Photographs of: the Beaufort Hotel, Green Street, The Parade, Pontins Holiday Camp, a view of Gorey and Mont Orgueil Castle, Les Maisonettes, Tower Road, and the Finnish flag being flown outside the offices of the Vice Consul in Hill Street.

Reference: L/A/75/A2/BUI/50/9

Date: 1967 - 1968

Subject: Buildings

File number: 50

Page number: 8

Photographic slide of brass plaques outside a doorway (possibly the offices of Mourant, Du Feu and Jeune) with the names: H. De C. Mourant/Advocate; C. A. R. Du Feu/Solicitor and Notary Public; R.R. Jeune/Solicitor; R.F.V Jeune/Advocate; C.F. Coutanche/Solicitor.

Reference: P/09/A/4296

Date: May 31st 1983 - May 31st 1983

Personal View of Senator Reg Jeune, President of the Education Committee. Born and brought up in Jersey-remembers difficult days of the late 1920s and 1930s-early life. Remembers a home with little money but very happy. It was a strict methodist home and his parents gave him a good start in life. His father had two hobbies-his garden and prize poultry. He got involved in his father's hobbies-he got involved with prize bantams in the local agricultural show. Has carried methodism throughout his life-has been a methodist local preacher for 40 years starting in 1942. Remembers the weather being nicer in his childhood-spent a lot of time on the beach and cycling around the island. Played tennis, watched cricket matches at the Victoria College Field when some of the top cricketers came to the island. Lived in Don Road and then in Georgetown as a child. He went to the De La Salle College-he was always encouraged to read books. He remembers going to the junior library with his mother where a Miss Priestley worked-never lost that interest. Thought that he may become a teacher but it was difficult getting grants at that time. His parents were ambitious for him-gave him a lot of encouragement. First Record-The Hallelujah Chorus from Handel's Messiah. Used to sing the piece of music in a choir-enjoyed being a chorister. At school-was interested in sport but was never particularly good. Left school to go into a bank-in waiting he went into Hill Street and then fell in love with law and took that up. Many of his fellow pupils went into a bank-it's much easier now. Studying was a struggle-graduated as a solicitor of the Royal Court of Jersey in 1945-a great deal of the examination was in French-was very difficult. Learnt French in order to be a solicitor. He was an office boy in Hill Street at first-used to collect rentes and write out contracts on parchment. Still sees the contracts that he used to write out. The occupation arrived-they were looking after people's affairs who had left the island-he started taking an active interest in cases after the second world war. It could take several years to study to qualify as a lawyer-took 6-8 years. Church took up quite a bit of time-choir and lay preaching. After he'd qualified he married in 1946 to Monica Valpy. Second Record-Flight of the Bumblebee by Rimsky-Korsakov. Hill Street was quiet during the occupation-had little to do-didn't experience hassle from the germans-helped look after people's affairs who had evacuated. He became a partner in a practice with two other men Helier Mourant and Clifford du Feu and created a company called Mourant, du Feu and Jeune-built up a substantial partnership. Started as a family practice until the financial scene came to Jersey-he became involved. It started around the early 1960s-he got interested when he got asked advice and he gradually became interested. He became chairman of the Youth Movement in 1947 and was involved in other organisations such as the Rotary Club-was interested in politics. Has always been interested in education and youth services. At one point thought that he may have gone into the church-if the occupation hadn't come along he may have done. Hadn't travelled much at this time-he'd been to Guernsey in England and that was all-after he qualified the opportunities to travel increased. He has now made many travels including extensively around the United States of America. Third Record-The Grand March from Verdi's Aida. Has been involved as much as possible with his family-his eldest son is a partner with him who has two daughters, his second son is London and has become an actor and his daughter is a jewellery designer who has come back to Jersey. Encouraged his son to read law. Tried to become a States member of St Helier No 2 District in the late 1950s but was unsuccessful. In 1962 he was successful in a by-election of St Helier No 3 District. Wasn't put off going into the States when he didn't get in the first time. Strange to go into the States especially in a by-election-the house was already set. Was nervous and excited the first time he spoke in the States despite having done a lot of public speaking in his job and church. After six months became president of the Public Works Committee-he had attacked the spending of money at the time especially for the tunnel-the money got thrown out and as a result two committees resigned-the Island Development Committee and the Public Works Committee and he became president of the Public Works Committee-he had been president of major committee ever since. Investigated the traffic problems in St Helier and eventually decided there should be a tunnel built under Fort Regent. Fourth Record-Le Rocquier School Band with Rock Around the Clock. Has a great love of music and books-still reads a lot despite working hard. The law firm has grown-he has become detached from the day to day business of the firm-tries to get there as much as possible-misses it. Became involved with the Trustees Savings Bank-joined the local board about 25 years previously and then became chairman of the Jersey Savings Bank, chairman of the