 1832 took place. Through him and his account we know about the epidemic-we know less about the cholera epidemics of the 1860s. Cholera epidemics-people did now know what caused it-Dr Hooper realised it was down to bad drains, poverty, hunger and drunkenness. He concluded that it was introduced via St Malo and was made worse by a prolonged drought before it came about. Thought there was more drunkenness in Jersey than anywhere else in the world. Plans for drainage in St Helier-in discussion-after outbreak urged authorities forward. The outbreak was partly caused by the lie of the land-lower parts of land getting all of the drainage from all parts of the land. Outbreak started in Cabot's Yard, Sand Street. It was so bad town was divided into 12 districts with different doctors for each, all markets were closed and traffic between St Aubin and St Helier was reduced to a minimum. Cases where population dense were hit worst-St Mary and St Aubin escaped from disease. It was a mystery how St Aubin escaped-speculation that it was because it was richer, thriving and there were less people. Bad outbreaks-south and east of town, St Saviour, St Clement and Grouville-built up areas. North of island almost escaped. 341 fatalities out of 806 case of a population of 36,000-high incidence of deaths. According to the diaries of Sir John Le Couteur he believed the prime cause was the bad water where some of the privies drained. 1849-300 died and 1867 another outbreak-improvements in drainage didn't come immediately-improved after 1867. 1849 epidemic-an entry in a diary of people contracting cholera but not dying displays that not everybody died. Dr Joe Dixon-rhyme written about him. Treatment in 1851 recorded in the diaries of Sir John Le Couteur. He had to get from First Tower to Millbrook with his troops for a militia inspection. At Mont Félard Sir John Le Couteur got kicked by a horse in his ankle but carried on with his review of the militia. When he got home Dr Dixon was called-gave 12 leaches and a purge to the ankle, linseed poultices were put on but the wound went septic. He went to a doctor in England-Dr Brody told him to put on lead ointment and keep living well. Joan Stevens comments that treatments have improved a great deal today. End of Side Two.

Reference: R/05/B/70

Date: September 30th 1983 - September 30th 1983

Jersey Talking Magazine-Christmas 1983. Introduction by Gordon Young with christmas carols sung throughout by the Jersey Festival Choir and their Junior Singers and Les Conteurs Singers. Gordon Young describing various christmas lights around Jersey including Bouley Bay, Charing Cross. Beth Lloyd reading a poem by Colin Plummer called 'Christmas Tree'. Gordon Young with a description of the christmas lights in the Childrens Ward at the Jersey General Hospital. Edgar Fryatt talking about previous christmases that he has experienced. Gordon Young describing christmas lights in an electrical shop and the entrance of Trinity Church. End of Side One. A Jersey version of 'The 12 days of Christmas' sung by the Home Chase Choir. Gordon Young describing the christmas lights at the Trinity Arms public house and the Jersey Airport. Margaret Jenkins talking about the origin of father christmas and reading 'The Night before Christmas' by Clement Clarke Moore. Gordon Young describing the light of the moon in Bouley Bay and the christmas lights in St Helier looking from Fort Regent. End of Side Two.

Reference: R/05/B/72

Date: December 25th 1983 - December 25th 1983

BBC Radio Jersey-Occupation Tapes. Told by the people who lived through it produced by Beth Lloyd. 1) Part 1: Preparing for the Inevitable. Alexander Coutanche talking about the surprise in the island when it was realised the island was not going to be defended and the evacuation was offered to the public. Eye witnesses talking about the panic of evacuation and the dilemma of whether to go or not, queuing to register, worry that the island was to be occupied, putting down of pets, Lord Coutanche being told to stay at his post and simplify the machinery of government, the potential blowing up of public utilities and the air raid on the island. 2) Part 2: The Germans Arrive. Eye witness accounts on seeing German planes flying low over the island and landing at the airport to begin the occupation, sending a message to the bailiff at the airport, meeting the germans for the first time, putting out white flags, demanding surrender, handing over the island, removal of the Union Jack from Fort Regent, BBC radio report on the start of the occupation, first impressions of the soldiers, germans buying food from the shops and the beginning of the paper war. 3) Part 3: Curbs on personal freedom. German orders being read out. Eye witnesses remember the losing of freedom, restrictions on vehicles, use of money paid for comandeered goods on essential supplies from France, orders against the use of coastal areas, changing side of the road to drive on, introduction and the experience of the curfew, life at the Evening Post, permits and other regulations. 4) Part 4: Food or the Lack of It. Poem on hunger. Eye witnesses talking about difficulty of lack of food and the improvisations with food, difficulty of feeding baby, difference between town and country people, suffering of women from malnutrition, children not knowing what food looked like, what people did to get by, food as subject of discussion, problem of lack of sugar and salt, use of potato flour, eating of seaweed, different methods of cooking and fuel, soup kitchens, bartering, farmers trying to get extra meat, getting extra eggs from chickens and keeping rabbits 5) Part 5: The wireless-Jersey's link with the outside world. Report by the BBC. Michael Ginns talking about eventual confiscation of radios. Eye witness accounts of v-signs at Rouge Bouillon, patrolling of district by islanders, confiscation and storage of radios, taking of radios from the parish hall, keeping of radios on threat of death, use of crystal radios sets, listening to the news, spreading of newsheets, the threat of being caught with radios and listening to tunes that had not been heard before the occupation 6) Part 6: Through the Eyes of a Child. Eye witness accounts of children and teenagers suffering a great deal, the fun children had, being hungry and cold, being without parents, relationships with german soldiers, schools continuing, difficulty of shortages of uniform, german lessons, soup kitchens, drilling on Victoria College playing fields, playing of sports, the Caerarean Tennis Club, riding on the german railway, mischief children got up to and scavenging for supplies.

