Digital copy of the Transcript of Day 135 of the hearings for the Independent Jersey Care Inquiry.

Reference: C/D/AW15/TD000135

Date: February 11th 2016 - February 11th 2016

Response to the Jersey Catholic Pastoral Review by various members of the States of Jersey including Alastair Layzell, Jerry Dorey, B G D Richardson and Vernon Tomes

Reference: H/B/M4/16

Date: October 28th 1994 - November 21st 1994

Who's Who in the Channel Islands 1987

Reference: JPF/L/1

Date: 1987

Images of an employee of Benest's, Millbrook and Alastair Layzell, standing with a shopping trolley full of goods. The customer is said to have won a competition, and his prize, presumbably, is the contents of his trolley. [The Photographers' Diary refers to a lady named Mary, and this may possibly be Mary Gauge who appears to be associated with the shop in question].

Reference: L/A/75/A3/2/3448

Date: March 15th 1977 - March 15th 1977

Photographer: Glenn Rankine

JEP Photographic Job Number: 1977/3448.

Images of a Senatorial hustings taking place at the Town Hall with the candidates on stage and the meeting presided over by Constable Peter Baker, with close ups of Senator John Averty [image E-G], Senator Cyril Le Marquand [image H, W-X], Deputy Jane Sandeman [image I-K], Don Pallot [image L and O], Maurice Buesnel [image Q and S], Senator Bill Morvan [image U-V], and audience members asking questions including George Dupré [image A_A, Z], Mr Eddie Anderson [Image A_C], Terry Le Main [Image C] and Kay Edgington [image Y], images of members of the press including Mike Bisson of the JEP [left] and Alastair Layzell of Channel Television [right with glasses] [image A_B].

Reference: L/A/75/A3/3/8837A

Date: November 13th 1978 - November 13th 1978

JEP Photographic Job Number: 1978/8837A

Images of the launch of a new lottery machine at Channel Television Centre, Rouge Bouillon, St Helier. Reporter Alastair Layzell [D - E and L - O, left; H - I; Q - R, front] is amongst those pictured.

Reference: L/A/75/A3/4/502

Date: May 10th 1979 - May 10th 1979

Photographer: Gary Grimshaw

JEP Photographic Job Number: 1979/502

Images of a day trip to Granville, Manche, Normandy, France following the opening of a new airline route. Includes aerial photographs taken from the aircraft upon arriving in Granville, portraits of the airline pilot next to the Britten-Norman Islander and of a man in a telephone box, and images of a local market, gym facilities, marina and a sitting of the Chambre de Commerce et d'Industrie [Chamber of Commerce and Industry]. Channel Television reporter Alastair Layzell [G, second from left; U - V, far left] possibly pictured amongst the Jersey delegation visiting Granville.

Reference: L/A/75/A3/4/610

Date: May 20th 1979 - May 20th 1979

Photographer: Reg Cridland

JEP Photographic Job Number: 1979/610

Images of the 1979 Daily Mail Ideal Home Exhibition at Earls Court in London. Includes images of a stall promoting Jersey run by two ladies from the States of Jersey Tourism Committee, images of June Wilson, the 1978 Miss Jersey Battle of Flowers [E - J, left] talking to Margaret Thatcher [E - J, right], the leader of the Conservative Party, images a group of cameramen and reporters including Channel Television reporter Alastair Layzell [M, far right; R, front fourth from right; U, second from left] and images of Princess Anne [N, front left; O - Q] looking around the latest housing designs on display at the exhibition. Clarence Dupré [R, front third from right], the President of the States of Jersey Tourism Committee, is also pictured at the exhibition. Please see also L/A/75/A3/4/9860A.

Reference: L/A/75/A3/4/9860B

Date: March 5th 1979 - March 5th 1979

Photographer: Ron Mayne

JEP Photographic Job Number: 1979/9860B

Images of an interschool debating contest held at St Helier Girls' School, Brighton Road, St Helier, featuring portraits of the students competing in the contest. Channel Television reporter Alastair Layzell [M and N, front row second from right] is pictured as part of the judging panel for the contest.

