Jersey Talking Magazine No 6-Christmas 1976. Introduction by Gordon Young with carols sung throughout the edition sung by pupils from Mont Cantel, St George's, St Michael's and the Boys from the Wooden Cross. Cooking Feature-Margaret Jenkins talking about cooking for christmas day. Gardening feature-talking about what happened in the garden this year. Island Administrator-Tom Goss, Dean of Jersey interviewed by Beth Lloyd about life in Jersey. Talks about his duties and responsibilities as Dean of Jersey, christmas day for the Dean and a christmas message for the readers. Humorous christmas pantomime performed by Di Weber of Cinderella from St Ouen's in a Jersey accent. End of Side One. Frances Le Sueur talking about the song twelve days of christmas relating to nature in the Channel Islands-the gifts given in the song. Recording of the bird song of the robin and a poem on the bird. Reading of the poems 'Christmas' by John Betjeman and 'The Oxen' by Thomas Hardy. Eileen Le Sueur speaking about christmas in Jersey-French. Reading of a poem called 'Santa Claus'. Reading of the story a 'Christmas Carol'. Gordon Young talking about the christmas in his household in 1938.

Reference: R/05/B/3

Date: December 15th 1976 - December 15th 1976

Jersey Talking Magazine-May Edition. Introduction by Gordon Young. Dixie Landick at a recent charity concert at the Opera House performing a humorous sketch about local radio. Nature feature-Frances Le Sueur talking about birds including the cuckoo and the collared dove. John Podmore talking about photography and a pioneering photographer, John Woolley. Cooking feature-Margaret Jenkins talking about jelly. Di Weber talking to Sister Ellen Syvret, a missionary nurse in Papua New Guinea about Papua New Guinea, her work in a hospital, the illnesses encountered, how she came to be in Papua New Guinea, giving talks about her work, learning the language, the culture and politics of Papua New Guinea and hopes for the future for Papua New Guinea. End of Side One. Guernsey feature-Linda Le Vasseur talking to the wife of the bailiff Lady Loveridge about adjusting to the position as wife of the bailiff, her background and her family, meeting her husband during the war, the things she does with the job, mastering public speaking and writing speeches, her involvement in charities especially caring for the elderly and the hospital, balancing her commitments of running the house and her job, her love of gardening, clothes and juggling her wardrobe and the visit of the Queen to Guernsey. Feature on the rugby match between Jersey and Guernsey, the Siam Cup including commentary on the plane journey across to Guernsey, a reception at the Governor's residence, talks to John Groves about his link to the Siam Cup and why it is called the Siam Cup, the Royal Thai Ambassador talking about the match, Sir John Martin, the governor of Guernsey, talking about how he used to play rugby, Dennis Hartley the President of the Jersey Rugby Club and the President of the Guernsey Rugby Club, Ernest Yates, talking about the match, John Everall talking about the match, Patrick McCeary, Guernsey captain, talking about the game, Peter Noble, the Jersey captain talking before the match, commentary on the match and Jersey receiving the trophy and Peter Noble talking about how it feels to win the trophy. Gordon Young telling a humorous story.

Reference: R/05/B/31

Date: April 30th 1979 - April 30th 1979

Jersey Talking Magazine-August Edition. Introduction by Gordon Young. Linda Le Vasseur-in Guernsey interviewing Fanny Craddock about her roots, her success and how much it was due to radio and television, how they got on to television, learning to cook, creating dishes, awkward and embarrassing moments when demonstrating cooking, how long and why they moved to Guernsey, whether there are any problems working in Guernsey, any unfulfilled dreams that she has and working on a children's cooking programme. Margaret Jenkins giving some In Touch tips for the blind on how to cope in the kitchen. Gordon Young taking a tour around a railway carriage at the Jersey Motor Museum with Michael Wilcock. They talk about what is special about the carriage, how a bungalow was built around the carriage, looking inside the carriage and describing it, using the train to post and transport letters and describing the working of the train. End of Side One. Jersey Zoo-a song about Jambo the gorilla. To celebrate the zoos twentieth anniversary they take a tour with Philip Coffey, the zoo education officer, looking at the statue of a dodo and explaining its significance, describing the animals and their habits including the macaws, the tapirs, the wallabies, the marmosets and tamarins, talking about feeding the animals, education in the zoo and talking to schools, talking about the pink pigeons, flamingos, swans, a white eared pheasant, the gorillas and a new enclosure being built for the gorillas. Joan Stevens talking about Trinity including the house where the Jersey Zoo is built, describing the parish of Trinity, Trinity Church and when the States went there when George Carteret got sworn in as governor, the church being hit by lightning and the conductor being put up, a mural dedicated to Sir Edward de Carteret, who was a gentleman of the black rod, inside the church, the bell in Trinity Church, a central pillar being moved from the church, the church holding the earliest piece of church silver in the island, Trinity Manor, its residents, being extended by Amice Lempriere and rebuilt by Athelstan Riley, Ville a L'Eveque, Trinity men leading the corn riots in 1769 and Howard David Farm, the States experimental farm. Gordon Young finishing by telling a joke.

