Talk by Herbert de Gruchy, Customs Officer at the St Helier Harbour during the occupation, to the Channel Islands Occupation Society. Subjects mentioned include his experiences in the royal navy before the war, moving back to Jersey and becoming a customs officer, being on duty the night before and the day of the evacuations, seeing the air raid on St Helier, the dropping of leaflets and white flags to be hung for the Germans, the arrival of the Germans, being sent to the Agricultural Department because of the lack of ships landing and his duties there, being called back to the Harbour to take up his post once again, defence around St Helier Harbour, experiences had with the germans whilst loading, unloading and transporting goods, his relationship with German soldiers, a storm and its effects at his home at 18, Coastlands, Greve d'Azette, the arrival of Organisation Todt workers, the attempts by the germans at stealing food, german warship coming in after being attacked and bodies being loaded off, unloading of live cattles and being arrested, taken to the Pomme d'Or and interrogated about stealing a cow, arrest of other workers on the Harbour, infestation of rats, his second arrest for stealing when he was found innocent once again, the assistance he was given to stop stealing, the railway in front of the Harbour Office, improvisation in making sugar beat into syrup, the deportations, anonymous informing letters in the Post Office, after the coming of D-Day there were no more ships and so was sent to check tobacco growing, arrival of the SS Vega, the boats to liberate the island and the first mailboat. Questions about the Russians POW, horses used for transportation, importation of French cattle, boats going to St Malo to help in the evacuation, railways and people that Mr de Gruchy knew. Announcements for the Channel Islands Occupation Society.

Reference: L/D/25/L/22

1) Talk by Stanhope Landick, school teacher from 1935, on education to the Channel Islands Occupation Society. Introduction by the Channel Islands Occupation Society President. Talks about his time at St Ouen's Central School under Mr A A H Downerat the start of the occupation, moving to the Intermediate School in Brighton Road in September 1941, his memories of St Ouen including the lack of nourishment for the pupils, Mr Downer's decision to start teaching german, experience of the Germans, a father of a pupil being shot dead for being out after curfew and the execution fo Francois Scornet, question of teaching german, the problem of heating, health of pupils, sport, talks of pupils that he remembers that are prominent in island life, an article that he had written, the demilitarisation of the Channel Islands and the evacuation, the actions of the Bailiff, Alexander Coutanche, men of military agebeing examined, books about education during the occupation, the story of Louisa Gould and Harold Le Druillenec, the States being formed into the Superior Council, the Education Committee, the air raid and arrival of the Germans, memories of other people, soup taken around schools, selling of salt water, milk for children, fundraisers for the Children's Benefit Fund, the visit of Graf von Schmettow in 1965 and a visit to the graves at Howard Davis Park, how they felt about von Schmettow, a meeting with Alexander Coutanche in 1970, making german compulsory, Victoria College, members of the Education Committee, visits by german officers, prize giving, raising of the school leaving age to 15, number of people who were in education during the occupation , the ease of getting out of the island after the occupation but difficulty in getting back in and the confiscation of radios. Questions about the hostages that were taken by the Germans, those who taught german, school children's diet, a particular teacher, Victoria College, a poem he wrote about the SS Vega and the Red Cross. Dixie Landick then talks about his life, his job of translating for the Germans, being involved as a translator for Graf von Schmettow he came to Jersey in 1965 and was interviewed by Channel Television, explaining how the interview took place. He plays the interview in which Graf von Schmettow answers questions concerning why he became a soldier, his thoughts on the Nazi party, how he came to be in the Channel Islands, his expectations of the local population, slave workers working for Organisation Todt on the fortifications, deportations, the refusal of a surrender proposal, consequences of German victory and what made him decide to come back to the Channel Islands. 2) Noises from the working of a mill (?)-with photographs being taken.

