Jersey Talking Magazine-March Edition. Introduction by Gordon Young. Vicki Stuckey interviewing Lady Whiteley, the wife of the Lieutenant Governor about her links to Jersey, living in Calcutta and what her father did, the amount of people in her family, whether she worked, how she met her husband Sir Peter Whitely, where they got married, where they lived in England, having travel as a result of her husband working at the royal marines in Malta and Singapore, the jobs of her four children, her hobbies including walking and birdwatching, a visit to Salisbury, Zimbabwe to see her daughter and what they planned to do when her husband's term of office as lieutenant governor has finished. Captain Martin Stewart, who works for Aurigny, talks to Phil about his trip to the Falkland Islands organised by the Overseas Development Administration in order to help set up an airline and test the pilots, what the Falkland Islands are like, the weather in the islands and the islanders attitude to being British. John Shield, Barry Jordan and Janet Le Cocq singing the Gilbert and Sullivan song 'Never Mind the Why and Wherefore' from 'HMS Pinafore'. Cooking Feature-Margaret Jenkins giving recipes for fish pie and a wholemeal yoghurt cake. Beth Lloyd talking to Pierre Coutanche, the project leader for an exhibition called 'Visions of the Blind' at the Minden Gallery involving blind children taking photographs and asks him how he got the idea to teach blind children photography, the techniques they use to get the children to take the photographs, the differences between teaching blind children and full sighted children, their favourite subjects to photograph, how long it has been running, the progress of his former pupils, his favourite photograph, how they focus the camera. Horoscope Feature-Diane Postlethwaite giving the forecast for the year for pisces. End of Side One. Gordon Young and Chris visiting Ann Street Brewery and being shown around by Ian Stevens, managing director, to the hops room and describes its effect on the taste of beer, how they are stored, how the brewery was built, the mill room, describing the process of making beer whilst going around the brewery and describes the derivation of Mary Ann Jubilee Lager. Gordon Young tells a joke. End of Side Two.

Reference: R/05/B/52

Date: February 28th 1981 - February 28th 1981

Jersey Talking Magazine-June Edition. Introduction by Gordon Young. Beth Lloyd interviewing Gerard Dubras, a purser on a cruise liner, talking about the ships that he works on, how he became a purser on P & O, what his job entails, the complaints that he has to deal with and what people expect of the cruise, romances on cruises, the places that he has visited including Australia, Hong Kong, South Africa and Mexico, the amount of time he can get back to Jersey, how long he is going to do the job and funny stories he has encountered on his job. Philip Gurdon talking to Jacques Toulonges, an employee of Jersey European Airway, about taking part in a trans Atlantic air race at Le Bourget as part of the Paris Air Show, what attracted him to take part, the aeroplane he is entering, how the plane is being modified, the routine after leaving Le Bourget, the course of the race, how long it will take, his father accompanying him on the race, supplies on the plane and how he rates his chances of winning the race. Horoscope Feature-Diane Postlethwaite giving the forecast for the year for gemini. Pat Dubras reading a story by a local musician, Muri Simons. June Gurdon giving some In Touch tips for the blind including music for the blind, talking books by computer and a talking alarm clock. End of Side One. Beth Lloyd interviews Patrick Fyffe and George Logan, a drag act known as Hinge and Bracket, talking in character of their desire to become musicians, their musical training, comedy, any funny stories whilst playing, rehearsals before they go on stage, changing their repertoire, their visit to Jersey, the songs that they perform, then they perform the song 'Happy Talk', what they do at home, herbalism, a theatre that they opened in their home town, what they think of Jersey, writing music, the oldest of the two of them, writing her autobiography and performing their favourite song 'Perchance to Dream'. Beth Lloyd talking to Pat Dubras, the producer of 'Harvey', a show at the Opera House asking her about the play. Talking to Peter Gilchrist, the lead actor, about the part, being able to read something into the part as a psychologist. An excerpt from the play being performed. Gordon Young interviewing Melanie Wilde who is in charge of a group from a school for special children talking about the pupils of the school, why she wanted to go into the job, what her job involves, whether the school improves their behaviour, a link to the social services in England, having a holiday in Jersey, staying with her mother and father, the problems that the five children who are on holiday have and what they are going to do whilst they are in Jersey.

Reference: R/05/B/55

Date: May 31st 1981 - May 31st 1981

Jersey Talking Magazine-April 1977 [March not recorded]. Introduction by Gordon Young and explanation for the reason that there was no March edition. Gardening Feature-walking around the garden and looking at the various vegetables, fruit and flowers that have began sprouting in springtime and in the greenhouse. Nature Feature-Frances Le Sueur discussing the chiff-chaff with an example of its bird song. The history of medicine-a doctor discussing the early history of medicine and the Hippocratic Oath. Cooking Feature-Margaret Jenkins giving a recipe for the making of bread. Island Administrators-Graham Pitman interviewing the Constable of St Helier, Peter Baker-talks about the history and role of the constable, the administration over which he presides, the work of the office and his role in the States of Jersey. Gordon Young talks about Reg Grandin, his experience during the occupation and his writing of the book 'Smiling Through' followed by a reader Mrs Renouf singing the song 'Smiling Through'. End of Side One. Acting out of a German pilot going over the Channel Islands on the 30th June 1940-1st July 1940 on an air reconnaissance and landing at the Jersey Airport linking in to a poem by Reg Grandin read by June Gurdon. Beth Lloyd talking to 17 year old Sarah Patterson, daughter of novelist Harry Patterson, regarding a novel she wrote on the second world war. Talks about whether she always wanted to be a writer, her father's influence, her book about the second world war, the research for her book, her next project and moving to Jersey with her family. The Market in St Helier that was built thanks to a lottery. Di Weber looks around the market talking about the history of markets in Jersey, the building of the markets, the centrepiece of the market, the market during the occupation, the market in 1977, a tour of the market starting in Market Street with a description of the building, stalls and things being sold including flowers, fruit and vegetables, meat, talks to the butcher about his job, talks to Mr Farley about the shop Red Triangle and leaving by Hilgrove Street. Gordon Young tells a humorous story about the market.

Reference: R/05/B/6

Date: March 31st 1977 - March 31st 1977

Jersey Talking Magazine-March Edition. Introduction by Gordon Young. Gordon Young visiting Schruns in Austria describing the view of the village from the top of a mountain, the ski slope and ski schools, the cable car down the mountain, the scene from the cable car, arriving at the cable car station, walking around the village of Schruns describing the park, the main square, the church with its bells ringing, the school, the streets, houses and the river. Sue talking to Sergeant O'Brian about the drug problem in Jersey, the number of drug addicts in Jersey, how drug addicts start, cannabis, drug smuggling, the customs checks at the airport and harbour, the main number arrests made because of information gained from informants, the people who abuse drugs, the part of the plant that the cannabis drug comes from and the other drugs of concern in the island including amphetamines and solvent abuse and problems in the future. End of Side One. Pat Dubras talking to Beth Lloyd about the first pantomime put on by the Jersey Amateur Dramatics Club called 'Cinderladdin and his Wonderful Cat' by Ken Fletcher about the pantomime, the decision to take the production on tour to different parish halls, the difficulty of moving between different locations, playing to packed houses and singing the title song from the pantomime. Philip Gurdon talking to Roger Pratt who decided the previous summer to join the British Antarctic Survey as a pilot on his decision to go on the expedition, the preparations for the journey, the flight to Antarctica, the equipment used to get to Antarctica, his first impression of the region, the different colours of the ice, the headquarters where they were based at Adelaide Island, 24 hours of daylight, the need for self sufficiency, supplies, the occasion of a storm which resulted in the aeroplanes being blown upside down and being almost completely wrecked, taking the aeroplanes to pieces and salvaging the wreckage, the different countries represented in the region, what people do to pass the time, working in the garage and getting airlifted out by the Chilean Air Force. End of Side Two.