Reference: L/A/75/A3/4/9914

Date: March 9th 1979 - March 9th 1979

Photographer: Ron Mayne

JEP Photographic Job Number: 1979/9914

Images relating to a plane crash in which an aeroplane piloted by millionaire Norman Harvey crashed into a granite house called Sous L'Eglise, near St Peter's Church, including images of Senator Bill Morvan standing with Channel Television's Alastair Layzell [image A] and the family living next door to the crash Vernon Balleine, Margaret Balleine and their children Graeme and Jane [image B-G] [from JEP 02/10/1980 p 1, 10-11].

Reference: L/A/75/A3/5/5464B

Date: October 1st 1980 - October 1st 1980

JEP Photographic Job Number: 1980/5464B

Images of Len Downer winning the Constable Election also pictured are Alf Vibert his opponent [images K-M] And his campaign lorry. [images S- X]. Alastair Layzell is there for Channel Television [images J and P]. Aso talking with Len Downer is Reverend Michael Halliwell and Brian Le Boutillier [image Q.]

Reference: L/A/75/A3/6/6392B

Date: January 14th 1981 - January 14th 1981

Photographer: Ron Mayne

JEP Photographic Job Number: 1981/6392B.

1) Programme entitled 'Summer 1940-Part One: The Distant War June 1st-19th' broadcast by Channel Television presented by Alastair Layzell. It covers the beginning of June 1940 when Britain had been at war for 9 months, peoplewere being encouraged to spend time in the Channel Islands but the war took a dramatic turn with the Germans pushing through Europe, background given on the Channel Islands, in Guernsey 1940 the bailiff was Victor Carey who was elderly and so Ambrose Sherwill, the attorney general, was given the job of running the island whilst Alexander Coutanche was in charge in Jersey. The Lieutenant Governor of Jersey Major General Harrison wrote to the War Office saying the island was virtually defenceless, uncertainty of what to do, some air raid precautions had been taken with the establishment of the Air Raid Patrol, everyone was issued with gas masks, realisation that war was on its way to the islands. On the morning of June 12th the War Cabinet decided to defend the islands but reversed the decision by the afternoon deciding on demilitarisation, the first contact with war was the evacuation of the British Expeditionary Force from St Malo. Islanders were asked to assemble yachts and Coutanche and the Commodore of St Helier Yacht Club W S Le Masurier organised crews to picking up the troops including Reg Nicolle and Bill Coom who talk of the enthusiasm for the operation, the blowing up of the loch gates, french citizens offering money to get on the ships, the courage of british nurses refusing to leave their ambulances and the terrible weather on the way home. Extract from Churchill speech telling about the situation in France. Activity at the airport with planes refuelling, Jersey Airways suspending services and helping the RAF, evacuating the staff and Charles de Gaulle refuelling in the island. War and Home Office still talking and life went on in Jersey. The Home Office invited islands to send a representative to England to discuss the possible evacuation of the islands. Jurat Edgar Dorey was sent and he and Markbreiter called the Ministry of Shipping in search of boats and when returning was given a letter telling the Lieutenant Governor to leave. The decision to demiltarise was announced in the States and the evacuation was to begin. 2) Programme called 'Summer 1940-Part 2: Evacuation June 20th-28th' broadcast by Channel Television presented by Alastair Layzell. References to the dilemma of evacuation, queuing to register at the Town Hall and the fact people changed their minds, the calming of the people by the Bailiff who said his family were staying and condemnation by Jurat Dorey for those leaving. Evacuees tell of their journey to Southampton and then to the north of England. The St John Ambulance in Guernsey helped with the sick and old. In Sark Dame Sybil Hathaway encouraged the inhabitants to stay on the island. In Alderney Judge Frederick French called a meeting where his residents decided to leave. George Baron tells of leaving on the spur of the moment and the St John Ambulance personnel from Guernsey went to Alderney to assist in the evacuation. Some of the evacuation was carried out by Jersey Airways as the airport was besieged by people trying to leave. There was a calm after the lieutenant governors left. At the Jersey Airport Bob Lawrence talks of breaking up the navigation equipment and sending it to Southampton. The Controlling Committee was set up in Guernsey and a member, Raymond Falla, talks about the evacuation of cattle from Alderney. On June 28th undecided whether the islands were defended the germans undertook air raids and eye witnesses describe seeing the air raids in Jersey and Guernsey leading to 44 deaths, 33 in Guernsey, 11 in Jersey. The BBC announced that day that the Channel Islands had been demilitarised ten days before but it was too late.