Reference: L/D/25/L/34

Interview of Frank Le Quesne by Fiona Spurr on Radio Jersey. Talking about Frank Le Quesne's grandfather Edward Le Quesne, who's diary entitled 'The Occupation of Jersey: Day by Day' was being published by La Haule Books. He talks about his first knowledge of the diary, the things that appeared in the diary including personal information and thoughts on the formation of the Superior Council during the war, why he decided to publish the diary and the encouragement he received from Michael Ginns, the fact that the diary was published unedited with compementary footnotes by Michael Ginns, his position in the Superior Council as head of the Department of Labour, his position towards the bailiff Alexander Coutanche, the transcription of the diary, the kind of person his grandfather was and his memories of him. Musical interlude with HMS Pinafore from the Pirates of Penzance being played as his father saw the show during the occupation and as Frank Le Quesne is the Chairman of the local Gilbert and Sullivan Society. Continues to talk about why his grandfather started writing the diary, an extract is quoted of his worst moment when the flag was lowered over Fort Regent and replaced by a white flag and then a German flag, he mentions a previous book about his life, the priorities of the Superior Council, some of the responsibilities of his grandfather, the uncertainty of the occupation, the difficulty in having to deal with the Germans on a daily basis and having to strike a balance between doing things for the good of the peopl and obeying the German's orders, being sentenced to prison towards the end of the war and his experience of the prison in Gloucester Street, his political views, being missed by the Germans as a contact, Baron von Ausfess' reaction to his arrest and release, his attempt to do the best for the people. Ron, a local who was a prisoner of war in Germany rings in and talks about the difficult position of the Bailiff and Edward Le Quesne. Frank Le Quesne discusses the point in the diary when the mood changes when waiting to be liberated and the arrival of the SS Vega. An extract from Christmas 1944 is giving prices of the black market and a comparison to the difficulties in other countries today is made.

Reference: L/D/25/L/37

Date: November 30th 1999 - November 30th 1999

Interview of Silver Le Riche, St Helier Harbour Pilot 1940-1945, by members of the Channel Islands Occupation Society. Talking about his experience as a pilot bringing boats into St Helier Harbour during the occupation. Subjects covered include the duties that he carried out, his refusal to pilot a boat that was carrying mines and his subsequent questioning at the Pomme d'Or, the boats that used to go out to meet ships, those that piloted during the occupation, how they received orders verbally at the Southampton Hotel, restrictions on movement, presence of german soldiers when they brought the boat in, going to St Malo and being put in prison, the recruitment of the crew of the SS Normand through the Harbour Office, Captain Sowden who skippered the boat, the overloading of ships, shipwrecks, Captain Bennett of the SS Spinel and his death in Guernsey, the biggest ship he brought in, the night the SS Schockland sank, what happened to the SS Robert Muller during the war, Ted Larbalestier, bringing the Lavada (?) in, whether the germans took their advice, how he crashed a damaged ship, the H49, was arrested and put in prison and interrogated for 7 days, reminiscences of german masters down at the harbour, a floating crane, sand runs to Gorey, the size of ships in St Aubin, the bombing of a german ship, air raids, being given german orders by Captain Richmond and going to the Grand Hotel with George Gill, Peter Guiton, Ted Larbalestier and Bob La Cloche, tug trips to Guernsey on the Duke of Normandy, the SS Normand, the position and types of buoys, driving the SS Normand and the captain after Silver Le Riche, passenger services to France, experiences on the SS Diamond, rescuing germans from a shipwreck and number of shipwrecks in the island, Bill Furzer and Captain Richmond's uniform, his fellow pilots, working on Peter Guiton's farm, liberation, the arrival of the SS Vega, they show him photographs of the occupation. He talks about treating with germans after the liberation. They identify the ships in the photos. Asked about aking photographs in Granville, who is alive today who worked at the harbour during the occupation, the most frightening experience during the occupation as a pilot when he had a shot fired at him, restrictions on pilots, buying rations in France, the Duke of Normandy, lights to guide boats into the harbour, a german ship hitting the Dog's Nest, bringing soldiers out of St Malo at the start of the occupation and seeing the loch gates being destroyed, the pilot in Granville, how busy Granville was and if they refused to bring military cargo back to Jersey, his memory of the deportations, the barges collecting sand at Gorey for building works, the arrival of the Russians, attempted rescue of a ship, being sent to the Pomme d'Or for being drunk, his time in prison in St Malo and in the Pomme d'Or for seven days, their uniforms, piloting ships into the harbour at liberation, the SS Vega, when and where the railway stopped and who else to interview.

