Jersey Talking Magazine-March Edition. Introduction by Gordon Young. Vicki Stuckey interviewing Lady Whiteley, the wife of the Lieutenant Governor about her links to Jersey, living in Calcutta and what her father did, the amount of people in her family, whether she worked, how she met her husband Sir Peter Whitely, where they got married, where they lived in England, having travel as a result of her husband working at the royal marines in Malta and Singapore, the jobs of her four children, her hobbies including walking and birdwatching, a visit to Salisbury, Zimbabwe to see her daughter and what they planned to do when her husband's term of office as lieutenant governor has finished. Captain Martin Stewart, who works for Aurigny, talks to Phil about his trip to the Falkland Islands organised by the Overseas Development Administration in order to help set up an airline and test the pilots, what the Falkland Islands are like, the weather in the islands and the islanders attitude to being British. John Shield, Barry Jordan and Janet Le Cocq singing the Gilbert and Sullivan song 'Never Mind the Why and Wherefore' from 'HMS Pinafore'. Cooking Feature-Margaret Jenkins giving recipes for fish pie and a wholemeal yoghurt cake. Beth Lloyd talking to Pierre Coutanche, the project leader for an exhibition called 'Visions of the Blind' at the Minden Gallery involving blind children taking photographs and asks him how he got the idea to teach blind children photography, the techniques they use to get the children to take the photographs, the differences between teaching blind children and full sighted children, their favourite subjects to photograph, how long it has been running, the progress of his former pupils, his favourite photograph, how they focus the camera. Horoscope Feature-Diane Postlethwaite giving the forecast for the year for pisces. End of Side One. Gordon Young and Chris visiting Ann Street Brewery and being shown around by Ian Stevens, managing director, to the hops room and describes its effect on the taste of beer, how they are stored, how the brewery was built, the mill room, describing the process of making beer whilst going around the brewery and describes the derivation of Mary Ann Jubilee Lager. Gordon Young tells a joke. End of Side Two.

Reference: R/05/B/52

Date: February 28th 1981 - February 28th 1981

Jersey Talking Magazine-April Edition. Introduction by Gordon Young. Philip Gurdon interviewing Ken Ball, an amateur radio enthusiast, about the equipment for his amateur radio station, the regulations involved in broadcasting amateur radio, the Radio Society of Great Britain, the examinations needed to be sat to operate an amateur radio, a blind operator, communicating with people throughout the world on the radio, listening to an amateur broadcaster from London and Malta and talking to people across the world. Joan Stevens taking a tour around St Ouen about it being the biggest parish in the island but one of the smallest population, named after a 7th century bishop of Rouen with a relic that was placed in the church, St Ouen's Church-the date it was built, St Ouen's Bay which is actually in three parishes, La Rocco Tower built between 1796 and 1800-a Jersey round tower-last to be built, was falling apart-during the occupation used as target practice, tower repaired. Vinchelez de Haut and Vinchelez de Bas Manor's-architectural details of the manors, Abraham Le Sueur was killed at Vinchelez de Bas by a falling rock, St Ouen's Manor-biggest and oldest manor in island, parts that date back to 1135 to the de Carteret families, 1490-fortified and crenellated by then seigneur of St Ouen in fear of attack, over years altered a great deal, 1670-restoration, later fell into disrepair-de Carteret family important in England, passed to the Malet de Carterets-Colonel Malet de Carteret-1860s-started large scale restorations until 1880-appearance there is today, Le Pinnacle-important site-centre of pilgrimage for over 2000 years, worry of erosion and vandalism, lovely area of flora, windmills and dolmens in parish-Moulin de la Mare did exist where Val de la Mar exists-a seigneurial mill-used by the public. L'Etacq-name from an old norse name, had a martello tower on it-L'Etacquerel-removed by germans during the occupation, lead found up at L'Etacq, vraic collected from L'Etacq which was used as compost, caves, Les Mielles-being kept as conservation centre, needs to be kept natural so it is not destroyed. Excerpt from a Midsummer Night's Dream, the first time Shakespeare had been performed at the Jersey Opera House for a number of years, featuring Sonia Hamon and Rosemary and Hilary Lissenden. Horoscope Feature-Diane Postlethwaite giving a forecast for the year for aries. End of Side One. Beth Lloyd describing the view from her house and the joys of spring with Gordon Young reading the poem 'I wander lonely as a cloud'. Vicki Stuckey talking to Lloyd Cornish of Elle, who provides wedding dresses asking what brides are wearing nowadays, what they should look for in a wedding dress, the colour and length of the wedding dress, the fashions, the expense of the dress, the style of veil and headdress, the design of Lady Diana's wedding dress. Beth Lloyd talking to Jeffrey Archer about his latest book 'Cain and Abel', the research that went into the book, his university days and running, keeping fit, becoming the youngest member of the Greater London Council, becoming a member of parliament, losing a million pounds with a bad investment, writing his first book based on his experiences, deciding to continue writing, his desire to get back in to politics and his decision to put it on hold, his next book, a sequel to 'Cain and Abel', his plans for the foreseeable future, an invitation to meet the Emperor of Japan and his pride in being published in Braille. Di Weber went to the Mont Felard Hotel asking Steve, the chef, how he copes with cooking for so many people, what he enjoys cooking the most, his hours at the hotel and Renata a waitress about working as a waitress, learning how to serve people, why she likes the job and where she comes from and Jill, the receptionist talking about her duties, difficult customers and living in the hotel. Gordon Young tells a humorous story. End of Side Two.

Reference: R/05/B/53

Date: March 31st 1981 - March 31st 1981

Jersey Talking Magazine-May Edition. Introduction by Gordon Young. Nature Feature-Frances Le Sueur talking about the seagull including examples of bird song. Beth Lloyd talking to Mr Atkinson, a man who has invented a machine designed to simplify learning Braille explaining how the machine works, being up for an award for the machine and the details of the machine and how to purchase it. Cooking Feature-Margaret Jenkins talking about recipes for easy bake ideas. Chris and David commentating on a walk at Les Mielles, St Ouen describing the scenery and the work that had gone on in the area. Beth Lloyd interviewing Sarah-Jane Lewis, who works for a group of magazines called Condé Nast that publishes Vogue, talking about her job selling the magazines promotions to certain shops, doing a colour promotion with de Gruchy, researching shops, the amount of time she spends in London and travelling, watching fashion shows and the fashion for summer wear. Horoscope Feature-Diane Postlethwaite giving a forecast for the year for taurus. End of Side One. Gordon Young visiting Inverness describing the scenery and the town and visiting Loch Ness. Chris interviewing spy author Palma Harcourt regarding joining the intelligence service during the war, describing what she was doing at Bletchley Park and in the intelligence service, writing books on the service, what made her want to write books, getting books published, her inspiration for writing the books, the Sir Roger Hollis affair, what she writes about, her new book called 'A Twisted Tree' and its plot. Pat Dubras performing a scene from Joyce Grenfell's 'A Terrible Worrier'. End of Side Two.