Reference: R/05/B/62

Date: February 28th 1982 - February 28th 1982

Jersey Talking Magazine-April Edition. Introduction by Gordon Young. Philip Gurdon interviewing David Watkins, a private investigator, talking about whether there was any need for a private investigator in Jersey, finding evidence of fraud, the difficult aspects of the job, tracing people who have disappeared, the reasons people disappear, training for the job as a member of the police, cooperation with the police force, the line between police and private investigation work, kidnappings, getting involved in situations outside of Jersey-has an office in London and travelling across the world to carry out investigations. Margaret Jenkins talking about the sense of smell. John Bouchere talking about Jersey and the Royal Mail including details of the Channel Islands, the transport of mail by aeroplanes and mail boats, the signalling of the arrival of the mail boat in former days, the transport of the mail by horse drawn car by Mr Le Couteur, the maintenance of the mail carts, the first real mail van in 1929, carrying the mail to Gorey Village, 1933 saw mail coming by air with the aeroplanes landing on West Park beach, Jersey Airport built in 1937 and a daily service was inaugurated, 1940-arrival of the occupation and the air force raids and the stopping of post between the UK and Jersey, use of bicycles instead of the vans, a telegraph messenger, Eric Hassall was sent to College House and received salutes as he was in uniform, Len Godel-collided with a sand laden german lorry and was charged with sabotage but was released, sometimes the bags of mail from Guernsey were opened for investigation, postal services resumed after the occupation, wide variety of mail received by farmers and the difficulty of finding different addresses in Jersey and driving in the country lanes. Beth Lloyd giving In Touch tips for the blind. End of Side One. Composition called 'Dead in Tune' written for narrator and orchestra and recorded by Channel Television featuring the Jersey Youth Orchestra and Alastair Layzell. End of Side Two.

Reference: R/05/B/63

Date: March 31st 1982 - March 31st 1982

Jersey Talking Magazine-October 1983. Introduction by Gordon Young. Beth Lloyd went to the Jersey Airport the day before the Battle of Britain air display to talk to some of the pilots of the aeroplanes. Tony Hogg talks about what he is doing with his helicopter in the display and how the weather will affect the display. The sound of the red arrows and talking to John Blackwell of the Red Arrows about what they will be doing in the air display, when they have time to come up with new displays, the difficulty of thinking up new ideas, how long the team are together-three pilots being changed each year. Flight Lieutenant Rick Watts, the training pilot for the VIP Andover talking about why he is in Jersey for the air display, what he will be doing in the air display, which VIPs are flown around and whether he has been to Jersey before. Chris Topham talking about his solo aerobatics display, winning the Aerobatics Trophy, what is in the display, how he feels when he is taking part in the display, if her feels scared before take off, what he is doing next in his RAF career, taking part in the Krypton Factor on television. Dave Morgan, the pilot of the sea harrier, talking about why a RAF pilot is flying a royal navy plane, being awarded the distinguished service cross for his courage in the Falklands War, being featured on British Heart Foundation advertisements because of his success after being born with a hole in his heart, what he is going to be doing in the display and what he thinks of the sea harrier. Gordon Young interviewing Leonard Cheshire who saw the dropping of the atom bomb and as a result decided to set up the Cheshire Home Foundation for disabled people. Talks about how many Homes have been opened, what started the idea to set up the Cheshire Homes, the help that he gets from local people-voluntary help, whether the Homes will continue to grow, trying to help the process of disabled people living at home and moving out into the community-independent living, the need for residential living and what happens when the Home becomes full-the ideas for extension. Margaret Jenkins with a descriptive piece about autumn. End of Side One. Norah Bryan talking to Mrs Palmer and Janey her daughter, Australians who own a large sheep farm, about the problem of having no rain for four years, living between Sydney and Brisbane in Australia, owning 4000 acres of land and 10,000 sheep, a creek that runs through the land, how the sheep get water, feeding the sheep, how people who don't have water cope with animals on the land, how they manage to fertilise the land-using an aeroplane, going up in the plane to see what the land looks like. Janey talking about flying a plane, shearing the sheep, tar used to stop cuts caused by shearing, how the shearing is organised, when the sheep are sold, keeping track of the sheep and the sheep in Jersey. Beth Lloyd interviewing Harry Hurst, a hypno and psycho therapist who has published a book about reincarnation called 'The Thousand Year Memory', talking about what persuaded him to write the book, the idea of people regressing into past lives, choosing five subjects and his findings from the tests, how far back people regressed, what makes him believe that they are regressing to a previous life and his belief in reincarnation. Joan Stevens talking about early local doctors in the 1800s. Dr George Symes Hooper-equivalent of the Medical Officer of Health nowadays-in charge whilst the cholera epidemic of 1832 took place. Through him and his account we know about the epidemic-we know less about the cholera epidemics of the 1860s. Cholera epidemics-people did now know what caused it-Dr Hooper realised it was down to bad drains, poverty, hunger and drunkenness. He concluded that it was introduced via St Malo and was made worse by a prolonged drought before it came about. Thought there was more drunkenness in Jersey than anywhere else in the world. Plans for drainage in St Helier-in discussion-after outbreak urged authorities forward. The outbreak was partly caused by the lie of the land-lower parts of land getting all of the drainage from all parts of the land. Outbreak started in Cabot's Yard, Sand Street. It was so bad town was divided into 12 districts with different doctors for each, all markets were closed and traffic between St Aubin and St Helier was reduced to a minimum. Cases where population dense were hit worst-St Mary and St Aubin escaped from disease. It was a mystery how St Aubin escaped-speculation that it was because it was richer, thriving and there were less people. Bad outbreaks-south and east of town, St Saviour, St Clement and Grouville-built up areas. North of island almost escaped. 341 fatalities out of 806 case of a population of 36,000-high incidence of deaths. According to the diaries of Sir John Le Couteur he believed the prime cause was the bad water where some of the privies drained. 1849-300 died and 1867 another outbreak-improvements in drainage didn't come immediately-improved after 1867. 1849 epidemic-an entry in a diary of people contracting cholera but not dying displays that not everybody died. Dr Joe Dixon-rhyme written about him. Treatment in 1851 recorded in the diaries of Sir John Le Couteur. He had to get from First Tower to Millbrook with his troops for a militia inspection. At Mont Félard Sir John Le Couteur got kicked by a horse in his ankle but carried on with his review of the militia. When he got home Dr Dixon was called-gave 12 leaches and a purge to the ankle, linseed poultices were put on but the wound went septic. He went to a doctor in England-Dr Brody told him to put on lead ointment and keep living well. Joan Stevens comments that treatments have improved a great deal today. End of Side Two.

Reference: R/05/B/70

Date: September 30th 1983 - September 30th 1983

Jersey Talking Magazine-November 1983. Introduction by Gordon Young. Ideal Homes Exhibition at Fort Regent last month. Beth Lloyd talking to a person on a stand about a talking oven for the blind, how it works and how much it may cost when it is released. Ruby Bernstein telling a story of a dog that followed her and her difficulty in trying to escape from it. Nature Feature-Frances Le Sueur talking about owls including examples of its call. Bob Evans interviewing Group Captain Fred Winterbottom talking about his early life, going on a trip through Canada, Japan, Hong Kong, Australia, New Zealand and India-seeing the Empire as it was before the first world war, returned before first world war began, joined a regiment and became a cavalry man, becoming a fighter pilot during the first world war, getting shot down and captured and was in a POW camp. How he became interested in the intelligence service, built up the air service of the secret service and some of the information he discovered. Paul Brown interviewed Harold MacMillan as a student at Leeds University and asked him who were the great Statesmen in the world that he had met including Jack Kennedy, Charles de Gaulle, what particularly inspired him in a man, who inspires him today and if he was a young man what he would strive towards in the current world. End of Side One. Gordon Young interviewing Jack Worrall at St Mark's Church about how church bells are rung, how he got interested in bell ringing, the ban on bells being rung being lifted in 1943, how bells are rung, the clock installed in St Mark's Church in 1880-dedicated to Charles William Robin, getting to the top of the clock tower to see the bells, the names of the bells, how the bells are hung, what you have to do to get the bells into the ringing position, the stay-can rest the bell on it so as not to have to pull the bell each time and it is a safety feature, the mechanics of bell ringing, the bells being made of copper and tin and the noise of the bell. Jack Worrall talking about the history of the bells in the church, the sally-the place that is pulled on the rope, the dangerous things that can happen, hand ringing bells, a spirit of comradeship between bell ringers-ringing bells for Charles Lovett whose golden wedding anniversary is being celebrated, the physical effort of bell ringing, sequences of bells ringing during a peal including examples on the hand bells, mistakes made during bell ringing and how the bells are played and conducted. Describing how the bells are pulled and talking about how hard it is getting the bell into position. Listening to the peal of church bells. Margaret Jenkins reading a poem by Stanley Holloway. Gordon Young finishing with a joke. End of Side Two.