Reference: L/D/25/L/38

Mrs M Bird, Past Vice-President of the Channel Islands Occupation Society (Guernsey) and Ex President of the Woman's Institute delivering a speech entitled 'Life on the Domestic Front and Life in General during the Occupation' delivered to the Channel Islands Occupation Society (Jersey) and the Channel Islands Family History Society. Kept diaries during occupation which the talk is mainly based upon. Was a housewife and so had to cope with life at home. Talk includes references concerning demilitarisation and evacuation, dilemma of whether to go or stay with mixed messages given by the States, decided against going although her mother went splitting the family up, air raid, landing of Germans and her first impressions, the running of the island, agriculture in the island, buying of food in France, attempt to live normally, gradual worsening of conditions, church arrangements, beaches, cinemas, entertainment during the occupation-keeping up morale, transport-bicycles, buses, hospitals, schools-german lessons, deportation of Guernsey residents to the internment camps, press-censorship, proliferation of rumours, wirelesses and crystal sets, GUNS-Guernsey Underground News Sheet, Red Cross messages, dropping of leaflets, food, cooking and clothing, 'a housewife's nightmare'-rationing, bartering economy, improvisation of ingredients for recipes, methods of cooking, fuel and the difficulty of rationing, food-details of level of rationing with different foods, extracts from diary on the dishes she made, treatment by german soldiers, desperation near the end-eating of pets by germans, D-Day-tightening up of everything, arrival of SS Vega and the Red Cross parcels, stealing on the increase, Organisation Todt camp nearby, liberation day, reintroduction of mail service and the feelings of thankfulness at the close of occupation.

Reference: L/D/25/L/4

Recording from the BBC 1 South West TV broadcast entitled 'The Lonely War' with Bruce Parker, a former Guernsey resident, looking back at the occupation of the Channel Islands with people who experienced it. 1) Part 1: Battleships of Iron and Steel. Introduction to the islands, the reason that they were invaded and the realisation that they were defenceless. Subjects discussed include the decision to demilitarise the islands, the dilemma whether to be evacuated or not, the fact that the boat to Sark did not arrive, the evacuation of Alderney and Daphne Pope's decision to stay, the air raid on the harbours and the arrival of the Germans, newspapers printing german orders, the first impression of german soldiers, the situation in Sark as recounted by Dame Sybil Hathaway, restrictions being introduced, Raymond Falla, the President of the Agriculture Department and a member of the Controlling Committee telling of the job of the government in Guernsey, the experience of Frank Falla, a journalist on the Guernsey Star newspaper, resistance in the islands, the relationship with the german soldiers, Jerry Bags, the sending of Hubert Nicolle to Guernsey on an intelligence gathering raid and later raids, the execution of Francois Scornet, escapes from the islands, trying to get supplies, entertainments the confiscation of radios and the secret listening to the BBC and disseminating information, the sinking of HMS Charybdis and HMS Limbourne prompting thousands to go to the funerals, the deportations and the internment camps, the terrible conditions of workers brought in by the Organisation Todt, the arrival of the D-Day and the expected liberation which took a year to actually occur. 2) Part 2: Our Dear Channel Islands. From 1944 the increase of hardship as a result of being cut off from mainland Europe as well as Britain. Subjects discussed include Alderney and the exoeriences of Gordon Prigent, a Jerseyman who had been sent to work on the island and Daphne Pope, who stayed on the island, their relationships with the Germans, the conditions in the Organisation Todt camps in Alderney, the death of Daphne Pope's 2 year old son, Gordon Prigent being caught listening to the BBC, being put in the concentration camp and having to cope with the conditions, a report on HMS Rodney's attack on Alderney, Pope making friends with German soldiers and the question of collaboration, the difficulty of rationing and having to improvise for food and fuel, worsening health of old people as witnessed by Pearl Regan, the running out of medication and the onset of famine and disease, red cross messages, red cross parcels arriving with the SS Vega, Harold Le Druillenec's memories of deportation and liberation at Belsen camp, the celebration of liberation on the islands, an extract of Churchill's speech, a contemporary report by the BBC on the surrender of the German forces, Rex Ferbrache, a Guernseyman, being welcomed home, the disarming of German troops and being shipped out as POWs, investigations into the events in Alderney during the occupation and punishment, collaboration, the royal visit, rehabilitation and the effect occupation had on islanders.

Reference: L/D/25/L/40

Date: June 27th 1980 - July 4th 1980

Original audio cassette recording - see file description.