Reference: R/05/B/34

Date: July 31st 1979 - July 31st 1979

Jersey Talking Magazine-October Edition. Introduction by Gordon Young. Gordon Young describing the Falcon parachute team's display at the Battle of Britain. Nature feature-Frances Le Sueur talking about jackdaws with examples of birdsong. Norah Bryan talking to Anthony Grey, a journalist, about being captured and held prisoner in China, writing novels, his current novel, whether he draws on his experiences when writing novels, moving to Jersey for three years after being released, returning to Jersey on holiday, what he loves about the island, bringing his children to the island and changes he has noticed. Linda Le Vasseur talking to Peter Brayou, secretary of the Guernsey Driving Society about how he first got interested in driving horses, how the society was formed, the variety of horse drawn carriages, the horse drawn bus, members making their own carriages, the difficulties in building a van, the costumes that are worn and the possibility of more people driving horse drawn carriages. In Touch tips for the blind on how to tell the time with a watch, a knitting needle gauge, setting up an alarm to hear when there was a letter delivered. End of Side One. Beth Lloyd visiting Alderney with the Jersey Amateur Dramatics Club to put on an entertainment for Alderney Week-including exerts from the show, watching an event where people jump off a platform trying to fly with commentary by Roger Burton, President of the Jersey Amateur Dramatics Club. Beth Lloyd talking to Eileen Sykes about the constitution of Alderney, finance in the island, the evacuation of the island during the occupation, the concentration camps, work permits on the island, building restrictions. Gordon Young telling a joke.

Reference: R/05/B/35

Date: September 30th 1979 - September 30th 1979

Jersey Talking Magazine No 7-January 1977. Introduction by Gordon Young and new year greetings. Cooking feature-Margaret Jenkins talking about cooking vegetables. Gardening feature-talking about looking after house plants and digging for potatoes. Nature feature-Frances Le Sueur talking about peewits and curlews with bird song from the birds. Island Administrators-Enfant Terrible and Champion of Causes of Local Politics Senator Dick Shenton interviewed by Beth Lloyd. Talks about his years in politics, his functions in the State, his working life away from the States, bringing local radio to the island and the importance of local radio. Hints for the blind including recommendations for large print knitting patterns and shoes for slippery weather. End of Side One. Part One of a tour of St Helier from the Royal Square to the Parade by Mr Robin Cox and Mrs Joan Stevens. Talk about the Royal Square including stories involving the market in the Royal Square until it was moved, became the Old Market, much later became known as the Royal Square after the Battle of Jersey, the different markets in St Helier, centrepiece the statue of George II-made by John Cheere, Chamber of Commerce building-first one in the english speaking world-1768-set up to assist merchants, St Helier Church-named after patron saint-who was he-Belgian hermit-talks about his life and the history of the church-last alteration just over a hundred years ago, the chapel on the side, the Royal Court and the States Building-the history of the different buildings used as a court house, a building built in 1730 by Philip Falle as a public library, the trees in the Royal Square, granite v sign set into the ground of the Royal Square. Interview by Reverend Peter Manton of Mr Bell, a New Zealand journalist, about life in New Zealand. Humorous story of the Winchester Dragon.

Reference: R/05/B/4

Date: December 31st 1976 - December 31st 1976

Jersey Talking Magazine-March Edition. Introduction by Gordon Young. Doctor Frank Le Maistre talking about Jersey French, trying to revive the language, making recordings of the language, the origins of the language, differences between language in the Channel Islands, changes in the language, funding into the study of jèrriais, work on, publication and sales of his dictionary and dialects in different parts of the island. Linda Le Vasseur interviewing Mr Ozane concerning teaching Guernsey Norman French to teachers, problems faced with learning the language, how he got involved in the teaching, different pronunciations in the parishes, speaks in Guernsey Norman French. Tim giving a tip from a reader for an alarm that can be put in your handbag. Competition winners and a new competition. Gordon Young tells a humorous story. Pat Dubras and Sonia Hamon performing Noel Coward's Cat's Cradle. End of Side One. Chris and Gordon at the opening of The Victoria public house in St Peter's Valley with Ian Stevens of Ann Street Brewery and Mr Le Marquand, the Constable of St Peter includes speeches by both, description of the pub and the impressions of the presenters, talking to Brian Garner, the architect, Mike Weaver, the builder and Ian Stevens, the director of Ann Street Brewery about the building. Nature feature-Frances Le Sueur talking about robins and their habits, including examples of their birdsong. Royal feature-Ruby Bernstein talking about Queen Mary having met her as press officer in the Rank Organisation, talks about her actions during the second world war, Queen Mary showing films to soldiers through the Rank Organisation, Mary's love of films, Ruby organising these viewings with the Queen, Mary going to events to do with film after the second world war, the difficulties of organising a toilet within a certain distance for the Queen to use and organising private viewings for Queen Mary to view films when she was older. Gordon Young ends with a humorous story.

Reference: R/05/B/40

Date: February 29th 1980 - February 29th 1980

Jersey Talking Magazine-September Edition. Introduction by Gordon Young. Joan Stevens taking a tour of St Clement talking about the early history of the parish, St Clement's Church including the piscina, the font, the paintings on the wall, the line of the roof, stone seats around the base of the pillars and the priory, the size of the parish, the effects of the sea, prehistoric remains including the dolmens, menhirs and prehistoric graves of the parish. The chapel that was dedicated to St John the Evangelist before the Reformation which was destroyed, Rocqueberg which was used by a witches coven, Jean Mourant and others who were killed for being witches. Talks about 1685 when they received french refugees, Le Hocq Tower-a Jersey Round Tower, Victor Hugo who lived at Marine Terrace from 1853 to 1855, Samares Manor including the fact it took its name from the salt around the manor, the dovecote, a windmill in 1218, the chapel, the families who held the manor who were the de Ste Hilaire's, the Payn's, the Dumaresq's, the Seale's, the Hamon's, the Mourant's and Sir James Knott who renovated the garden. Before that Philippe Dumaresq built a garden, he also wrote an important survey on Jersey in the 1680s. Cooking Feature-Margaret Jenkins giving recipes for desserts. Guernsey Feature-Linda Le Vasseur talking to Joan Stockdale, a Guernsey journalist for a newspaper, asking her why she decided to become a reporter, how she started, how she felt when she started, how it developed, her women's and children's pages, the most interesting people she has interviewed, interviewing Michael Parkinson, Jimmy Saville, Frank Bough, Peter Sellers, Oliver Reed, the most difficult part of the job, coping with a career and a family, her interest in tropical birds, her collection of amber, her favourite books and her advice for the listener who wants a career in journalism. Horoscope feature-Diane Postlethwaite talking about the forecast for virgo for the year. End of Side One. Driving down to Corbiere, on top of tower-radio aerials-home of Jersey Radio, the nerve centre of Jersey shipping communications and run by the Harbours and Airport Committee-describing the structure, talking to Mr Dale about a rescue taking place of a fishing boat, the view from the tower, the wind blowing, the increased need for Jersey Radio, what Jersey Radio does and is told by boats, working with the French, dealing with a rescue, the frequencies used, what's happening with the rescue, the transmissions between the officials dealing with the rescue, the use of air rescue, the frequency and types of emergencies. Story read by Peter Gilchrist about Mike Tetley, a guide dog owner and completely blind, who appeared on This is Your Life and climbed up Mount Everest describing his life, his training and the process by which he climbed the mountain. Quiz-Gordon Young announces the winner from the previous month and sets a new quiz. End of Side Two.

