Mont Orgueil Castle Visitors book with signatures of official visitors to the castle, 1921 - to date. Includes the signatures of George V, and Mary, Edward VIII, Elizabeth II, and Philip Duke of Edinburgh, Bailiffs, Lieutenant Governors and politicians.

Reference: C/D/P/B3/1

Date: July 12th 1921 - December 31st 1997

Letter from the Home Secretary thanking the States for their congratulations on the birth of Prince Edward

Reference: D/AP/AE/17

Date: April 6th 1964 - April 6th 1964

St Mark's Girls School Log Book. From 1919 this school amalgamated with Brighton Road and became Brighton Road Girls School. This volume records the daily events at the school and has been indexed by name of the person mentioned. The index created by volunteers has been attached as a PDF so that you can see the page numbers the person is mentioned on. The volume has not been digitised to date so you will need to contact the Archive to obtain copies of the relevant pages.

Reference: D/J/N3/13

Date: 1901 - 1954

Photographs of the Royal Visit of the Queen and Prince Philip showing the arrival and departure of the Queen at Albert Pier

Reference: D/Q/S14/31

Date: June 27th 1978 - June 27th 1978

Photographs of the Royal Visit of the Queen and Prince Philip showing the Queen meeting the bailiff and jurats

Reference: D/Q/S14/32

Date: June 27th 1978 - June 27th 1978

Files relating to the arrangements for the Royal Visit of Princess Elizabeth and Prince Philip to Jersey

Reference: D/Z1/A310/1

Date: 1949 - 1949

Files relating to the arrangements for the Royal Visit of HM Queen and the Duke of Edinburgh

Reference: D/Z1/A310/15

Date: 1978 - 1978

Files relating to the arrangements for the Royal Visit of Queen Elizabeth and the Duke of Edinburgh

Reference: D/Z1/A310/4

Date: 1957 - 1957

VHS Tape: 1) 16mm colour film. Southern Railways ship Brittany entering St Helier Harbour, late 1940s. 1949: Havre des Pas Bathing Pool. 1950: historical pageant with characters in medieval costumes at St Ouen’s Manor. 1950: parachute descent over St Aubin’s Bay. 1950: Corbière in a storm. 1951: scenes at the Battle of Flowers, [the first after the Occupation]. 1953: decorations throughout St Helier to mark the coronation of Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth II. 1954: Battle of Flowers on Victoria Avenue. 1954: horse racing at Les Landes, scenes of the tote and spectators. 1954: sea at St Ouen’s Bay. 1956: gathering vraic at St Ouen’s Bay, including scenes of the vraic stacks. 1956: Battle of Flowers. July 1957, visit of the Queen and the Duke of Edinburgh; shows Royal Yacht Britannia arriving off Noirmont, scenes on the Albert Pier and the Queen being driven through streets of St Helier. 1957: good scenes at the sub-aqua club at Rozel and shots at the airport. 1958: scenes at the BSJA [British Show Jumping Association] gymkhana.

Reference: Q/05/A/141

Date: 1949 - 1958

VHS tape of 5 separate films: 1) Filmed by Dixie Landick in 16mm colour. Film shows College Field under snow 1970's. Victoria College cross country on the sand dunes, St Ouen. July 1957 - HM Queen Elizabeth II visit to Jersey; landing at St Helier. Inspecting CCF guard of honour. HM Queen at Victoria College. B&W film inside College Hall. 0h 11m 03s 2) Filmed by Dixie Landick in 16mm colour. Film shows Victoria College. Demolition of de Carteret building (old Art school). VCJ. Swimming Pool. Band of the Blues and Royals. Opening of new squash courts. headmaster Martyn Devenport. Football Match, College Field. The Temple and invited guests to witness publication of book about College by Derek Cotterill. 0h 09 32s 3) Filmed by Dixie Landick in 16mm colour. Film shows Victoria College including the Dean Jeune library opened by the Lieutenant-Governor, General Sir Desmond Fitzpatrick. Bailiff Sir Frank Ereaut & re-opening of Howard Hall. 0h 03 11s 4) Filmed by Dixie Landick in 16mm colour. Film shows HM Queen Elizabeth II and the Duke of Edinburgh at Grainville school meeting schoolchildren. 0h 03m 11s 5) Filmed by Dixie Landick in 16mm colour. Film shows HRH Princess Anne opening new science block at Victoria College. Also present are the Lieutenant-Governor Air Chief Marshall Sir John Davies and the President of the Education Committee Senator Reg Jeune. 0h 02 25s. This film is located in the Audio Visual Area of the Jersey Archive.

