Marie Lucscombe (Alto) and Joanne Lunn (James Southall at piano) enjoying a musical joke at the Jersey Festival Choir Annual Choral Weekend at Le Rocquier School.

Reference: P/03/D1/29

Date: February 12th 2000 - February 12th 2000

Lunch break for the Jersey Fetival Choir at their Annual Choral Weekend at Le Rocquier School. Sally Le Brocq, Maureen Burton, Roger Burton, Belinda Barlow, Deirdre Shute, Susan Harvey, David Lawrence and Condutor Joanne Lunn sitting around the table.

Reference: P/03/D1/30

Date: February 12th 2000 - February 12th 2000

Lunch break for the Jersey Festival Choir on their Annual Choral Weekend at Le Rocquier School. John Gottrell, Laura Pittman, Marguerite Blampied, Sally Le Brocq and Doreen Gottrell sitting around the table.

Reference: P/03/D1/31

Date: February 12th 2000 - February 12th 2000

Lunch break for David Laurence, Amy Luce and Joanne Lunn from the Jersey Festival Choir Annual Choral Weekend at Le Rocquier School.

Reference: P/03/D1/32

Date: February 12th 2000 - February 12th 2000

Photographic slide of an aerial view of Le Rocquier School from the north west

Reference: P/09/A/2199

Date: 1970 - 1990

Photographic slide of an aerial view of Le Rocquier School from the north

Reference: P/09/A/2200

Date: 1970 - 1990

Photographic slide of an aerial view of Le Rocquier School from the west

Reference: P/09/A/2201

Date: 1970 - 1990

Photographic slide of an aerial view of Le Rocquier School

Reference: P/09/A/2202

Date: 1970 - 1990

Photographic slide of the view from a field over a section of the south east coast of Jersey. Le Rocquier School is visible to the right, as is Icho Tower in the far distance

Reference: P/09/A/4153

Date: 1970 - 1990

Photographic slide of an aerial view of Le Rocquier School.

Reference: P/09/A/678

Date: June 10th 1977 - June 10th 1977

Photographic slide of an aerial view of St Clement's School and part of Le Rocquier.

Reference: P/09/A/694

Date: June 10th 1977 - June 10th 1977

Photographic slide of an aerial view of a section of the south east coast of Jersey including Les Marais flats, Le Rocquier School, Le Squez School and Le Croc du Hurté point.

Reference: P/09/A/754

Date: June 10th 1977 - June 10th 1977

Personal View of the Reg Jeune, recorded a week after his retirement from the States of Jersey after 35 years, interviewed by Hamish Marett-Crosby. He had good parents although they were not wealthy. It was a strict methodist upbringing-the only liqueur in the house was for the christmas pudding or for medicine. Remembers that he wanted to go and swim on a Sunday and he was forbidden to do that. He went to a Dame School in Vauxhall run by Miss Le Sauteur-she was a great disciplinarian but she was a good teacher. Miss Le Sauteur used a ruler on your knuckles-years later he became her lawyer and when he visited her she told him that she was terrified by the visit of her lawyer and he replied that the roles were reversed from years ago. He started as a solicitor's clerk-his parents couldn't afford further education after he left De La Salle College at 15½. The intention was for him to go into Lloyds Bank like many of his contemporaries but he went into the offices of Crill and Benest and after the occupation he moved to Oliver Mourant's office. First Record-Guide Me O Thou Great Jehovah. He went to De La Salle, a Catholic school, despite being a strict metodist and he married into an anglican family and he is proud that he is now Vice Chairman of the Governing Body. He is a lay brother of the De La Salle Order-he believes in the ecumenical movement and hopes the churches continue to get closer together. He met his wife Monica at the Food Office. Her father farmed at Rozel and he used to ride up there from town. They were engaged in 1943-she worked as secretary to the Medical Officer of Health and he wrote a presciption for some alcohol for the to celebrate. He started to get involved in a society called Toc H which encouraged public service. They moved to Bagot and he got involved in Georgetown Methodist Church becoming the superintendent of the sunday school and after the war he became chairman of the Jersey Youth Movement. At that stage people were rebuilding and weren't thinking about helping individuals. Harold Stephens and he started to visit the prison to entertain the prisoners. He became a lawyer without qualifications but he learned a great deal through experience. On the 1st January 1947 Mourant, du Feu and Jeune was set up with 39 articles of partnership. He stood in No 2 District unsuccessfully in the late 1950s but he lost. Second Record-Jacqueline du Pré playing Elgar's Cello Concerto. He stood in a by-election in St Helier District No 3 after much persuasion. His main opponent was Norman Le Brocq and he won comfortably and stayed as deputy in No 3 District for 10 years. He was stirred to stand because of the bad housing situation in St Helier. He thought the priorities were in the wrong place like spending money on the tunnel-he brought down two committees at the time. He took on the Presidency of Public Works and decided that the traffic meant that the tunnel was needed. Third Record-The Beatles with It's been a Hard Days Night. In the 1960s he was involved in the baking world and became chairman of the Royal Trust Company of Canada and TSB and the Jersey Savings Bank as it was known then. He finds life fascinating and like to be involved in things. He will carry on working rather than retire. He pushed for an ombudsman when he came into the States because there wasn't an appeal process-eventually a process was brought in. He thinks that the panel should now be made up from people who aren't in the States and it has been approved that he be the first chairman of the body now he has left the States. He once stood for constable of St Saviour when he was deputy of St Helier but Gordon Le Breton, a centenier, won the seat. He enjoyed working on the Education Committee for 15 years and he helped bring in Highlands College, the 14 plus transfer, Le Rocquier School was built and Grainville was bought. Highlands College has pushed on further education. He was worried that Hautlieu was going to be changed from a 14 plus transfer system and still believes in the system. At the start of his presidential career in the States he saw the end of the big politicians from 1948. He has remained a methodist lay preacher-at the beginning of the war he was singing in the choir of the methodist church. Fourth Record-Hallelujah Chorus. Believes in the importance of the Commonwealth Parliamentary Association-he went on his first conference to Canada in 1966. It is one of the few organisations in the world where everybody is equal-he was asked to join the finance committee in London and subsequently they elected him to be the International Treasurer. When he gave up being Treasurer he was one of the Trustees of their investment funds. The value for Jersey going to the conferences are the contacts made, the States members getting a wider perspective of life. He learned that the same kind of problems exist in other jurisdictions. People visit the island in association with the CPA. Wilfred Krichefski and Clarry Dupré were the only people prior to himself who were President of the CPA. Fifth Record-Music of the Night from Phantom of the Opera. Doesn't know what Jersey would have been like if the finance industry hadn't come to the island-in 1962 his first budget was £6 million income and £5 million expenditure-a tight hold were kept on finances. The budgets took time to debate and balance. He is happy with the creation of the Policy and Resources Committee. He implemented the idea of zero job growth in order to lower immigration. Has tried to persuade the States committees to think corporately but hasn't been entirely successful. Fifth Record-St Michael's Choir with 'What a Wonderful World'.

