Jersey Talking Magazine-April Edition. Introduction by Gordon Young. Philip Gurdon interviewing Ken Ball, an amateur radio enthusiast, about the equipment for his amateur radio station, the regulations involved in broadcasting amateur radio, the Radio Society of Great Britain, the examinations needed to be sat to operate an amateur radio, a blind operator, communicating with people throughout the world on the radio, listening to an amateur broadcaster from London and Malta and talking to people across the world. Joan Stevens taking a tour around St Ouen about it being the biggest parish in the island but one of the smallest population, named after a 7th century bishop of Rouen with a relic that was placed in the church, St Ouen's Church-the date it was built, St Ouen's Bay which is actually in three parishes, La Rocco Tower built between 1796 and 1800-a Jersey round tower-last to be built, was falling apart-during the occupation used as target practice, tower repaired. Vinchelez de Haut and Vinchelez de Bas Manor's-architectural details of the manors, Abraham Le Sueur was killed at Vinchelez de Bas by a falling rock, St Ouen's Manor-biggest and oldest manor in island, parts that date back to 1135 to the de Carteret families, 1490-fortified and crenellated by then seigneur of St Ouen in fear of attack, over years altered a great deal, 1670-restoration, later fell into disrepair-de Carteret family important in England, passed to the Malet de Carterets-Colonel Malet de Carteret-1860s-started large scale restorations until 1880-appearance there is today, Le Pinnacle-important site-centre of pilgrimage for over 2000 years, worry of erosion and vandalism, lovely area of flora, windmills and dolmens in parish-Moulin de la Mare did exist where Val de la Mar exists-a seigneurial mill-used by the public. L'Etacq-name from an old norse name, had a martello tower on it-L'Etacquerel-removed by germans during the occupation, lead found up at L'Etacq, vraic collected from L'Etacq which was used as compost, caves, Les Mielles-being kept as conservation centre, needs to be kept natural so it is not destroyed. Excerpt from a Midsummer Night's Dream, the first time Shakespeare had been performed at the Jersey Opera House for a number of years, featuring Sonia Hamon and Rosemary and Hilary Lissenden. Horoscope Feature-Diane Postlethwaite giving a forecast for the year for aries. End of Side One. Beth Lloyd describing the view from her house and the joys of spring with Gordon Young reading the poem 'I wander lonely as a cloud'. Vicki Stuckey talking to Lloyd Cornish of Elle, who provides wedding dresses asking what brides are wearing nowadays, what they should look for in a wedding dress, the colour and length of the wedding dress, the fashions, the expense of the dress, the style of veil and headdress, the design of Lady Diana's wedding dress. Beth Lloyd talking to Jeffrey Archer about his latest book 'Cain and Abel', the research that went into the book, his university days and running, keeping fit, becoming the youngest member of the Greater London Council, becoming a member of parliament, losing a million pounds with a bad investment, writing his first book based on his experiences, deciding to continue writing, his desire to get back in to politics and his decision to put it on hold, his next book, a sequel to 'Cain and Abel', his plans for the foreseeable future, an invitation to meet the Emperor of Japan and his pride in being published in Braille. Di Weber went to the Mont Felard Hotel asking Steve, the chef, how he copes with cooking for so many people, what he enjoys cooking the most, his hours at the hotel and Renata a waitress about working as a waitress, learning how to serve people, why she likes the job and where she comes from and Jill, the receptionist talking about her duties, difficult customers and living in the hotel. Gordon Young tells a humorous story. End of Side Two.

Reference: R/05/B/53

Date: March 31st 1981 - March 31st 1981

Jersey Talking Magazine-May Edition. Introduction by Gordon Young. Nature Feature-Frances Le Sueur talking about the seagull including examples of bird song. Beth Lloyd talking to Mr Atkinson, a man who has invented a machine designed to simplify learning Braille explaining how the machine works, being up for an award for the machine and the details of the machine and how to purchase it. Cooking Feature-Margaret Jenkins talking about recipes for easy bake ideas. Chris and David commentating on a walk at Les Mielles, St Ouen describing the scenery and the work that had gone on in the area. Beth Lloyd interviewing Sarah-Jane Lewis, who works for a group of magazines called Condé Nast that publishes Vogue, talking about her job selling the magazines promotions to certain shops, doing a colour promotion with de Gruchy, researching shops, the amount of time she spends in London and travelling, watching fashion shows and the fashion for summer wear. Horoscope Feature-Diane Postlethwaite giving a forecast for the year for taurus. End of Side One. Gordon Young visiting Inverness describing the scenery and the town and visiting Loch Ness. Chris interviewing spy author Palma Harcourt regarding joining the intelligence service during the war, describing what she was doing at Bletchley Park and in the intelligence service, writing books on the service, what made her want to write books, getting books published, her inspiration for writing the books, the Sir Roger Hollis affair, what she writes about, her new book called 'A Twisted Tree' and its plot. Pat Dubras performing a scene from Joyce Grenfell's 'A Terrible Worrier'. End of Side Two.