Reference: R/05/B/46

Date: August 31st 1980 - August 31st 1980

Jersey Talking Magazine-October Edition. Introduction by Gordon Young. Nature Feature-Frances Le Sueur talking about the magpie. Beth Lloyd interviewing Mrs Skinner about her language school in Jersey, how she started, arranging pupil exchanges, asked to arrange language courses by the Comité d'Accueil, set up a business for it, the experience that the pupils receive, the reason students come over, owning and driving coaches in the island. Cooking Feature-Margaret Jenkins giving recipes for paté. Glen Williams talking about the history of the tarot cards. Horoscope Feature-Diane Postlethwaite talking about the forecast for libra for the year. Quiz-Gordon Young announcing the winner of the previous months quiz and setting a new quiz. End of Side One. Gordon Young on his trip to London including flying on the aeroplane, describing what is happening below, looking out from the cockpit and talking to Philip Gurdon who is the pilot, describing the landing, going on a train and describing the journey, sitting in Oxford Street and describing the surroundings, sitting in Hyde Park and describing the surroundings, standing on London Bridge and describing the surroundings and giving the reasons that he visited London. End of Side Two.

Reference: R/05/B/47

Date: September 30th 1980 - September 30th 1980

Jersey Talking Magazine-January Edition (User Copy). Introduction by Gordon Young. Cooking Feature-Margaret Jenkins giving recipes for the making of soup. Nature Feature-Frances Le Sueur talking about ducks with examples of duck noises. Beth Lloyd interviewing Faith Brown, an impressionist about how she became an impressionist, how she does her impressions, practising the impressions, giving examples of her impressions, hiding behind her impressions, visiting America, an impression of Margaret Thatcher talking about Jersey and meeting Kate Bush. Headmaster of Trinity School Roland Heaven singing 'Take a Pair of Sparkling Eyes' from The Gondoliers from the Gilbert and Sullivan Society. Beth Lloyd interviewing Mrs Clement-Robson about the dried fish industry in Newfoundland about how the industry began, when her grandfather went to Newfoundland in 1835 and created the business de Gruchy, Renouf, Clement and Company at La Poile and later at Channel and Burgeo, La Poile which was later bought by a Le Seelleur, the other Jersey businesses-Falle's, the Robin family at Gaspé, how the fishes were dried and the length of time it took, where the fishes were sold in Europe, the origins of the crew-some were Jersey. The Gilbert and Sullivan Society singing 'Once More Gondolieri'. End of Side One. D'Hautrée School's account of the Battle of Jersey on the occasion of its bicentenary with a summary of its events and an account of how the people felt when experiencing it based on the letters of Charles Poingdestre to Charles de Carteret, including children acting out the parts of Pierre Journeaux, the pilot, Baron de Ruellecourt, Falle, a member of the militia, Moses Corbet, the lieutenant governor, Adjutant Harrison, a British officer and Major Peirson, the commanding officer including a letter to Major Peirson's father from the States of Jersey in tribute. John Shield singing 'I am the Very Model of a Model Major-General'. Horoscope Feature-Diane Postlethwaite giving a forecast for sagittarius and capricorn. Gordon Young ends with a humorous story. End of Side Two.

Reference: R/05/B/50

Date: 1981-01 - 1981-01

Jersey Talking Magazine-January Edition, original cassette copy.

Reference: R/05/B/50/1

Date: 1981-01 - 1981-01

Jersey Talking Magazine-March Edition. Introduction by Gordon Young. Vicki Stuckey interviewing Lady Whiteley, the wife of the Lieutenant Governor about her links to Jersey, living in Calcutta and what her father did, the amount of people in her family, whether she worked, how she met her husband Sir Peter Whitely, where they got married, where they lived in England, having travel as a result of her husband working at the royal marines in Malta and Singapore, the jobs of her four children, her hobbies including walking and birdwatching, a visit to Salisbury, Zimbabwe to see her daughter and what they planned to do when her husband's term of office as lieutenant governor has finished. Captain Martin Stewart, who works for Aurigny, talks to Phil about his trip to the Falkland Islands organised by the Overseas Development Administration in order to help set up an airline and test the pilots, what the Falkland Islands are like, the weather in the islands and the islanders attitude to being British. John Shield, Barry Jordan and Janet Le Cocq singing the Gilbert and Sullivan song 'Never Mind the Why and Wherefore' from 'HMS Pinafore'. Cooking Feature-Margaret Jenkins giving recipes for fish pie and a wholemeal yoghurt cake. Beth Lloyd talking to Pierre Coutanche, the project leader for an exhibition called 'Visions of the Blind' at the Minden Gallery involving blind children taking photographs and asks him how he got the idea to teach blind children photography, the techniques they use to get the children to take the photographs, the differences between teaching blind children and full sighted children, their favourite subjects to photograph, how long it has been running, the progress of his former pupils, his favourite photograph, how they focus the camera. Horoscope Feature-Diane Postlethwaite giving the forecast for the year for pisces. End of Side One. Gordon Young and Chris visiting Ann Street Brewery and being shown around by Ian Stevens, managing director, to the hops room and describes its effect on the taste of beer, how they are stored, how the brewery was built, the mill room, describing the process of making beer whilst going around the brewery and describes the derivation of Mary Ann Jubilee Lager. Gordon Young tells a joke. End of Side Two.