Reference: R/05/B/54

Date: April 30th 1981 - April 30th 1981

Jersey Talking Magazine-June Edition. Introduction by Gordon Young. Beth Lloyd interviewing Gerard Dubras, a purser on a cruise liner, talking about the ships that he works on, how he became a purser on P & O, what his job entails, the complaints that he has to deal with and what people expect of the cruise, romances on cruises, the places that he has visited including Australia, Hong Kong, South Africa and Mexico, the amount of time he can get back to Jersey, how long he is going to do the job and funny stories he has encountered on his job. Philip Gurdon talking to Jacques Toulonges, an employee of Jersey European Airway, about taking part in a trans Atlantic air race at Le Bourget as part of the Paris Air Show, what attracted him to take part, the aeroplane he is entering, how the plane is being modified, the routine after leaving Le Bourget, the course of the race, how long it will take, his father accompanying him on the race, supplies on the plane and how he rates his chances of winning the race. Horoscope Feature-Diane Postlethwaite giving the forecast for the year for gemini. Pat Dubras reading a story by a local musician, Muri Simons. June Gurdon giving some In Touch tips for the blind including music for the blind, talking books by computer and a talking alarm clock. End of Side One. Beth Lloyd interviews Patrick Fyffe and George Logan, a drag act known as Hinge and Bracket, talking in character of their desire to become musicians, their musical training, comedy, any funny stories whilst playing, rehearsals before they go on stage, changing their repertoire, their visit to Jersey, the songs that they perform, then they perform the song 'Happy Talk', what they do at home, herbalism, a theatre that they opened in their home town, what they think of Jersey, writing music, the oldest of the two of them, writing her autobiography and performing their favourite song 'Perchance to Dream'. Beth Lloyd talking to Pat Dubras, the producer of 'Harvey', a show at the Opera House asking her about the play. Talking to Peter Gilchrist, the lead actor, about the part, being able to read something into the part as a psychologist. An excerpt from the play being performed. Gordon Young interviewing Melanie Wilde who is in charge of a group from a school for special children talking about the pupils of the school, why she wanted to go into the job, what her job involves, whether the school improves their behaviour, a link to the social services in England, having a holiday in Jersey, staying with her mother and father, the problems that the five children who are on holiday have and what they are going to do whilst they are in Jersey.

Reference: R/05/B/55

Date: May 31st 1981 - May 31st 1981

Jersey Talking Magazine-July Edition. Introduction by Gordon Young. Margaret Jenkins reading a creative essay that she had written for a recent O Level course. Nature Feature-Frances Le Sueur talking about rare warblers with examples of bird song. Horoscope Feature-Diane Postlethwaite giving a forecast for the year for cancer. June Gurdon with In Touch tips for the blind talking about the Royal National Institute for the Blind, typewriters for the partially sighted, milk saver pans and clocks. Beth Lloyd talking to Max Robertson about commentating at Wimbledon tennis tournament, whether he used to play tennis, having knowledge of the game, commentating, how he keeps talking throughout the game, commentating on other occasions, a funny story that happened to him and the future of radio. Elizabeth Beresford, Max Robertson's wife, talking about the Wombles, how she thought up the idea, what her family think of it, whether she is still writing Wombles books, the success of the books, her roll in the television series, writing the scripts for the television programmes, the message of The Wombles to keep tidy. End of Side One. Gordon Young visiting the Durrell Wildlife Preservation Trust to see the opening of the Gorilla Breeding Centre describing the new exhibit, the visitors including Gerald Durrell, Gerald Durrell giving an opening speech for the exhibit, talking about Jambo, Lieutenant Governor Sir Peter Whiteley making a speech to open the exhibit, Gordon Young commentating on the opening of the complex. Quentin Bloxham, member of the zoo staff, talking about the importance of the breeding centre, the number of families that will use the area, the habitat provided by the centre. Nick Lindsay talking about the gorillas and the breeding centre. Gordon Young describing the inside and outside of the breeding centre and the gorillas behaviour. Anton Mosimann, head chef at the Dorchester Hotel at the age of 29, being interviewed by Beth Lloyd talking about when he decided to become a chef, other chefs he worked with, the skills that he had to learn, learning to cook as a child and giving dinner parties, how a head chef in the Dorchester Hotel checks the standard of all of the food with 80 staff working under him, looking after his staff, creating new recipes and implementing a surprise menu at the Dorchester Hotel. End of Side Two.

Reference: R/05/B/56

Date: June 30th 1981 - June 30th 1981

Jersey Talking Magazine-August Edition. Introduction by Gordon Young. Mark Higgins, a member of St Paul's Cathedral Choir School, who is singing at the royal wedding of Prince Charles and Princess Diana, sings 'I Know that My Redeemer' and talking about how he got into the school, the levels he had to achieve in order to be accepted, how long he spends singing, the amount of boys in the school, the different time he has his holidays, preparing for the royal wedding, the songs they are going to sing at the royal wedding, whether he feels nervous about performing in front of so many people, the other occasions they sing for at the Cathedral, singing outside the Cathedral, making recordings, meeting the Queen Mother and other members of the royal family and sings another song. Norah talking to Jeremy Scriven, a Jersey boy who left the island to climb Mount Kilimanjaro in Tanzania talking about how he decided to climb the mountain, his lack of regrets of going, getting to Tanzania and the difficulty in doing so because the border of Kenya and Tanzania was closed, being arrested for crossing the border into Tanzania without realising and being put into prison for four days, the conditions in the prison, being tried in the court, being allowed free and then expelled into Kenya, managed to go through Uganda in order to get to Tanzania, buying tickets to Kilimanjaro on the black market, encountering violence in Kampala, journeying and climbing Mount Kilimanjaro, spending 4 days climbing, a member of the party suffering altitude sickness, the experience of climbing the mountain, the view from the top of the mountain and how he felt climbing down again. Katina Hervau, a french girl in the island to learn the language, talking about her first impressions of Jersey roads and the island. Horoscope Feature-Diane Postlethwaite talking about the forecast for the year for leo. June Gurdon giving some In Touch tips for the blind about cooking vegetables without water. End of Side One. Gordon Young taking a trip in a hot air balloon describing the balloon, getting into the balloon, taking off, describing the views of Jersey below including town, St Helier Harbour, Elizabeth Castle, Victoria Avenue, St Aubin's Bay, Noirmont and to the Jersey Airport to land. Gordon Young at Government House for a ball for the Royal National Lifeboat Institution describing the gardens of Government House, the food for the occasion, the scene in the marquees, the scene inside Government House. Talking to Sir Peter Whiteley about piloting in the hot air balloon and the ball for the RNLI and to Lady Whiteley about the weather and the amount of people attending the ball. Listening to the band in the marquee. End of Side Two.

