Applications of evacuees with surnames beginning with letters T-Z wishing to return to Jersey after the Occupation.Each volume of applications includes; names of applicants, date they left the Island before the Occupation, names of children, occupation, date of birth, address in Jersey and address in United Kingdom.

Reference: B/A/L42/13

Date: 1943 - 1945

Application for postponement of Military Service for Denis Vibert of Val de la Mare, St Ouen, born 19/01/1919.

Reference: D/AU/V8/B3/7

Date: May 4th 1940 - May 4th 1940

Registration form of Denis Vibert, of Val de la Mare, St Ouen, born 19/01/1919

Reference: D/S/A/9/A1082

Date: January 14th 1941 - January 14th 1941

Blue registration form of Denis Vibert, of Val de la Mare, St Ouen, born 19/01/1919

Reference: D/S/A/9/B1082

Date: January 14th 1941 - January 14th 1941

Handwritten account of Jersey under German Occupation, prepared from a verbal account given by Denis Vibert who escaped from Jersey in September 1941

Reference: L/A/30/E2/2

Date: 1941 - 1941

Photograph of Jersey-born potter Mr Denis Vibert, on holiday in the island from his home in Maine, USA, showing Jersey Weekly Post reporter Mr Michael Arthur "Mike" Rumfitt illustrations of his work, and a photograph of Senator Ralph Vibert with Mr Frederick Bayes "Fred" Copeman, a volunteer in the International Brigades during the Spanish Civil War outside the arrivals hall at Jersey Airport.

Reference: L/A/75/A2/POR/52/7

Date: February 7th 1962 - February 17th 1962

Subject: Portraits

File number: 52

Page number: 7

Scrapbook kept by Helene Marie Sinnatt, née Jackson, during the Occupation. Book 3, Page 3. Includes newscuttings from the Evening Post of orders, notices, advertisements published in the Exchange and Mart column, and an announcement regarding the decision to cease publication of the Evening Post on Thursdays.

Reference: L/C/306/A/3/3

Date: November 7th 1941 - November 12th 1941

Newspaper cuttings and photocopies of articles on escapees from Occupied Jersey, 1940-1945. Includes an appreciation of Philip Cotillard, an escapee, order of service's for the interment of Maurice Jay Gould and Peter Denis Hassall, articles on the escape of Barbara Langley, née Hutchings and John Langley, David Blandin, Robert Roger, Donald Le Lievre, Patrick Smith, Peter de Verger and Valentine Goudré, Sir Peter Crill, Roy Mourant and John Floyd, Bernie Turpin and Denis Vibert.

Reference: L/D/25/A/22

Date: October 16th 1944 - May 21st 1999

Documents relating to conditions within the island during the German Occupation including a report entitled 'A few authentic facts relating to the Island, obtained from Mr V Senr' and 2 copies of 'Jersey under German Occupation' a narrative prepared from a verbal account given by escapee Denis Vibert who arrived in England in September 1941