Reference: R/05/B/52

Date: February 28th 1981 - February 28th 1981

Jersey Talking Magazine-May Edition. Introduction by Gordon Young. Nature Feature-Frances Le Sueur talking about the seagull including examples of bird song. Beth Lloyd talking to Mr Atkinson, a man who has invented a machine designed to simplify learning Braille explaining how the machine works, being up for an award for the machine and the details of the machine and how to purchase it. Cooking Feature-Margaret Jenkins talking about recipes for easy bake ideas. Chris and David commentating on a walk at Les Mielles, St Ouen describing the scenery and the work that had gone on in the area. Beth Lloyd interviewing Sarah-Jane Lewis, who works for a group of magazines called Condé Nast that publishes Vogue, talking about her job selling the magazines promotions to certain shops, doing a colour promotion with de Gruchy, researching shops, the amount of time she spends in London and travelling, watching fashion shows and the fashion for summer wear. Horoscope Feature-Diane Postlethwaite giving a forecast for the year for taurus. End of Side One. Gordon Young visiting Inverness describing the scenery and the town and visiting Loch Ness. Chris interviewing spy author Palma Harcourt regarding joining the intelligence service during the war, describing what she was doing at Bletchley Park and in the intelligence service, writing books on the service, what made her want to write books, getting books published, her inspiration for writing the books, the Sir Roger Hollis affair, what she writes about, her new book called 'A Twisted Tree' and its plot. Pat Dubras performing a scene from Joyce Grenfell's 'A Terrible Worrier'. End of Side Two.

Reference: R/05/B/54

Date: April 30th 1981 - April 30th 1981

Jersey Talking Magazine-July Edition. Introduction by Gordon Young. Margaret Jenkins reading a creative essay that she had written for a recent O Level course. Nature Feature-Frances Le Sueur talking about rare warblers with examples of bird song. Horoscope Feature-Diane Postlethwaite giving a forecast for the year for cancer. June Gurdon with In Touch tips for the blind talking about the Royal National Institute for the Blind, typewriters for the partially sighted, milk saver pans and clocks. Beth Lloyd talking to Max Robertson about commentating at Wimbledon tennis tournament, whether he used to play tennis, having knowledge of the game, commentating, how he keeps talking throughout the game, commentating on other occasions, a funny story that happened to him and the future of radio. Elizabeth Beresford, Max Robertson's wife, talking about the Wombles, how she thought up the idea, what her family think of it, whether she is still writing Wombles books, the success of the books, her roll in the television series, writing the scripts for the television programmes, the message of The Wombles to keep tidy. End of Side One. Gordon Young visiting the Durrell Wildlife Preservation Trust to see the opening of the Gorilla Breeding Centre describing the new exhibit, the visitors including Gerald Durrell, Gerald Durrell giving an opening speech for the exhibit, talking about Jambo, Lieutenant Governor Sir Peter Whiteley making a speech to open the exhibit, Gordon Young commentating on the opening of the complex. Quentin Bloxham, member of the zoo staff, talking about the importance of the breeding centre, the number of families that will use the area, the habitat provided by the centre. Nick Lindsay talking about the gorillas and the breeding centre. Gordon Young describing the inside and outside of the breeding centre and the gorillas behaviour. Anton Mosimann, head chef at the Dorchester Hotel at the age of 29, being interviewed by Beth Lloyd talking about when he decided to become a chef, other chefs he worked with, the skills that he had to learn, learning to cook as a child and giving dinner parties, how a head chef in the Dorchester Hotel checks the standard of all of the food with 80 staff working under him, looking after his staff, creating new recipes and implementing a surprise menu at the Dorchester Hotel. End of Side Two.

Reference: R/05/B/56

Date: June 30th 1981 - June 30th 1981

Jersey Talking Magazine-October Edition. Introduction by Gordon Young. Beth Lloyd talking to Roy Jones, a production manager for Bergerac, about why Jersey was chosen as the location for the television series, the number of teams in the television crew, the length of time the series will take, how long an episode takes to shoot, the different members of the team, the amount of people on the production team and the different jobs that they do including the director, production manager and location manager, any problems about coming to Jersey, travelling to the island and going through customs. John Nettles talking about the character of Bergerac, the development of the television series and the character, enjoying the character, how he enjoys working on television as opposed to the stage, learning the script and the local pronunciations. Nature Feature-Frances Le Sueur talking about avocets in Jersey. Pauline Faires interviewing Sharon Wilkinson, a 10 year old who has won a place at Chethams Music School, what her friends at St Saviour's School think of her going away, her father saying how they are going to move across to England, his daughter Caroline getting into the same school, when Sharon started playing, playing the violin and piano, life at Chethams, the subjects studied at Chethams, life at the weekends, family living near the area, making friends in the area, the amount of pupils in the same year and when she is going across to the school. Pat Dubras performing a Joyce Grenfell piece. Beth Lloyd with In Touch tips for the blind talking about books for the blind about the royal wedding. End of Side One. To commemorate the anniversary of the Battle of Britain a poem written by Barry Sutton, an ex-fighter pilot who lived in Jersey, entitled 'The Summer of the Firebird' is read. Margaret Jenkins with a creative essay regarding her home parish of St Ouen and the landscape and weather encountered therein. Norah Bryan interviewing Simon Hicks, the Durrell Wildlife Conservation Trust secretary and co-ordinator, asking who the person was behind the projects at the zoo, Gerald Durrell, a training facility that has just been built, describing the process of conservation, where the trainees come from, the success of the training centre, stories of the trainees, how many the training centre holds and the programme for the training scheme. Phil Gurdon at Glencoe, St Lawrence for an auction talking to the people at the auction to see why they come to the auction including some speaking in Jèrriais [with local accents], meeting people at the auction, whether the sale has changed, whether there are less farmers who come to the sale and who comes to the sale. Looking at some of the lots at the auction. Talking to customers about how often they come to the auction, what they buy and what they have bought at the auction this time. Listening to the auctioneer sell some lots. Talking to Victor Pallot, the auctioneer, about how the sale went, how long he had done the job and the owner of the sale. End of Side Two.