Reference: R/05/B/57

Date: July 31st 1981 - July 31st 1981

Jersey Talking Magazine-October Edition. Introduction by Gordon Young. Beth Lloyd talking to Roy Jones, a production manager for Bergerac, about why Jersey was chosen as the location for the television series, the number of teams in the television crew, the length of time the series will take, how long an episode takes to shoot, the different members of the team, the amount of people on the production team and the different jobs that they do including the director, production manager and location manager, any problems about coming to Jersey, travelling to the island and going through customs. John Nettles talking about the character of Bergerac, the development of the television series and the character, enjoying the character, how he enjoys working on television as opposed to the stage, learning the script and the local pronunciations. Nature Feature-Frances Le Sueur talking about avocets in Jersey. Pauline Faires interviewing Sharon Wilkinson, a 10 year old who has won a place at Chethams Music School, what her friends at St Saviour's School think of her going away, her father saying how they are going to move across to England, his daughter Caroline getting into the same school, when Sharon started playing, playing the violin and piano, life at Chethams, the subjects studied at Chethams, life at the weekends, family living near the area, making friends in the area, the amount of pupils in the same year and when she is going across to the school. Pat Dubras performing a Joyce Grenfell piece. Beth Lloyd with In Touch tips for the blind talking about books for the blind about the royal wedding. End of Side One. To commemorate the anniversary of the Battle of Britain a poem written by Barry Sutton, an ex-fighter pilot who lived in Jersey, entitled 'The Summer of the Firebird' is read. Margaret Jenkins with a creative essay regarding her home parish of St Ouen and the landscape and weather encountered therein. Norah Bryan interviewing Simon Hicks, the Durrell Wildlife Conservation Trust secretary and co-ordinator, asking who the person was behind the projects at the zoo, Gerald Durrell, a training facility that has just been built, describing the process of conservation, where the trainees come from, the success of the training centre, stories of the trainees, how many the training centre holds and the programme for the training scheme. Phil Gurdon at Glencoe, St Lawrence for an auction talking to the people at the auction to see why they come to the auction including some speaking in Jèrriais [with local accents], meeting people at the auction, whether the sale has changed, whether there are less farmers who come to the sale and who comes to the sale. Looking at some of the lots at the auction. Talking to customers about how often they come to the auction, what they buy and what they have bought at the auction this time. Listening to the auctioneer sell some lots. Talking to Victor Pallot, the auctioneer, about how the sale went, how long he had done the job and the owner of the sale. End of Side Two.

Reference: R/05/B/58

Date: September 30th 1981 - September 30th 1981

Jersey Talking Magazine-November Edition. Introduction by Gordon Young. Beth Lloyd interviews Max Bygraves, who has just completed a summer season in Jersey and asks what he thought of Jersey, the speed the time went in Jersey, his decision to do a summer season in Jersey, eating good food in restaurants in Jersey, the success of the summer, the secret of his success, telling a funny story, his records, how he started recording, whether he considers himself a singer or comedian-an entertainer, how he changes his act, working in America and what he is doing after leaving Jersey-a charity concert and a song by Max Bygraves. Cooking feature-Margaret Jenkins giving some recipes for easy soups. Norah Bryan interviewing Dr Samuel Macey, a professor of English at the University of British Columbia who started by running a wholesale business in Jersey, about how it had all come about, retiring at 35 and educating himself, moved to Canada and moved into education, gained a degree and PhD, began teaching english literature at the University of British Columbia and became assistant dean of graduate studies, interest in time, books that are concerned with time and clocks, finding out about time and clocks on a year of sabbatical travelling around the world, interesting clocks in Jersey and the differences in Jersey since he previously lived here. Pat Dubras performing a short story called 'When a Young Man's Fancy' by Diana Childe. End of Side One. Gordon Young visiting the Normandy Landing Beaches describing the museum of St Mere d'Eglise and its exhibits with stories of the battles and occurrences in the town and the people involved and describing the cemeteries and the memorials to the people who died during the second world war and describing the beach and at Aramanche describing the scene and a german cemetery. End of Side Two.

Reference: R/05/B/59

Date: October 31st 1981 - October 31st 1981

Jersey Talking Magazine-December Edition. Introduction by Gordon Young. Joan Stevens taking a tour of St Peter talking about the size of the parish with the sea on two sides, St Peter's Church which is mentioned in records before 1066, in 1053 it is referred to as St Pierre don la dessert because of the exposed sandy soil. Where Jersey Airport is now used to be rich corn land with massive harvests. Down near St Ouen the sand dunes are with diverse wildlife-Les Mielles is being preserved as a result. St Peter's Church-tallest spire in the island and has been hit by lightning at least 3 time, it dates from 1400s and there are some initials on some of the stones. In the church an incised tombstone has been built into the wall-marks of a blacksmiths grave. Over 100 years ago the church was too small for congregation-an extra knave was built as a result of the garrison being stationed at St Peter's Barracks. Barracks built in 1811 until 1927-they were removed to make way for Airport. Bell in church has a name incised on it, a piscina in the church was found in Les Bois when it was knocked down and was installed in church. A priory in St Peter was on land called La Flocquetterie-now Philadelphie Chapel stands on it. On the corner by Oak Walk there was a leper house. St Anastase-in Coin Varin-was a school house which was founded in 1496. Children attended from 6am-6pm and had lessons in latin and were taught latin, the classics and divinity. La Hague Manor-now changed to school, the colombiers was changed into the school library. The house itself was built in 1634, rebuilt in 1733 and in 1871 by Colonel Le Cornu. St Peter's House-originally home of Robin Family-burnt in 1754 and rebuilt-greatly altered since-used to be home of Sir William Venables Vernon-bailiff. The Rectory-moved 3 times in the parish-used to be next to La Hague Manor then moved nearer church to north of La Flocquetterie-1800s and then moved beside there and then modern rectory moved close by church. Mills-more mills than every other parish-Quetteville has been restored by the National Trust for Jersey-working mill, Tostain Mill-did belong to a lame priest. St Peter had a windmill in 1837-turned into restaurant. Parish gun-1551 at Beaumont Hill-all parishes had guns-only one that survived-made by John Owen and inscribed, in 1839-Sir John le Couteur found it in England and returned it to the parish. St Ouen's Bay-a great deal of it in St Peter-famous battle-commonwealth defeated royalists during civil war-Sir George Carteret defeated by Admiral Blake-Carteret fled to Elizabeth Castle. Jersey Airport-started 1937-extensions since. Germans dug into St Peter almost more than any other parish-headquarters at Panigo [?]-underground constructions and strongpoints in the parish. Beautiful houses in St Peter. St Peter's Valley-crowning glory of parish-Queen Victoria-visit in 1859 taken by Sir John Le Couteur for a drive there. Rachel Pirouet singing a song that she sang in the Jersey Eisteddfod followed by the presentation of the John Lobb memorial goblet to the Jersey Eisteddfod. Phil Gurdon talks to Beryl Jordan about how the Jersey Eisteddfod was going, the judge of the competition, the number of people who had entered, no class for the Jersey Norman French, how long the Eisteddfod had been going in Jersey and when they start preparing for the next years competition. Pat Dubras and Brian Le Breton singing a duet from the play 'Free as Air' performed at the Jersey Opera House. Beth Lloyd paying tribute to David Scott-Blackwell who used to present In Touch tips for the blind including quotations fro his poetry. End of Side One. Chris and David at a steam fair in Trinity in the sheds of Lyndon Charles Pallot with a steam engine threshing corn describing the scene and how the engine and the threshing machine works, what the engine is used for, looking at the steam machines in the shed, hand threshing being shown and the man being interviewed [with a Jersey accent] about the process, the threshing machine, when it would have been last used and a corn measure. A man being interviewed about bread being made and the process involved, cabbage loaves and how they are made. Description of a petrol engine and a smaller threshing machine with the noise of the machine and interviews about the machine including with Jim Purvis, description of a tractor, interview about a machine that rolls oats for the horses. Describing model steam engines made by Harold Taylor of St Ouen with the noise of the engines. Mr Pallot talking about the different machines that he owns, working with them and the steam fair. Description of different engines on display. Cynthia Reed interviewing Robert Farnon, a composer and arranger who lives in Guernsey, asking whether he came from a musical family, what musical instruments he played when he was young, having professional training, when he wrote his first piece of music, his first job in the professional world-playing in his brother's band, how he starts composing music, conducting, when he moved to Guernsey, his favourite piece of music he wrote, how much he enjoys arranging music, the music he listens to, his favourite artist to work with -Tony Bennett and what he is doing next in his career. James Clayton reading a story about 'Dinah-the Dog with a Difference'. End of Side Two.