Reference: Q/05/A/66

Date: 1957 - 1978

Jersey Talking Magazine-December 1977 Edition. Introduction by Gordon Young. Nature feature-Frances Le Sueur talking about owls including examples of their noise. Medical feature-Beth Lloyd talking to a doctor about keeping warm in winter. Cooking feature-Margaret Jenkins talking about steaming. Island Administrators-Graeme Pitman interviewing Senator Bernard Binnington, President of the Agriculture and Fisheries Committee about the responsibilities of his committee, administration of the States Farm at the Howard Davis Farm and the work that goes on there, things that he think may change in the industry in the future, the involvement of the committee in fisheries, the possibility of taking over responsibility for food stocks, how long he has been president and been in the States. Mike Le Cocq talking about hints for gardening for blind people. End of Side One. Child reading a poem about winter. In July Andrew Millar who is blind, PRO of Talking Newspaper, a physiotherapist and a guide around Colchester and Marjorie Norton visited Buckingham Palace for a garden party and talks about their experience, meeting the Queen and Prince Philip. Norah Bryant, a picture restorer, being interviewed by Beth Lloyd about picture restoration, the process of restoration and cleaning, the implications of having a picture restored and examples of work. Interview by Philip Gurdon of Joe Rechka, a pilot, who talks about his early life just after the Germans had invaded Czechoslovakia, travelling from Poland to Calais and then Paris, joining the French Foreign Legion and training for war, defending railway stations over the Maginot Line, the Allies losing the war and moving to Liverpool, joining the British Fighter Squadron, ferrying planes, flying over Malta, returning to Czechoslovakia after the war and escaping to the UK to escape the regime.