Reference: L/D/25/L/57

Date: June 19th 1980 - June 26th 1980

1) Programme entitled 'Summer 1940-Part Three: Occupation June 29th-July 5th' broadcast by Channel Television presented by Alastair Layzell. Talks about the effect the air raid had on the islanders, the fact that the air raid confirmed to the Germans fact that the islands were undefended, the population being in fear of more air raids, Philip Warder, who wroked for the Post Office, waiting for instructions to sever the cable between Jersey and England, the Guernsey Controlling Committee running island and Raymond Falla talking about his experiences, the landing of the Germans in Guernsey on June 30th and met by Ambrose Sherwill, proclamations being put up and anger at Raymond Falla because cows were on the runway at Guernsey Airport, July 1st the Germans invaded Jersey and dropped an ultimatum which was taken to the bailiff, it told that white flags had to put up, the States agreed to comply, an aeroplane landed at the Jersey Airport the next day and sent a message that the island was to be occupied fom 3pm that day when the bailiff, government secretary and attorney general met the Germans, Leslie Sinel went to cinema at The Forum and when he came out Germans were walking on the streets, the Germans soon looked at the essential services, at the Post Office Philip Warder was arrested for no reason and offered resistance for the rest of war by destroying letters sent to the commandant and the Evening Post came under the eyes of the german censor. First impressions of the german soldiers was them buying up of goods from shops. Jack Herbert took germans to the generating station at the airport and had to watch as Germans defused bombs left at the airport, tomato growers realised their income had stopped, the Controlling Committee took the glass houses over to plant other crops, Alderney was taken over and headquarters were established, July 4th a party crossed to Sark and met with Sybil Hathaway showing her respect but brought her list of orders. Captain Gussek was the first commandant and with him Coutanche worked out a proclamation for the local government to continue. Overall the Germans were friendly, morale was high and they believed the islands were a stepping stone to England. 2) A brief account of the German Occupation of Jersey from the BBC Schools Broadcast produced in Jersey by Joe Jackson and Graham Simms. Report on the origins and development of the second world war. July 1st 1940 occupation of Jersey begins. The responsibility for the island was on Sir Alexander Moncrieff Coutanche and the programme shows how he shouldered the burden. He remembers the arrival of the Germans and the affect it had on his position in the islands. Bob Le Sueur remembers the uncertainty and the speech by the bailiff in the Royal Square giving instructions to fly the white flag. Mrs Perkins remembers Germans bombing the harbour and their arrival with the orders received by the islanders. They remember Germans thinking they could get to London very easily, the introduction of a curfew, the surprise at the discipline of the Germans, the scarcity of money and schemes to raise some, the scarcity of food and improvisation with different ingredients. A poem written during the occupation about the scarcity of food is sung. After D-Day food supplies were cut off and after protests from the governments the red cross ship the SS Vega arrived. The liberation came with the arrival of the HMS Beagle and Coutanche got a message to go to the Pomme d'Or Hotel from where he was taken to the ship to witness the surrender. The programme looks at his life before and after the occupation and the award of his knighthood and peerage.

Reference: L/D/25/L/58

Date: November 7th 1974 - July 3rd 1980

Planning and Environment Committee. Alistair Layzell chairs the Development Subcommittee. At the meeting around the table (left to right) Nick Fagan (Planning Officer), Roy Webster (Senior Planning Officer), Kevin Pilley (Principle Planning Officer), Peter Thorne (Director of Planning), Andy Townsend (Senior Planning Officer), (lady in the corner unknown), Kay Tremellen-Frost (lady in green - Committee Clerk), Alistair Layzell, Deputy Jennifer Bridge and Constable Phillip Ozouf.

Reference: P/03/B132/01

Date: September 18th 2000 - September 18th 2000

Planning and Environment Committee. Kay Tremellen-Frost, Alistair Layzell and Jennifer Bridge.