Reference: R/06/2

1) Programme about the Liberation of the Channel Islands traced through the archives of the BBC. Winston Churchill's speech on Victory in Europe and the liberation of the island. Douglas Willis, a BBC correspondent, who sailed with the liberating forces into the harbour in HMS Beagle and HMS Bulldog-comments on the arrival into the harbour in Guernsey-arrived in the afternoon but a German officer, Captain Zimmerman arrived who didn't have the power to sign the surrender. Zimmerman was told to withdraw with a copy of the surrender in german and english-he told the British forces that if they kept the ship there that it would be considered a hostile action. HMS Beagle and Bulldog withdrew until they were called to a rendez-vous at midnight so that Major General Heine could sign the surrender. For the first time in 6 years HMS Bulldog is lit up. Heine came out in a ship but did not leave in order to board the HMS Bulldog-the commander of the HMS Bulldog started to get impatient-they turned on the searchlight-the boat arrived after 10 minutes. Commentates on Major General Heine getting on the ship and going to sign the surrender-recording of the surrender. At 6.30 on May 9th Douglas Willis sent another report from HMS Bulldog commentating on the surrender of the german commander in chief and his garrison-waiting for more than 5½ hours-moved towards Guernsey. Recording of British soldier demanding the signing of the surrender. Report at 7.15 on May 9th by Douglas Willis on the surrender of the German forces. Brigadier Snow transferred to HMS Beagle to go to Jersey to receive the surrender of the German garrison-anchored off St Helier Harbour at 10am-Wolf was ordered to the ship but failed to appear immediately. Alexander Coutanche, the bailiff, explains that he was called to meet the German commander in order to accompany him to the boat. When he arrived he found Wulf had his staff officers with him and when he saw that he demanded that his officers came as well-they waited for him. The bailiff sent messages to both the King and Winston Churchill-on May 12th the King issued a royal proclamation about the freeing of the Channel Islands [which is read out]. On the 1 o'clock news on the 16th May it was reported that Herbert Morrison had a great reception on a visit to St Helier-the next day the shops were due to be filled with goods. In Guernsey Herbert Morrison talks about his visit to the Channel Islands. On the 5th June the bailiff spoke on radio-talks about the Jersey residents in the armed forces, his thanks towards the government in the UK, the force under Brigadier Snow and the Channel Islanders who were deported during the second world war and his wish to hurry their return to the island although warns that the islands may have changed from when they left them and he talks about the changes and difficulties that the island experienced during the occupation-the shortages, rationing, worsening conditions and the Red Cross. On the 7th June the royal visit of King George VI and Queen Elizabeth took place. BBC Correspondent Howard Marshall reporting about the King and Queen arriving at the States building and meeting the bailiff, the crowds in the Royal Square to see the royal visit, playing of the national anthem, going in and coming out of the States Building with a fanfare and the car being driven away. On christmas day 1945 Harold Le Druillenec, the only British survivor of Belsen, was chosen to introduce the King's message to the Commonwealth-talks about his experience in the concentration camp, the death of his sister and his survival, his life during the occupation in the Channel Islands and the freedom they now experience. 2) Tom Salmon interviewing Sir Alexander Coutanche. Talks about the office of bailiff and its 3 main functions-presiding in the court, presiding in the States and administrative work. Started as a member of the Bar during the first world war, came back to practice in Jersey in 1920 and soon after that he was elected as a deputy in St Helier. After 3 years he was appointed as the solicitor-general and then attorney-general and then bailiff. He is been a member of the States for 38 years in different capacities. Became the bailiff in 1935. When he became solicitor-general in 1925 he knew there needed to be a reorganisation of the public services-by 1935 the reorganisation had taken place. Saw the possibility of Jersey as a tourist destination-was interested in the building of the Airport and updating of the harbours. The increase in tourism meant a reorganisation in society in order to deal with visitors and hotel workers. Was responsible for the establishment of the first housing scheme. The arrival of the second world war-no one believed that there was going to be an occupation. The island was prepared to receive soldiers from St Malo as a defensive position-the Germans didn't go directly to St Malo and so the soldiers could get back to Britain safely. As a result the British troops were removed and the islands were left undefended-the Jersey people felt horror at this news. When the evacuation was completed he was ordered to take on the responsibilities of both bailiff and governor-a war time government was established to speed up the process. When the British troops left they offered to blow up the public utilities but he pointed out they'd be needed for the residents and so they decided to leave them as they were. On the day the German soldiers landed he was in his house in the morning and he received notice that papers had been dropped ordering the surrender of the island. He had told residents that when he could not guarantee their safety he would lower the flag from Fort Regent and that day he went to Fort Regent