Harbours Department. Pat O'Holloran with a solar panel which is to be fitted at Sorel Lighthouse.

Reference: P/03/B205/25

Date: November 20th 2000 - November 20th 2000

Harbours Department. Pat O'Halloran

Reference: p/03/b284/02

Date: August 10th 2000 - August 10th 2000

Pat O'Halloran removing the pot of mercury from the light at Corbière lighthouse. This is an operation which is carried out once every twenty years.

Reference: P/03/B39/10

Date: August 24th 2000 - August 24th 2000

An overhead shot looking down on the light at Corbière lighthouse. Geoff Ninnis is inside the light and Pat O'Halloran half-in. They are cleaning the light and carrying out the mercury recovery. This is an operation which is carried out once every twenty years. They are both wearing protective clothing, gloves and masks.

Reference: P/03/B39/15

Date: August 24th 2000 - August 24th 2000

Pat O'Halloran of Public Services cleaning around the base of the light inside Corbière lighthouse.

Reference: P/03/B40/07

Date: August 24th 2000 - August 24th 2000

Pat O'Halloran of Public Services in the light at Corbière lighthouse during the recovery of the mercury. This is an operation which is carried out once every twenty years.

Reference: P/03/B40/23

Date: August 24th 2000 - August 24th 2000

Pat O'Halloran of Public Services and George Gordon (contracted from England) checking for mercury in the light at Corbière lighthouse. This is an operation which is carried out once every twenty years.

Reference: P/03/B40/24

Date: August 24th 2000 - August 24th 2000

A photogragh of the reflection of Pat O'Halloran from Public Services in the dark red prespex taken at Corbière lighthouse during the mercury recovery. This is an operation which is carried out once every twenty years.

Reference: P/03/B40/25

Date: August 24th 2000 - August 24th 2000

Jersey Harbours. Pat O'Halloran testing a new solar powered light for Sorel Lighthouse.

Reference: p/03/b413/03

Date: November 21st 2000 - November 21st 2000

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