Reference: R/05/B/60

Date: November 30th 1981 - November 30th 1981

Jersey Talking Magazine-January Edition. Introduction by Gordon Young. Interview with Robert Lacey who wrote a biography regarding Queen Elizabeth II talking to Beth Lloyd about the success of the book, where he got his information from, letting the queen know he was writing the book, going into Buckingham Palace for the first time, meeting the Queen, his impressions of her, the popularity of Lady Diana, his next book about the kingdom of Saudi Arabia, the story of Saudi Arabia, how he was able to talk to the Saudi Arabian royal family, his impressions of the family, the cultural differences between the Arab and western countries and the conflict between the Arabs and the Jews. Dixie Landick and Stephen Lucas singing 'Gloom is Just Around the Corner'. Cooking Feature-Margaret Jenkins giving recipes for what to cook after christmas. End of Side One. Gordon Young visiting Noirmont Command Bunker with John Bouchere of the Channel Islands Occupation Society talking about the bunker, it being closed from 1945, describing the bunkers defences, specifications and different rooms within the bunker, the restoration of the bunker, the different objects found within the bunker, looking out from Noirmont, describing a 15cm gun that was dumped at the end of the war and retrieved by the Channel Islands Occupation Society from the bottom of a cliff at Les Landes and put at Noirmont, defences that used to exist at Noirmont, the number of guns that was controlled by the Noirmont Command Bunker. End of Side Two.

Reference: R/05/B/61

Date: December 31st 1981 - December 31st 1981

Jersey Talking Magazine-March Edition. Introduction by Gordon Young. Gordon Young visiting Schruns in Austria describing the view of the village from the top of a mountain, the ski slope and ski schools, the cable car down the mountain, the scene from the cable car, arriving at the cable car station, walking around the village of Schruns describing the park, the main square, the church with its bells ringing, the school, the streets, houses and the river. Sue talking to Sergeant O'Brian about the drug problem in Jersey, the number of drug addicts in Jersey, how drug addicts start, cannabis, drug smuggling, the customs checks at the airport and harbour, the main number arrests made because of information gained from informants, the people who abuse drugs, the part of the plant that the cannabis drug comes from and the other drugs of concern in the island including amphetamines and solvent abuse and problems in the future. End of Side One. Pat Dubras talking to Beth Lloyd about the first pantomime put on by the Jersey Amateur Dramatics Club called 'Cinderladdin and his Wonderful Cat' by Ken Fletcher about the pantomime, the decision to take the production on tour to different parish halls, the difficulty of moving between different locations, playing to packed houses and singing the title song from the pantomime. Philip Gurdon talking to Roger Pratt who decided the previous summer to join the British Antarctic Survey as a pilot on his decision to go on the expedition, the preparations for the journey, the flight to Antarctica, the equipment used to get to Antarctica, his first impression of the region, the different colours of the ice, the headquarters where they were based at Adelaide Island, 24 hours of daylight, the need for self sufficiency, supplies, the occasion of a storm which resulted in the aeroplanes being blown upside down and being almost completely wrecked, taking the aeroplanes to pieces and salvaging the wreckage, the different countries represented in the region, what people do to pass the time, working in the garage and getting airlifted out by the Chilean Air Force. End of Side Two.

Reference: R/05/B/62

Date: February 28th 1982 - February 28th 1982

Jersey Talking Magazine-April Edition. Introduction by Gordon Young. Philip Gurdon interviewing David Watkins, a private investigator, talking about whether there was any need for a private investigator in Jersey, finding evidence of fraud, the difficult aspects of the job, tracing people who have disappeared, the reasons people disappear, training for the job as a member of the police, cooperation with the police force, the line between police and private investigation work, kidnappings, getting involved in situations outside of Jersey-has an office in London and travelling across the world to carry out investigations. Margaret Jenkins talking about the sense of smell. John Bouchere talking about Jersey and the Royal Mail including details of the Channel Islands, the transport of mail by aeroplanes and mail boats, the signalling of the arrival of the mail boat in former days, the transport of the mail by horse drawn car by Mr Le Couteur, the maintenance of the mail carts, the first real mail van in 1929, carrying the mail to Gorey Village, 1933 saw mail coming by air with the aeroplanes landing on West Park beach, Jersey Airport built in 1937 and a daily service was inaugurated, 1940-arrival of the occupation and the air force raids and the stopping of post between the UK and Jersey, use of bicycles instead of the vans, a telegraph messenger, Eric Hassall was sent to College House and received salutes as he was in uniform, Len Godel-collided with a sand laden german lorry and was charged with sabotage but was released, sometimes the bags of mail from Guernsey were opened for investigation, postal services resumed after the occupation, wide variety of mail received by farmers and the difficulty of finding different addresses in Jersey and driving in the country lanes. Beth Lloyd giving In Touch tips for the blind. End of Side One. Composition called 'Dead in Tune' written for narrator and orchestra and recorded by Channel Television featuring the Jersey Youth Orchestra and Alastair Layzell. End of Side Two.