Reference: L/D/25/A/38

Date: November 3rd 1941 - August 28th 1944

Occupation-BBC Radio Jersey tape. The story of the occupation of Jersey during World War 2 told by the people who lived through it produced by Beth Lloyd. 1) Part 13: The Todt Organisation and their Russian Slave Labourers. Eye witnesses talking about the background of the Organisation Todt, the arrival of the Russians on the island, the condition they were in, the brutality of their overseers, begging and stealing food, concentration camps, the Jersey Communist Party and other people giving shelter, food, clothes, false papers and english lessons with Mrs Metcalfe to escaped prisoners, the story of Louisa Gould, Harold Le Druillenec and Feodor Burrij and the experience of other residents who harboured escapees. 2) Part 14: Entertainment. Eye witnesses talking about the difficulties of the first show during the occupation put on by the Jersey Amateur Dramatics Club, cinemas and the films that were shown, variety entertainment at the Opera House, West's Cinema and out in the parishes, finding musicians, public dances, the Amateur Variety Band, the Green Room Club productions including pantomimes, easter productions and shows, improvisations with costumes and scenery and censorship of the shows. 3) Part 15: We Are At War. Eye witness accounts of feelings of isolation, seeing and hearing British and German aeroplanes, feeling and seeing bombing raids on the coast of France, leaflet raids, members of the royal air force being taken as prisoners of war, commando raid on Egypt, sabotage, the v sign campaign, resistance and reprisals, youth groups against the Germans, the British Patriots group and Norman Le Brocq and Leslie Huelin working with the Free Germany Movement represented by Paul Muelbach calling for a mutiny in the garrison. 4) Occupation Part 16: Escapes produced by Beth Lloyd made up of interviews of local people who were in Jersey during the Occupation. Subjects discussed include the escape of Denis Vibert to England in September 1941, tales of different escapes to France by islanders recounted by Eddie Le Corre, Basil Le Brun, Peter Crill, John Floyd, Roy Mourant and their subsequent experiences of interrogations by the Home Forces and arrival in England. 5) Part 17: D-Day and the Last Terrible Year. Eye witnesses talking about the realisation that D-Day was taking place, aeroplanes going over the island, lack of fuel and food supplies, health in island worsening, Red Cross parcels, the arrival and unloading of the SS Vega, starvation of German soldiers and waiting for liberation. 6) Part 18: Liberation. Eye witnesses including the bailiff talking about the change in the high command of the german administration and listening to Winston Churchill's speech, release of political prisoners, celebrations, surrender of Germans and arrival of royal navy officers. See R/06/4.

Reference: L/D/25/L/44

Scrapbook entitled 'Essential Commodoties' compiled by Mr E J de Ste Croix. Includes a photograph of Mr E J de Ste Croix, leaflet dropped by the RAF giving news of Allied successes for German forces, an invite to the Imperial War Museum to an occupation exhibition, a copy of the report given by Denis Vibert to the War Department after his successful escape attempt, an Organisation Todt armband, an example of a registration form, a copy of a red cross message, issues of occupation notes, copies of bread, electricity, milk, gas, fuel and meat rationing forms and correspondence with the Imperial War Museum concerning the deposit of his scrapbooks.

Reference: L/D/25/M2/8

Date: 1940 - 1963

Original manuscript of Lest We Forget: Escapes and Attempted Escapes from Jersey during the German Occupation 1940 - 1945 by Roy Thomas.

Reference: L/F/341/A/1

Date: 1992 - 1992

Draft manuscript of Lest We Forget: Escapes and Attempted Escapes from Jersey during the German Occupation 1940 - 1945 by Roy Thomas.

Reference: L/F/341/A/2

Date: 1992 - 1992

Souvenir newspaper titled Liberation! A Jersey Evening Post souvenir supplement commemorating the 40th anniversary of the end of the German Occupation of Jersey, May 9, 1945.

Reference: L/F/341/C/1

Date: May 3rd 1985 - May 3rd 1985

Account of the occupation of Jersey prepared during the second world war from a narrative given by Denis Vibert after his escape to England in September 1941 for information for the Allied Forces. Contains information on the escape, the local government, finance, agriculture and farming, food, fuel and clothing, black market, transport, the german military, Guernsey and Alderney.