Reference: R/05/B/14

Date: November 30th 1977 - November 30th 1977

Personal View of Florence Bechelet [with jersey accent] interviewed by Beth Lloyd talking to her about the Battle of Flowers. She has been making floats since 1934, she decided to start when she saw a float in 1928, noticed a carnival class was being held-decided she wanted to take part in it, she made a watering can costume and showed it to a neighbour who said that she'd done very well, was going to walk in with it but it would have been too heavy. At 15 she found an old pram, which she tied with string planks and put a tower shaped clock and vases with flowers on it. With two friends she went to the Battle Of Flowers at Springfield and won 3rd Class in the class with 10 shillings prize money. She was determined to do better next time. She was not artistic at school, she put the floats together by looking at picture of animals to get ideas and cutting a piece of wire bigger than the animal and shaping it. For the first 3 years she made it with hydrangeas. She found out there was a prize for best exhibit in junior class and senior in wild flowers. In 1937 she made a weather house in heather and won first in her class and the junior wild flowers prize, which was 6 solid silver tea spoons. First record-a March from the Band of the Welsh Guards. Battle Of Flowers at Springfield was a smaller scale than today but had beautiful floats. They used a lot more hydrangeas in those days. There was more of a team effort in the past, young people used to put together exhibits, most young people were in the Battle. Springfield-used to hold up to 10,000 people who were mostly islanders but there were a few tourists. Local bands used to play. The outbreak of war stopped the Battle Of Flowers. Her family had a farm but they couldn't export produce and cattle kept being taken by the germans. They were left with 2 cattle, a severely depleted stock, in St Ouen. The Germans took 12 vergees of land in Les Landes. She didn't really deal with the Germans. Food was scarce-a lot of people were saved by the Red Cross parcels. She had planned for the Battle Of Flowers before the outbreak of war but didn't do it until 1951. It was a hunting scene, which won first prize in its class with a prize of £15, first in the junior wild flowers which was a prize of a silver tea set, the prix de merit, which was a prize of a refrigerator which still works today and the best exhibit of the whole show by an individual, which was a prize of a radiogram worth 160 guineas. Second record-Sound of Music. Battle Of Flowers started again in 1951 and went to Victoria Avenue which was a better venue and had a smooth road. She didn't know why it changed back as it started on Victoria Avenue. There hasn't been a Battle at the end of the Battle of Flowers for 7 or 8 years. At the end of the parade she used to have to protect her own float. She has started a Battle Of Flowers Museum through her interest in the event, it has proved popular after the first three years of difficulty. It was opened on 16th June 1971 with one building and then a second, third and fourth with sixteen models from the Battle Of Flowers in total. She has made 40 exhibits for the Battle Of Flowers and 13 exhibits for other fetes including on Grouville Common, St Ouen's Fete, Villa Millbrook and St Andrew's Park-in competition. Her favourite float was made for the Queen and Duke of Edinburgh's visit in 1979 with an exhibit of 40 flamingos, took it to Howard Davis Park and were introduced and talked to the Queen and Duke of Edinburgh who were easy to talk to. The President of the Battle Of Flowers' Association gave her permission to show it before the Battle Of Flowers took place and she used it in the Battle Of Flowers that year although it didn't win a prize and the Association said they couldn't give her a guarantee for it because it had been shown before but it was sorted out although she was upset and didn't exhibit for the next 2 years. Had an exhibit that became a design for a stamp, which was a float of ostriches. She later became allergic to glue. Told by Philatelic Bureau that her design was being used as a stamp-1s 9d. Third Record-Blue Danube. She makes a float by getting a book on animals, making a scene, for example, a jaguar with llamas, keeps the design in her head rather than drawing it, no help given to her-all individual work. She picks the grasses as soon as they're ready. Used to pick them at the sand dunes and now grows her own. Has to sew them each year. She makes her mind up on what the theme will be on christmas day and doesn't change her mind. The float is made from three quarter inch mesh chicken wire. On a horse and bison float-84,000 pieces of grass were used on each horse and 11,000 bunches of approx 20 each on the bison. All her spare time is spent doing things. She is not normally a patient person but enjoys doing it and never gets bored. She dyes the grasses before putting them on the float in a bucket on her gas cooker. Prefers making animals to human figures. She was especially careful when making a Jersey calf figure as she was asked to do so by the Société Jersiaise and she wanted to make sure it was right and kept checking. Fourth Record-Jimmy Shand-chose it because it has a good rhythm. She talks about her exhibits that went to Exeter for Jersey Tourism and Leeds. She went with them and got a good reaction from people as there is nothing like it in England. She went to Guernsey with the Pied Piper of Hamlyn and got first prize. Brought humour into her exhibit, the funniest was a donkey derby. The Battle Of Flowers is not as good as it used to be-early 50s used to be 80 or 90 exhibits-a lot more than today. The young people not interested. The parochial classes not as popular as they can't find a leader. Miss Battle of Flowers is a good idea and provides an extra exhibit. Visitors still very keen. New set up with the arch ways on the Victoria Avenue good. Pictures hanging in museum. Fifth Record-Mary Poppins-Chimchiminy. Went to the ball at the West Park Pavilion as a chicken and won first prize and the tortoise and the hare but she collapsed due to lack of air in the costume. She was unable to compete in the Battle Of Flowers this year because she has been in hospital, told to rest but she has an