Reference: L/D/25/L/40/1

Date: June 27th 1980 - July 4th 1980

Occupation-BBC Radio Jersey tape. The story of the occupation of Jersey during World War 2 told by the people who lived through it produced by Beth Lloyd. 1) Part 13: The Todt Organisation and their Russian Slave Labourers. Eye witnesses talking about the background of the Organisation Todt, the arrival of the Russians on the island, the condition they were in, the brutality of their overseers, begging and stealing food, concentration camps, the Jersey Communist Party and other people giving shelter, food, clothes, false papers and english lessons with Mrs Metcalfe to escaped prisoners, the story of Louisa Gould, Harold Le Druillenec and Feodor Burrij and the experience of other residents who harboured escapees. 2) Part 14: Entertainment. Eye witnesses talking about the difficulties of the first show during the occupation put on by the Jersey Amateur Dramatics Club, cinemas and the films that were shown, variety entertainment at the Opera House, West's Cinema and out in the parishes, finding musicians, public dances, the Amateur Variety Band, the Green Room Club productions including pantomimes, easter productions and shows, improvisations with costumes and scenery and censorship of the shows. 3) Part 15: We Are At War. Eye witness accounts of feelings of isolation, seeing and hearing British and German aeroplanes, feeling and seeing bombing raids on the coast of France, leaflet raids, members of the royal air force being taken as prisoners of war, commando raid on Egypt, sabotage, the v sign campaign, resistance and reprisals, youth groups against the Germans, the British Patriots group and Norman Le Brocq and Leslie Huelin working with the Free Germany Movement represented by Paul Muelbach calling for a mutiny in the garrison. 4) Occupation Part 16: Escapes produced by Beth Lloyd made up of interviews of local people who were in Jersey during the Occupation. Subjects discussed include the escape of Denis Vibert to England in September 1941, tales of different escapes to France by islanders recounted by Eddie Le Corre, Basil Le Brun, Peter Crill, John Floyd, Roy Mourant and their subsequent experiences of interrogations by the Home Forces and arrival in England. 5) Part 17: D-Day and the Last Terrible Year. Eye witnesses talking about the realisation that D-Day was taking place, aeroplanes going over the island, lack of fuel and food supplies, health in island worsening, Red Cross parcels, the arrival and unloading of the SS Vega, starvation of German soldiers and waiting for liberation. 6) Part 18: Liberation. Eye witnesses including the bailiff talking about the change in the high command of the german administration and listening to Winston Churchill's speech, release of political prisoners, celebrations, surrender of Germans and arrival of royal navy officers. See R/06/4.

Reference: L/D/25/L/44

Talk by Dr Raymond Osmont of his experiences as a doctor at the General Hospital during the occupation to the Channel Islands Occupation Society. Talk includes references to his return to island before being qualified and Dr McKinstry arranging for him to work at the hospital to gain experience, Dr Darling who he lived with and taught him about clinical medicine, learning about procedures and surgical instruments, the effect of the occupation on the hospital with many nurses evacuating and the matron Miss Miller and later Miss Carter heading the team, a recruitment campaign to bring new nursing staff in, some of the medical staff of the hospital including Dr Arthur Halliwell, Dr John Hanna, Mr Arnold Ferguson, Dr Warrington, Dr Blampied, Dr Wood and the dentist Mr Joe Price, the GPs of the island, the reorganisation of the wards after being taken over by the Germans, the maternity wing transferring to the Dispensary with Dr John Lewis being put in charge, the geriatric ward on the top floor under the leadership of Sister Renoir, the increase in the death rates on the island due to lack of drugs, food and heating, increase in tuberculosis, the treatment of Miss Ivy Forster the sister of Louisa Gould and Harold Le Druillenec, Elise Floyd helping prisoners' families meet with them in the physiotherapy department, the casualty and outpatient departments under Dr Darling, a fracture clinic run by Dr Halliwell on a saturday morning, the pathology lab under Dr McKinstry who looked after public health and Overdale Hospital, the increase in epidemics during the occupation, the number of cases of diptheria, whooping cough and other diseases, vaccinations, foreign workers bringing in diseases, a house in Grands Vaux being used as a tuberculosis sanotorium, the death of Arnold Ferguson, the isolation wards in the hospital who dealt with the psychiatric patients, a German air force doctor who used to smuggle small quantities of drugs from Germany for Dr McKinstry, the height and weight of children at this time, the improvement in children's teeth, the crisis year of 1944 where supplies of insulin, anaesthetics and fuel were getting low, supplies being brought in from France but a great deal being stolen on the way to the island, all supplies ceasing from D-Day to the arrival of the SS Vega leading to the death of 14 diabetics, the running out of anaesthetics, tar being used as a fuel in place of coal, the problem of running out of x ray films,a lack of variety of drugs and the drugs used, a show put on by the hospital staff to keep morale up, the senior pharmacist Snowdon Amy, the different medicines used for different diseases, the arrival of penicillin on the SS Vega and the treatment of the prostitutes used by the german soldiers for venereal diseases.