Reference: R/05/B/58

Date: September 30th 1981 - September 30th 1981

Jersey Talking Magazine-April 1977 [March not recorded]. Introduction by Gordon Young and explanation for the reason that there was no March edition. Gardening Feature-walking around the garden and looking at the various vegetables, fruit and flowers that have began sprouting in springtime and in the greenhouse. Nature Feature-Frances Le Sueur discussing the chiff-chaff with an example of its bird song. The history of medicine-a doctor discussing the early history of medicine and the Hippocratic Oath. Cooking Feature-Margaret Jenkins giving a recipe for the making of bread. Island Administrators-Graham Pitman interviewing the Constable of St Helier, Peter Baker-talks about the history and role of the constable, the administration over which he presides, the work of the office and his role in the States of Jersey. Gordon Young talks about Reg Grandin, his experience during the occupation and his writing of the book 'Smiling Through' followed by a reader Mrs Renouf singing the song 'Smiling Through'. End of Side One. Acting out of a German pilot going over the Channel Islands on the 30th June 1940-1st July 1940 on an air reconnaissance and landing at the Jersey Airport linking in to a poem by Reg Grandin read by June Gurdon. Beth Lloyd talking to 17 year old Sarah Patterson, daughter of novelist Harry Patterson, regarding a novel she wrote on the second world war. Talks about whether she always wanted to be a writer, her father's influence, her book about the second world war, the research for her book, her next project and moving to Jersey with her family. The Market in St Helier that was built thanks to a lottery. Di Weber looks around the market talking about the history of markets in Jersey, the building of the markets, the centrepiece of the market, the market during the occupation, the market in 1977, a tour of the market starting in Market Street with a description of the building, stalls and things being sold including flowers, fruit and vegetables, meat, talks to the butcher about his job, talks to Mr Farley about the shop Red Triangle and leaving by Hilgrove Street. Gordon Young tells a humorous story about the market.

Reference: R/05/B/6

Date: March 31st 1977 - March 31st 1977

Jersey Talking Magazine-November 1983. Introduction by Gordon Young. Ideal Homes Exhibition at Fort Regent last month. Beth Lloyd talking to a person on a stand about a talking oven for the blind, how it works and how much it may cost when it is released. Ruby Bernstein telling a story of a dog that followed her and her difficulty in trying to escape from it. Nature Feature-Frances Le Sueur talking about owls including examples of its call. Bob Evans interviewing Group Captain Fred Winterbottom talking about his early life, going on a trip through Canada, Japan, Hong Kong, Australia, New Zealand and India-seeing the Empire as it was before the first world war, returned before first world war began, joined a regiment and became a cavalry man, becoming a fighter pilot during the first world war, getting shot down and captured and was in a POW camp. How he became interested in the intelligence service, built up the air service of the secret service and some of the information he discovered. Paul Brown interviewed Harold MacMillan as a student at Leeds University and asked him who were the great Statesmen in the world that he had met including Jack Kennedy, Charles de Gaulle, what particularly inspired him in a man, who inspires him today and if he was a young man what he would strive towards in the current world. End of Side One. Gordon Young interviewing Jack Worrall at St Mark's Church about how church bells are rung, how he got interested in bell ringing, the ban on bells being rung being lifted in 1943, how bells are rung, the clock installed in St Mark's Church in 1880-dedicated to Charles William Robin, getting to the top of the clock tower to see the bells, the names of the bells, how the bells are hung, what you have to do to get the bells into the ringing position, the stay-can rest the bell on it so as not to have to pull the bell each time and it is a safety feature, the mechanics of bell ringing, the bells being made of copper and tin and the noise of the bell. Jack Worrall talking about the history of the bells in the church, the sally-the place that is pulled on the rope, the dangerous things that can happen, hand ringing bells, a spirit of comradeship between bell ringers-ringing bells for Charles Lovett whose golden wedding anniversary is being celebrated, the physical effort of bell ringing, sequences of bells ringing during a peal including examples on the hand bells, mistakes made during bell ringing and how the bells are played and conducted. Describing how the bells are pulled and talking about how hard it is getting the bell into position. Listening to the peal of church bells. Margaret Jenkins reading a poem by Stanley Holloway. Gordon Young finishing with a joke. End of Side Two.

Reference: R/05/B/71

Date: October 31st 1983 - October 31st 1983

Jersey Talking Magazine-June 1977 Edition. Introduction by Gordon Young. Nature Feature-Frances Le Sueur talks about wild garlic and the cuckoo with its bird call. Interview by Gordon Young of the television naturalist David Bellamy talking about what drew him into botany, his interest in flowers and the conservation of animals and plants in the garden. Cooking Feature-Margaret Jenkins talking about what recipes you can make with cheese. Beth Lloyd talking to a doctor about the use of vitamin supplements. Island Administrators-Graham Pitman talking to John Lees of Controller of Social Security about the functions of the Social Security Department, the differences between Jersey and the UK, future developments in social security, how awareness is raised of the department's work to the public. Tim giving hints on bath aids for the blind and elderly. End of Side One. June Gurdon reading Reg Grandin's poem 'Little Treasured Joys'. Commander Cruisarr from Guernsey talking about the evolution of Talking Books for the blind. Beth Lloyd talking to Frank Walker, Managing Director of the Jersey Evening Post, about the moving of the newspaper offices from Bath Street to Five Oaks, the printing of the newspaper, going on a tour of the building with descriptions of each room and the printing process. Roy Fauvel tells the history of a gold snuff box recently presented to St Helier by Eric Young which was presented to Edward Nicolle, the Constable of St Helier in the 1820s, who was censured by the States after comments made but received the box as a vote of confidence from the parish. Gordon Young with a story about the muratti.