Reference: R/05/B/71

Date: October 31st 1983 - October 31st 1983

Jersey Talking Magazine-May 1984. Introduction by Gordon Young. Beth Lloyd interviewing Philip Forster, the Promotions manager at Fort Regent, talking about the 'Kingdom of the Sharks' display-how the display works and a description of the display, the Victor White Model Aircraft Collection with a description of the items held and a description of a display of spaceships, the exhibit called SAVE-with a description of what it is. Joan Stevens continuing her talk on admirals. Charles Bertram-1777-1854-joined navy under d'Auvergne and took part in 1795 at Quiberon. He was taken prisoner at that time and remained in prison for some years until exchanged for other prisoners. He was put on press gang service where he had to abduct men to serve in the navy. Well-loved and recognised at home. In 1808 a newspaper wrote a poem greeting him home. At the museum there are his portrait, cutlass, some of his commissions and his court martial in 1813 when he was honourably acquitted. The court martial was an enquiry and not what we'd consider a court martial which took place when any sailor lost his ship. Henry Dumaresq is not as well known. Born 1808-1877, the son of Sir John Dumaresq, and was born in St Peter's House. In a French Revolution of 1848, when France became a Republic, the French Royal family fled and some of them came to Jersey in order to get to England. When they contacted Sir John Le Couteur he organised getting them to safety in England on the naval ship HMS Cuckoo, which was stationed in Gorey Harbour under Captain Henry Dumaresq. Sir John arranged for Henry to transport them. The night before they left they had roast beef and plum pudding on board of HMS Cuckoo. A couple of years later Henry Dumaresq was in charge of HMS Cuckoo when it was wrecked in St Helier Harbour. It struck Oyster Rock and sank and it was his guidance that led to no loss of life and she was later salvaged and repaired and went back into commission. In 1875 he became an admiral. Beth Lloyd talking about the Talking Newspaper Association of the United Kingdom who have formed the National Newspaper and Magazine Tape Services for the blind. A pilot project set up in 1983 which was very successful and led to 15 national newspapers and magazines now being available on tape. A permanent production unit has been set up with funding and Beth Lloyd talks about how to become eligible, how long you can have them for and how to subscribe. Collectors Corner- in St Brelade where there is a large collection of china, glass and books, relating to the royal family, at the home of Peggy Dollop. She talks about how she started collecting in 1940, the range of her collection, the book that started her collection, the latest book in her collection, the china, portraits of Queen Elizabeth, descriptions of various pieces of her collection, the oldest piece of her collection, her cabinet and its contents. End of Side One. Gordon Young talking about the production of Annie at the Jersey Opera House by the Green Room Club. Interviewing Lloyd Cornish talking about having to shave his head for the role, how the show is going, whether it has come up to his expectations, the performance of the dog and whether he would like to go on to a bigger production after the end of the run. Interviewing Sadie Marshall about how the show is going, working on her accent, whether the hard work was worth it, how good the children are to work with and the dog. Talking to the children of the production about whether they are enjoying themselves, what the show Annie is about and singing for the show. Talking to Diane Powell who plays Annie about what it is like taking part in the show, what the show is about, whether she enjoys the singing and dancing and whether she has taken part in a show before. Talking to the dog. Ben Fox, Crime Prevention Officer, talking about callers to the house, not allowing strangers into your house, getting a door chain fitted, the importance of being vigilant, who might call at a house, alarms and the fitting of a new door chain. Gordon Young talking through the Lionel Richie video for the song 'Hello'. Ken Kirk-Bailey talking about broadcasting on amateur radio, how they call people up, Tony Hancock playing an amateur radio enthusiast, describing the machines from which they broadcast and the distance over which they can communicate and the difference between ham and CB radio. St Clement gave them a lease for Le Hocq Tower and they made it into a club headquarters. The Philatelic Bureau issued a stamp of Le Hocq Tower which is now a collectors item and the new penny has a picture of Le Hocq Tower, the world's first amateur radio station to be on a penny. They are spending a week talking to the amateur radio hams in New Jersey to promote the island and he talks about their reaction, making personal friends of people they have never met in their life and a special week in july when they are going to promote the Durrell Wildlife Conservation Trust. End of Side Two.

Reference: R/05/B/75

Date: April 30th 1984 - April 30th 1984

Occupation-BBC Radio Jersey tape. The story of the occupation of Jersey during World War 2 told by the people who lived through it produced by Beth Lloyd. 1) Part 13: The Todt Organisation and their Russian Slave Labourers. Eye witnesses talking about the background of the Organisation Todt, the arrival of the Russians on the island, the condition they were in, the brutality of their overseers, begging and stealing food, concentration camps, the Jersey Communist Party and other people giving shelter, food, clothes, false papers and english lessons with Mrs Metcalfe to escaped prisoners, the story of Louisa Gould, Harold Le Druillenec and Feodor Burrij and the experience of other residents who harboured escapees. 2) Part 14: Entertainment. Eye witnesses talking about the difficulties of the first show during the occupation put on by the Jersey Amateur Dramatics Club, cinemas and the films that were shown, variety entertainment at the Opera House, West's Cinema and out in the parishes, finding musicians, public dances, the Amateur Variety Band, the Green Room Club productions including pantomimes, easter productions and shows, improvisations with costumes and scenery and censorship of the shows. 3) Part 15: We Are At War. Eye witness accounts of feelings of isolation, seeing and hearing British and German aeroplanes, feeling and seeing bombing raids on the coast of France, leaflet raids, members of the royal air force being taken as prisoners of war, commando raid on Egypt, sabotage, the v sign campaign, resistance and reprisals, youth groups against the Germans, the British Patriots group and Norman Le Brocq and Leslie Huelin working with the Free Germany Movement represented by Paul Muelbach calling for a mutiny in the garrison. 4) Occupation Part 16: Escapes produced by Beth Lloyd made up of interviews of local people who were in Jersey during the Occupation. Subjects discussed include the escape of Denis Vibert to England in September 1941, tales of different escapes to France by islanders recounted by Eddie Le Corre, Basil Le Brun, Peter Crill, John Floyd, Roy Mourant and their subsequent experiences of interrogations by the Home Forces and arrival in England. 5) Part 17: D-Day and the Last Terrible Year. Eye witnesses talking about the realisation that D-Day was taking place, aeroplanes going over the island, lack of fuel and food supplies, health in island worsening, Red Cross parcels, the arrival and unloading of the SS Vega, starvation of German soldiers and waiting for liberation. 6) Part 18: Liberation. Eye witnesses including the bailiff talking about the change in the high command of the german administration and listening to Winston Churchill's speech, release of political prisoners, celebrations, surrender of Germans and arrival of royal navy officers.