Reference: L/D/25/L/49

Date: March 11th 1987 - March 11th 1987

Talk by Mr T Riley to the Channel Islands Occupation Society. (Very faint at some points) Talks about his experiences during the occupation and the different jobs he undertook including working at George D Laurens shop in Queen Street, being called up by Theodor Elsch to help build sea walls at La Braye slip wall but refusing to work, being put into prison in Gloucester Street for not complying, given a month in prison, when he got out was put to work on the sea walls but started registering in the morning and then going home, put to work on the German Hospital in St Peter's Valley but stopped going after a rock fall, got sent down the Victoria Pier cleaning the walls of tanks but didn't want to work there either, put to work in a german store but was eventually arrested, interrogated by the police at Silvertide, Havre des Pas and was offered the choice of doing 5 months prison in France or 5 weeks solitary confinement in Jersey, decided on staying in Jersey, was classed as an 'undesirable', talks about the reduced rations they received in prison, a plan whereby he got increased rations, a job at the Homestead in Vallée des Vaux when he was released, got extra beer by delivering beer from Ann Street Brewery, getting a letter saying he was to be deported but avoiding it as his name was late in the alphabet, becoming friendly with a german he was living next to and being allowed off the next deportations, working for the States down St Helier Harbour unloading supplies, the stealing that used to take place of German goods, being arrested by the Germans for stealing and being sentenced by the local police court as it was States goods to four weeks hard labour, breaking stones in the prison, getting shingles in prison and was given light duties, got married and was living in town, got a job looking after and grave digging at the Stranger's Cemetery, got fired for only going to work every other day and pulling down a hut to burn for fuel, sent to Midvale Road to work in OT offices as a cleaner, taking fuel from the offices, picking berries from a mountain ash for his boss who lived in Clarendon Road to distill into alcohol, opening a room at the office which had a great deal of food inside and taking supplies, moved to St Brelade and worked at knocking down trees for people's fuel, used to fill bins with sea water and extracted the salt, taking weapons and binoculars from a store and looking in the bunker at La Pulente and finding a motorbike. Comments made by the audience about their dealings with the germans at the Harbour and taking food, the need for policemen as so much was being taken. Riley tells how he was caught out after curfew 52 times, he had to go to Bagatelle House to explain himself, dealing on the blackmarket for an old lady who lived in Colomberie, the ships that transported essential commodoties the SS Normand and SS Spinel their captains, the arrival of the Russian POWs, taking butter from the germans, the arrival of the SS Vega and the red cross parcels, the fact that things for babies were never touched and how they always tried to steal from the Germans. Questions asked and comments made concerning his arrests and whether it was recorded in the press, the Painters, listening to radios and an American airman who crashed and was saved by John de la Haye.

