Personal View of Senator Pierre Horsfall, the President of Finance and Economics, interviewed by Geraldine des Forges. His earliest memories of the island are of the occupation-remembers the red cross parcels and the liberation. Lived at Rue du Galet in Millbrook-remembers lots of aeroplanes flying over and his brother running outside and coming back and shouting, "They're ours". Didn't feel the hardship of the occupation-remembers going to the bakery to pick up his meals but never felt deprived. Had some contact with german soldiers-one used to give him presents and he considered him his friend. Went to Firmandale School at Beaumont and then he went to St Mark's Primary School which was a very good school. Moved to Victoria College Preparatory School on a scholarship-enjoyed the sciences but never worked particularly hard at them. There was more discipline in schools when he went to school-the standards have slipped since. He then went to Victoria College-enjoyed his time there-had many teachers who had been in the army so it was a good standard of discipline and teaching. First Record-Clair de Lune by Debussy. In the 1950s his mother managed the Grève de Lecq Hotel so they were allowed to do what ever they wanted at Grève de Lecq. Remembers how good the weather used to be-befriended Frank Carré, a fisherman at Grève de Lecq, who he helped going fishing. Used to swim off Grève de Lecq for an afternoon. Went in to a cave off Grève de Lecq and went through to discover a new bay-used to show guests from the hotel to the bay for money. Used to go to school on the bus and he also had a bicycle. He used to be very free-much more so than the modern world. Avoided sport as much as possible-ended up taking up shooting. From an early age he made model aeroplanes-he always wanted to be an aeronautical engineer-he decided he wanted to work for the Bristol Aeroplane Company and he achieved that aim. He never aimed to go into politics. Second Record-12th Street Rag by Peewee Hunt. Moved to England for his first job with the Bristol Aeroplane Company as a student. Did a sandwich course where he studied for six months and worked for six months in the factory-did this for 3 years and then a further 3 years after that. Worked hard on his course and job-enjoyed the experience. He often put himself forward to take part in jobs. Worked in lots of different aircraft. The design office was working on supersonic transport-worked with a french company to produce concorde. He knew french and so he made sure his managers knew this-he was taken on board by the company directors to the meeting between the British and French-he was involved for six years. He had several roles-he was at first taken because he spoke French and knew what was going on, he then went into a liaison department with the French factory-did a lot of travelling. Third Record-Music from Coppelia. In the early days there was a honeymoon with the French-when the work started there started to be differences of opinion. There were also a lot of enjoyable nights out. The language was a problem because there wasn't simultaneous translation. Feels proud when seeing concorde now. Came back to Jersey because the family business would have been sold otherwise-looked after the hotel. Tourism standards were lower in those days-standards were starting to be raised. A lot more elderly people came to the island at that time. There was always plenty of business around-people didn't realise that tourism was going to decrease. Decided to stand for the States-he was on the Jersey College for Girls PTA and from that someone suggested that he stand for politics. He was deputy of St Clement in 1975. Fourth Record-Piece from Carmina Burana. He spent six years as president of the Agriculture and Fisheries Committee and enjoyed it a great deal. He became president of the Island Development Committee, joined the Policy Advisory Committee and after Agriculture he became President of the Finance and Economics Committee. He set up an office to work at home and withdrew from the hotel business. Being President of the Finance and Economics Committee means a lot of duties-finds it challenging and tiring. He feels the greatest sense of achievement over an amendment to increase the size of the waterfront and feels good that he helps in the politics of the island. He thinks Jersey is secure but it must be careful and address the current problems. Has a happy family life-his wife is a keen horse woman-spends a lot of time watching horses. They enjoy travelling and visit London to see his daughter. Feels if he gets elected that he would stay in the States for one more term of six years. Fifth Record-Piece from Nabucco by Verdi.