Reference: R/06/4

Personal View of Senator Reg Jeune, President of the Education Committee. Born and brought up in Jersey-remembers difficult days of the late 1920s and 1930s-early life. Remembers a home with little money but very happy. It was a strict methodist home and his parents gave him a good start in life. His father had two hobbies-his garden and prize poultry. He got involved in his father's hobbies-he got involved with prize bantams in the local agricultural show. Has carried methodism throughout his life-has been a methodist local preacher for 40 years starting in 1942. Remembers the weather being nicer in his childhood-spent a lot of time on the beach and cycling around the island. Played tennis, watched cricket matches at the Victoria College Field when some of the top cricketers came to the island. Lived in Don Road and then in Georgetown as a child. He went to the De La Salle College-he was always encouraged to read books. He remembers going to the junior library with his mother where a Miss Priestley worked-never lost that interest. Thought that he may become a teacher but it was difficult getting grants at that time. His parents were ambitious for him-gave him a lot of encouragement. First Record-The Hallelujah Chorus from Handel's Messiah. Used to sing the piece of music in a choir-enjoyed being a chorister. At school-was interested in sport but was never particularly good. Left school to go into a bank-in waiting he went into Hill Street and then fell in love with law and took that up. Many of his fellow pupils went into a bank-it's much easier now. Studying was a struggle-graduated as a solicitor of the Royal Court of Jersey in 1945-a great deal of the examination was in French-was very difficult. Learnt French in order to be a solicitor. He was an office boy in Hill Street at first-used to collect rentes and write out contracts on parchment. Still sees the contracts that he used to write out. The occupation arrived-they were looking after people's affairs who had left the island-he started taking an active interest in cases after the second world war. It could take several years to study to qualify as a lawyer-took 6-8 years. Church took up quite a bit of time-choir and lay preaching. After he'd qualified he married in 1946 to Monica Valpy. Second Record-Flight of the Bumblebee by Rimsky-Korsakov. Hill Street was quiet during the occupation-had little to do-didn't experience hassle from the germans-helped look after people's affairs who had evacuated. He became a partner in a practice with two other men Helier Mourant and Clifford du Feu and created a company called Mourant, du Feu and Jeune-built up a substantial partnership. Started as a family practice until the financial scene came to Jersey-he became involved. It started around the early 1960s-he got interested when he got asked advice and he gradually became interested. He became chairman of the Youth Movement in 1947 and was involved in other organisations such as the Rotary Club-was interested in politics. Has always been interested in education and youth services. At one point thought that he may have gone into the church-if the occupation hadn't come along he may have done. Hadn't travelled much at this time-he'd been to Guernsey in England and that was all-after he qualified the opportunities to travel increased. He has now made many travels including extensively around the United States of America. Third Record-The Grand March from Verdi's Aida. Has been involved as much as possible with his family-his eldest son is a partner with him who has two daughters, his second son is London and has become an actor and his daughter is a jewellery designer who has come back to Jersey. Encouraged his son to read law. Tried to become a States member of St Helier No 2 District in the late 1950s but was unsuccessful. In 1962 he was successful in a by-election of St Helier No 3 District. Wasn't put off going into the States when he didn't get in the first time. Strange to go into the States especially in a by-election-the house was already set. Was nervous and excited the first time he spoke in the States despite having done a lot of public speaking in his job and church. After six months became president of the Public Works Committee-he had attacked the spending of money at the time especially for the tunnel-the money got thrown out and as a result two committees resigned-the Island Development Committee and the Public Works Committee and he became president of the Public Works Committee-he had been president of major committee ever since. Investigated the traffic problems in St Helier and eventually decided there should be a tunnel built under Fort Regent. Fourth Record-Le Rocquier School Band with Rock Around the Clock. Has a great love of music and books-still reads a lot despite working hard. The law firm has grown-he has become detached from the day to day business of the firm-tries to get there as much as possible-misses it. Became involved with the Trustees Savings Bank-joined the local board about 25 years previously and then became chairman of the Jersey Savings Bank, chairman of the Channel Islands Savings Bank and then elected to the board in London. Goes to two meetings a month in London. Received the OBE for his services to the savings banks-was very thrilled. Enjoyed going to Buckingham Palace to receive the award. Wants Jersey to retain its character but not to be insulated-he's chairman of the Executive Committee of the Commonwealth Parliamentary Association and involved with the French side of the parliamentarians. Fifth Record-Treorky Male Voice Choir. Has been involved in bringing an ombudsman into the States-succeeded-there is now a Review Tribunal. Doesn't have many more great ambitions in the States-is at the service of the States. Thinks it would be almost impossible to set higher education up in Jersey-Highlands College and what it offers with further education is about the limit that Jersey can expect. End of Side One. Personal View of Senator Ralph Vibert, interviewed by Beth Lloyd. Is the father of the house and president of the Finance Committee. At school-pictures that he would be a teacher-went to Victoria College in the 1920s-was captain of the football and head prefect. Didn't get a scholarship to Oxford University-Lord Coutanche was reorganising the States departments and set up the Law Officers-he became a secretary for the Attorney General-decided to become a lawyer. Was secretary to Lord Coutanche during the day and studied law in the evening. Was called to the bar in 1933/34-set up a private practice on his own. First Record-Welcome Song of the Maori People of New Zealand. Has not been to New Zealand but his daughter has. Has travelled a great deal-enjoys it. Had a law practice in Hill Street in the 1930s-business was quite slow-people paid on time. His first client was the late Senator Edward Le Quesne who was trying to get compensation from a shipping company when a boat broke down travelling to France. In the 1930s became interested in the movement of Moral Rearmament-was given a new conception of Christianity-it enables Christians to work with other people of faith throughout the world. Moral Rearmament took part in the bringing of democracy to Zimbabwe. Second Record-Unofficial National Anthem of all of Africa. He is well known in the Swiss village of Caux because it is the world conference centre of Moral Rearmament. Believes that when people work together good things come of it. His wife and he went to Zimbabwe to help friends-they had met Alec Smith-the son of a prime minister and a drug addict-through the attention of Kit Prescott, a friend, he stopped being an addict and became a leading statesman. During the occupation he evacuated in order to enlist-his wife was undecided-in the end she decided to leave. His wife had a baby and he joined up-got into a school of cipher breaking-60 pupils were in the first ever course held on this and only 3 were good enough-he didn't make the grade but they wanted people who could speak french and could teach ciphers to people in the field who were behind enemy lines. Later moved to India to become instructor training people to work behind enemy lines. Worked for the Special Operations Executive-met Maurice Buckmaster who was head of the French Section. His brother Denis escaped to England during the occupation and then joined the Royal Air Force. Third Record-Beethoven's Fifth Symphony. When the war was finished he helped clear up with the courts and then he got back in late 1946. Went back into his law practice. He became solicitor-general in 1948 until 1955-decided not to continue to become bailiff-had differences with the attorney-general Cecil Harrison and decided to leave. Believes those years were wasted years-he could have built up a practice at that time. Went back into private practice with his younger brother. Decided to go into politics because he wanted a hand in running the island. Fourth Record-Mozart's Piano Sonata No 11. His wife, Muriel Vibert, née Le Gros, has been a big support all his life. Became a deputy for St Brelade in 1955 and 2 years later became a senator in an uncontested by-election. Has always been invited onto committees-the sudden death of George Troy led him to become President of Defence, the collapse of the Establishment Committee led to him taking it on and the sudden death of Cyril Le Marquand led to him being President of Finance. Also was President of the Common Market Committee. Constant change of personnel in the States-new wave of people coming to the States typified by Senator Shenton who have brought new life to the States and a desire to do things quickly. Thinks more businessmen should be in the States but it's difficult as they are often too busy to get to States sittings. Dislikes important decisions being rushed through without due consideration. Likes the Jersey system-believes it's a very democratic system. Likes the tradition of the honorary system. Instigated the concept of a minimum income for States members-people could become members of the States without fear of financial difficulties-wouldn't like to see all the States members becoming professionals. Believes the parishes should keep their autonomy. Fifth Record-Manhattan Beach by Sousa. As a hobby he enjoyed playing tennis, likes to garden and play with the grandchildren. One of his daughters is a freelance photographer-became interested in photography. Was awarded the OBE in 1977 and became father of the house in 1980-has no more political ambitions. Believes Jersey's political future should be secure. Sixth Record-An Anglican Hymn. Commentary on the Battle of Britain Red Arrow display by Squadron Leader Henry Ploszek. Talks about the distance that the Red Arrows stay away from each other in the display, the training for formation flying, as manager he organises the administrative duties. End of Side Two.