Reference: P/03/B132/15

Date: September 18th 2000 - September 18th 2000

Deputy Alistair Layzell and Deputy Peter Troy in the States Building

Reference: P/03/B52/10

Date: July 18th 2000 - July 18th 2000

Jersey Talking Magazine-April Edition. Introduction by Gordon Young. Philip Gurdon interviewing David Watkins, a private investigator, talking about whether there was any need for a private investigator in Jersey, finding evidence of fraud, the difficult aspects of the job, tracing people who have disappeared, the reasons people disappear, training for the job as a member of the police, cooperation with the police force, the line between police and private investigation work, kidnappings, getting involved in situations outside of Jersey-has an office in London and travelling across the world to carry out investigations. Margaret Jenkins talking about the sense of smell. John Bouchere talking about Jersey and the Royal Mail including details of the Channel Islands, the transport of mail by aeroplanes and mail boats, the signalling of the arrival of the mail boat in former days, the transport of the mail by horse drawn car by Mr Le Couteur, the maintenance of the mail carts, the first real mail van in 1929, carrying the mail to Gorey Village, 1933 saw mail coming by air with the aeroplanes landing on West Park beach, Jersey Airport built in 1937 and a daily service was inaugurated, 1940-arrival of the occupation and the air force raids and the stopping of post between the UK and Jersey, use of bicycles instead of the vans, a telegraph messenger, Eric Hassall was sent to College House and received salutes as he was in uniform, Len Godel-collided with a sand laden german lorry and was charged with sabotage but was released, sometimes the bags of mail from Guernsey were opened for investigation, postal services resumed after the occupation, wide variety of mail received by farmers and the difficulty of finding different addresses in Jersey and driving in the country lanes. Beth Lloyd giving In Touch tips for the blind. End of Side One. Composition called 'Dead in Tune' written for narrator and orchestra and recorded by Channel Television featuring the Jersey Youth Orchestra and Alastair Layzell. End of Side Two.

Reference: R/05/B/63

Date: March 31st 1982 - March 31st 1982

Jersey Talking Magazine-December Edition. Introduction by Gordon Young. John Boucheré talking about camping describing what camping is today, what he likes about camping, the monthly meeting of a camping club, advice for the novice camper, meeting people in the camp sites and bad weather camping. Alastair Layzell interviewing Michael Nicholson, the television journalist who covered the Falklands War for ITN, about the Falklands War, the interest in the War, protesting after the war about the lack of cooperation from the Ministry of Defence, the lack of uniforms and equipment for the troops, communication from the ships, finding out for a soldier whether he had a child from HMS Hermes, how journalism has affected his life and how his family feel about him not reporting on any other wars. Joan Stevens talking about early Jersey doctors-no doctors in the earliest records. Gift of healing-became known throughout the community. A rector became known for this-Samuel de la Place-Rector of St Ouen in 1590-died 1651-came of a french refugee family-his services were paid in kind including by wheat, lamb, pork and other food and goods. Cures-purge used a great deal, a plaster for a child, bleeding and vomit. Unknown Account-from Linden Hall, Mont au Prêtre-c1630-probably from the Messervy family-list of cures written in english-different cures read out. Condition in the island-Camden wrote in 1586-that the inhabitants were in good health-no physicians in the island. Beth Lloyd with In Touch tips for the blind. End of Side One. Gordon Young on the train from Paris to Munich-commentating on the train journey with the sound of the train and talking about the other passengers on the train. Arriving in Munich for the beer festival describing the fairground at the festival, going on the ghost train and describing other rides and attractions. Sue Mackin talking to David Langlois, who during a three month stay in South Africa joined an American adventure excursion going down the rapids of the River Zambezi on an inflatable dinghy, describing how the trip started, looking at the first rapids, seeing the Victoria Falls, the guides, the boats, the work they had to do in order to help sail the boat, the requirements for the trip, shooting seventeen rapids and riffles, whether it got easier as the days went on, the different rapids and their difficulties, the feeling of elation once he had finished the rapid, being able to name a rapid, the different names of the rapids, camping at nights, the different animals that they saw, travelling down 105 miles in 7 days, staying on beaches by the river, encounters with crocodiles, defences against crocodiles, other animals they saw on their expedition, going around a waterfall, the number of boats and guides, his travelling companions and unrest between the two different countries-Zimbabwe and Zambia. Cooking Feature-Margaret Jenkins giving recipes for vegetables. End of Side Two.

