Account of James Pipon Assistant Commissary of the Severn District with Daniel Barber, storekeeper at Bristol

Reference: L/C/67/A6/F/4

Date: June 1st 1804 - December 31st 1804

Accounts and Abstracts of Disbursements for the King's Magazine at Bristol

Reference: L/C/67/A6/F/9

Date: February 1st 1805 - September 30th 1805

Architectural drawings of proposed stand and hall at Springfield by Gardiner Sons & Co. Ltd of Bristol, engineers

Reference: L/D/09/J/1

Date: March 21st 1935 - March 19th 1936

Map of South England including Southampton, Bristol, Isle of Wight and Portsmouth, scale 1:250,000 Plate 11-England

Reference: L/D/25/G/16

Date: 1940 - 1940

Letter from W Mackenzie, Fort Regent to his mother Mrs Mackenzie, Brook Lodge, Wrington, Bristol general account of the social activities, the races, a picnic at St Brelade's Bay, a concert at Government House and swimming in the sea

Reference: L/F/08/A/44

Date: August 13th 1836 - August 13th 1836

Letter from W Mackenzie, Fort Regent to his mother Mrs Mackenzie, Brook Lodge, Wrington, Bristol description of his social engagements

Reference: L/F/08/A/45

Date: September 5th 1836 - September 15th 1836

Letter from W Mackenzie, Fort Regent to his mother Mrs Mackenzie, Brook Lodge, Wrington, Bristol account of preparations for a ball at a hotel in town, officers from Guernsey also invited and forthcoming Inspection at Gorey 'all the Island are to out looking at us'

Reference: L/F/08/A/46

Date: September 30th 1836 - September 30th 1836

Warrant from Charles II to Sir George Carteret, Lieutenant Governor. The warrant orders Sir George Carteret to seure more information on the ownership of the goods now on board the vessel held in Jersey named the 'Dorothy' of Bristol

Reference: L/F/08/H/32

Date: May 6th 1648 - May 6th 1648

Letter of recommendation for William Le Grand from the master of the ship called 'Glenui' from Bristol.

Reference: L/F/47/A/9

Date: January 26th 1894 - January 26th 1894

Bristol Port records which include accounts of imports from Jersey in the nineteenth century

Reference: NLW MS 8923F

Date: 1800 - 1899

Personal View of Michael Day, Director of the Jersey Heritage Trust, interviewed by Beth Lloyd. Was not interested in museums or collecting as a child-was interested in collecting train numbers. Got a passion for football-wanted to be a goalkeeper for Aston Villa-played for local league team. Was born in Nottingham-a midlander. Went to Nottingham High School from 8-18-a public school and got the exams he needed to get. Enjoyed part of his school days-got involved in things with enthusiasm-responded to the teachers-struggled at history at school. Enjoyed sport-his father played cricket throughout his life-is interested in all sports. He has a brother who is 2½ years younger than him who is an equestrian competitor. When he went into sixth form he wanted to get into languages but then realised he didn't like them-applied to do English at Leeds University. First Record-Some Kinda Wonderful by The Q-Tips. Enjoys modern rock music. Was nervous about University but when he realised people were feeling the same he was alright. He read English but as an option he took a course on folk life studies which he got really interested in-pursued this interest avidly which led him to museums. Was interested in folk music-in the early 70s he collected songs. At the end of his first year went to Norwich and went to a museum which he was impressed by-at the end of his second year decided to write to museums for work and got a job as a paid volunteer in Bristol on an exhibition project and went back at the end of his third year thinking museums was where he wanted to work. After six weeks of work a job came up in the museum that had first inspired him in Norwich and he applied for it and got it. The folk life studies was a world view with a particularly celtic view-thinks a lot of it has become less relevant to people's lives. People want to get back to their roots and traditions-especially in Jersey. Second Record-Emmylou Harris, Dolores Keane and Mary Black performing The Grey Funnel Line. His life has been full of coincidences that led him to museums and Jersey. People were supportive in the museum profession. He was allowed to do displays, enquiries and tours as a student. At Norwich he started as Trainee Assistant in Social History and then he moved through the museum-he gradually moved towards things he was interested in like trade and industrial subjects. Museums and social history cover a great range of topics-has a breadth of experience. Became particularly interested in urban industrial history which he researched and lectured in-the 1970s was a period that was changing from the Industrial Age to the Post-Industrial Age-factories were being closed down at that time. Museums have changed in the past 20 years-has different ideas from when he started-thinks museums are now more directed towards the users. There are no limits on museums-just need an imagination. Was interested in the Caen Museum-he enjoyed it because it challenged him-there will be a need to connect to people in the future. There's a need to be educational but without being didactic. Has never been a great museum visitor-goes for a professional point of view-many don't appeal to him. In Norwich his career was progressing gradually-knew the city very well-had no desire to leave but his opportunities would have been limited if he had stayed. Was aware of the things happening in Ironbridge and he applied for the job and got it. He was a curator of Social History and manager of Blist's Hill Open Air Museum-a recreated late 19th century town. It was his first experience of management-it was very challenging and threatening-a difficult culture to work in. Third Record-Sylvia Sass singing an opera aria. Ironbridge was one of the most exciting times of his life professionally-built 8 new recreated buildings in his 3½ years working there including a bakery which is what his father did. His experience at Ironbridge will help him when dealing with Hamptonne. He got confidence from the project management training he undertook. Has had some training in management since Ironbridge. Is not very patient but has had to develop it. He is very enthusiastic in his work. Decided to move from Ironbridge to Jersey-was interested in setting up the organisation and a museum. Was interviewed for the job-expressed some concerns about the job and was forthright in his approach and got the job. Has no regrets now although the first year was difficult and frustrating. The new museum was due to have started being built before he arrived but it was caught up in a political debate and was delayed. In Jersey there is a pressure cooker atmosphere because it is a small place-he represented change and was seen as a threat. The people who were arranging the new arrangements between the Jersey Heritage Trust and the Société Jersiaise contributed greatly in solving the situation. There was an agreement meeting towards the end of 1987 at the end of his first year when it was agreed and if it hadn't been he would have left-gradually it started to be turned around. Is very proud for all the people that have helped that the Museum is running. Fourth Record-If I Had a Boat by Lyle Lovett. Sails in order to relax-sails competitively. Enjoys playing badminton and listening to music and likes to juggle. Has ambitions in his personal and professional life but is looking forward to the unexpected. Fifth Record-You Are Everything by REM.