Reference: R/07/B/11

Date: 1982 - 1982

Alfred Pierre Laurent, a social reformer and basket-maker, talks about his Norman father who was known as one of the finest workers in Jersey-there was only one other person who was up to his standard and workmanship of basket-making-Mr Le Cornu. He could do anything in basket-making. He was very quick tempered-once some six pences went missing-his younger brother had taken them. His father said he'd prefer to see his children dead than dishonest. Feared his father-he spoke French-his father wouldn't allow him to speak jèrriais. His father loved the British people but he wouldn't allow his children to speak jèrriais or english. He came from a large family-life was hard-his mother was a good cook and could make a good meal out very little. His mother was a breton and his father a Norman-it was unusual for the two to marry. He lived in town as a child-used to be drinking problems in town-used to charge 1d a pint. You had to make do when you were poor-he had his first cup of tea when he worked at Averty's the butcher when he was 9. A lot of children worked then-used to eat a lot of meat. In his spare time used to read second hand books and newspapers-spent all his money in book. Didn't enjoy school-some of the teachers were not very nice-children used to be beaten with a leather strap. Remembers the start of the soup kitchens in Victoria Street-a lady was making porridge in a tureen-remembers seeing Dean Falle who helped make the kitchens possible and thinking that he was God. In the age that he was brought up in there was more cruelty and interest in money-good people suffered and the richer people often took advantage. Today he thinks it has gone too far the other way-there is a lack of discipline. Ada Prouten [with a Jersey accent] lived in St Ouen all her life in later years at Ville Bagot where her husband farmed for many years. She was born Ada England 81 years ago when her father leased a farm at Vinchelez and she and her sister went to Les Landes School but she was expecting to do her bit on the farm when they got home each day. She used to pick potatoes in the summer and in the winter used to scrape the roots for the cows. On Saturdays they had extra work to do as nobody worked on Sundays. Life was hard for her mother-there were two days butter making a week, one wash day, a baking day on Friday. All the people her father employed ate at the same table as the family did. Had lunch at 9.30 in the fields, 12.30 had dinner and in the afternoon had coffee and cake in the field and at the end of the day had tea. In October her sister and her worked until 10 o'clock in the lofts. Her mother made jam, bread and cakes-never bought anything. Wash day-used to put the clothes to soak the day before, would boil water in a bath on a tripod, would then hang the clothes up. Hard work cleaning the house-there were no hoovers. Reused flour bags for various purposes including for pillow cases and aprons. Went to Les Landes School-enjoyed school-was always near the top of the class. When they were putting up St George's Church they were told not to go to the Church-she climbed up to the top of the church-she got in trouble with her teacher. Left school at 15 when the teacher was told a false story about her and when she didn't believe her she left school. Decided to help her father on the farm and used to go vraicing down at L'Etacq. Used to lease the farm-the lease was finished at 12 o'clock on christmas day-could be hard. Her sister and her were not paid-they had money when they wanted some and clothes when they wanted some. Her husband and her didn't have a very large farm. Had her first daughter a year after she was married but coped with it well-had to do your own work because you couldn't pay for anything else. She enjoyed her young life-people were friendlier in her childhood. Philip Le Troquer was born in 1896 at Le Pont, St Martin-when he was 4 his mother died-remembers being called to his mother's deathbed and her final words were 'carry on being a good boy'. Six years later his father died leaving 4 children under 10 as orphans-they went to Sacre Coeur Orphanage. His father died in April 1906 and he entered the orphanage as a 10 year old in May. He had a sister Selina and two brothers John and Frank. Life was nice but disciplined at Sacre Coeur-went to a church service first thing in the morning, had breakfast and went to school for 9 o'clock. Went to St Thomas' School-had their three meals at the orphanage. After school did his homework and cleaned the orphanage-had a rota for cleaning. The nuns were good to him. Had an uncle still alive-they were allowed out on their own once every quarter and they would go and visit him at that time. Used to visit his aunt in St Aubin once a year. Had to be back by 6 o'clock on the days they were allowed out. He left school at 13 and he decided he wanted to become a gardener. Used to have lessons from Mr Nouvel from Highlands College every night throughout the winter. Was always interested in gardening-Sacre Coeur Orphanage had a large garden. It was good training to become a gardener-trained for 4 winters. Received a certificate for finishing the course. When he finished training the first world war started-he was mobilised-was drafted to India and went through South Africa. There were about 20 boys from Jersey-stayed in India for 3-4 months then went through the Persian Gulf towards Turkey. When he returned he visited Reverend Le Grand and talked to him about his experiences-he was like a father to him. He has now worked 60 years as a gardener without a break. Enjoyed his time in the orphanage. Frank Noel [with a Jersey accent], 86 this year, has lived in Gorey all his life and is a plumber. His father worked on big racing cutters for Miles Kennedy. Frank did some work on TB Davis' yacht Westward. His father worked on the Southern Railway mailboats but they never moved from Gorey and he still lives in the same house as he moved to when he was 10 in 1908. Life in Gorey Village was quiet, some fishing took place. Gorey Pier was busy with sailing cutters but not as busy as today. Coal was brought in to Gorey by schooners for the Farmers Union that had a stall in Gorey. There was a windmill at Gorey to pump water for the train. As a child used to go to town on christmas eve as a treat and had Marett's sausages. Used to go on sunday school outings on horses and carts. Used to transport vraic using carts. After school and on Saturday he delivered beer for a shop in Gorey Village. Left school at 15 and went to Grandins to work as a plumber. He had wanted to go to sea but his father told him to learn a trade. Used his bicycle to get into work bought his mother. Joined up in the first world war-his parents were upset but proud. Landed back in Jersey on a Sunday morning-waited for the 1 o'clock train and when he got home it was one of the greatest days of his life. The first world war was frightening-not like the movies. Fought in the trenches and mountains-the worst was Belgium. Went back to Jersey on leave during the war-most of the boys in Gorey joined up. Loves low water and boat fishing-caught a 9lb lobster low water fishing and caught a conger of 40lb-it was hiding in a shipwreck. Professor Albert Messervy was a vet in Jersey for many years before, in 1953, he was invited to the chair of veterinary surgery at the University of Bristol. He was one of 6 children brought up in Trinity where his father was a farmer. He was 6 years old when the first world war broke out but he can remember the day. His brother and he were living at Stonewall, Mont au Prêtre with his Aunt Martha because his mother was seriously ill. They used to go to school in Trinity but on thought morning his Uncle George came in and said that war had been declared-he was horrified because their sunday school was due to have tea at Trinity Manor the next day but that had to be abandoned. Remembers in 1912 when the aircraft came from Dinard to Jersey in a race and was at West Park-remembers the pilot-on their way back to Trinity it started to thunder and lightning and somebody sheltering under a tree at Oaklands, St Saviour was killed when it collapsed on him. In 1915 they made some black butter-remembers the different kinds of apples added-in the evening a chimney caught fire-a photograph was taken which is now in Jersey Through the Lens. Was always interested in animals-especially horses. Fed ducklings foxgloves once not knowing that they were poisonous and when they died they got disciplined by their father-12 years later when he was studying to be a vet he was asked about in an examination about the effect of foxgloves on animals and he was able to answer fully. Also had a goat which had twins but she died choking on the afterbirth. The goats used to run into the house. During his childhood there was a fire at Trinity Manor-remembers horses pulling the fire engine to the manor. At the end of the first world war there was a Peace Fete which he managed to go to-his uncle bought fireworks from G D Laurens and Company-some of the fireworks didn't work properly. Jersey suffered little during the first world war-was some rationing of sugar and tea but it had no effect. After the war the farming community was hit-a depression took place and some people emigrated to find work. End of Side One. Personal View of Jurat Clarry Dupré who spent 24 years in the States of Jersey. Is retired but keeps the name jurat. Is enjoying his retirement. Was born in Jersey in 1914-had a happy childhood. Was born in Simon Place and at 6 years old he moved to Beresford Street where his father ran a fish and poultry business and lived there for the next 60 years. His father had 4 brothers and 1 sister but he only had one brother who he has worked with in the fish and poultry business for 40 years. He went to De La Salle College at 6 to 16 and then he spent a year in London learning about the fish and poultry business. After that he worked in Beresford Street from 17 to 24 until the time of the occupation when joined up with the army. He and his family are roman catholics. Played a lot of sport at school. Was the Jersey squash champion in 1938 and played for the Junior Muratti football in 1930 and 1931. First Record-Vera Lynn's 'We'll Meet Again'. When the second world war broke out he was 23/24-he evacuated from the island in June 1940 ad joined up as soon as he got into Weymouth. He was attached to the 11th Battalion of the Hampshire Regiment-he went to the Royal Military Academy at Sandhurst from where he was commissioned to the Middle East with the Cheshire Regiment. Saw active service from Alamein to Tunisia, Egypt to Sicily for the D-Day landings in Sicily. Returned to England in 1943 ready for D-Day in Normandy. Went to Sandhurst for 7 months and left as a second lieutenant and he eventually became a major. He was awarded a military cross-felt he was in the right place in the right time. Was not married when he left the island-left his fiance in Jersey and they got married in July 1945. His brother joined up and spent 4 years of his service in Malta. After he got married in 1945 he signed back with the army for two years and was stationed in the Middle East at Palestine. When he came back his son was 10 months old. Second Record-Lily Marlene with 'The Girl Underneath the Lantern'. Came out of the army in 1947 and worked with his brother for 10 years until 1957 when he went into the States. Entered as a deputy in St Helier No 1 District-was elected unopposed but three years later came second in the election and went into the States-Terry Sowden was first. A year later he stood for senator in a by-election against Senator John Venables but lost and a year after that he stood for election for senator and topped the polls and was a senator for nine years before being re-elected for six years and then losing the election as senator but became a deputy in St Helier No 1 District again before not being re-elected and retiring from politics. After not being returned as a senator decided he would stand as a deputy and was elected as the President of Tourism making it 21 years. He was also Vice-President of the Defence Committee and Finance Committee. Follows the States on Radio Jersey-felt he was getting too old for the States. Believes people are still out there who could be politicians-wouldn't like to see party politics. Wouldn't like to see States members paid. Has served on the Tourism Committee for 24 years and as President for 21 years-it has increased massively in that time. He was elected on to the Executive of the Commonwealth Parliamentary Association-saw over 20 different countries on conferences as a result. As President of the Tourism Committee was always a great supporter of the Battle of Flowers and when he retired he was made an honorary Vice-President of the Battle of Flowers' Association-hasn't missed a Battle of Flowers in 30 years. Used to go to Battersea Park and run an exhibit in the park. Third Record-Stuart Gillies with Amanda. Stuart Gillies spent many seasons in Jersey-is a character. When he retired from the States he became a jurat-had been out of the States for only 6 months and he was asked to fill a vacancy-he filled the vacancy for 4 years until he had to retire because of his age. You keep the title of jurat for the rest of your life. Jurats sits with the bailiff in the court-they are judges of fact-they decide on the sentences-they also sit on various boards-he sat on the Prison Board for 4 years. Didn't enjoy going to the prison but found it worthwhile. Jurats are responsible in the parish for elections. Attended the assize d'héritage and the swearing in of new jurats and advocates. Still goes to the honorary occasions such as the swearing in of new people but doesn't have the power of jurats anymore. Used to wear robes as a jurat and now hats are worn. Still worked in the fishmonger because it was early mornings-especially Friday and Saturday. The business was opened by his father in Beresford Street in 1921and he closed it 2 years after his brother died 4 years previously. His father died in 1924-when he was 10-his mother ran the business until he joined it. He has never done any fishing. Enjoyed meeting people in the business. Was a very small business-had 5 staff and 2 girls in the office-there was some competition with the fish market. They didn't do any wholesaling. Fourth Record-Pretty Woman by Roy Orbison. Has an understanding wife for 41 years of marriage-has one son and two granddaughters. Used to play squash until his 40s but didn't really have many hobbies. Feels he's been very lucky-doesn't regret anything. Fifth Record-Walking in the Air with Aled Jones.