Channel Islands Savings Bank and then elected to the board in London. Goes to two meetings a month in London. Received the OBE for his services to the savings banks-was very thrilled. Enjoyed going to Buckingham Palace to receive the award. Wants Jersey to retain its character but not to be insulated-he's chairman of the Executive Committee of the Commonwealth Parliamentary Association and involved with the French side of the parliamentarians. Fifth Record-Treorky Male Voice Choir. Has been involved in bringing an ombudsman into the States-succeeded-there is now a Review Tribunal. Doesn't have many more great ambitions in the States-is at the service of the States. Thinks it would be almost impossible to set higher education up in Jersey-Highlands College and what it offers with further education is about the limit that Jersey can expect. End of Side One. Personal View of Senator Ralph Vibert, interviewed by Beth Lloyd. Is the father of the house and president of the Finance Committee. At school-pictures that he would be a teacher-went to Victoria College in the 1920s-was captain of the football and head prefect. Didn't get a scholarship to Oxford University-Lord Coutanche was reorganising the States departments and set up the Law Officers-he became a secretary for the Attorney General-decided to become a lawyer. Was secretary to Lord Coutanche during the day and studied law in the evening. Was called to the bar in 1933/34-set up a private practice on his own. First Record-Welcome Song of the Maori People of New Zealand. Has not been to New Zealand but his daughter has. Has travelled a great deal-enjoys it. Had a law practice in Hill Street in the 1930s-business was quite slow-people paid on time. His first client was the late Senator Edward Le Quesne who was trying to get compensation from a shipping company when a boat broke down travelling to France. In the 1930s became interested in the movement of Moral Rearmament-was given a new conception of Christianity-it enables Christians to work with other people of faith throughout the world. Moral Rearmament took part in the bringing of democracy to Zimbabwe. Second Record-Unofficial National Anthem of all of Africa. He is well known in the Swiss village of Caux because it is the world conference centre of Moral Rearmament. Believes that when people work together good things come of it. His wife and he went to Zimbabwe to help friends-they had met Alec Smith-the son of a prime minister and a drug addict-through the attention of Kit Prescott, a friend, he stopped being an addict and became a leading statesman. During the occupation he evacuated in order to enlist-his wife was undecided-in the end she decided to leave. His wife had a baby and he joined up-got into a school of cipher breaking-60 pupils were in the first ever course held on this and only 3 were good enough-he didn't make the grade but they wanted people who could speak french and could teach ciphers to people in the field who were behind enemy lines. Later moved to India to become instructor training people to work behind enemy lines. Worked for the Special Operations Executive-met Maurice Buckmaster who was head of the French Section. His brother Denis escaped to England during the occupation and then joined the Royal Air Force. Third Record-Beethoven's Fifth Symphony. When the war was finished he helped clear up with the courts and then he got back in late 1946. Went back into his law practice. He became solicitor-general in 1948 until 1955-decided not to continue to become bailiff-had differences with the attorney-general Cecil Harrison and decided to leave. Believes those years were wasted years-he could have built up a practice at that time. Went back into private practice with his younger brother. Decided to go into politics because he wanted a hand in running the island. Fourth Record-Mozart's Piano Sonata No 11. His wife, Muriel Vibert, née Le Gros, has been a big support all his life. Became a deputy for St Brelade in 1955 and 2 years later became a senator in an uncontested by-election. Has always been invited onto committees-the sudden death of George Troy led him to become President of Defence, the collapse of the Establishment Committee led to him taking it on and the sudden death of Cyril Le Marquand led to him being President of Finance. Also was President of the Common Market Committee. Constant change of personnel in the States-new wave of people coming to the States typified by Senator Shenton who have brought new life to the States and a desire to do things quickly. Thinks more businessmen should be in the States but it's difficult as they are often too busy to get to States sittings. Dislikes important decisions being rushed through without due consideration. Likes the Jersey system-believes it's a very democratic system. Likes the tradition of the honorary system. Instigated the concept of a minimum income for States members-people could become members of the States without fear of financial difficulties-wouldn't like to see all the States members becoming professionals. Believes the parishes should keep their autonomy. Fifth Record-Manhattan Beach by Sousa. As a hobby he enjoyed playing tennis, likes to garden and play with the grandchildren. One of his daughters is a freelance photographer-became interested in photography. Was awarded the OBE in 1977 and became father of the house in 1980-has no more political ambitions. Believes Jersey's political future should be secure. Sixth Record-An Anglican Hymn. Commentary on the Battle of Britain Red Arrow display by Squadron Leader Henry Ploszek. Talks about the distance that the Red Arrows stay away from each other in the display, the training for formation flying, as manager he organises the administrative duties. End of Side Two.