and lowered the flag. When at Fort Regent received a message saying the Germans had landed at the Jersey Airport-he went out there and the German officers explained that Jersey was occupied. The German officers were young airborne troops-later he came to the house and read proclamations. They enquired about supplies and when he told them of the stocks of food they didn't think rationing would be necessary as they were on their way to England. After the Battle of Britain he met the officer again who said he felt sorry for them as a paper war was about to begin-a large administration was then brought in. Jersey was lucky because the heads of the administration were gentlemen-he could deal with them. He was always convinced that Britain would win-never thought they'd be here for ever. As a representative of his people-he had to deal with the Germans-he had no means of letting the people know what and why he was doing things-could gain great advantages but people wouldn't know about it. Felt no moral qualms about the things they did because the one thing they wanted to do was make sure the people of the island survived. Felt lonely-his wife often felt worse. There was nothing anyone could do in terms of sabotage-punishments would follow like wirelesses were taken away. When they were taken away he didn't have a secret set but was kept up to date with news. The worst time was in 1942 when the deportations took place-wanted to resign but was persuaded to stay. The conditions after D-Day were terrible-had no gas, electricity, coal or bread or a lot of other things. Had soup rations given out. If you lived in the country you were better off than the town people. He was able to have a fire because of the trees in his garden and had candles so he was fortunate. Everybody lost weight-his wife lost a great deal. The Germans near the end changed the people in the high command-the head was an admiral who he never got on with. He was determined never to surrender-he only surrendered when he was ordered to do so-had to climb down. Addressed the people in the Royal Square-played Winston Churchill's speech over loudspeakers in the Square and celebrations took place but they were not liberated until the next day on his birthday, 9th May 1945. During the war he protested-that was all he could do. After the liberation the problems were getting people back to the island. The constitutional set up of the island were examined-were asked how to reform the States and Royal Court and most of these were approved. The great task was to put in place the political reforms-15 years later they were not quite put in place. Housing was a great problem at that time-people coming back. Proud of the changes since the war. End of Side One. 3) Deportee Bob Samson being interviewed about a society that was formed after a visit to Germany in 1971 with the aim to foster better relationships between Jersey and the German people. Was an internee for 3 years. He was born in Birmingham-he was the only one in his family born outside of the island. He wasn't badly treated. About 2000 people were sent out of the island in six weeks. Was given notice of a day that he was to be deported-he received it a week before he was 18. He was not worried about being sent to Germany but his mother and father were worried. They couldn't stop him being sent away. He looked after himself on the boat-he knew people on the boat from St Ouen. Deportee Maurice Hill being interviewed about being arrested in September 1942 after protesting against the deportation of English born people to Germany. Was one of 13 arrested outside of the Barra Hotel. Was sentenced in a German court for 4 months-it was reduced to a month and he was released after 3 weeks but in February 1943 he was sent to Laufen. He was sent to the local prison in Jersey and Laufen was an old castle. The guards were regular soldiers but they did have an SS search once for a radio. The head of Laufen offered to take it and return it after the SS search which they did. They were supposed to get the German front line soldier but they didn't have much. A couple of people attempted to escape including an ex island footballer Cyril Dale who left with a Guernsey boy, Bill Russell-got as far as Vienna before getting caught. Bill Russell escaped when in Yugoslavia and joined the partisans. Laufen was an all male camp, families went to Biberach originally and then most of them went to Wurzach. They had a football pitch for entertainment on a small island-if they misbehaved it would be closed. There was a concert hall, table tennis table. All the equipment came through the Red Cross-received red cross parcels. They were released on May 4th-were listening to the news and saw American troops and ran out-they didn't know their was an internment camp in the village. Got back to Jersey in September but some got back before that and some after. 