Reference: R/07/B/18

Date: September 20th 1992 - September 20th 1992

Personal View of Jurat Barbara Myles, the first woman jurat in Jersey and doctor, interviewed by Beth Lloyd. Talking about her early childhood. Education-went to nursery school, a foundations school-interrupted by the second world war which led to her going to three different grammar schools. Her father was a doctor of philosophy-worked in insecticides during the war. Her father came over to Jersey after the war to sort out the Colorado beetle problem. Always wanted to be a doctor and was encouraged. First Record-Little Sir Echo-released when the world changed. Almost got sent to America for safety but stayed. Until 1945/46 lived in Maidenhead and then moved to Kent to school. Tried to get in to train as a doctor but was rejected and then worked in a laboratory. Got a place at Trinity College, Dublin as a medical student-ended with 20 women students. Recalls a disruptive patient. Specialists-were some characters and difficult people. Second Record-Ring of Bright Water sung by Val Doonican. After finishing her medical training came to Surrey near where her parents were living to work in anaesthetics-worked in St Peter's Hospital, Cherstey. Met her husband there who was a surgeon. Worked with him in the casualty department. Got married and started working part time locum work. Had her child Caroline in the autumn of 1960 just after they'd moved house. Was in the house 4 or 5 months when a chance for a job in Jersey came up-decided to move across-had no doubts. Worked in a few locum jobs in anaesthetics in the early 1960s. Had more children-second daughter-1962, third daughter-65, son 68. It was fun but hard work-lived at La Rocque. Third Record-Misalliance sung by Flanders and Swan. Offered work-Jersey Family Welfare Association-needed doctors for their clinics-worked with Dr Crill. Now does 2 half days a week. Got involved with the Jersey College for Girls-was asked to teach health education to the students. Got involved with the Jersey College for Girls Parent Teacher Association-was the president. 1970-asked to work on the Juvenile Court-12 lay members sat with a magistrate-was trained in it. Working in the juvenile court was distressing-difficult to try and change a child's background. There are no easy answers to help the children-have to get the children at an early age. Fourth Record-Mozart's Symphony No 40. Decided to stand for jurat because of the lack of women in the Royal Court. When the time came at the end of her time in the Juvenile Court was asked to become a jurat by Jurat Hamilton. Stood for jurat but did not get in the first time. Decided to stand again because of the support she received. Was nervous when she became a jurat. Jurats sit in the Royal Court as the Inferior and Superior Number, work on the licensing bench, overseeing the job of curator for people who can't manage their own affairs. When trying a criminal case-can worry her-have to work out what you believe. Retirement of Lester Bailhache there are now no lawyers as jurats-thinks there is a case to have lawyers as jurats. Jurats get together to discuss law changes. Nothing had to change when she became the first woman jurat-big change for the other jurats. Fifth Record-Menuhin and Grapelli with Jealousy. Hobbies-sailing-likes to have a break from the island-visits the Ecréhous and the South of Brittany. Ambitions-would like to write. Used to sing in a quartet. Sixth Record-Vera Lynn with When I Grow too Old to Dream. End of Side One. Personal View with Betty Brooke. Started writing a column for the Evening Post in 1966. Asked by Jim Scriven, the editor of the time, to write a column to interest people in island politics. Considered standing for election-is not a committee person. Has more power as a writer than as a politician. Was born and raised in Aberdeen and when the second world war came she became a wren where she met her husband who was a navy chaplain. Wrote and edited for ship's magazines. Her husband retired from the royal navy in 1957 and came to Jersey to a church. Liked the States of Jersey because the people could make a difference. Started as a signals wren, trained at Rosyth and then moved to Liverpool-difficult time-worked 72 hours a week-lost many friends. Became an instructor in London and trained people for D Day. Was going to marry somebody else and he was supposed to conduct the ceremony before they realised they loved each other. First Record-Kathleen Ferrier with Blow the Wind Southerly. Became a naval chaplain's wife-stationed at HMS Royal Arthur and then moved to Leigh on Solent and then to Malta for 4 years. Became a snooker player of some repute. Became a sort of surrogate mother to the naval recruits. Had to move on after 4 years-adopted a baby at this time. Posted to Devenport and after two years retired and was invited to move to the Aquila Road Methodist Church-became a methodist lay preacher soon after she was married. Second Record-Mozart's Ave Verum. Impressions of Jersey-had always wanted to come to the Channel Islands-had organised to come to Jersey and as they were organising it had an invitation from Aquila Road Church to come and preach. Simon, her son was 3, and they lived at West Park Avenue in The Manse. Loved living in Jersey especially the Jersey people-warmth and friendship. Preached in the methodist churches-in 1966 Barry, her husband, collapsed in the pulpit and died. Life changed dramatically-was widowed with a 12 year old son-was necessary to look at life again. Continued in the church for 11 months until another minister was appointed. Grieved with the congregation. Third Record-Frankie Lane with Do Not Forsake Me from High Noon. In 1966 her life took a new turn-had to work-worked as a freelance journalist-wrote two columns for the Jersey Evening Post. Wrote articles for the Daily Telegraph and for women's magazines. Was correspondent for the South West region in Jersey before Radio Jersey was set up and interviewed people for Channel Television. Fourth Record-Mozart's Violin Concerto. Never felt she wanted to publish a permanent record of her thoughts-has written two books-a thriller and her autobiography-may publish it at some point. Doesn't travel a lot but has relatives in America and loves France. Fifth Record-Pie Jesu. Doesn't like to plan for the future-lives for the present. Would like the prosperity of Jersey to continue. Sixth Record-Nat King Cole with Ramblin' Rose. End of Side Two.

Reference: R/07/B/5

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