Reference: R/05/B/8

Date: May 31st 1977 - May 31st 1977

Personal View of Florence Bechelet [with jersey accent] interviewed by Beth Lloyd talking to her about the Battle of Flowers. She has been making floats since 1934, she decided to start when she saw a float in 1928, noticed a carnival class was being held-decided she wanted to take part in it, she made a watering can costume and showed it to a neighbour who said that she'd done very well, was going to walk in with it but it would have been too heavy. At 15 she found an old pram, which she tied with string planks and put a tower shaped clock and vases with flowers on it. With two friends she went to the Battle Of Flowers at Springfield and won 3rd Class in the class with 10 shillings prize money. She was determined to do better next time. She was not artistic at school, she put the floats together by looking at picture of animals to get ideas and cutting a piece of wire bigger than the animal and shaping it. For the first 3 years she made it with hydrangeas. She found out there was a prize for best exhibit in junior class and senior in wild flowers. In 1937 she made a weather house in heather and won first in her class and the junior wild flowers prize, which was 6 solid silver tea spoons. First record-a March from the Band of the Welsh Guards. Battle Of Flowers at Springfield was a smaller scale than today but had beautiful floats. They used a lot more hydrangeas in those days. There was more of a team effort in the past, young people used to put together exhibits, most young people were in the Battle. Springfield-used to hold up to 10,000 people who were mostly islanders but there were a few tourists. Local bands used to play. The outbreak of war stopped the Battle Of Flowers. Her family had a farm but they couldn't export produce and cattle kept being taken by the germans. They were left with 2 cattle, a severely depleted stock, in St Ouen. The Germans took 12 vergees of land in Les Landes. She didn't really deal with the Germans. Food was scarce-a lot of people were saved by the Red Cross parcels. She had planned for the Battle Of Flowers before the outbreak of war but didn't do it until 1951. It was a hunting scene, which won first prize in its class with a prize of £15, first in the junior wild flowers which was a prize of a silver tea set, the prix de merit, which was a prize of a refrigerator which still works today and the best exhibit of the whole show by an individual, which was a prize of a radiogram worth 160 guineas. Second record-Sound of Music. Battle Of Flowers started again in 1951 and went to Victoria Avenue which was a better venue and had a smooth road. She didn't know why it changed back as it started on Victoria Avenue. There hasn't been a Battle at the end of the Battle of Flowers for 7 or 8 years. At the end of the parade she used to have to protect her own float. She has started a Battle Of Flowers Museum through her interest in the event, it has proved popular after the first three years of difficulty. It was opened on 16th June 1971 with one building and then a second, third and fourth with sixteen models from the Battle Of Flowers in total. She has made 40 exhibits for the Battle Of Flowers and 13 exhibits for other fetes including on Grouville Common, St Ouen's Fete, Villa Millbrook and St Andrew's Park-in competition. Her favourite float was made for the Queen and Duke of Edinburgh's visit in 1979 with an exhibit of 40 flamingos, took it to Howard Davis Park and were introduced and talked to the Queen and Duke of Edinburgh who were easy to talk to. The President of the Battle Of Flowers' Association gave her permission to show it before the Battle Of Flowers took place and she used it in the Battle Of Flowers that year although it didn't win a prize and the Association said they couldn't give her a guarantee for it because it had been shown before but it was sorted out although she was upset and didn't exhibit for the next 2 years. Had an exhibit that became a design for a stamp, which was a float of ostriches. She later became allergic to glue. Told by Philatelic Bureau that her design was being used as a stamp-1s 9d. Third Record-Blue Danube. She makes a float by getting a book on animals, making a scene, for example, a jaguar with llamas, keeps the design in her head rather than drawing it, no help given to her-all individual work. She picks the grasses as soon as they're ready. Used to pick them at the sand dunes and now grows her own. Has to sew them each year. She makes her mind up on what the theme will be on christmas day and doesn't change her mind. The float is made from three quarter inch mesh chicken wire. On a horse and bison float-84,000 pieces of grass were used on each horse and 11,000 bunches of approx 20 each on the bison. All her spare time is spent doing things. She is not normally a patient person but enjoys doing it and never gets bored. She dyes the grasses before putting them on the float in a bucket on her gas cooker. Prefers making animals to human figures. She was especially careful when making a Jersey calf figure as she was asked to do so by the Société Jersiaise and she wanted to make sure it was right and kept checking. Fourth Record-Jimmy Shand-chose it because it has a good rhythm. She talks about her exhibits that went to Exeter for Jersey Tourism and Leeds. She went with them and got a good reaction from people as there is nothing like it in England. She went to Guernsey with the Pied Piper of Hamlyn and got first prize. Brought humour into her exhibit, the funniest was a donkey derby. The Battle Of Flowers is not as good as it used to be-early 50s used to be 80 or 90 exhibits-a lot more than today. The young people not interested. The parochial classes not as popular as they can't find a leader. Miss Battle of Flowers is a good idea and provides an extra exhibit. Visitors still very keen. New set up with the arch ways on the Victoria Avenue good. Pictures hanging in museum. Fifth Record-Mary Poppins-Chimchiminy. Went to the ball at the West Park Pavilion as a chicken and won first prize and the tortoise and the hare but she collapsed due to lack of air in the costume. She was unable to compete in the Battle Of Flowers this year because she has been in hospital, told to rest but she has an idea