Reference: R/07/B/24

Date: 1997 - 1997

Visit of His Royal Highness the Duke of Edinburgh to the St John's Youth and Community Centre to open the Billy Butlin Memorial Hall commentated on by Mike Vibert on 29/03/1983. Description of the visit of the Prince, a description of the youth centre, children playing badminton, all the St John's School pupils at the event, Le Rocquier Band playing the national anthem. The main building of the centre was open on September 7th 1980 by Wilfred Tomes. Diane Smith commentates outside the centre waiting for the Prince to arrive describing the crowd. Famous visitors to the opening. Cost of the centre-£300,000. Mike Vibert-Duke's 6th visit to the island-describes the other visits. Diane Smith-Prince Philip's car just pulled up-accompanied by Sir Peter Whiteley and Sir Frank Ereaut, the Lieutenant Governor and Bailiff. Welcomed by Constable John Le Sueur and Lady Sheila Butlin, Mrs Le Sueur, Deputy Fred le Brocq, Senator Reg Jeune, head of the Education Committee-unveils the plaque. Prince being guided around the centre. Sees squash being played by Gillian Ferguson and her father and coach Doug Ferguson. Doug Ferguson talking about coaching his daughter, the championships she holds, how she feels about playing in front of Prince Philip. Prince Philip then making his way to the scout room to see demonstrations by the scouts. Beth Lloyd commentating on the Prince's visit to the scout room, Prince Philip meeting Colonel Bill Hall, the Scout Commissioner, talking about the different activities the scouts take part in, looking at tying knot demonstrations, first aid demonstrations, trip to Kenya to build a community building there, Duke of Edinburgh leaves the scout room. Mike Vibert-Duke of Edinburgh viewing a game of badminton, Barry Smith says who is playing in the demonstration games and the badminton club. Famous guests Morecambe and Wise, Dickie Henderson and Danny La Rue. Diane Smith-Prince entering club room, describing the club room. Mike Vibert-Prince standing on the balcony looking at the hall watching the men's badminton. Diane Smith-Prince introduced to the president and chairperson of the Jersey Flower Club Leah Samson and Viola Trenchard who helped decorate the centre. Diane Smith talking to Leah Samson and Viola Trenchard about the amount of members involved in arranging the flowers for the decoration, the time it took, the kind of flowers used and the theme of the decoration, the club which has been going since 1960 with almost 200 members, raising money for charity, organising flower and church festivals and fundraisers and the Woman's Institute of the island deciding to set up the Jersey Flower Club. Prince Philip leaving the club room-heading to the Billy Butlin Memorial Hall. Mike Vibert-waiting for the royal party to enter, La Rocquier School Band play the national anthem. Prince Philip being introduced to the officials of the Centre including Centenier Carl Hinault and Daphne Hinault, Mr and Mrs Angus Spencer-Nairn, Mr and Mrs Richard Dupré. Prince Philip meets officials of St John's School Ron Smith and David Rogers and meeting the school's football team. Meets celebrities and the Committe of the Centre, the Duke of Edinburgh award scheme winners. Speech made about the Duke of Edinburgh award scheme and each person is called up to collect their awards including Russell Gibaut, Steven Davidson, Duncan Gibaut, Steven Rondel, Alan Cadoret, Lloyd Pinel and Collette Le Riche. Constable of St John, John Le Sueur making a speech about the centre. Prince Philip making a speech about the Duke of Edinburgh award scheme and the opening of the centre. The Royal Party departing and an overview of the rest of the programme being undertaken by the Duke of Edinburgh. The bailiff giving a speech about the islanders leaving to take part in the Falklands War wishing them luck and a safe return. Recording of Winston Churchill's speech announcing Victory in Europe including the liberation of 'our dear Channel Islands'. End of Side One. Personal View of Joan Stevens interviewed by Beth Lloyd. Talking about her love of history. Had a happy childhood-was an only child. In the early years moved around a lot as her father was in the army-moved wherever her father's regiment was sent. Moved back to Jersey when she was 12. Jersey became home quickly-lived in Les Pins in Millbrook. Went to school at Jersey College for Girls-was smaller in those days-arrived with French being her worst subject and left with it being her best