4) Personal view of Michael Ginns, a founder of the Channel Islands Occupation Society (Jersey Branch), interviewed by Beth Lloyd. The CIOS was originally founded in Guernsey in 1966 and the Jersey branch was formed in 1971 for the purpose of reporting and collating all aspects of the occupation. Believes some bunkers should be preserved for posterity-one day the bunkers will be looked upon in the same way as the martello towers. The bunkers and constructions were mostly built to fortress standards-will last a long time. The Germans left the bunkers in working order-straight after the occupation people went to the bunkers and took souvenirs-when the British troops arrived they took out the hardware which was dumped in the sea. Each type of the smaller weapons were given to the States of Jersey but everything else was dumped into the sea. As the years went by the bunkers were used as rubbish tips and so in the early 1960s all bunkers on public land were sealed to the public. Some are now open because in 1976 he thought it would be a good idea to open the Noirmont Bunker to the public-wrote to the Public Works Committee and they told him that in the winter they would go and look at it to see its prospects. The committee was later taken over by Senator John Averty-he was keen to open it and allowed the CIOS to look after it. Since then they have given the responsibility for the associated observation tower nearby, the bunker at Corbière, La Carrière, St Brelade and the Gun Emplacement and Underground Bunkers at Les Landes, St Ouen. Have 170 local member in the CIOS of which a dozen are very active. Noirmont is open twice a month for visitors. First Record-A german march. He was 11 years old when the second world war started. He had just started at Victoria College in 1939. Life continued as normal at first but had to carry his gas mask. He enjoyed it as a boy-liked seeing aeroplanes fly overhead. Knew the Germans were coming-after the evacuation there was a calm. His father though of evacuating but never managed to leave. The Germans moved into Victoria College House. Carried on at school-it began at 10 o'clock. In 1941 Victoria College moved to Halkett Place as it was taken over by the Germans as a barracks. In 1941 a German schools inspector visited Victoria College. The first he knew of deportation was when he was visiting town with his mother and she was told by a friend that the deportations were to take place. They were fortunate because it was a Tuesday but they didn't leave until Friday-some had to leave within 24 hours. Had to send animals to the Animal Shelter to be put down. Had to report at Grouville Station where a bus was laid on to take them to St Helier. Had to report to the JMT Garage on the Esplanade-they were on the last bus and couldn't get on the ship. Went home-some went home to empty houses which had been looted by neighbours. When they came back 21 days later people held back and weren't deported-there was a minor deportation in February 1943. Second Record-Vera Lynn with 'The White Cliffs of Dover'. The journey from France to Germany has to be looked at in terms of the time. They were the only prisoners at the time being transported in second class railway carriages as opposed to good carriages. They got in to the train at St Malo-were warned to bring enough food for two days and were given some food by the German soldiers. Arrived at Biberach-they then walked up to the camp-it was a prisoner of war camp. Quickly organised themselves in the camp-Captain Hilton was appointed camp senior. Education was laid on for everyone in the first 6 weeks but during this time they were being sorted out. Single men over 16 went to Laufen, married couples with children went to Wurzach and single couples stayed in Biberach and were joined the Guernsey deportees who were following. The rations from the Germans left you hungry but not starving but without the red cross parcels they would have been in trouble. He preferred Wurzach where he moved to-everything was under one roof. Life for a teenage boy-there were football matches, stage shows. It was difficult for a parent with a young family and older people. His mother was matron of the camp hospital-she was asked by Dr Oliver who went with them. Mrs Hutton was the first matron of the hospital but she died in 1943 and his mother took over. His father was ill and spent time in hospital-he was repatriated in September 1943 because of ill health. He was the only child-was in a room with 20 other men and boys there own age-used to collect bread and milk from the village. Had visits from the Red Cross and they decided they needed more room to exercise. There were organised walks outside of the camp twice a week-the guard would sometimes stop at the pub and they had some money from the government. They were repatriated in March 1945 to join up with his father-Germany was falling apart at this time but they were taken on a Red Cross train through Germany, Denmark into Gothenburg, Sweden. Crossed from Gothenburg to Liverpool. They returned to Jersey on July 28th 1945. Everything was intact in their home. Third Record-The Watermill. Felt pleased to be home but was annoyed that he missed the liberation of the camp and Jersey. He and his friends went to Mr Robinson's private school in Balmoral Terrace and he took the school certificate. He joined the army and went to Bodmin-got as far as Nottingham but didn't go abroad-was a vehicle mechanic who worked on tanks-stayed for 6 years. Fourth Record-The theme from the television series We'll Meet Again. When he left the army he started to work in the post office in Nottinghamshire-worked there from Christmas 1952 until May 1953 when he came back to Jersey and became a postman and has been so ever since. Can have problems with dogs but generally are not too bad. Knows about jersey buses-is fascinated by the transport systems of Jersey-wrote a book about the buses in Jersey. Is involved with the Jersey Camera Club and with David Bishop and his wife they produce tape slide sequences. They visited the Royal Air Force base in Cranwell after the RAF visited Jersey and saw his slide show sequences about the occupation and invited them to show them at the base-enjoyed the trip. Fifth Record-Royal Air Force March Past played the Central Band of the Royal Air Force. Enjoys writing books about the occupation. Archives are still being discovered. Most of his work is taken up by running the CIOS. His wife shares his interest in the occupation. Wants to write a definitive work on the defences of the Channel Islands.