idea for next years float already. End of Side One. Personal View of Major John Riley. Born in Trinity Manor in 1925. His grandfather came to Jersey in 1908. His ancestry is from Yorkshire and later his grandfather moved to Cornwall and London and came to Jersey in 1908. He had an interest in islands and tried to buy Sark and move to Alderney but moved to Jersey. He was interested in architecture, by profession a theologian but had a love of architecture and took time and money rebuilding the manor which was near derelict when he moved in. The roof had to come off and it was reconstructed in a French style. The architect was Sir Reginald Bloomfield, a London architect. The manor goes back to 1550. It was the seat of the de Carteret family and was successfully restored and enlarged by de Carterets in 1660 and the 19th century. First memories of the manor were of his grandfather who was an imposing and a great church man-morning and evening prayers were in the chapel and many people lived there including 3 uncles and his father but mother died in an accident in 1928 but he had a largely happy childhood. In the 1930s he travelled around England as his father was in the army. It was a contrast to living in manor but it only struck him as odd later in life. Being brought up in a large house was not restrictive, the children had good fun and he had affection for certain parts of house. First Record-Carmen Jones. Schooling-he went to day school in Jersey, preparatory school in England and then school in Winchester when war broke out in 1939. He didn't enjoy school, he was not academic and not good at ball games but it was a good education. During World War 2 his grandfather was allowed to live in the Manor for the first 2 years, the grounds were used as an ammunition dump, later the garrison moved into the house and his grandfather moved to one of the lodges. House undamaged and well looked after. When he arrived back in the island day after the liberation the germans were cleaning the manor. Felt worried about being separated from the island and the only contact was red cross letters which were only 28 words long-had to be careful. Was registered by mistake as an enemy alien card in England. Ambitions-had it not been for World War 2 he may have had an academic career-unsure. Couldn't think of any other profession he would have done apart from the army. His grandfather wanted him to have a classical education, he was an academic man and had stood for parliament but didn't get in. Ended up in the Coldstream Guards-his father had been a member, he has no regrets as he lived with marvellous people. He joined in 1943 and was commissioned in 1944 and joined the forces in North West Europe as a platoon commander. He wasn't frightened of getting killed, the idea of coming home as a wounded war hero appealed, but he had a fear of being frightened. In general the sergeant runs the platoon as they have massive experience and the officers, who had more training, did the planning. He went to North West Germany and saw action for 9 days before he was wounded on 9th March 1945 and evacuated to a hospital in Nottingham 48 hours after. It was the last he saw of the second world war. After he went out to Palestine. They had been earmarked to go to Japan but the bomb was dropped before he had to go. Second Record-Underneath the Arches. He stayed in army for 20 years, working with nice people who trust in each other. He was in a brigade of guards and had a really varied time. Later he was involved in the administration of the army. When he was in the Coldstream Guards he talks about how they felt in full uniform, being very hot whilst on parade, standing still was tiring, he took part in the vigil when the king died. He served in Palestine between 1945-48, then back for 3 months then went out to Malaya for 2½ years which was exciting. As company commander he led a patrol of 14-20 men for a week-10 days in the jungle. His father was still in Jersey at this time and became a jurat in the Royal Court. He came back on leave from time to time. The Manor was not in working order till the mid 50s. When he came back he helped around the Manor. In his army career he became an instructor-dealing with officers in their early 30s who were destined for commanding positions. During the Seven Day War there was both an Israeli and Egyptian who were called back into service. Third Record-Glen Miller. Took the Coldstream Guards Band to America in 1954-for 12 weeks. 160 men would move into a hotel, play a concert, have dinner, go to bed and then move around-strenuous. He left the army in 1963, he was sad to leave but had two young children, schooling was a problem for serving officers. He came back to Trinity Manor, didn't know what he wanted to do, determined to find plenty to do. He took the dairy farm back and got involved in companies and then stood for the States. He decided to go in to politics because he felt he had a responsibility to the island and wanted to give something back. His experience outside of the island was of value. He had no ambitions as a politician-the States was more like local administration. Fourth Record-Noel Coward. Politicians work hard-especially becoming president of a major committee which holds almost a ministerial responsibility, you need to be able to communicate with people. Life going to become more difficult for people in politics. You could run the island with 20 people but would have to pay them, which is against what the island politics is about. Became President of the Defence Committee-linked to his background. Wilfred Krichefski asked him to join the committee and he was able to help because of his military background. It was not like the Ministry of Defence-more like a Committee of Public Safety. Decided to finish in politics last year as he had done 18 years and didn't want to go stale and stand in the way of other people. He wanted to clear the way for other people to be promoted and hopes people don't stay on too long. He has been able to develop Trinity Manor for people to have seminars as he has moved himself in to one end of the house and through this he meets interesting people through the functions and it keeps the Manor occupied. For relaxation he goes sailing during the summer and rides horses in the winter.