Reference: L/F/57/C/1

Date: 1941 - 1945

Occupation-BBC Radio Jersey tape. The story of the occupation of Jersey during World War 2 told by the people who lived through it produced by Beth Lloyd. 1) Part 13: The Todt Organisation and their Russian Slave Labourers. Eye witnesses talking about the background of the Organisation Todt, the arrival of the Russians on the island, the condition they were in, the brutality of their overseers, begging and stealing food, concentration camps, the Jersey Communist Party and other people giving shelter, food, clothes, false papers and english lessons with Mrs Metcalfe to escaped prisoners, the story of Louisa Gould, Harold Le Druillenec and Feodor Burrij and the experience of other residents who harboured escapees. 2) Part 14: Entertainment. Eye witnesses talking about the difficulties of the first show during the occupation put on by the Jersey Amateur Dramatics Club, cinemas and the films that were shown, variety entertainment at the Opera House, West's Cinema and out in the parishes, finding musicians, public dances, the Amateur Variety Band, the Green Room Club productions including pantomimes, easter productions and shows, improvisations with costumes and scenery and censorship of the shows. 3) Part 15: We Are At War. Eye witness accounts of feelings of isolation, seeing and hearing British and German aeroplanes, feeling and seeing bombing raids on the coast of France, leaflet raids, members of the royal air force being taken as prisoners of war, commando raid on Egypt, sabotage, the v sign campaign, resistance and reprisals, youth groups against the Germans, the British Patriots group and Norman Le Brocq and Leslie Huelin working with the Free Germany Movement represented by Paul Muelbach calling for a mutiny in the garrison. 4) Occupation Part 16: Escapes produced by Beth Lloyd made up of interviews of local people who were in Jersey during the Occupation. Subjects discussed include the escape of Denis Vibert to England in September 1941, tales of different escapes to France by islanders recounted by Eddie Le Corre, Basil Le Brun, Peter Crill, John Floyd, Roy Mourant and their subsequent experiences of interrogations by the Home Forces and arrival in England. 5) Part 17: D-Day and the Last Terrible Year. Eye witnesses talking about the realisation that D-Day was taking place, aeroplanes going over the island, lack of fuel and food supplies, health in island worsening, Red Cross parcels, the arrival and unloading of the SS Vega, starvation of German soldiers and waiting for liberation. 6) Part 18: Liberation. Eye witnesses including the bailiff talking about the change in the high command of the german administration and listening to Winston Churchill's speech, release of political prisoners, celebrations, surrender of Germans and arrival of royal navy officers.