Reference: R/07/B/14

Personal View of Gordon Young, feature writer for the Jersey Evening Post, interviewed by Geraldine des Forges. Was born and bred in Warwickshire in 1933 and got into a choir school at a cathedral. Went on to public school with a bursary-found it difficult because he wasn't allowed to talk to girls. He was thrown out of the school for talking to a girl on the street. Used to get into trouble at school-didn't enjoy academic work but enjoyed sport. There was no freedom in the school so he rebelled. He spent a lot of time singing at school. He played rugby and football and other sports. When he came to Jersey he joined the Jersey Rugby Football Club. He was 6 when the second world war broke out-remembers going through the Birmingham and Coventry blitz. He remembered enjoying the war-going into the woods and finding fragments of bullets-for him it was an adventure whilst his parents were terrified. In those days you were what your parents wanted you to be-they wanted to be a doctor. He started medical school at Birmingham University but gave it up after a year-didn't enjoy studying. He enjoyed the army and had a wonderful time for 5 years. First Record-Ella and Louis with A Foggy Day. Initially when he joined the army he applied to go in to the Gordon Highlanders but he was put in the Black Watch and was sent to Fort George-he liked the army discipline. He was picked out as an officer-went to train as an officer at Eaton Hall. He applied to join the Gurkhas but he was seconded to the King's African Rifles. He loved Africa-all his soldiers were Africans-they were wonderful. Then got sent out to Malaya. It was a tough life but for a bachelor the army was good because you could see the world. The companies he joined had great traditions-he liked the discipline because you knew what you could and couldn't do. He doesn't think national service should be brought back although it is a good experience. He never played the bagpipes as a member of the Black Watch. After he left the army he came to Jersey-he met a girl in England who was coming to Jersey and he followed her over and they got married at Trinity Church. There was very little work in Jersey at the time-he worked in a market garden which got into trouble because of a poor winter. He found another job at the hospital on the Observation Ward where he worked for a couple of years. At that point he heard of a building surveyors job which he got-he loved it and spent 27 years in the business-dealt with the Island Development Committee. Has never regretted not becoming a doctor. Second Record-Kai Winding. Surveying took a lot of training but he learnt by experience. You were never stuck in an office-he surveryed the whole of the Jersey Airport which took about 3 months and St Helier Harbour. Saw the poverty in St Helier-a lot of houses were in awful conditions and had people living inside of them. The buildings in the island have improved but there are still some appalling buildings. Loved the Noel and Porter Building but the British Home Stores building replaced it getting rid of all the beauty-King Street has lost some of its character. Loves buildings with Jersey granite-architects are now doing a good job. Hue Street was a beautiful street and he is glad it is finally being renovated. Loves railways-his father was a transport manager for a steel company. As a child he used to travel a great deal on the railways. Received a clockwork train set as a child and then as an adult bought a model railway and has been building it ever since. Third Record-Jersey Bounce. George Marshman, a cameraman from Channel Television, asked him if he wanted to be on television. He went for an interview with Ward Rutherford and he got the job-for 13 years he did freelance work for Channel Television and worked on every programme they produced. The broadcasts were all live so people saw your mistakes. He then worked for the Jersey Talking Magazine for the blind with Philip Gurdon which he really enjoyed and then Radio Lions with Alastair Layzell. For Radio Lions he did a minimum of five interviews in half an hour and everyone was very good. He thinks it's one of the best things that people can do for the hospital and broadcasters could gain experience from the job. He was keen to try something new and decided to move into journalism full time. His wife worked at the Jersey Evening Post and she told him that the 'Under the Clock' column needed a new author and he went for an interview with Mike Rumfitt and got the job. Loves writing and working at the Jersey Evening Post. He likes to comment on things that people are interested in. He thrives on deadlines and meeting people. He has written a book on rugby for the Jersey Rugby Club-they researched a great deal through the newspaper and it took 10 years to write. It's hard to write a book because it takes such a long time-he needed to take a break from writing but it has now been published. He'd like to write fictional books. He also enjoys painting and reading-he now writes art and book reviews for the newspaper. Fourth Record-Frank Sinatra with New York, New York. Enjoys family life-has had two sons and a daughter who have left the island. His eldest son works at the Jersey General Hospital but is going back to England, his second son works with computers and his daughter is a journalist. He has two grandchildren-Amy and Joshua. Started playing music 2 years ago-took up the trombone and has joined the Jersey Big Band where he plays the bass trombone. Fifth Record-Kid Ory with Oh Didn't he Ramble?.