Reference: R/07/B/1

Date: 1982 - 1982

Visit of His Royal Highness the Duke of Edinburgh to the St John's Youth and Community Centre to open the Billy Butlin Memorial Hall commentated on by Mike Vibert on 29/03/1983. Description of the visit of the Prince, a description of the youth centre, children playing badminton, all the St John's School pupils at the event, Le Rocquier Band playing the national anthem. The main building of the centre was open on September 7th 1980 by Wilfred Tomes. Diane Smith commentates outside the centre waiting for the Prince to arrive describing the crowd. Famous visitors to the opening. Cost of the centre-£300,000. Mike Vibert-Duke's 6th visit to the island-describes the other visits. Diane Smith-Prince Philip's car just pulled up-accompanied by Sir Peter Whiteley and Sir Frank Ereaut, the Lieutenant Governor and Bailiff. Welcomed by Constable John Le Sueur and Lady Sheila Butlin, Mrs Le Sueur, Deputy Fred le Brocq, Senator Reg Jeune, head of the Education Committee-unveils the plaque. Prince being guided around the centre. Sees squash being played by Gillian Ferguson and her father and coach Doug Ferguson. Doug Ferguson talking about coaching his daughter, the championships she holds, how she feels about playing in front of Prince Philip. Prince Philip then making his way to the scout room to see demonstrations by the scouts. Beth Lloyd commentating on the Prince's visit to the scout room, Prince Philip meeting Colonel Bill Hall, the Scout Commissioner, talking about the different activities the scouts take part in, looking at tying knot demonstrations, first aid demonstrations, trip to Kenya to build a community building there, Duke of Edinburgh leaves the scout room. Mike Vibert-Duke of Edinburgh viewing a game of badminton, Barry Smith says who is playing in the demonstration games and the badminton club. Famous guests Morecambe and Wise, Dickie Henderson and Danny La Rue. Diane Smith-Prince entering club room, describing the club room. Mike Vibert-Prince standing on the balcony looking at the hall watching the men's badminton. Diane Smith-Prince introduced to the president and chairperson of the Jersey Flower Club Leah Samson and Viola Trenchard who helped decorate the centre. Diane Smith talking to Leah Samson and Viola Trenchard about the amount of members involved in arranging the flowers for the decoration, the time it took, the kind of flowers used and the theme of the decoration, the club which has been going since 1960 with almost 200 members, raising money for charity, organising flower and church festivals and fundraisers and the Woman's Institute of the island deciding to set up the Jersey Flower Club. Prince Philip leaving the club room-heading to the Billy Butlin Memorial Hall. Mike Vibert-waiting for the royal party to enter, La Rocquier School Band play the national anthem. Prince Philip being introduced to the officials of the Centre including Centenier Carl Hinault and Daphne Hinault, Mr and Mrs Angus Spencer-Nairn, Mr and Mrs Richard Dupré. Prince Philip meets officials of St John's School Ron Smith and David Rogers and meeting the school's football team. Meets celebrities and the Committe of the Centre, the Duke of Edinburgh award scheme winners. Speech made about the Duke of Edinburgh award scheme and each person is called up to collect their awards including Russell Gibaut, Steven Davidson, Duncan Gibaut, Steven Rondel, Alan Cadoret, Lloyd Pinel and Collette Le Riche. Constable of St John, John Le Sueur making a speech about the centre. Prince Philip making a speech about the Duke of Edinburgh award scheme and the opening of the centre. The Royal Party departing and an overview of the rest of the programme being undertaken by the Duke of Edinburgh. The bailiff giving a speech about the islanders leaving to take part in the Falklands War wishing them luck and a safe return. Recording of Winston Churchill's speech announcing Victory in Europe including the liberation of 'our dear Channel Islands'. End of Side One. Personal View of Joan Stevens interviewed by Beth Lloyd. Talking about her love of history. Had a happy childhood-was an only child. In the early years moved around a lot as her father was in the army-moved wherever her father's regiment was sent. Moved back to Jersey when she was 12. Jersey became home quickly-lived in Les Pins in Millbrook. Went to school at Jersey College for Girls-was smaller in those days-arrived with French