Reference: R/07/B/13

Date: 1984 - 1987

Personal View of Senator Pierre Horsfall, the President of Finance and Economics, interviewed by Geraldine des Forges. His earliest memories of the island are of the occupation-remembers the red cross parcels and the liberation. Lived at Rue du Galet in Millbrook-remembers lots of aeroplanes flying over and his brother running outside and coming back and shouting, "They're ours". Didn't feel the hardship of the occupation-remembers going to the bakery to pick up his meals but never felt deprived. Had some contact with german soldiers-one used to give him presents and he considered him his friend. Went to Firmandale School at Beaumont and then he went to St Mark's Primary School which was a very good school. Moved to Victoria College Preparatory School on a scholarship-enjoyed the sciences but never worked particularly hard at them. There was more discipline in schools when he went to school-the standards have slipped since. He then went to Victoria College-enjoyed his time there-had many teachers who had been in the army so it was a good standard of discipline and teaching. First Record-Clair de Lune by Debussy. In the 1950s his mother managed the Grève de Lecq Hotel so they were allowed to do what ever they wanted at Grève de Lecq. Remembers how good the weather used to be-befriended Frank Carré, a fisherman at Grève de Lecq, who he helped going fishing. Used to swim off Grève de Lecq for an afternoon. Went in to a cave off Grève de Lecq and went through to discover a new bay-used to show guests from the hotel to the bay for money. Used to go to school on the bus and he also had a bicycle. He used to be very free-much more so than the modern world. Avoided sport as much as possible-ended up taking up shooting. From an early age he made model aeroplanes-he always wanted to be an aeronautical engineer-he decided he wanted to work for the Bristol Aeroplane Company and he achieved that aim. He never aimed to go into politics. Second Record-12th Street Rag by Peewee Hunt. Moved to England for his first job with the Bristol Aeroplane Company as a student. Did a sandwich course where he studied for six months and worked for six months in the factory-did this for 3 years and then a further 3 years after that. Worked hard on his course and job-enjoyed the experience. He often put himself forward to take part in jobs. Worked in lots of different aircraft. The design office was working on supersonic transport-worked with a french company to produce concorde. He knew french and so he made sure his managers knew this-he was taken on board by the company directors to the meeting between the British and French-he was involved for six years. He had several roles-he was at first taken because he spoke French and knew what was going on, he then went into a liaison department with the French factory-did a lot of travelling. Third Record-Music from Coppelia. In the early days there was a honeymoon with the French-when the work started there started to be differences of opinion. There were also a lot of enjoyable nights out. The language was a problem because there wasn't simultaneous translation. Feels proud when seeing concorde now. Came back to Jersey because the family business would have been sold otherwise-looked after the hotel. Tourism standards were lower in those days-standards were starting to be raised. A lot more elderly people came to the island at that time. There was always plenty of business around-people didn't realise that tourism was going to decrease. Decided to stand for the States-he was on the Jersey College for Girls PTA and from that someone suggested that he stand for politics. He was deputy of St Clement in 1975. Fourth Record-Piece from Carmina Burana. He spent six years as president of the Agriculture and Fisheries Committee and enjoyed it a great deal. He became president of the Island Development Committee, joined the Policy Advisory Committee and after Agriculture he became President of the Finance and Economics Committee. He set up an office to work at home and withdrew from the hotel business. Being President of the Finance and Economics Committee means a lot of duties-finds it challenging and tiring. He feels the greatest sense of achievement over an amendment to increase the size of the waterfront and feels good that he helps in the politics of the island. He thinks Jersey is secure but it must be careful and address the current problems. Has a happy family life-his wife is a keen horse woman-spends a lot of time watching horses. They enjoy travelling and visit London to see his daughter. Feels if he gets elected that he would stay in the States for one more term of six years. Fifth Record-Piece from Nabucco by Verdi.