thanks to Miss Holt. After leaving school went to a family in Lausanne, Switzerland to practice her french. When she came back she got a job at the Société Jersiaise Museum as a secretary typist-became fond of the museum. First Record-Scarlet Ribbons by Kenneth McKellar. Went to West Park Pavilion as a girl and went surfing. Met her husband, Charles Stevens, soon after starting at the museum. He was about to go to Africa with the Administration Service. Met five times before they got engaged and then he went away for 3 years-was love at first sight. Knew he was coming back and so didn't mind that he went away-got married as soon as he got back and then went straight back to Zambia. He travelled around the country-went with him on tour but after having children didn't go with him. Had a number of servants. Enjoyed life in Africa in retrospect but longed for Jersey. Was out in Africa during the occupation. Second world war-was worried about everybody in Jersey-was 18 months before they discovered there second son was born. Heard from them through the red cross messages. War didn't touch them directly in Zambia but saw a great deal of troop movements-was a transit camp-helped the troops as they passed through. Second Record-Impatience by Schubert. Came back to Jersey on leave after the war to see her family in 1947. Came back for good in 1949 so the children could be educated. Her time was taken up with bringing up the family. Took part in some farming on their farm in St Mary on a modest scale. Started researching into old Jersey houses and decided to write a book on the subject. Researched by talking to people in Jersey. Wrote Old Jersey Houses and then 'Victorian Voices'-the Sumner family had papers in their house Belle Vue-gave it to the Museum and was asked to catalogue it. It was made up mainly of the diaries and letter books of Sir John Le Couteur and his family. Books about Jersey don't traditionally sell well but her 'Short History' sold well. Third Record-Silver Swan by Orlando Gibbons. Interested in Jerseymen from the past but wouldn't write about it because it has been covered by Mr Balleine's Biographical Dictionary. Her favourite historical Jersey figure is Sir John Dumaresq who was the lieutenant bailiff-an important figure of the time-was Sir John Le Couteur's grandfather-was the head of the liberal party in Jersey-was a great orator-was sent to plead for the island on 23 occasions-kept diaries in the late 1700s and showed a very human side. Had a large family that he brought up after his wife died when his family was still quite young. Collects a lot of information about individuals and then puts it together to form a picture. Fourth Record-The Gondeliers with 'Take a Pair of Sparkling Eyes'. Balleine's History-it had been out of print for 20 years and nothing had replaced it so they decided to rewrite Balleine-decided to reprint it with additions-things that have happened since Mr Balleine had written and the need to emphasise certain aspects of the book. Marguerite Syvret and her worked together-good to work as a team. Added a great deal but it was woven in to the text. Mr Balleine was not very good at listing his sources and so they had to find all of the sources that he mentioned. Brought out a book with Richard Mayne called 'Jersey Through the Lens' with photographs and explanations. She is working with Jean Arthur on the place names of Jersey. Has three sons in England and a daughter in Jersey-one son is an architect, one is in the Homes Office and one is a freelance cabinetmaker-she tries to see her grandchildren as much as possible. Fifth Record-Danny Kay with Inch Worm. Her daughter lives with her in Jersey-she teaches riding. Jersey has changed a lot-the pressure of population. Believes there is a need to give something back to the community. At the Société Jersiaise Museum-goes to a lot of meetings-very alive in the community-trying to get younger people involved. Involved with the National Trust for Jersey-has the same aims of as the Trust in Britain but is autonomous. Is unhappy that the Queen's Valley flooding has gone through the States with a small majority-would like to see an alternative. Doesn't like the fact that the land is going to be bought by compulsory purchase. Sixth Record-Mario Lanza with Ave Maria.

Reference: R/07/B/7

Date: 1982 - 1983

JEP Newscutting - Article on the history of Jersey's education system - 21.06.1995

Reference: US/174

Date: 1995 - 1995

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