Reference: R/07/B/19

Date: December 20th 1992 - December 20th 1992

Personal View of Leslie Sinel, former Jersey Evening Post employee and occupation historian. Born in St Helier in 1906. Involved with people around you-knew everybody in the district-different today. His father was a saddler-used to do jobs at different farms-got to love horses. Not many vehicles around-1920 no one on the Jersey Evening Post owned a private car. Newspaper was distributed by horse-1910-got two delivery cars with open sides so delivery people could throw the paper out of the car. Went to the Jersey National School-church school-difficult but accepted it. Jersey french not taught in schools-French was taught-headmistress Miss Bennett was tough but she taught everybody how to read and write. First Record-The Trumpet Voluntary by Jeremiah Clarke-used to listen to it during the occupation on crystal radio sets. Childhood-holidays coincided with the potato season-worked at T & J Moor and the Great Western Railway. At 14 joined the Jersey Evening Post-father got him the job-started as an apprentice printer-Wolfdale printing machines. Newspaper only means of communication at the time. Jersey Evening Post used to be distributed by horses-1910 got first car. Newspaper printed at 3.30 so people could catch the train from Snow Hill to Gorey at 4 o'clock. 1920-took 3 hours to print 7,500 newspapers, today can print 23,000 in three quarters of an hour. Newspapers dropped off at each station both east and west. Exciting to go on the train as a child-sad but inevitable that the railways went when buses were brought in. Tourism in the summer of the 1920s and 1930s-not comparable with today-people used to stay longer. St Brelade popular for tourists. Second Record-the Radetzky March by Strauss. Radio-what he used to listen to. 1930s-became a proof reader at the Jersey Evening Post and wrote some articles-never had an ambition to become a journalist-worked mostly from the printing side. Newspapers today good quality but reporting is 'muck raking' now. Media today-good variety-modern way of life. Spent 15 years as a Constables Officer and Vingtenier in St Saviour and 21 years in St Helier as a churchwarden and on the Welfare Board and on the Battle of Flowers' Association and Jersey Eisteddfod-always involved in something. Honorary policeman-got fed up with job at the time of the prowler-stayed out watching farms at nights. Queen came-did Government House duty all night. Mostly traffic duties. States Police and Honorary Police can work together. Never wanted to leave Jersey-some travelling on the Continent. Has lived in St Helier and St Saviour. Not the same parochialism today. First buses here-used to run through Bagot-used to call it the 'Orange Box'. The JMT and Red Band Bus-opened up the island-created more movement in the island. 1925-1930s-motor cars increased in number. Third Record-Zadoc the Priest from the Coronation Anthem. Second world war-Germans swept across France getting closer to Jersey-hoped nothing would happen but thought it would. Government realised it was impossible to defend and pulled out. Germans took the island-no alternative-no question of resistance-couldn't have sabotage during the occupation-where could you go? Repercussions on other islanders. Had a guilt complex-felt if he'd gone away he may have been able to do something but if everybody had left the island it would have been destroyed. Decided against evacuation-two of his family left but the rest stayed. Continued to work at the Jersey Evening Post-censored by the Germans but the staff used to resist. On the surface looked to be agreeing with them but were resisting. Was asked to put an article in the newspaper but he took three days off and burned it. Fourth Record-Vidor's Toccata and Fugue. During the occupation worked on a farm in the afternoon-used to get some extra food-learned how to make sugar beet syrup. Meat was scarce-used to get some on the black market-used to be expensive but nothing on the price today. Used to listen to the radio every morning-every hour on the hour-would listen until 9 in the morning-used to leave the house and people would tell him the news-everybody knew it. Used to type out 3 copies of the news-took one to Captain Robin of Petit Menage, one to the Jersey Evening Post and kept one. Many people listened to the radio-he would have been prosecuted for disseminating the news. Used to find out news from German soldiers. Fifth Record-To be a Pilgrim. Liberation-can't talk about it without emotion. Enjoyed life since the war-is retired but very active. Enjoys writing-historical and local events. Would have liked to have been a teacher. End of Side One. Personal View with Jack(John) Herbert interviewed by Beth Lloyd, the war time Airport Commander. Enjoyed working at the Jersey Airport. Was born in Bath and went to Green Park College in Bath. Was part of the choir in Bath but gave up his music-difficult to choose music for the programme. Came over to Jersey at 11-his father was an engineer on a ship-his mother wanted him to stay on shore. Worked in Bath and the Piers and Harbours Committee of 1923 advertised for a harbour engineer. Was learning about law but ended up sailing instead- helped the fishermen Tommy and Charlie King and helped the pilots in St Helier Harbour. First Record-Underneath the Arches by Flanagan and Allen. After leaving school joined his father at the Harbour Office. Worked as clerk dealing with harbour dues-counted the passengers coming in. On the Albert Pier with Captain Furzer-a ship collided with the Albert Pier-harbour had to be dredged. Mr Bill Thurgood visited the island-decided to set up an aeroplane route-administration of the aeroplanes were placed under the auspices of the Piers and Harbour Committee-staff had to check beach. First flight took place on the 18th December 1933 from Jersey to Portsmouth. The beach was cleared of people-a great local event. Had a refueler and a coach for the office work. Had to be an English customs officer, Bill Ivy, and a Jersey customs officer, Harold Robins. No aeroplane dues-the aeroplanes used to pay harbour dues. Aeroplane had a tragic accident-a little boy was sitting on the beach and was killed and a coach got trapped on the beach and was swamped by the sea. Second Record-Stranger on the Shore. Used to create a weather report at the Harbour Office by letting a balloon go into the air and timing it going in to cloud cover. Sites inspected to build Jersey Airport-a site at Grosnez turned down. Site at St Peter decided-problem with fog. No other suitable place in the island for it. Jersey Airport-Piers and Harbour Committee was put in charge of the Airport being built-plans were approved-there were four runways-Jersey Airways ran from Jersey to Portsmouth and Jersey to Heston. Air France went from the Jersey Airport. Third Record-Glenn Miller and American Patrol. Second world war-all messages came in code. Bill Lawford-an air traffic control officer came over. Had to camouflage the airport. Jersey Airways staff evacuated-was in charge of the evacuation-no panic at the Airport to get off the island-between 400-600 left by the Airport. Was ordered to stay at his post, Chris Phillips, an air traffic controller, was called back to the royal navy. Late May some French air force plane with two highly ranked officers and a ground crew. The morning of the 1st June in his office when he saw a german plane fly over and dropped a container-it was addressed to the Bailiff of Jersey. German landed and spoke to the Bailiff-wanted the island to be handed over later that afternoon-put up white flags. Jack Herbert told to cut off the electricity supply-had shipped all their radios to Bristol. Fourth Record-Luftwaffe March. Jack Herbert was transferred to the Transport Office in Bond Street during the occupation-converted some vehicles to use gas as fuel-had to improvise to create fuel as it was in such short supply. Fifth Record-It Must be Him by Vikki Carr. Liberation-transferred back to the Jersey Airport on May 10th 1945-airfields were mined and booby traps-were cleared. German officer detailed to cut the grass at the Airport. Royal air force officer was in charge of Airport and it was handed over 2nd October 1945. Civil aviation picked up between 1948 and 1952. The airport was tarmacked in 1952-the material came from the excavation of the Jersey Underground Hospital. The Jersey Airport became the second busiest airport in Britain in the 1960s. Was presented with an MBE by the Queen in 1974 and retired in 1975.