Reference: R/07/B/18

Date: September 20th 1992 - September 20th 1992

Personal View of Leslie Sinel, former Jersey Evening Post employee and occupation historian. Born in St Helier in 1906. Involved with people around you-knew everybody in the district-different today. His father was a saddler-used to do jobs at different farms-got to love horses. Not many vehicles around-1920 no one on the Jersey Evening Post owned a private car. Newspaper was distributed by horse-1910-got two delivery cars with open sides so delivery people could throw the paper out of the car. Went to the Jersey National School-church school-difficult but accepted it. Jersey french not taught in schools-French was taught-headmistress Miss Bennett was tough but she taught everybody how to read and write. First Record-The Trumpet Voluntary by Jeremiah Clarke-used to listen to it during the occupation on crystal radio sets. Childhood-holidays coincided with the potato season-worked at T & J Moor and the Great Western Railway. At 14 joined the Jersey Evening Post-father got him the job-started as an apprentice printer-Wolfdale printing machines. Newspaper only means of communication at the time. Jersey Evening Post used to be distributed by horses-1910 got first car. Newspaper printed at 3.30 so people could catch the train from Snow Hill to Gorey at 4 o'clock. 1920-took 3 hours to print 7,500 newspapers, today can print 23,000 in three quarters of an hour. Newspapers dropped off at each station both east and west. Exciting to go on the train as a child-sad but inevitable that the railways went when buses were brought in. Tourism in the summer of the 1920s and 1930s-not comparable with today-people used to stay longer. St Brelade popular for tourists. Second Record-the Radetzky March by Strauss. Radio-what he used to listen to. 1930s-became a proof reader at the Jersey Evening Post and wrote some articles-never had an ambition to become a journalist-worked mostly from the printing side. Newspapers today good quality but reporting is 'muck raking' now. Media today-good variety-modern way of life. Spent 15 years as a Constables Officer and Vingtenier in St Saviour and 21 years in St Helier as a churchwarden and on the Welfare Board and on the Battle of Flowers' Association and Jersey Eisteddfod-always involved in something. Honorary policeman-got fed up with job at the time of the prowler-stayed out watching farms at nights. Queen came-did Government House duty all night. Mostly traffic duties. States Police and Honorary Police can work together. Never wanted to leave Jersey-some travelling on the Continent. Has lived in St Helier and St Saviour. Not the same parochialism today. First buses here-used to run through Bagot-used to call it the 'Orange Box'. The JMT and Red Band Bus-opened up the island-created more movement in the island. 1925-1930s-motor cars increased in number. Third Record-Zadoc the Priest from the Coronation Anthem. Second world war-Germans swept across France getting closer to Jersey-hoped nothing would happen but thought it would. Government realised it was impossible to defend and pulled out. Germans took the island-no alternative-no question of resistance-couldn't have sabotage during the occupation-where could you go? Repercussions on other islanders. Had a guilt complex-felt if he'd gone away he may have been able to do something but if everybody had left the island it would have been destroyed. Decided against evacuation-two of his family left but the rest stayed. Continued to work at the Jersey Evening Post-censored by the Germans but the staff used to resist. On the surface looked to be agreeing with them but were resisting. Was asked to put an article in the newspaper but he took three days off and burned it. Fourth Record-Vidor's Toccata and Fugue. During the occupation worked on a farm in the afternoon-used to get some extra food-learned how to make sugar beet syrup. Meat was scarce-used to get some on the black market-used to be expensive but nothing on the price today. Used to listen to the radio every morning-every hour on the hour-would listen until 9 in the morning-used to leave the house and people would tell him the news-everybody knew it. Used to type out 3 copies of the news-took one to Captain Robin of Petit Menage, one to the Jersey Evening Post and kept one. Many people listened to the radio-he would have been prosecuted for disseminating the news. Used to find out news from German soldiers. Fifth Record-To be a Pilgrim. Liberation-can't talk about it without emotion. Enjoyed life since the war-is retired but very active. Enjoys writing-historical and local events. Would have liked to have been a teacher. End of Side One. Personal View with Jack(John) Herbert interviewed by Beth Lloyd, the war time Airport Commander. Enjoyed working at the Jersey Airport. Was born in Bath and went to Green Park College in Bath. Was part of the choir in Bath but gave up his music-difficult to choose music for the programme. Came over to Jersey at 11-his father was an engineer on a ship-his mother wanted him to stay on shore. Worked in Bath and the Piers and Harbours Committee of 1923 advertised for a harbour engineer. Was learning about law but ended up sailing instead- helped the fishermen Tommy and Charlie King and helped the pilots in St Helier Harbour. First Record-Underneath the Arches by Flanagan and Allen. After leaving school joined his father at the Harbour Office. Worked as clerk dealing with harbour dues-counted the passengers coming in. On the Albert Pier with Captain Furzer-a ship collided with the Albert Pier-harbour had to be dredged. Mr Bill Thurgood visited the island-decided to set up an aeroplane route-administration of the aeroplanes were placed under the auspices of the Piers and Harbour Committee-staff had to check beach. First flight took place on the 18th December 1933 from Jersey to Portsmouth. The beach was cleared of people-a great local event. Had a refueler and a coach for the office work. Had to be an English customs officer, Bill Ivy, and a Jersey customs officer, Harold Robins. No aeroplane dues-the aeroplanes used to pay harbour dues. Aeroplane had a tragic accident-a little boy was sitting on the beach and was killed and a coach got trapped on the beach and was swamped by the sea. Second Record-Stranger on the Shore. Used to create a weather report at the Harbour Office by letting a balloon go into the air and timing it going in to cloud cover. Sites inspected to build Jersey Airport-a site at Grosnez turned down. Site at St Peter decided-problem with fog. No other suitable place in the island for it. Jersey Airport-Piers and Harbour Committee was put in charge of the Airport being built-plans were approved-there were four runways-Jersey Airways ran from Jersey to Portsmouth and Jersey to Heston. Air France went from the Jersey Airport. Third Record-Glenn Miller and American Patrol. Second world war-all messages came in code. Bill Lawford-an air traffic control officer came over. Had to camouflage the airport. Jersey Airways staff evacuated-was in charge of the evacuation-no panic at the Airport to get off the island-between 400-600 left by the Airport. Was ordered to stay at his post, Chris Phillips, an air traffic controller, was called back to the royal navy. Late May some French air force plane with two highly ranked officers and a ground crew. The morning of the 1st June in his office when he saw a german plane fly over and dropped a container-it was addressed to the Bailiff of Jersey. German landed and spoke to the Bailiff-wanted the island to be handed over later that afternoon-put up white flags. Jack Herbert told to cut off the electricity supply-had shipped all their radios to Bristol. Fourth Record-Luftwaffe March. Jack Herbert was transferred to the Transport Office in Bond Street during the occupation-converted some vehicles to use gas as fuel-had to improvise to create fuel as it was in such short supply. Fifth Record-It Must be Him by Vikki Carr. Liberation-transferred back to the Jersey Airport on May 10th 1945-airfields were mined and booby traps-were cleared. German officer detailed to cut the grass at the Airport. Royal air force officer was in charge of Airport and it was handed over 2nd October 1945. Civil aviation picked up between 1948 and 1952. The airport was tarmacked in 1952-the material came from the excavation of the Jersey Underground Hospital. The Jersey Airport became the second busiest airport in Britain in the 1960s. Was presented with an MBE by the Queen in 1974 and retired in 1975.