Reference: R/05/B/63

Date: March 31st 1982 - March 31st 1982

Jersey Talking Magazine-June Edition. Introduction by Gordon Young. Beth Lloyd talking to Maurice Gautier, a beekeeper, about why he doesn't want Queen's Valley flooded, the bees in the valley, the trees and plants that Jersey bees like, the taste of Jersey honey, the different seasons and their effects on the bees, about 80 beekeepers with up to 480 colonies of bees on the island and what to do if bees swarm. Pat Dubras reads the Joyce Grenfell poem 'Time'. Beth Lloyd interviewing Paul Birt regarding a textbook to aid the teaching of Jersey Norman French about how he came to be involved in the language, the textbook helping people to learn jèrriais, the importance of keeping the language, the teaching of jèrriais in schools, the interest in jèrriais outside of the island, working with Dr Frank Le Maistre and the length of time it will take to compile the book. Phil Gurdon talking to Don Lusher about being lead trombonist with the Ted Heath Band, working with Frank Sinatra, his three bands that he runs-the Don Lusher Big Band, the Don Lusher Quartet and the Don Lusher Trombone Ensemble together with the revival of the Ted Heath Band, named as musician of the year by the BBC Jazz Society in 1976, how you differentiate between a great and good musician, holding music clinics for brass musicians, coming to Jersey in June to do a clinic with a brass band and playing a concert, being a faculty member in Belmont College, Nashville for a trombone clinic with some of the greatest trombone players in the world and working as a session trombone musician with Don Lusher playing his own piece of music. End of Side One. Frank Korowoski, a blind man, talking about his holiday in East Germany including entering the country for the first time, the officials checking passports, reaching Berlin, seeing the Berlin Wall, getting off the train, meeting the German Red Cross who were to guide him whilst in the country, his impressions of the country, meeting an East German blind lady who he had corresponded with in Braille, staying in a hotel for western visitors, a description of his room, the cheapness of the meal, the difficulties experienced in East Germany, his journey to Poland by train, people being helpful, meeting his friends and going around Poznan in Poland, discovering the difficulty in getting food in Poland, Roman Catholicism in Poland and a church service he went to, going out for sunday lunch because of the food shortage, the places that he visited in Poland, being amazed at the spectacle of Warsaw, a school for the blind in Poland, visiting Krakow, visiting the black madonna at Czestochowa and seeing the pilgrims going to the shrine, visiting other places in Poland and then to Czechoslovakia, lack of freedom of movement in the country, more prosperity than Poland but the people wanted to live in other countries, discrimination against people believing in religion, his journey back to Britain and his hopes for the country of his father, Poland. Gordon Young with contributions from the readers and answering their questions. End of Side Two.

Reference: R/05/B/64

Date: May 31st 1982 - May 31st 1982

Jersey Talking Magazine-July Edition. Introduction by Gordon Young. Reverend Graham Long, a concologist, an expert on molluscs, talking to Beth Lloyd about how long he has been interested in molluscs, how he became interested in molluscs by finding some snails, the only collector on the island of non-marine molluscs, the interesting molluscs on the island, species we have are generally smaller in size as a result of a lack of chalk on the island, a species was found in Jersey that had only previously been seen in America, a slug of German origin that has been found in St Martin, his theory that it was brought to the island during the second world war, toads eating slugs, over 70 species of gastropods been identified, massive variety of molluscs, majority very small and his decision not eating snails. Joan Stevens talking about a famous Jerseyman who moved away from Jersey and became famous elsewhere. Thomas de Soulemont who died in 1541 and became the Dean of Jersey in 1534 but didn't stay in Jersey. Moved to England and became French Secretary for King Henry VIII, started to collect property across England, held many positions, fiercely upheld the rights of the ecclesiastical courts and took cases for the benefit of Jersey, well respected and scholarly, bought property of Jersey girls who had married Englishmen. Nicholas the brother of Thomas gave a cast iron gun to the parish of St Saviour. Chris and David at Howard Davis Park taking a tour around the gardens with descriptions of the plants and flowers, the rose garden with descriptions of the colours and smells of the roses, the entrance of the park and the beauty of the park. Margaret Jenkins giving recipes for vegetarian food. Gordon Young telling a story. End of Side One. Norah Bryan at the spring town fair which was held in the Royal Square for charity. Talks with a member of the Jersey Society for the Disabled about how the spring fair started, his part in the fair, the stalls at the fair and the amount of money that was raised for charity. Describes the stalls around the Royal Square and the different charities represented. Sue Carr talked to Brian Waites about how he became interested in golf, whether he wanted to become a player at school, becoming a golf professional, his career, the different types of golf professional-looking after a shop at the golf course and giving tuition or playing tournaments, he tries to blend them both together, the number of tournaments he takes part in a year, taking his family to tournaments, playing with Senator John Rothwell and Bill Roache in the Pro Am Tournament and other people that he has played with. Sue Carr interviews Renton Laidlaw, a golf correspondent, whether he always walks around the golf course before a tournament, research for television, the different newspapers, radio and television programmes that he reports for, who pays the expenses for his travel, the countries that he enjoys the most including Switzerland, the Philippines and Hawaii and America, the communications from different countries, the relations between the press and golfers and the younger generation of golfers. At La Moye Golf Course there is a statue of a wooden unicorn-Howard Baker wrote a story around the unicorn which is read by Stewart Lobb. End of Side Two.