for next years float already. End of Side One. Personal View of Major John Riley. Born in Trinity Manor in 1925. His grandfather came to Jersey in 1908. His ancestry is from Yorkshire and later his grandfather moved to Cornwall and London and came to Jersey in 1908. He had an interest in islands and tried to buy Sark and move to Alderney but moved to Jersey. He was interested in architecture, by profession a theologian but had a love of architecture and took time and money rebuilding the manor which was near derelict when he moved in. The roof had to come off and it was reconstructed in a French style. The architect was Sir Reginald Bloomfield, a London architect. The manor goes back to 1550. It was the seat of the de Carteret family and was successfully restored and enlarged by de Carterets in 1660 and the 19th century. First memories of the manor were of his grandfather who was an imposing and a great church man-morning and evening prayers were in the chapel and many people lived there including 3 uncles and his father but mother died in an accident in 1928 but he had a largely happy childhood. In the 1930s he travelled around England as his father was in the army. It was a contrast to living in manor but it only struck him as odd later in life. Being brought up in a large house was not restrictive, the children had good fun and he had affection for certain parts of house. First Record-Carmen Jones. Schooling-he went to day school in Jersey, preparatory school in England and then school in Winchester when war broke out in 1939. He didn't enjoy school, he was not academic and not good at ball games but it was a good education. During World War 2 his grandfather was allowed to live in the Manor for the first 2 years, the grounds were used as an ammunition dump, later the garrison moved into the house and his grandfather moved to one of the lodges. House undamaged and well looked after. When he arrived back in the island day after the liberation the germans were cleaning the manor. Felt worried about being separated from the island and the only contact was red cross letters which were only 28 words long-had to be careful. Was registered by mistake as an enemy alien card in England. Ambitions-had it not been for World War 2 he may have had an academic career-unsure. Couldn't think of any other profession he would have done apart from the army. His grandfather wanted him to have a classical education, he was an academic man and had stood for parliament but didn't get in. Ended up in the Coldstream Guards-his father had been a member, he has no regrets as he lived with marvellous people. He joined in 1943 and was commissioned in 1944 and joined the forces in North West Europe as a platoon commander. He wasn't frightened of getting killed, the idea of coming home as a wounded war hero appealed, but he had a fear of being frightened. In general the sergeant runs the platoon as they have massive experience and the officers, who had more training, did the planning. He went to North West Germany and saw action for 9 days before he was wounded on 9th March 1945 and evacuated to a hospital in Nottingham 48 hours after. It was the last he saw of the second world war. After he went out to Palestine. They had been earmarked to go to Japan but the bomb was dropped before he had to go. Second Record-Underneath the Arches. He stayed in army for 20 years, working with nice people who trust in each other. He was in a brigade of guards and had a really varied time. Later he was involved in the administration of the army. When he was in the Coldstream Guards he talks about how they felt in full uniform, being very hot whilst on parade, standing still was tiring, he took part in the vigil when the king died. He served in Palestine between 1945-48, then back for 3 months then went out to Malaya for 2½ years which was exciting. As company commander he led a patrol of 14-20 men for a week-10 days in the jungle. His father was still in Jersey at this time and became a jurat in the Royal Court. He came back on leave from time to time. The Manor was not in working order till the mid 50s. When he came back he helped around the Manor. In his army career he became an instructor-dealing with officers in their early 30s who were destined for commanding positions. During the Seven Day War there was both an Israeli and Egyptian who were called back into service. Third Record-Glen Miller. Took the Coldstream Guards Band to America in 1954-for 12 weeks. 160 men would move into a hotel, play a concert, have dinner, go to bed and then move around-strenuous. He left the army in 1963, he was sad to leave but had two young children, schooling was a problem for serving officers. He came back to Trinity Manor, didn't know what he wanted to do, determined to find plenty to do. He took the dairy farm back and got involved in companies and then stood for the States. He decided to go in to politics because he felt he had a responsibility to the island and wanted to give something back. His experience outside of the island was of value. He had no ambitions as a politician-the States was more like local administration. Fourth Record-Noel Coward. Politicians work hard-especially becoming president of a major committee which holds almost a ministerial responsibility, you need to be able to communicate with people. Life going to become more difficult for people in politics. You could run the island with 20 people but would have to pay them, which is against what the island politics is about. Became President of the Defence Committee-linked to his background. Wilfred Krichefski asked him to join the committee and he was able to help because of his military background. It was not like the Ministry of Defence-more like a Committee of Public Safety. Decided to finish in politics last year as he had done 18 years and didn't want to go stale and stand in the way of other people. He wanted to clear the way for other people to be promoted and hopes people don't stay on too long. He has been able to develop Trinity Manor for people to have seminars as he has moved himself in to one end of the house and through this he meets interesting people through the functions and it keeps the Manor occupied. For relaxation he goes sailing during the summer and rides horses in the winter.