Reference: R/07/B/3

Date: 1982 - 1982

Personal View of Police Chief, David Parkinson interviewed by Beth Lloyd. Was brought up in Huddersfield and when he left school went in to an office and then did his national service. Came out at the age of 20 and went back to his old job but was then made redundant. Then decided to join the local police force. Worked on the beat for 3 years and was then selected for mobile patrol duties and worked in various parts in the police force and in 1963 was promoted to sergeant-as a sergeant did patrol work and operation room work. No management training in those days. 1964-Royal Commission into the police force-big changes-number of police forces reduced. Became a different police world-in 1966 had transferred as inspector to the Essex Police Force. First Record-Hallelujah Chorus from Handel's Messiah. Was married 12 months after joining the force in January 1954. The lives of policemen's wives can be very difficult but it depends on the policeman. Moved to the Essex Police Force as an inspector-change from Huddersfield-was a big change of policing. Then moved to the Hertfordshire Police Force-overlap between them and the Metropolitan Police Force. Was a superintendent in Watford. Cooperation between police forces is good although professional rivalry does exist although it does not affect solving crimes. Crime levels rose through the 1960s and 1970s although it has slowed down recently. Policemen were moved off the beat into cars around the mid 1960s and lost contact with the public but have now been moved back. In 1977 reached the rank of Chief Superintendent of Stevenage. Went through a course for chief officers-was made Assistant Chief Constable in the Derbyshire Police Force and then became Deputy Chief Constable from 1977-1983. Second Record-Ted Heath with Don Lusher playing Lush Slide. Personal View with Lieutenant Governor Peter Whiteley interviewed by Beth Lloyd. Had targeted a number of ambitions including making the job as lieutenant governor as relevant to islanders as possible. Has got to know many islanders. Some aspects are like a service job. Was a relaxation after working in the armed forces. Talks of the need to store the archives of the lieutenant governor. First Record-William Boyce Symphony No 5 by the Academy of St Martin in the Field. Originally wanted to become a journalist-second world war came and he dropped it all-gained an understanding of the job. Joined the Royal Marines and eventually became the commander in chief of the Allied Forces Northern Europe. It was a responsibility but didn't worry about it. Has had royal visits to the island-seven since he has been lieutenant governor. Was used to meeting royalty after his previous job. Felt frustrated when the Falklands War was taking place but was satisfied that the people doing the job knew what they were doing. His son was involved and was injured but has now recovered. Threat of nuclear war-can be both helpful and harmful to show films of the possibility. Second Record-Kathleen Ferrier with O Rest in the Lord from Mendelssohn's Elijah. Leaving Jersey next month-advice for the island-need to keep the island beautiful. Believes that the environment makes the man. Need to maintain agriculture. Interest in the work of Gerald Durrell-immense importance. Need to prevent the extinction of animals. Greenpeace-in many cases have spoiled their case by breaking the law and becoming over politicised. Is hopeful for the future. Third Record-Mozart's First Movement of the Piano Sonata No 11 in A Major. Personal View of Reverend Peter Manton, Rector of St John. His family first came to Jersey in 1897 and he was brought up in Jersey. Joined the militia. Went to the Modern School and Victoria College and then joined the Royal Jersey Militia. On the 1st September 1939 was called up at Grouville Arsenal-marked the end of peace days. Pleasant childhood in Jersey-his family was very poor. Caddied for golf in order to make some money. Scouts was the dominating force in his life as a teenager. Went into the army in the second world war. Had wanted to go in to the church since the age of 10. When he was 12 took a weather badge in the scouts which interested him greatly. Ideally he wanted to become a country priest with a weather station which he has now achieved. Got called in to the militia who guarded key points of the island. June 22nd 1940-all shipped to the Isle of Wight. Cut the telecommunication lines before they left. When he left thought he was leaving forever. First record-Morning by Grieg. Went to Grieg's home as chaplain on the Queen Elizabeth II in