Reference: L/D/25/L/54

Date: April 8th 1981 - April 8th 1981

1) Programme entitled 'Summer 1940-Part Three: Occupation June 29th-July 5th' broadcast by Channel Television presented by Alastair Layzell. Talks about the effect the air raid had on the islanders, the fact that the air raid confirmed to the Germans fact that the islands were undefended, the population being in fear of more air raids, Philip Warder, who wroked for the Post Office, waiting for instructions to sever the cable between Jersey and England, the Guernsey Controlling Committee running island and Raymond Falla talking about his experiences, the landing of the Germans in Guernsey on June 30th and met by Ambrose Sherwill, proclamations being put up and anger at Raymond Falla because cows were on the runway at Guernsey Airport, July 1st the Germans invaded Jersey and dropped an ultimatum which was taken to the bailiff, it told that white flags had to put up, the States agreed to comply, an aeroplane landed at the Jersey Airport the next day and sent a message that the island was to be occupied fom 3pm that day when the bailiff, government secretary and attorney general met the Germans, Leslie Sinel went to cinema at The Forum and when he came out Germans were walking on the streets, the Germans soon looked at the essential services, at the Post Office Philip Warder was arrested for no reason and offered resistance for the rest of war by destroying letters sent to the commandant and the Evening Post came under the eyes of the german censor. First impressions of the german soldiers was them buying up of goods from shops. Jack Herbert took germans to the generating station at the airport and had to watch as Germans defused bombs left at the airport, tomato growers realised their income had stopped, the Controlling Committee took the glass houses over to plant other crops, Alderney was taken over and headquarters were established, July 4th a party crossed to Sark and met with Sybil Hathaway showing her respect but brought her list of orders. Captain Gussek was the first commandant and with him Coutanche worked out a proclamation for the local government to continue. Overall the Germans were friendly, morale was high and they believed the islands were a stepping stone to England. 2) A brief account of the German Occupation of Jersey from the BBC Schools Broadcast produced in Jersey by Joe Jackson and Graham Simms. Report on the origins and development of the second world war. July 1st 1940 occupation of Jersey begins. The responsibility for the island was on Sir Alexander Moncrieff Coutanche and the programme shows how he shouldered the burden. He remembers the arrival of the Germans and the affect it had on his position in the islands. Bob Le Sueur remembers the uncertainty and the speech by the bailiff in the Royal Square giving instructions to fly the white flag. Mrs Perkins remembers Germans bombing the harbour and their arrival with the orders received by the islanders. They remember Germans thinking they could get to London very easily, the introduction of a curfew, the surprise at the discipline of the Germans, the scarcity of money and schemes to raise some, the scarcity of food and improvisation with different ingredients. A poem written during the occupation about the scarcity of food is sung. After D-Day food supplies were cut off and after protests from the governments the red cross ship the SS Vega arrived. The liberation came with the arrival of the HMS Beagle and Coutanche got a message to go to the Pomme d'Or Hotel from where he was taken to the ship to witness the surrender. The programme looks at his life before and after the occupation and the award of his knighthood and peerage.

Reference: L/D/25/L/58

Date: November 7th 1974 - July 3rd 1980

Autograph Book kept by Margaret Ginns, née Bouchere, during the German occupation and especially when she was a student nurse at the Jersey General Hospital, from August 1944 to May 1945. The book includes some personal items, the signatures of a crew member of HMS Beagle, Joe Jones; Theo Krausen, but added when he was 'discovered' at Batterie Lothringen, Noirmont in 1982; Newell Younggren, captured in his pyjamas by the Germans at Granville, 09/03/45; Armand Dubois, an American POW who was being treated for wounds at the Jersey General Hospital in August 1944, having been captured at St Malo; Captain C Hargreaves, No 20 Civil Affairs Unit; Captain Nichol; John Anderson, the UNRRA captured at Granville March dated 09/05/1945; Major Frank Sargent, RAOC, Force 135, during his visit to Jersey in 1980; Second Officer of the Vega; Peter Holt and Philip Congdon, RAF, added 27/04/1983; signatures from the anniversary of the liberation, May 1984; A Jansson, Captain of the Vega; Thomas Tait, ex US PC 564 revisiting Alderney in December 1986 and some german signatures including Willi Hagedorn from 1987.

Reference: L/D/25/M4/29

Date: 1944 - 1987

Souvenir newspaper titled Liberation! A Jersey Evening Post souvenir supplement commemorating the 40th anniversary of the end of the German Occupation of Jersey, May 9, 1945.

Reference: L/F/341/C/1

Date: May 3rd 1985 - May 3rd 1985

Magazine titled The 40th anniversary of the Liberation of Jersey: An historic souvenir of the Liberation of Jersey and programme of celebrations, May 6 - May 12, 1985. Edited by Rob Shipley.

Reference: L/F/341/C/2

Date: May 6th 1985 - May 12th 1985

Occupation Memories by Idrys Perry Buésnel [Idrys Noele Buesnel, formerly Perry, née Rodda].

Reference: L/F/448/A/1

Date: 2012 - 2012

Photocopy of a poster advertising the 'Vega' Draw in aid of the Red Cross Society - not dated

Reference: L/F/54/C/H/20

Date: 1944 - 1946

Department of Essential Commodities notices and articles re. forthcoming Red Cross supplies published in the Evening Post

Reference: M/05/1/1

Date: November 22nd 1944 - November 22nd 1944

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