Reference: R/07/B/1

Date: 1982 - 1982

Personal View of the Durrell Wildlife Conservation Trust by Hamish Marett-Crosby. Talks to Quentin Bloxam, Zoo Project Director. There is a staff of 70 including everybody and there are thousands of animals. There are a wide range of skills that have to be catered for but the staff are well trained and take the pressure off you. Martin Syvret, groundsman, looks after 32 acres of grounds. You need a diverse range of skills to work there. An average day involves checking the grounds are clear, that the paths are walkable and then general gardening walk. He is laying a temporary path in front of the bear enclosure to give people a firmer footing. Doesn't enjoy clearing up after the public but enjoys developing the enclosures in the animal areas-growing rainforest plants in a Jersey winter is difficult. He has learnt a great deal since working in the zoo. First Record-Blur with Girls and Boys. Quentin Bloxam talks about the increase in size of the zoo but the philosophy is still the same. The zoo hasn't got commercialised-the family atmosphere has been maintained. Donna Preece, the junior reptile keeper, talks about the radiated tortoise-they come from Madagascar and enjoy the sun. They provide heating for tortoises so that they don't go into hibernation. The morning starts with the maintenance of the exhibition area, clearing up and when the public are let in the conservation projects are undertaken. A lot of time is spent observing the animals. They participate in special projects. She hasn't travelled yet but there have been trips to St Lucia and Madagascar. She has always been interested in animals and started volunteering in zoos from 13 and she has worked her way up the ladder until being offered a job in Jersey. She has been in Jersey for a year. Her favourite animals are the iguanas because they have their own individual characters. They try not to interfere with the animals and mimic nature as much as possible. Second Record-Peter And the Wolf. Mark Brayshaw, in charge of the marmoset rangers. Over the previous year that redeveloped the marmoset areas to increase their space so they are redeveloping another area this year. The marmosets use all of the space that is provided. They are allowed out in to the wood-they are checked 4 or 5 times a day and they are always fed at the same time of the day. When they're first let out they are observed. The breed in the woods-there was a birth of a black lion tamarin today. They try not to get involved in the process of the animals giving birth although a marmoset did have to have a caesarean section a couple of weeks previously. Not all of the marmosets have names but they have there own personalities. You can get attached to the marmosets and it is sad to see them go although it's for the greater good. He hasn't been involved in releasing any animals back into the wild but he hopes to in the future. He studied zoology and always wanted to work in a zoo. His favourite breed of animals that he looks after are the pied and black lion tamarins. Chris Dutton, a vet, has been at the Zoo for just over a year. He qualified in Bristol and worked in a normal veterinary practice but he got very interested in exotic animals at that time and subsequently worked in London Zoo for a year and after that he moved to Jersey. It is difficult changing from helping domestic to exotic animals-he tries to treat similar animals for example treating a snow leopard is comparable to treating a cat. He is still learning all the time-it makes it exciting and rewarding. Recently two gorillas were exported-the day of the movement was tense and he had to do the anaesthetic but it went well. The Jersey General Hospital staff provide help in their holiday times especially with the larger primates. He qualified at Bristol but when he qualified very little time was devoted to exotic animals but it is expanding now and people can specialise earlier. Most of the zoo work is preventative rather than emergencies-they are also involved in post mortems. They are involved in the breeding process-contraception is a major part of their work. Zoo work is a growing area of expertise for vets. Third Record-Rachmaninov. Second Part. Talking to Hilary French, the parrot keeper. She has worked in Jersey for 8½ years and she is from Somerset. Before she came to Jersey she worked at a wildlife rehabilitation centre in the West Country. She decided to come to Jersey Zoo because she had heard about Gerald Durrell. Her favourite part of the job is the breeding and working with a species that gets released back into the wild. The parrots of St Lucia were a great success-she has been out to St Lucia twice for field work. The birds that they breed at the zoo won't need to be released because the programme has been successful in St Lucia. She gets attached to the individual birds. She works with the St Lucian Parrots and the Thick Billed Parrot and her favourites are the St Lucians. They recognise her and new people. Her normal day is spent in the morning cleaning aviaries, servicing aviaries, checking the birds and preparing food. The afternoon is spent with another feeding round or maintenance work. In the summer because she works on the breeding programme she has to stay late in order to feed the chicks. Different chicks eat different food. The zoo look carefully they are feeding the various species the best diet that is nutritionally available. The birds are all endangered in the zoo. The birds can be very shy-it is difficult getting a balance between birds hiding and visitors wanting to see them. Fourth Record-Mozart's Magic Flute. Stella Norcup looking after the lemurs. Diet is important for the various animals-presentation has a lot to do with the diet. Insects are bred to feed insect eaters like the aye-aye and a lot is imported. She has stuffed larvae in a piece of bamboo because aye-ayes in the wild eat insects from wood and they try to replicate that in captivity. The long finger of the aye-aye is about one and a half times the length of its other fingers. She got interested in the work because she did a degree in environmental biology and then she volunteered and got a job at London Zoo and after finishing there cam to Jersey-about 15 months previously. There is a need for zoos for captive conservation and the educational side must be realised as well. Jersey has started a keeper scientist job which means some keepers get to go on field trips. Fruit is washed to get off the pesticides. A lot of fruit and vegetables are picked from the organic farm at the zoo. Lemurs are given fruit, vegetables, nuts, seeds, leaves and wood to eat. Bread and bananas are being fed to the bears. Hard boiled eggs are fed to the macaques. You have to know how much the animals move and eat and can't feed them too much of what they like. The future holds a lot of hard work, little pay but a lot of enjoyment-she hopes to take more field trips and improving animals lives in the zoo and learning more about animals. Fifth Record-Joni Mitchell with Big Yellow Taxi. Alan Gates, a man who used to work at the zoo. He sees a lot of improvements and an increase in size. He was originally on the bird section looking after the parrots. Remembers the cages of the primates. When he was at the zoo 27 years previously he didn't think it would grow so successfully. He is walking around and surprised at the different new complexes that have been built. Quentin Bloxam talking about the building of a new complex for the bears funded by Jersey Tourism. The building sites can look bad in the winter but he hopes that people come back to see the completed version in the summer. The paying visitors are vitally important for the continuation of the zoo. There is a conflict between conservation and putting on a show but ther're not mutually exclusive. You have to stimulate the animals as if they were in the wild and then they act naturally and interest people. The work at the zoo never finishes-they are always thinking of how to push the barriers back. He misses going on extensive field trips but he is very interested in staff development. Sixth Record-Chris Rea with Daytona.

Reference: R/07/B/25

Date: January 11th 1998 - January 18th 1998

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