Reference: R/05/B/65

Date: June 30th 1982 - June 30th 1982

Jersey Talking Magazine-October Edition. Introduction by Gordon Young. Joan Stevens talking about TB Davis-born in 1866-died 1942. Born at Havre des Pas, went to sea as a young boy and was thought to have been drowned but had been picked up and arrived back in Jersey and walked into his memorial service. Attached to South Africa where he established himself as a stevedore and bought almost all of the stevedore interests in South Africa. He was very generous-gave to England, South Africa and Jersey. Gave University to City of Durban. All things given in memory of his son-Howard Leopold David-devoted local things in memory to him including Howard Davis Farm, the Howard Davis Hall at Victoria College, Howard Davis Park and various scholarships. Daughters continued his generosity giving money in memory of their father. Appeared in newspaper giving a window in memory of their father to St Luke's Church. Gave a room to the Société Jersiaise in memory of the Westward, their father's yacht-he loved sailing and made a great deal of the furniture of the Westward himself. Beth Lloyd interviewing Margaret Law, Assistant Chief Librarian, regarding what the Jersey Library has for partially sighted readers, large print books, the branch libraries large print books, if people cannot get into the library someone can choose books for them, improvements in large print books, the popularity of the books on the island, facilities for cassette recordings of books and advice given by library staff. Beth Lloyd with In Touch tips for the blind talking about the problem of drawing out money on holiday. Mary Phillips, a new member of the staff, introducing herself, describes where she lives and cooking for her son. Jean Le Boutillier sent a report from Malole, Zambia with singing from the children, talking about the building of a new clinic for the people of the Malole region, describing the project, talking to Peter Chileshi [?], a trained nurse, about the amount of people he sees a day, the complaints people come with-malaria, how you know people are suffering from malaria and the difference the clinic will make to the people of Malole. Talks to Pierre Jeunet [?], the foreman of the project, talking about how the building work is progressing, the comparison between the building in Zambia and Jersey, people suffering from the sun, repairing the cement mixer, help from the local people, the standard of their work, confident they will complete the project on time and the benefit of the project to the region. Geoffrey Baker, the leader of the project, talking about the selection process for the project, how the project is affecting the Jersey people working on the project, changes in the group, work done apart from the building-highlights of the visit-seeing the locals working and living in their villages. End of Side One. Beth Lloyd talking to Marion Bickerton about the permanent exhibition of Lillie Langtry memorabilia at the Société Jersiaise regarding when and why it was decided to put up the permanent exhibition, describing the redecoration of the room and the exhibits including her clock, a golden gun, a picture of the town called Langtry in Texas, a wardrobe, photographs of Lillie Langtry's life with description of her life, her travelling case and mirror, a variety of books relating to Lillie, a costume worn by Francesca Annis in the London Weekend Television series regarding Lillie Langtry, notes made by Lillie Langtry for her autobiography, copy of the Jersey Lily picture, advertising for Pears Soap, describing her various homes in Britain which are now hotels, the dresses for television, photocopy of Lillie Langtry's will, her funeral, the falling out of Lillie and her daughter, Edward Pointer's painting of Lillie Langtry and paintings by Ouless. John Boucheré talking about black butter including the milking of the cows, the custom of branchage and other customs of Jersey, black butter-social event of the season, describes where black butter would be made, mixing apples together in a pan, was the centre of a social occasion and describes how exactly it was made. End of Side Two.

Reference: R/05/B/66

Date: September 30th 1982 - September 30th 1982

Jersey Talking Magazine-December Edition. Introduction by Gordon Young. John Boucheré talking about camping describing what camping is today, what he likes about camping, the monthly meeting of a camping club, advice for the novice camper, meeting people in the camp sites and bad weather camping. Alastair Layzell interviewing Michael Nicholson, the television journalist who covered the Falklands War for ITN, about the Falklands War, the interest in the War, protesting after the war about the lack of cooperation from the Ministry of Defence, the lack of uniforms and equipment for the troops, communication from the ships, finding out for a soldier whether he had a child from HMS Hermes, how journalism has affected his life and how his family feel about him not reporting on any other wars. Joan Stevens talking about early Jersey doctors-no doctors in the earliest records. Gift of healing-became known throughout the community. A rector became known for this-Samuel de la Place-Rector of St Ouen in 1590-died 1651-came of a french refugee family-his services were paid in kind including by wheat, lamb, pork and other food and goods. Cures-purge used a great deal, a plaster for a child, bleeding and vomit. Unknown Account-from Linden Hall, Mont au Prêtre-c1630-probably from the Messervy family-list of cures written in english-different cures read out. Condition in the island-Camden wrote in 1586-that the inhabitants were in good health-no physicians in the island. Beth Lloyd with In Touch tips for the blind. End of Side One. Gordon Young on the train from Paris to Munich-commentating on the train journey with the sound of the train and talking about the other passengers on the train. Arriving in Munich for the beer festival describing the fairground at the festival, going on the ghost train and describing other rides and attractions. Sue Mackin talking to David Langlois, who during a three month stay in South Africa joined an American adventure excursion going down the rapids of the River Zambezi on an inflatable dinghy, describing how the trip started, looking at the first rapids, seeing the Victoria Falls, the guides, the boats, the work they had to do in order to help sail the boat, the requirements for the trip, shooting seventeen rapids and riffles, whether it got easier as the days went on, the different rapids and their difficulties, the feeling of elation once he had finished the rapid, being able to name a rapid, the different names of the rapids, camping at nights, the different animals that they saw, travelling down 105 miles in 7 days, staying on beaches by the river, encounters with crocodiles, defences against crocodiles, other animals they saw on their expedition, going around a waterfall, the number of boats and guides, his travelling companions and unrest between the two different countries-Zimbabwe and Zambia. Cooking Feature-Margaret Jenkins giving recipes for vegetables. End of Side Two.