Reference: R/07/B/3

Date: 1982 - 1982

Personal View of Vi Lort-Phillips, Jersey's lady of the camellias, interviewed by Beth Lloyd. Talks about her love of flowers-it came late in life. Lived in London as a child and was not born in Jersey but her maiden name, St Alban, has an Island connection. Born in London. Was in London in 1915-her uncle was the first officer VC. Met Rudolph Valentino as a teenager who kissed her hand. First Record-Mad Dogs and Englishmen by Noel Coward, who she met after going to the dentist and couldn't laugh at any of his jokes. Got married young after both her parent had died at 15 and 15-married a soldier from the Scots Guards. After they married he left the regiment and worked in London and she went travelling-was unusual. Decided to visit Russia with Primrose Harley a friend of hers-learnt russian. Used to be interested in sport-she was very interested in horses. Her husband got polio and was on sticks for a long time-had to give up shooting. She had a motor accident and her foot was crushed so she couldn't continue participating in sport. Second World War-During the Battle of Britain was playing croquet with polish pilots after they returned after their sweeps. Was an air raid warden-she resigned because she was afraid of the dark. Her husband worked in the War Office. Second Record-The Regimental March of the Scots Guards. Came to Jersey in the early 1950s-she didn't know she was going to come-her husband decided to buy a cottage in Jersey when a friend decided not to move there. Her husband had always wanted to live on an island. She sat for Augustus John who drew charcoal drawings of her-drew 12 drawings of her in 9 years-met many interesting people. Was fascinated by his fascination whenever he drew her. Bought La Colline in 1957 and the garden developed gradually. Her interest was triggered off by coming into a bit of money-decided to build a garden in memory of her brother Teddy St Alban who died whilst flying at the end of the war. Has some rare plants in the garden-when she went to Australia, Japan and America-joined the International Camellia Society-got a wonderful reception in Japan. Collected plants from around the world on her travels. Bred a flower called Magnolia Jersey Belle-was adjudged a hybrid. Third Record-Pastoral by Beethoven. President of the International Camellia Society-started in 1961/2 and has just over 1000 members from nearly all temperate zones. There are many kinds of different camellia-in China they use them for medicinal purposes in Japan they are grown as a crop for charcoal and in the west the main use is decoration. They can be flowering for six months of the year. You need to have acid soil for the flowers to grow. Has travelled with the International Camellia Society-had a conference in Jersey, visited Spain and Portugal. This year went with 40 to China for a conference-took 128 camellias to China and planted a Garden of Friendship. Fourth Record-Hole in the Road by Bernard Cribbens. Personal View of Phyllis Haines, headmistress of Helvetia House School. The school has always been run by her family-it was founded by her aunt, 16 years later her mother took it on and after the second world war she took it on. Her origins were mixed-her great great grandfather Etienne Joste on her mother's side came to Jersey in 1793 from Switzerland-set up a bakery and confectionary shop in Halkett Place and became naturalised-it cost 120 livres. He got married to a Jersey girl, Jeanne Le Bas, in 1795. Their grandson Captain Elias Joste bought the house for his elderly parents and educated his nieces, one of the nieces Eva Joste, started the school and her mother continued. Went to school at Helvetia but wasn't taught by her mother, later on went to courses in London and France. Later on specialised in maths with Mr Kellett from Victoria College. Always wanted to be a teacher-both sides of her family were teachers. Her mother and aunt were not trained as teachers. She didn't go to university-no grants. Went to England via the mailboat and went to London and later visited her father's family. First Record-'Love Is Meant to Make us Glad' from Merry England. Was brought in to teach at Helvetia when she was 21/22. The school has always done well. When her aunt started the school she had 5 pupils, before the war 80, after the war 40 and now 95-100. Used to be a secondary school but is now just a primary school. Social life-she loved dancing-used to enjoy dancing at the West Park Pavilion. Was involved in St Helier's Literary Society-flourished before the war-had Amy Johnson coming to speak to them. Before the war they were talking about getting Winston Churchill over to talk to them-would have cost £50. Involved in acting-inherited from her family-helped start a group called the Unnamed Players with Arthur Dethan and Keith Bell and others so that they could put on plays-the first one was 'The Importance of Being Earnest' at Victoria College and Pride and Prejudice for the Literary Society-both produced by Grace Pepin. It wasn't a very big club-about 10 people and stopped when the war started. Enjoyed travelling abroad-one to the Mediterranean and one to the north. Second Record-The Isle of Capri. Decided to stay in Jersey during the occupation-went out to the Jersey Airport and couldn't get an aeroplane and her mother was too old to go on the boat so stayed. Decided to keep the school open-got orders from the Germans that they had to teach German and joined together with St George's School to do so. Because of a lack of food sport was not allowed to be played in schools. She enjoyed the dances during the occupation. Drama flourished during the occupation-helped the population. She joined the Green Room Club during the war and joined the Jersey Amateur Dramatics Club after the war. Every fortnight a performance was taking place and so she appeared a great many shows. She was involved in the Children's Benefit Fund-it came about because some money was made at school and she wanted it to help children and she got in touch with the hospital and they set up a fund under Arthur Halliwell to enable parents to buy rations for their children. Red cross parcels came in at an important time. Just before the war she'd taken part in a play at West Park Pavilion to raise money for the Red Cross International Society and she was glad that they had because later they saved people's lives. During the occupation the most dramatic change was the lack of radios and letters-despite the red cross messages. A lot of her friends were deported. Were aware when D-Day took place-entertainments were stopped but started again later but often the electricity used to fail and people ended up using lighters to light up the stage. Third Record-Rachmaninov's 'Prelude in C Sharp Minor'. End of Side One. Personal View of Diane Postlethwaite, clairvoyant, astrologer and fortune teller. Was taught from an early age to read tarot cards, hands and crystals. Learnt astrology later and she combines all of the disciplines. She was born with the gift and was not well at the age of 3½-became sensitive to people. Astrology is a science and an art and you need to be slightly clairvoyant to do it. Crystal ball-people hold the crystal and then you take them from them and pick up images from it. Tarot cards-you are given formulas for their use. First Record-All Things Bright and Beautiful. Was 3½ when she was told she had the gift-her mother found her in a church sitting up by the altar being very aware. Told her mother she would have a sister and she did. During the war years was separated from her mother and was taught to read tarot cards by a gypsy. Used to read her friend's fortunes. Went to a convent and the reverend mother caught her playing cards and called her 'a child of the devil'. Became a hairdresser but still told people's fortunes. Took it up as a career in her mid 30s-lived in India with her husband and learnt astrology, she met Mother Theresa in India and some Tibetan people who encouraged her to take it up as a career. She had had her eyes opened in India seeing the poverty and suffering that people suffered. Enjoyed her life in India. Second Record-Ravi Shankar. Went to England and Bermuda after leaving India-encountered voodoo which was frightening. Was going to move to South Africa but ended up coming to Jersey. Have been in Jersey for almost 10 years. Did some fortune telling at a Jersey Choir bazaar and her career took off from there. People are interested in fortune telling now-start of the 'Age of Enlightenment'. People looking for an answer-she is used as a crutch by some people. Learnt meditation to remove herself from other people's problems. Is a practicing Christian. When people come to have their fortunes read she starts with their astrology, then reads their hands. Uses tarot cards for general reading. Tries to help people who come to her with illness-their are many psychic healers in the island. Medicine and healing should be used together. People write to her for advice including people with business contracts. Replies to people by using clairvoyance. Third Record-Bob Newhart with 'The Driving Instructor'. Has been called in to use her clairvoyance to help solve crimes. In the 1600s she could have been burnt for being a witch-has experienced witchcraft in the island-goes to the church for help. Is against the use of ouija boards and witchcraft. Can see beyond what other people sees but can switch it off when she is with her family. Has seen things about her family and herself but does not look into them. Her family are tolerant and help her with her work. They can get annoyed with people who impose on them. Fourth Record-Cosmos. Gets involved in spirits in the house-believes a poltergeist is a magnetic force or the spirit of somebody who hasn't moved on-gets a priest out to help get rid of them. Has been to an exorcism. Spiritualism-can fell when people have died. Feels she is here to help people. The church doesn't agree with astrology but she believes in it. Fifth Record-Joyce Grenfell. During the summer visits a lot of Women's Institutes and take part in bazaars. One fete she was put down by a band. Has just bought a computer to help with her job-will programme people onto her computer. Astrology in the newspaper are very general and difficult to do because of different factors. Some people use their gifts to charge a lot of money but she doesn't believe in it. Her grandmother was psychic and so is her sister. Used to play golf and paint but doesn't get time to do them now. Would like to take up art again. She gets involved in her gift when she goes on holiday. Sixth Record-Chariots of Fire by Vangelis. Tells the future of Jersey for the year including predicting vandalism on the ferries to increase, the States of Jersey defence and fisheries will be discussed and we may have a tremor, oil off the coast will be found within two years, peace and environment groups activities will increase and drugs come under jurisdiction-bright year for the Island. Runs through the horoscopes for the year and the predictions for BBC Radio Jersey.

Reference: R/07/B/8

BBC Radio Jersey-Occupation Tapes. Told by the people who lived through it produced by Beth Lloyd. Part 15: We Are At War. Eye witness accounts of feelings of isolation, seeing and hearing British and German aeroplanes, feeling and seeing bombing raids on the coast of France, leaflet raids, members of the royal air force being taken as prisoners of war, commando raid on Egypt, sabotage, the v sign campaign, resistance and reprisals, youth groups against the Germans, the British Patriots group and Norman Le Brocq and Leslie Huelin working with the Free Germany Movement represented by Paul Muelbach calling for a mutiny in the garrison. See R/06/4.

Reference: R/07/F1/15

Date: July 22nd 1990 - July 22nd 1990

BBC Radio Jersey-Occupation Tapes. Told by the people who lived through it produced by Beth Lloyd. Part 17: D-Day and the Last Terrible Year. Eye witnesses talking about the realisation that D-Day was taking place, aeroplanes going over the island, lack of fuel and food supplies, health in island worsening, Red Cross parcels, the arrival and unloading of the SS Vega, starvation of German soldiers and waiting for liberation. See R/06/4.

Reference: R/07/F1/17

Date: August 5th 1990 - August 5th 1990

BBC Radio Jersey-Occupation Tapes. Told by the people who lived through it produced by Beth Lloyd. Part 2: The Germans Arrive. Eye witness accounts on seeing German planes flying low over the island and landing at the airport to begin the occupation, sending a message to the bailiff at the airport, meeting the germans for the first time, putting out white flags, demanding surrender, handing over the island, removal of the Union Jack from Fort Regent, BBC radio report on the start of the occupation, first impressions of the soldiers, germans buying food from the shops and the beginning of the paper war. See R/06/2.

Reference: R/07/F1/2

Date: April 22nd 1990 - April 22nd 1990

Jersey Evening Post Obituary : Alan Buchanan, a naval architect who worked on bombers and flying boats

Reference: US/1418

Date: February 17th 2015

Jersey Evening Post Newpaper article : A night flight to Jersey ends in disaster. Pilot killed as a private jet crashes into a family home.

Reference: US/1461

Date: June 22nd 2019

Jersey Evening Post Newspaper photographic article : The 80th anniversary of the tragic loss of the inter-island amphibian plane 'Cloud of Iona' which disappeared on a flight from Guernsey to Jersey on 31st July, 1936.

Reference: US/1488

Date: July 28th 2016

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