being her worst subject and left with it being her best thanks to Miss Holt. After leaving school went to a family in Lausanne, Switzerland to practice her french. When she came back she got a job at the Société Jersiaise Museum as a secretary typist-became fond of the museum. First Record-Scarlet Ribbons by Kenneth McKellar. Went to West Park Pavilion as a girl and went surfing. Met her husband, Charles Stevens, soon after starting at the museum. He was about to go to Africa with the Administration Service. Met five times before they got engaged and then he went away for 3 years-was love at first sight. Knew he was coming back and so didn't mind that he went away-got married as soon as he got back and then went straight back to Zambia. He travelled around the country-went with him on tour but after having children didn't go with him. Had a number of servants. Enjoyed life in Africa in retrospect but longed for Jersey. Was out in Africa during the occupation. Second world war-was worried about everybody in Jersey-was 18 months before they discovered there second son was born. Heard from them through the red cross messages. War didn't touch them directly in Zambia but saw a great deal of troop movements-was a transit camp-helped the troops as they passed through. Second Record-Impatience by Schubert. Came back to Jersey on leave after the war to see her family in 1947. Came back for good in 1949 so the children could be educated. Her time was taken up with bringing up the family. Took part in some farming on their farm in St Mary on a modest scale. Started researching into old Jersey houses and decided to write a book on the subject. Researched by talking to people in Jersey. Wrote Old Jersey Houses and then 'Victorian Voices'-the Sumner family had papers in their house Belle Vue-gave it to the Museum and was asked to catalogue it. It was made up mainly of the diaries and letter books of Sir John Le Couteur and his family. Books about Jersey don't traditionally sell well but her 'Short History' sold well. Third Record-Silver Swan by Orlando Gibbons. Interested in Jerseymen from the past but wouldn't write about it because it has been covered by Mr Balleine's Biographical Dictionary. Her favourite historical Jersey figure is Sir John Dumaresq who was the lieutenant bailiff-an important figure of the time-was Sir John Le Couteur's grandfather-was the head of the liberal party in Jersey-was a great orator-was sent to plead for the island on 23 occasions-kept diaries in the late 1700s and showed a very human side. Had a large family that he brought up after his wife died when his family was still quite young. Collects a lot of information about individuals and then puts it together to form a picture. Fourth Record-The Gondeliers with 'Take a Pair of Sparkling Eyes'. Balleine's History-it had been out of print for 20 years and nothing had replaced it so they decided to rewrite Balleine-decided to reprint it with additions-things that have happened since Mr Balleine had written and the need to emphasise certain aspects of the book. Marguerite Syvret and her worked together-good to work as a team. Added a great deal but it was woven in to the text. Mr Balleine was not very good at listing his sources and so they had to find all of the sources that he mentioned. Brought out a book with Richard Mayne called 'Jersey Through the Lens' with photographs and explanations. She is working with Jean Arthur on the place names of Jersey. Has three sons in England and a daughter in Jersey-one son is an architect, one is in the Homes Office and one is a freelance cabinetmaker-she tries to see her grandchildren as much as possible. Fifth Record-Danny Kay with Inch Worm. Her daughter lives with her in Jersey-she teaches riding. Jersey has changed a lot-the pressure of population. Believes there is a need to give something back to the community. At the Société Jersiaise Museum-goes to a lot of meetings-very alive in the community-trying to get younger people involved. Involved with the National Trust for Jersey-has the same aims of as the Trust in Britain but is autonomous. Is unhappy that the Queen's Valley flooding has gone through the States with a small majority-would like to see an alternative. Doesn't like the fact that the land is going to be bought by compulsory purchase. Sixth Record-Mario Lanza with Ave Maria.

Reference: R/07/B/7

Date: 1982 - 1983

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