Reference: R/05/B/67

Date: November 30th 1982 - November 30th 1982

Jersey Talking Magazine-Christmas Edition. Introduction by Gordon Young with christmas carols throughout by St John's Church Choir and Les Conteurs Singers. Poem by Gladys Rogers. Jennifer Grundy at the Met Office being interviewed, talking about what happens over christmas, the number of people on duty for shifts and keeping busy with different duties including weather forecasts. Mr Wileman, the general manager of the L'Horizon Hotel, talking about the hotel over christmas, who stays over Christmas, people going swimming in the sea, Christmas trees in the hotel, guests getting Christmas presents for christmas, going to de Gruchy after it is closed and choosing the presents and staff wrap the presents at a christmas party. David Killip at La Collette Power Station who is in charge on Christmas day describing what he has to do on christmas day, when it will be at is busiest, the number of staff in on christmas day and if there were any power cuts in the past on Christmas day. BBC Radio Jersey producer Peter Gore talking about what will be happening on the station on Christmas day-a Christmas morning programme, messages from the bailiff, the dean and the lieutenant governor on the show, getting in at 6.30, how he is spending the rest of the day and his favourite Christmas record. Quentin Bloxham, curator of reptiles at Jersey Zoo talking about what they do on Christmas day, amusing experiences on Christmas day-pythons go into the public area and his favourite Christmas carol. David Guy-Station Officer with the States of Jersey Ambulance Service-talking about working on christmas day, the staff working at the station on Christmas day, the duties carried out-checking the equipment and vehicles, having breakfast and waiting for call outs. Poem by Colin Plummer read by Pat Dubras. Beth Lloyd interviewing Joan Le Miere, at the telephone exchange, talking about the change in the telephone system, previous years when people had to book times to have a telephone call, if people are more patient on Christmas day, the number of people working on Christmas day and looking after the Christmas day. Gordon Young talking about cooking Christmas dinner. End of Side One. General Sir Peter Whiteley, lieutenant governor, with a Christmas message for the readers of the Jersey Talking Magazine. Harbour Master, Captain Bullen talking about the harbour on Christmas day, the number of people on duty including Jersey Radio, the people at the pierhead, the marina staff, the staff at Fort Regent and the police. The Islander magazine-an article written by Sonia Hillsdon called 'Christmas Past' about christmas in Jersey in previous years. Living in Jersey in past-second half of the 16th Century-islanders were not encouraged to celebrate Christmas because of Ccalvinism-worked as a normal day. 1726 a dead whale was washed up at La Pulec, St Ouen-77 foot long-declared as his by the of Seigneur of Vinchelez de Bas-two jaw bones of the whale was attached to his manor house. 1790-theatre-magic lantern show-shown by Mr Belon from France. 1799-over 6000 Russian soldiers-found all over the island-allies against the French. 19th Century-Christmas came into own-1834-a whole week of Christmas and merry making-Christmas dinner followed by cards. Used to ring the Christmas bells from midday Christmas night to midnight on Christmas day-in St Mary it got out of hand-in the 1850s Reverend Le Couteur Balleine tried to put a stop to it. In 1858 he removed the bell clapper, bell rope and the ladder to the bells and changed the locks on the church doors. A hand bell was circulated-while the door was being kicked in they got replacements for the rope clappers and managed to get in. There was no support from the parish assembly for the rector. Trevor Barette, dairy farmer of St Mary, talking about his Christmas day-milking, feeding, cleaning the cows, the cows going outside, a few hours off and then the feeding and milking the cows again and amusing experiences at Christmas. Tug Wilson, a fireman, talking about the hours he will be working on Christmas day, the duties on Christmas day and emergencies on past Christmases. Alan, a taxi driver, talking about what he does on Christmas day. Chris, an air traffic controller, talking about what he may be doing on Christmas day, being on call and trying to close the Jersey Airport. Sister Moulin, a nurse at the Jersey Maternity Hospital, talking about what she does on Christmas day, mothers, former staff and doctors bring their Christmas babies back, whether people like having Christmas babies, a special crib for a Christmas baby and a favourite Christmas carol. Michel Le Troqueur, a policeman, talking about being on duty over christmas, how he celebrates Christmas, crime over Christmas and a relaxed attitude over Christmas. End of Side Two.

Reference: R/05/B/68

Date: December 25th 1982 - December 25th 1982

Jersey Talking Magazine-January 1983. Introduction by Gordon Young. Beth Lloyd interviewing Katie Boyle, the television personality who has written two books-Boyle's Law and her autobiography 'What this Katie did'. Talks about why she had written her autobiography, her early life was harrowing-was imprisoned and put in a mental institution-the book was a release, whether she likes her image, her father and her childhood, her book called Boyle's Law which is a tribute to her relationship between her and her readers, her heritage-born in Italy and her father was part Russian and part Italian, her ability with languages, her ability to seem calm on television, working on the Eurovision Song Contest, coming to Jersey for her honeymoon and enjoying her holidays in the island. A guide by Lloyds Bank Limited for the blind and visually handicapped presented by Malcolm [?]. Kevin Mulhern talking about the difficulties that banks can offer for the visually impaired. Peter Thomas, chairman of the Amersham and Chesham Talking Newspaper and manager of Lloyds Fenchurch Street Branch, giving advice for visually handicapped people when using a bank including ringing in advance and using the same cashier. Kevin Mulhern cashing a cheque and talking about how welcoming the bank is, how much help he needs to complete the cheque, his routine when he comes into a bank, a member of staff helping him complete the cheque and getting out his money. Kevin Mulhern interviewing Peter Thomas about the possibility having a deposit account without a cheque book, writing that you are visually handicapped on the cheque book. Ernest Watson, a customer at the Great Portland Street Lloyds, talking about how long he has had his bank account, not to be worried when coming into the bank, what the staff do to help, what he uses the bank for and having no worries about withdrawing money. Peter Thomas and Kevin Mulhern talking about the facility of standing orders, statements and guides issued in Braille and large print, being able to talk to the bank manager, the services that the bank offers and the costs of the services. Kevin Mulhern talking about if he could live without a bank account. End of Side One. Group Captain Fred Winterbottom talking about Adolf Hitler, the Nazi party in the 1930s, getting to know Alfred Rosenberg-third in power in the early Nazi party. The Foreign Office had forbidden the embassies to talk to anyone in the Nazi Party so he went to Germany to see if he could find out any information, he talks about getting to know Hitler in 1934, his cover was that he was a supporter of the Nazi regime, they wanted him to be an unofficial contact with members of government in England. Had an interview with Hitler for an hour and quarter-was told Hitler's plans for the future world and heard Hitler rant about communists. When they found out who he actually was through Italian information in 1938 Rosenberg told him not to come back to Germany again. By that time he had established number of the German Air Force, the blitzkrieg strategy of the German tanks and the dates that the russian war was due to start and he knew the mentality of the people at the top. The quality of intelligence was so good that it was difficult convincing the Allied forces that it was real. He was involved in code breaking and details tricks used, 1942-43-built the first ever computer which could run all of the possibilities quickly to break the codes. His first book-'The Ultra Secrets' says some of the Allied commanders thought it was unfair that they knew what the enemy were doing-Montgomery especially. He had to brief the commanders about the intelligence-Montgomery was the only one who was uncooperative. The intelligence was essential for the victory of the Battle of Britain. He talks about the lack of credit for the code breakers of the second world war, whether it is possible to create an unbreakable code and experimenting with aerial photography. Joan Stevens talking about Jersey doctors. 1700s-quite a number of doctors were in the island including Solomon Journeaux, Dr Sabir [?] and Dr Forbes. In 1746 Dr Forbes attended Mr de Sausmarez and charged him for 'Peruvian bark' which was a precursor to quinine and was used for fevers in the late summer. There is mention of Dr Seale who was a physician and a surgeon. In 1745 Dr Richard Smith, visitor to the island, advertised 'scurvy grass' as a cure for scurvy. Dr Philip Choué de Vaumorel was born in Jersey in 1726 and died in 1789. He was a son of french refugees from Normandy. Choué means a screech owl and Vaumorel was their home. Once in Jersey he became known as de Vaumorel. Lived in Hue Street with a garden as far as Old Street and was an island character. He married Constance Charlotte Le Hardy, daughter of the attorney general, who acted as her husband's secretary. A bill survives from 1759 signed by her for 2 years of treatment for Mrs de Sausmarez. In 1773 Dr de Vaumorel offered to attend the poor at the Hospital for no charge. He was frequently quoted in newspapers of time. The medical treatment of the time mostly consisted of vomiting, bleeding and purging. Gordon Young taking a tour around the Sacre Coeur Cathedral in Paris describing the cathedral. End of Side Two.