Reference: R/07/B/11

Date: 1982 - 1982

Personal View of the Reg Jeune, recorded a week after his retirement from the States of Jersey after 35 years, interviewed by Hamish Marett-Crosby. He had good parents although they were not wealthy. It was a strict methodist upbringing-the only liqueur in the house was for the christmas pudding or for medicine. Remembers that he wanted to go and swim on a Sunday and he was forbidden to do that. He went to a Dame School in Vauxhall run by Miss Le Sauteur-she was a great disciplinarian but she was a good teacher. Miss Le Sauteur used a ruler on your knuckles-years later he became her lawyer and when he visited her she told him that she was terrified by the visit of her lawyer and he replied that the roles were reversed from years ago. He started as a solicitor's clerk-his parents couldn't afford further education after he left De La Salle College at 15½. The intention was for him to go into Lloyds Bank like many of his contemporaries but he went into the offices of Crill and Benest and after the occupation he moved to Oliver Mourant's office. First Record-Guide Me O Thou Great Jehovah. He went to De La Salle, a Catholic school, despite being a strict metodist and he married into an anglican family and he is proud that he is now Vice Chairman of the Governing Body. He is a lay brother of the De La Salle Order-he believes in the ecumenical movement and hopes the churches continue to get closer together. He met his wife Monica at the Food Office. Her father farmed at Rozel and he used to ride up there from town. They were engaged in 1943-she worked as secretary to the Medical Officer of Health and he wrote a presciption for some alcohol for the to celebrate. He started to get involved in a society called Toc H which encouraged public service. They moved to Bagot and he got involved in Georgetown Methodist Church becoming the superintendent of the sunday school and after the war he became chairman of the Jersey Youth Movement. At that stage people were rebuilding and weren't thinking about helping individuals. Harold Stephens and he started to visit the prison to entertain the prisoners. He became a lawyer without qualifications but he learned a great deal through experience. On the 1st January 1947 Mourant, du Feu and Jeune was set up with 39 articles of partnership. He stood in No 2 District unsuccessfully in the late 1950s but he lost. Second Record-Jacqueline du Pré playing Elgar's Cello Concerto. He stood in a by-election in St Helier District No 3 after much persuasion. His main opponent was Norman Le Brocq and he won comfortably and stayed as deputy in No 3 District for 10 years. He was stirred to stand because of the bad housing situation in St Helier. He thought the priorities were in the wrong place like spending money on the tunnel-he brought down two committees at the time. He took on the Presidency of Public Works and decided that the traffic meant that the tunnel was needed. Third Record-The Beatles with It's been a Hard Days Night. In the 1960s he was involved in the baking world and became chairman of the Royal Trust Company of Canada and TSB and the Jersey Savings Bank as it was known then. He finds life fascinating and like to be involved in things. He will carry on working rather than retire. He pushed for an ombudsman when he came into the States because there wasn't an appeal process-eventually a process was brought in. He thinks that the panel should now be made up from people who aren't in the States and it has been approved that he be the first chairman of the body now he has left the States. He once stood for constable of St Saviour when he was deputy of St Helier but Gordon Le Breton, a centenier, won the seat. He enjoyed working on the Education Committee for 15 years and he helped bring in Highlands College, the 14 plus transfer, Le Rocquier School was built and Grainville was bought. Highlands College has pushed on further education. He was worried that Hautlieu was going to be changed from a 14 plus transfer system and still believes in the system. At the start of his presidential career in the States he saw the end of the big politicians from 1948. He has remained a methodist lay preacher-at the beginning of the war he was singing in the choir of the methodist church. Fourth Record-Hallelujah Chorus. Believes in the importance of the Commonwealth Parliamentary Association-he went on his first conference to Canada in 1966. It is one of the few organisations in the world where everybody is equal-he was asked to join the finance committee in London and subsequently they elected him to be the International Treasurer. When he gave up being Treasurer he was one of the Trustees of their investment funds. The value for Jersey going to the conferences are the contacts made, the States members getting a wider perspective of life. He learned that the same kind of problems exist in other jurisdictions. People visit the island in association with the CPA. Wilfred Krichefski and Clarry Dupré were the only people prior to himself who were President of the CPA. Fifth Record-Music of the Night from Phantom of the Opera. Doesn't know what Jersey would have been like if the finance industry hadn't come to the island-in 1962 his first budget was £6 million income and £5 million expenditure-a tight hold were kept on finances. The budgets took time to debate and balance. He is happy with the creation of the Policy and Resources Committee. He implemented the idea of zero job growth in order to lower immigration. Has tried to persuade the States committees to think corporately but hasn't been entirely successful. Fifth Record-St Michael's Choir with 'What a Wonderful World'.

Reference: R/07/B/24

Date: 1997 - 1997

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