Reference: R/06/4

Personal View of Bailiff Sir Peter Crill, interviewed by Hamish Marett-Crosby. Has an eclectic musical taste-chosen his records because they are a cross section of music that he likes-he enjoys singing. Used to compete in the Jersey Eisteddfod and now sings in church choirs. Was involved in theatrical productions-started acting at Victoria College-didn't take part during the occupation-didn't want to play to the german soldiers. Took it up again after the war at Oxford University. Helpful to have acted if you want to be an advocate-useful when speaking to a jury. Education suffered during the occupation-there was a shortage of teachers. Pays tribute to the headmaster Mr Tatum who stayed through the occupation. Was moved to Halkett Place Infant School in 1941. Was a teenager so remembers the occupation well-had all night parties despite the curfews. Escaped to France in a boat before the end of the occupation with two friends-between 50-60 did this. Only one real escapee, Denis Vibert, who got to England in 1941. Went to England from France-their information about the hunger in the island and a report by the Bailiff, Lord Coutanche, helped persuade the authorities to allow the red cross ship the SS Vega to come to the island. First Record-Handel's Water Music Suite. Read law at Oxford University-went up in 1945 with the aid of the Howard Davis Trust. He rowed when he was at Oxford in the Head of the River Race. Was called to the Bar in 1949 and called to the Jersey Bar in the same year. Later brought in local examination-there wasn't when he joined. Was on the committee to created the deputy bailiff and became deputy bailiff later. Second Record-Prokofiev's Romeo and Juliet. Reached the conclusion in 1954 to create the post of deputy bailiff-Mr Harrison was the first deputy bailiff, Sir Robert Le Masurier became lieutenant bailiff before becoming bailiff. The second deputy bailiff was Mr Bois [Francis de Lisle] who was appointed in 1963, then Sir Frank Ereaut and then himself. The law has a weight of tradition-he keeps up the tradition but cuts it down, for example, the assize d'héritage-lost its meaning by leaving twice a year-decided to hold it only once a year-added a service and bailiff's reception at the time of the assize d'héritage to add more importance to it. Bailiff performs the role of presiding officer of the States. He was a deputy for 9 years-took a break because his father was ill-has seen it from the benches as well. He was also solicitor and attorney general for 12 years. Finds it difficult to stop speakers repeating themselves-the bailiff has the power to stop members from speaking. There is a need to observe standing orders. There is a rule that speeches should not be read-some people do nonetheless. Third Record-Chopin's Polonaise in C Sharp Minor. Jurats left in 1948 but the constables still sit in the States-wouldn't make a difference if they were elected to the States rather than elected as heads of the parish and sit in the States as virtue of the office. Constables are the oldest members of the States-doesn't want to lose constables as it is a link to the past. The problem with constables sitting in the States is that they are police officers-there's a possible question over the fact that 12 policemen make up a quarter of the States. The country parishes have retained their former way of life more than the urban parishes-in the urban parishes the role of honorary police is much more difficult to maintain. Has noticed a change since the radio started broadcasting the States sittings-more people have started speaking and for longer. Jersey was affected by the French Revolution-progressive parties were formed although it didn't crystallise into definite parties-there was left and right within the States. The States may have been built in a circular so no people were directly facing others in opposition. Fourth Record-A Piece from Aida. The States was also designed so that all of the different groups, senators, deputies, constables, could sit together. There have been groups in the past from the left and right. During the second world war two groups emerged-the Jersey Progressive Party who wanted reform and the Jersey Democratic Movement, who were further to the left. Progressive Party got 17 members in the first post war States-carried out their reforms and then disbanded-they achieved their objective and decided that they did not want to continue as a political party. In the States today he doesn't notice any individual groupings. A difference in degree and not complete opposed political viewpoints. Fifth Record-Bach's Prelude and Fugue in G Minor. Was for 5 years the president of the Société Jersiaise-helped create the Jersey Heritage Trust. The Société wanted to remain as the learned society but could not show all of its collections off properly and in accordance with modern thinking in museums. The Société built an education room but it never got off the ground. When he took over he made it clear that members had a choice-it could remain as a learned society or it could become a trustee of all the acquisitions that they had and receive help-from this the Jersey Heritage Trust was created. The Jersey Heritage Trust was supposed to be a channel of funds from the States to other cultural bodies in the island-believes a grant should be granted to someone like the poet Jeremy Reed. Enjoys music, books, horses, boats and pottering about. Doesn't use a computer now. Does still cycle in the summer. Sixth Record-Gilbert and Sullivan-The Overture to the Gondoliers.