Reference: R/05/B/67

Date: November 30th 1982 - November 30th 1982

Personal View of Gordon Young, feature writer for the Jersey Evening Post, interviewed by Geraldine des Forges. Was born and bred in Warwickshire in 1933 and got into a choir school at a cathedral. Went on to public school with a bursary-found it difficult because he wasn't allowed to talk to girls. He was thrown out of the school for talking to a girl on the street. Used to get into trouble at school-didn't enjoy academic work but enjoyed sport. There was no freedom in the school so he rebelled. He spent a lot of time singing at school. He played rugby and football and other sports. When he came to Jersey he joined the Jersey Rugby Football Club. He was 6 when the second world war broke out-remembers going through the Birmingham and Coventry blitz. He remembered enjoying the war-going into the woods and finding fragments of bullets-for him it was an adventure whilst his parents were terrified. In those days you were what your parents wanted you to be-they wanted to be a doctor. He started medical school at Birmingham University but gave it up after a year-didn't enjoy studying. He enjoyed the army and had a wonderful time for 5 years. First Record-Ella and Louis with A Foggy Day. Initially when he joined the army he applied to go in to the Gordon Highlanders but he was put in the Black Watch and was sent to Fort George-he liked the army discipline. He was picked out as an officer-went to train as an officer at Eaton Hall. He applied to join the Gurkhas but he was seconded to the King's African Rifles. He loved Africa-all his soldiers were Africans-they were wonderful. Then got sent out to Malaya. It was a tough life but for a bachelor the army was good because you could see the world. The companies he joined had great traditions-he liked the discipline because you knew what you could and couldn't do. He doesn't think national service should be brought back although it is a good experience. He never played the bagpipes as a member of the Black Watch. After he left the army he came to Jersey-he met a girl in England who was coming to Jersey and he followed her over and they got married at Trinity Church. There was very little work in Jersey at the time-he worked in a market garden which got into trouble because of a poor winter. He found another job at the hospital on the Observation Ward where he worked for a couple of years. At that point he heard of a building surveyors job which he got-he loved it and spent 27 years in the business-dealt with the Island Development Committee. Has never regretted not becoming a doctor. Second Record-Kai Winding. Surveying took a lot of training but he learnt by experience. You were never stuck in an office-he surveryed the whole of the Jersey Airport which took about 3 months and St Helier Harbour. Saw the poverty in St Helier-a lot of houses were in awful conditions and had people living inside of them. The buildings in the island have improved but there are still some appalling buildings. Loved the Noel and Porter Building but the British Home Stores building replaced it getting rid of all the beauty-King Street has lost some of its character. Loves buildings with Jersey granite-architects are now doing a good job. Hue Street was a beautiful street and he is glad it is finally being renovated. Loves railways-his father was a transport manager for a steel company. As a child he used to travel a great deal on the railways. Received a clockwork train set as a child and then as an adult bought a model railway and has been building it ever since. Third Record-Jersey Bounce. George Marshman, a cameraman from Channel Television, asked him if he wanted to be on television. He went for an interview with Ward Rutherford and he got the job-for 13 years he did freelance work for Channel Television and worked on every programme they produced. The broadcasts were all live so people saw your mistakes. He then worked for the Jersey Talking Magazine for the blind with Philip Gurdon which he really enjoyed and then Radio Lions with Alastair Layzell. For Radio Lions he did a minimum of five interviews in half an hour and everyone was very good. He thinks it's one of the best things that people can do for the hospital and broadcasters could gain experience from the job. He was keen to try something new and decided to move into journalism full time. His wife worked at the Jersey Evening Post and she told him that the 'Under the Clock' column needed a new author and he went for an interview with Mike Rumfitt and got the job. Loves writing and working at the Jersey Evening Post. He likes to comment on things that people are interested in. He thrives on deadlines and meeting people. He has written a book on rugby for the Jersey Rugby Club-they researched a great deal through the newspaper and it took 10 years to write. It's hard to write a book because it takes such a long time-he needed to take a break from writing but it has now been published. He'd like to write fictional books. He also enjoys painting and reading-he now writes art and book reviews for the newspaper. Fourth Record-Frank Sinatra with New York, New York. Enjoys family life-has had two sons and a daughter who have left the island. His eldest son works at the Jersey General Hospital but is going back to England, his second son works with computers and his daughter is a journalist. He has two grandchildren-Amy and Joshua. Started playing music 2 years ago-took up the trombone and has joined the Jersey Big Band where he plays the bass trombone. Fifth Record-Kid Ory with Oh Didn't he Ramble?.

Reference: R/07/B/19

Date: December 20th 1992 - December 20th 1992

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