Reference: R/05/B/69

Date: December 31st 1982 - December 31st 1982

Jersey Talking Magazine-May 1977 Edition. Introduction by Gordon Young. Nature, Gardening and Cooking Features with Frances Le Sueur, Chris and David and Margaret Jenkins-all talking about the use, growing, cooking and types of herbs. Island Administrators-Graham Pitman interviewing Senator Reg Jeune, President of the Education Committee about the responsibilities of the Education Committee, the differences between Jersey and the UK education committees, the problems for Jersey in the future, the problems of over crowding and the time that States work takes up. Eileen Le Sueur telling a humorous story of being caught for being drunk in charge in Jersey French. Gordon Young talking about the humorous story from the last edition. End of Side One. June Gurdon reading a poem by Reg Grandin about the queuing during the occupation. Interview with Molly Parker, a local artist who paints in the Chinese style. Talks about her art style, how she got into painting, different forms of Chinese art, being invited to display her art in an exhibition in Taiwan and she describes some of her painting and talks of her future plans. Di Weber visits HMS Jersey describing the ship, the activity on the ship. Talks to Mr Philips from Radio Lions about the outside broadcast that they're holding and the captain of the ship about the ship, her crew, the duties of the ship and a presentation of a bell to the ship by the island. Continues on the tour and talks to a sailor about the working of the ship, his time on the ship and his duties. Continues to describe the ship and talks to A V Tinning about the navigation and radar system on the ship and his duties. Talks about the gun on the ship, the view from St Helier Harbour, the flag, the quarter deck, the dinghies used to board other fishing vessels, the accommodation on the ship and the food. Gordon Young tells a humorous anecdote.

Reference: R/05/B/7

Date: April 30th 1977 - April 30th 1977

Jersey Talking Magazine-October 1983. Introduction by Gordon Young. Beth Lloyd went to the Jersey Airport the day before the Battle of Britain air display to talk to some of the pilots of the aeroplanes. Tony Hogg talks about what he is doing with his helicopter in the display and how the weather will affect the display. The sound of the red arrows and talking to John Blackwell of the Red Arrows about what they will be doing in the air display, when they have time to come up with new displays, the difficulty of thinking up new ideas, how long the team are together-three pilots being changed each year. Flight Lieutenant Rick Watts, the training pilot for the VIP Andover talking about why he is in Jersey for the air display, what he will be doing in the air display, which VIPs are flown around and whether he has been to Jersey before. Chris Topham talking about his solo aerobatics display, winning the Aerobatics Trophy, what is in the display, how he feels when he is taking part in the display, if her feels scared before take off, what he is doing next in his RAF career, taking part in the Krypton Factor on television. Dave Morgan, the pilot of the sea harrier, talking about why a RAF pilot is flying a royal navy plane, being awarded the distinguished service cross for his courage in the Falklands War, being featured on British Heart Foundation advertisements because of his success after being born with a hole in his heart, what he is going to be doing in the display and what he thinks of the sea harrier. Gordon Young interviewing Leonard Cheshire who saw the dropping of the atom bomb and as a result decided to set up the Cheshire Home Foundation for disabled people. Talks about how many Homes have been opened, what started the idea to set up the Cheshire Homes, the help that he gets from local people-voluntary help, whether the Homes will continue to grow, trying to help the process of disabled people living at home and moving out into the community-independent living, the need for residential living and what happens when the Home becomes full-the ideas for extension. Margaret Jenkins with a descriptive piece about autumn. End of Side One. Norah Bryan talking to Mrs Palmer and Janey her daughter, Australians who own a large sheep farm, about the problem of having no rain for four years, living between Sydney and Brisbane in Australia, owning 4000 acres of land and 10,000 sheep, a creek that runs through the land, how the sheep get water, feeding the sheep, how people who don't have water cope with animals on the land, how they manage to fertilise the land-using an aeroplane, going up in the plane to see what the land looks like. Janey talking about flying a plane, shearing the sheep, tar used to stop cuts caused by shearing, how the shearing is organised, when the sheep are sold, keeping track of the sheep and the sheep in Jersey. Beth Lloyd interviewing Harry Hurst, a hypno and psycho therapist who has published a book about reincarnation called 'The Thousand Year Memory', talking about what persuaded him to write the book, the idea of people regressing into past lives, choosing five subjects and his findings from the tests, how far back people regressed, what makes him believe that they are regressing to a previous life and his belief in reincarnation. Joan Stevens talking about early local doctors in the 1800s. Dr George Symes Hooper-equivalent of the Medical Officer of Health nowadays-in charge whilst the cholera epidemic of 1832 took place. Through him and his account we know about the epidemic-we know less about the cholera epidemics of the 1860s. Cholera epidemics-people did now know what caused it-Dr Hooper realised it was down to bad drains, poverty, hunger and drunkenness. He concluded that it was introduced via St Malo and was made worse by a prolonged drought before it came about. Thought there was more drunkenness in Jersey than anywhere else in the world. Plans for drainage in St Helier-in discussion-after outbreak urged authorities forward. The outbreak was partly caused by the lie of the land-lower parts of land getting all of the drainage from all parts of the land. Outbreak started in Cabot's Yard, Sand Street. It was so bad town was divided into 12 districts with different doctors for each, all markets were closed and traffic between St Aubin and St Helier was reduced to a minimum. Cases where population dense were hit worst-St Mary and St Aubin escaped from disease. It was a mystery how St Aubin escaped-speculation that it was because it was richer, thriving and there were less people. Bad outbreaks-south and east of town, St Saviour, St Clement and Grouville-built up areas. North of island almost escaped. 341 fatalities out of 806 case of a population of 36,000-high incidence of deaths. According to the diaries of Sir John Le Couteur he believed the prime cause was the bad water where some of the privies drained. 1849-300 died and 1867 another outbreak-improvements in drainage didn't come immediately-improved after 1867. 1849 epidemic-an entry in a diary of people contracting cholera but not dying displays that not everybody died. Dr Joe Dixon-rhyme written about him. Treatment in 1851 recorded in the diaries of Sir John Le Couteur. He had to get from First Tower to Millbrook with his troops for a militia inspection. At Mont Félard Sir John Le Couteur got kicked by a horse in his ankle but carried on with his review of the militia. When he got home Dr Dixon was called-gave 12 leaches and a purge to the ankle, linseed poultices were put on but the wound went septic. He went to a doctor in England-Dr Brody told him to put on lead ointment and keep living well. Joan Stevens comments that treatments have improved a great deal today. End of Side Two.

Reference: R/05/B/70

Date: September 30th 1983 - September 30th 1983

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