Reference: R/07/B/10

Date: July 11th 1982 - July 11th 1982

Personal View of Senator Reg Jeune, President of the Education Committee. Born and brought up in Jersey-remembers difficult days of the late 1920s and 1930s-early life. Remembers a home with little money but very happy. It was a strict methodist home and his parents gave him a good start in life. His father had two hobbies-his garden and prize poultry. He got involved in his father's hobbies-he got involved with prize bantams in the local agricultural show. Has carried methodism throughout his life-has been a methodist local preacher for 40 years starting in 1942. Remembers the weather being nicer in his childhood-spent a lot of time on the beach and cycling around the island. Played tennis, watched cricket matches at the Victoria College Field when some of the top cricketers came to the island. Lived in Don Road and then in Georgetown as a child. He went to the De La Salle College-he was always encouraged to read books. He remembers going to the junior library with his mother where a Miss Priestley worked-never lost that interest. Thought that he may become a teacher but it was difficult getting grants at that time. His parents were ambitious for him-gave him a lot of encouragement. First Record-The Hallelujah Chorus from Handel's Messiah. Used to sing the piece of music in a choir-enjoyed being a chorister. At school-was interested in sport but was never particularly good. Left school to go into a bank-in waiting he went into Hill Street and then fell in love with law and took that up. Many of his fellow pupils went into a bank-it's much easier now. Studying was a struggle-graduated as a solicitor of the Royal Court of Jersey in 1945-a great deal of the examination was in French-was very difficult. Learnt French in order to be a solicitor. He was an office boy in Hill Street at first-used to collect rentes and write out contracts on parchment. Still sees the contracts that he used to write out. The occupation arrived-they were looking after people's affairs who had left the island-he started taking an active interest in cases after the second world war. It could take several years to study to qualify as a lawyer-took 6-8 years. Church took up quite a bit of time-choir and lay preaching. After he'd qualified he married in 1946 to Monica Valpy. Second Record-Flight of the Bumblebee by Rimsky-Korsakov. Hill Street was quiet during the occupation-had little to do-didn't experience hassle from the germans-helped look after people's affairs who had evacuated. He became a partner in a practice with two other men Helier Mourant and Clifford du Feu and created a company called Mourant, du Feu and Jeune-built up a substantial partnership. Started as a family practice until the financial scene came to Jersey-he became involved. It started around the early 1960s-he got interested when he got asked advice and he gradually became interested. He became chairman of the Youth Movement in 1947 and was involved in other organisations such as the Rotary Club-was interested in politics. Has always been interested in education and youth services. At one point thought that he may have gone into the church-if the occupation hadn't come along he may have done. Hadn't travelled much at this time-he'd been to Guernsey in England and that was all-after he qualified the opportunities to travel increased. He has now made many travels including extensively around the United States of America. Third Record-The Grand March from Verdi's Aida. Has been involved as much as possible with his family-his eldest son is a partner with him who has two daughters, his second son is London and has become an actor and his daughter is a jewellery designer who has come back to Jersey. Encouraged his son to read law. Tried to become a States member of St Helier No 2 District in the late 1950s but was unsuccessful. In 1962 he was successful in a by-election of St Helier No 3 District. Wasn't put off going into the States when he didn't get in the first time. Strange to go into the States especially in a by-election-the house was already set. Was nervous and excited the first time he spoke in the States despite having done a lot of public speaking in his job and church. After six months became president of the Public Works Committee-he had attacked the spending of money at the time especially for the tunnel-the money got thrown out and as a result two committees resigned-the Island Development Committee and the Public Works Committee and he became president of the Public Works Committee-he had been president of major committee ever since. Investigated the traffic problems in St Helier and eventually decided there should be a tunnel built under Fort Regent. Fourth Record-Le Rocquier School Band with Rock Around the Clock. Has a great love of music and books-still reads a lot despite working hard. The law firm has grown-he has become detached from the day to day business of the firm-tries to get there as much as possible-misses it. Became involved with the Trustees Savings Bank-joined the local board about 25 years previously and then became chairman of the Jersey Savings Bank, chairman of the Channel Islands Savings Bank and then elected to the board in London. Goes to two meetings a month in London. Received the OBE for his services to the savings banks-was very thrilled. Enjoyed going to Buckingham Palace to receive the award. Wants Jersey to retain its character but not to be insulated-he's chairman of the Executive Committee of the Commonwealth Parliamentary Association and involved with the French side of the parliamentarians. Fifth Record-Treorky Male Voice Choir. Has been involved in bringing an ombudsman into the States-succeeded-there is now a Review Tribunal. Doesn't have many