Reference: R/05/B/54

Date: April 30th 1981 - April 30th 1981

Jersey Talking Magazine-January 1983. Introduction by Gordon Young. Beth Lloyd interviewing Katie Boyle, the television personality who has written two books-Boyle's Law and her autobiography 'What this Katie did'. Talks about why she had written her autobiography, her early life was harrowing-was imprisoned and put in a mental institution-the book was a release, whether she likes her image, her father and her childhood, her book called Boyle's Law which is a tribute to her relationship between her and her readers, her heritage-born in Italy and her father was part Russian and part Italian, her ability with languages, her ability to seem calm on television, working on the Eurovision Song Contest, coming to Jersey for her honeymoon and enjoying her holidays in the island. A guide by Lloyds Bank Limited for the blind and visually handicapped presented by Malcolm [?]. Kevin Mulhern talking about the difficulties that banks can offer for the visually impaired. Peter Thomas, chairman of the Amersham and Chesham Talking Newspaper and manager of Lloyds Fenchurch Street Branch, giving advice for visually handicapped people when using a bank including ringing in advance and using the same cashier. Kevin Mulhern cashing a cheque and talking about how welcoming the bank is, how much help he needs to complete the cheque, his routine when he comes into a bank, a member of staff helping him complete the cheque and getting out his money. Kevin Mulhern interviewing Peter Thomas about the possibility having a deposit account without a cheque book, writing that you are visually handicapped on the cheque book. Ernest Watson, a customer at the Great Portland Street Lloyds, talking about how long he has had his bank account, not to be worried when coming into the bank, what the staff do to help, what he uses the bank for and having no worries about withdrawing money. Peter Thomas and Kevin Mulhern talking about the facility of standing orders, statements and guides issued in Braille and large print, being able to talk to the bank manager, the services that the bank offers and the costs of the services. Kevin Mulhern talking about if he could live without a bank account. End of Side One. Group Captain Fred Winterbottom talking about Adolf Hitler, the Nazi party in the 1930s, getting to know Alfred Rosenberg-third in power in the early Nazi party. The Foreign Office had forbidden the embassies to talk to anyone in the Nazi Party so he went to Germany to see if he could find out any information, he talks about getting to know Hitler in 1934, his cover was that he was a supporter of the Nazi regime, they wanted him to be an unofficial contact with members of government in England. Had an interview with Hitler for an hour and quarter-was told Hitler's plans for the future world and heard Hitler rant about communists. When they found out who he actually was through Italian information in 1938 Rosenberg told him not to come back to Germany again. By that time he had established number of the German Air Force, the blitzkrieg strategy of the German tanks and the dates that the russian war was due to start and he knew the mentality of the people at the top. The quality of intelligence was so good that it was difficult convincing the Allied forces that it was real. He was involved in code breaking and details tricks used, 1942-43-built the first ever computer which could run all of the possibilities quickly to break the codes. His first book-'The Ultra Secrets' says some of the Allied commanders thought it was unfair that they knew what the enemy were doing-Montgomery especially. He had to brief the commanders about the intelligence-Montgomery was the only one who was uncooperative. The intelligence was essential for the victory of the Battle of Britain. He talks about the lack of credit for the code breakers of the second world war, whether it is possible to create an unbreakable code and experimenting with aerial photography. Joan Stevens talking about Jersey doctors. 1700s-quite a number of doctors were in the island including Solomon Journeaux, Dr Sabir [?] and Dr Forbes. In 1746 Dr Forbes attended Mr de Sausmarez and charged him for 'Peruvian bark' which was a precursor to quinine and was used for fevers in the late summer. There is mention of Dr Seale who was a physician and a surgeon. In 1745 Dr Richard Smith, visitor to the island, advertised 'scurvy grass' as a cure for scurvy. Dr Philip Choué de Vaumorel was born in Jersey in 1726 and died in 1789. He was a son of french refugees from Normandy. Choué means a screech owl and Vaumorel was their home. Once in Jersey he became known as de Vaumorel. Lived in Hue Street with a garden as far as Old Street and was an island character. He married Constance Charlotte Le Hardy, daughter of the attorney general, who acted as her husband's secretary. A bill survives from 1759 signed by her for 2 years of treatment for Mrs de Sausmarez. In 1773 Dr de Vaumorel offered to attend the poor at the Hospital for no charge. He was frequently quoted in newspapers of time. The medical treatment of the time mostly consisted of vomiting, bleeding and purging. Gordon Young taking a tour around the Sacre Coeur Cathedral in Paris describing the cathedral. End of Side Two.

Reference: R/05/B/69

Date: December 31st 1982 - December 31st 1982

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