Norway. Was due to go on a Greek shop but his wife got ill and he had to cancel and they offered him the QE2 as an alternative later. Hard work-1600 people on board and 1200 crew-a lot of troubles to look after. Was happy fighting the German forces because he hated the Nazi doctrine. Had a strict upbringing-when he was 14 met a girl but it was broken up. Met her 20 years later by chance but she was married by then. Thinks there is too much freedom for young people now. Used to go on the train which he enjoyed greatly-inspired him to choose the next record. Second Record-recording of trains. Still interested in railways in England-takes part in trainspotting. It was part of the character and life of Jersey. Could buy a ticket from Snow Hill to Paris via the boat at Gorey Pier. Went off to the second world war-spent time with the Royal Hampshire's. At that time went into a church and made a vow that if he survived the war he would go into the church. Went out on D Day, then went out to India to fight the Japanese. After the war went to a theological college in Oxford-was accepted but was told he was too old by the bishop and that a younger man would give longer service. Joined the Meteorological Office at the Jersey Airport for 13 years. If he had gone into the church he would have been prepared to go wherever he was sent and would have been a better clergyman. Was happy to go into the Met Office-used to work from sunrise to sunset and then did 24 hour watches. Was an interesting job-has pleasure making notes on the weather. Had limited equipment at the end of the war-did a lot of observation of the sky. Had news by the radio of the weather in different parts of the world and then teleprinters. They were able to predict things remarkably accurately. Average rainfall in St John is 33 inches but in La Rocque it was 26 inches-big difference in a small island. Enjoyed his days in the Met Office. After 13 years in the Met Office he was sitting a civil service exam and at that time the Dean of Jersey asked him to reconsider ordination. Was offered promotion at the Jersey Airport but he wanted to wait for the bishop's decision whether to accept him. The Bishop of Winchester interviewed him and he was accepted. Third Record-Miserarie. Became curate of St Mark's Church for five years. Had full theological training at Whitcliffe Hall at Oxford-very disciplined life in college. Could have been sent anywhere but he was drawn back to Jersey-he understood the people he was serving. Helpful to understand parish life-is involved in the parish. Has extra functions than in England-looks after the churchyards and cemeteries. Thinks the church will always be important in island life. Fourth Record-Religious piece of music sung by Paul Phoenix. Was a curate for 5 years and was then invited to take St John's Church-was extremely nervous in take services on his own for the first time. Can be difficult for a first time rector-thought he had done very well for his first funeral but discovered he'd put the body in the wrong grave. Parishioners forgave the mistake. Has been rector of St John's for 17 years. Did not know the parish well previously-only went out there for the first time at 10 years of age. Only happy when he is taking services in church-a feeling of completion. Strong community in St John with the church playing a large part in this. Fifth Record-Pomp and Circumstance No 4. Still maintains his interest in the weather-weather hasn't changed much. The relationship between tides and the weather. End of Side Two.

Reference: R/07/B/6

Date: 1982 - 1984

Jersey Evening Post supplement relating to the re-development of Jersey Airport

Reference: US/09

Date: June 22nd 1897 - June 22nd 1897

Jersey Evening Post Newpaper article : In 1979 an extended bout of fog coincided with the end of the 'Battle of Flowers' week leaving thousands of holiday makers stranded at Jersey Airport

Reference: US/1443

Date: August 13th 2019

Jersey Evening Post Newspaper article : ' What's Your Street's Story' - The Airport

Reference: US/1534

Date: May 15th 2017

Jersey Evening Post Newspaper picture article : Love Island - 50's Style

Reference: US/1592

Date: January 30th 2021

Jersey Evening Post Newspaper - The Big Picture : The Airport Arrival's Hall

Reference: US/1604

Date: January 3rd 2021

Jersey Evening Post Newspaper article : The Airport's 1937 terminal building will no longer be demolished but Save Jersey's Heritage found Alastair Layzell says the Island still needs a cultural vision

Reference: US/1612

Date: March 6th 2021

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