more great ambitions in the States-is at the service of the States. Thinks it would be almost impossible to set higher education up in Jersey-Highlands College and what it offers with further education is about the limit that Jersey can expect. End of Side One. Personal View of Senator Ralph Vibert, interviewed by Beth Lloyd. Is the father of the house and president of the Finance Committee. At school-pictures that he would be a teacher-went to Victoria College in the 1920s-was captain of the football and head prefect. Didn't get a scholarship to Oxford University-Lord Coutanche was reorganising the States departments and set up the Law Officers-he became a secretary for the Attorney General-decided to become a lawyer. Was secretary to Lord Coutanche during the day and studied law in the evening. Was called to the bar in 1933/34-set up a private practice on his own. First Record-Welcome Song of the Maori People of New Zealand. Has not been to New Zealand but his daughter has. Has travelled a great deal-enjoys it. Had a law practice in Hill Street in the 1930s-business was quite slow-people paid on time. His first client was the late Senator Edward Le Quesne who was trying to get compensation from a shipping company when a boat broke down travelling to France. In the 1930s became interested in the movement of Moral Rearmament-was given a new conception of Christianity-it enables Christians to work with other people of faith throughout the world. Moral Rearmament took part in the bringing of democracy to Zimbabwe. Second Record-Unofficial National Anthem of all of Africa. He is well known in the Swiss village of Caux because it is the world conference centre of Moral Rearmament. Believes that when people work together good things come of it. His wife and he went to Zimbabwe to help friends-they had met Alec Smith-the son of a prime minister and a drug addict-through the attention of Kit Prescott, a friend, he stopped being an addict and became a leading statesman. During the occupation he evacuated in order to enlist-his wife was undecided-in the end she decided to leave. His wife had a baby and he joined up-got into a school of cipher breaking-60 pupils were in the first ever course held on this and only 3 were good enough-he didn't make the grade but they wanted people who could speak french and could teach ciphers to people in the field who were behind enemy lines. Later moved to India to become instructor training people to work behind enemy lines. Worked for the Special Operations Executive-met Maurice Buckmaster who was head of the French Section. His brother Denis escaped to England during the occupation and then joined the Royal Air Force. Third Record-Beethoven's Fifth Symphony. When the war was finished he helped clear up with the courts and then he got back in late 1946. Went back into his law practice. He became solicitor-general in 1948 until 1955-decided not to continue to become bailiff-had differences with the attorney-general Cecil Harrison and decided to leave. Believes those years were wasted years-he could have built up a practice at that time. Went back into private practice with his younger brother. Decided to go into politics because he wanted a hand in running the island. Fourth Record-Mozart's Piano Sonata No 11. His wife, Muriel Vibert, née Le Gros, has been a big support all his life. Became a deputy for St Brelade in 1955 and 2 years later became a senator in an uncontested by-election. Has always been invited onto committees-the sudden death of George Troy led him to become President of Defence, the collapse of the Establishment Committee led to him taking it on and the sudden death of Cyril Le Marquand led to him being President of Finance. Also was President of the Common Market Committee. Constant change of personnel in the States-new wave of people coming to the States typified by Senator Shenton who have brought new life to the States and a desire to do things quickly. Thinks more businessmen should be in the States but it's difficult as they are often too busy to get to States sittings. Dislikes important decisions being rushed through without due consideration. Likes the Jersey system-believes it's a very democratic system. Likes the tradition of the honorary system. Instigated the concept of a minimum income for States members-people could become members of the States without fear of financial difficulties-wouldn't like to see all the States members becoming professionals. Believes the parishes should keep their autonomy. Fifth Record-Manhattan Beach by Sousa. As a hobby he enjoyed playing tennis, likes to garden and play with the grandchildren. One of his daughters is a freelance photographer-became interested in photography. Was awarded the OBE in 1977 and became father of the house in 1980-has no more political ambitions. Believes Jersey's political future should be secure. Sixth Record-An Anglican Hymn. Commentary on the Battle of Britain Red Arrow display by Squadron Leader Henry Ploszek. Talks about the distance that the Red Arrows stay away from each other in the display, the training for formation flying, as manager he organises the administrative duties. End of Side Two.

Reference: R/07/B/11

Date: 1982 - 1982

BBC Radio Jersey-Occupation Tapes. Told by the people who lived through it produced by Beth Lloyd. Part 16: Escapes. Subjects discussed include the escape of Denis Vibert to England in September 1941, tales of different escapes to France by islanders recounted by Eddie Le Corre, Basil Le Brun, Peter Crill, John Floyd, Roy Mourant and their subsequent experiences of interrogations by the Home Forces and arrival in England. See R/06/4.

Reference: R/07/F1/16

Date: July 29th 1990 - July 29th 1990

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