Reference: R/07/B/16

Date: June 28th 1992 - June 28th 1992

Personal View of the Durrell Wildlife Conservation Trust by Hamish Marett-Crosby. Talks to Quentin Bloxam, Zoo Project Director. There is a staff of 70 including everybody and there are thousands of animals. There are a wide range of skills that have to be catered for but the staff are well trained and take the pressure off you. Martin Syvret, groundsman, looks after 32 acres of grounds. You need a diverse range of skills to work there. An average day involves checking the grounds are clear, that the paths are walkable and then general gardening walk. He is laying a temporary path in front of the bear enclosure to give people a firmer footing. Doesn't enjoy clearing up after the public but enjoys developing the enclosures in the animal areas-growing rainforest plants in a Jersey winter is difficult. He has learnt a great deal since working in the zoo. First Record-Blur with Girls and Boys. Quentin Bloxam talks about the increase in size of the zoo but the philosophy is still the same. The zoo hasn't got commercialised-the family atmosphere has been maintained. Donna Preece, the junior reptile keeper, talks about the radiated tortoise-they come from Madagascar and enjoy the sun. They provide heating for tortoises so that they don't go into hibernation. The morning starts with the maintenance of the exhibition area, clearing up and when the public are let in the conservation projects are undertaken. A lot of time is spent observing the animals. They participate in special projects. She hasn't travelled yet but there have been trips to St Lucia and Madagascar. She has always been interested in animals and started volunteering in zoos from 13 and she has worked her way up the ladder until being offered a job in Jersey. She has been in Jersey for a year. Her favourite animals are the iguanas because they have their own individual characters. They try not to interfere with the animals and mimic nature as much as possible. Second Record-Peter And the Wolf. Mark Brayshaw, in charge of the marmoset rangers. Over the previous year that redeveloped the marmoset areas to increase their space so they are redeveloping another area this year. The marmosets use all of the space that is provided. They are allowed out in to the wood-they are checked 4 or 5 times a day and they are always fed at the same time of the day. When they're first let out they are observed. The breed in the woods-there was a birth of a black lion tamarin today. They try not to get involved in the process of the animals giving birth although a marmoset did have to have a caesarean section a couple of weeks previously. Not all of the marmosets have names but they have there own personalities. You can get attached to the marmosets and it is sad to see them go although it's for the greater good. He hasn't been involved in releasing any animals back into the wild but he hopes to in the future. He studied zoology and always wanted to work in a zoo. His favourite breed of animals that he looks after are the pied and black lion tamarins. Chris Dutton, a vet, has been at the Zoo for just over a year. He qualified in Bristol and worked in a normal veterinary practice but he got very interested in exotic animals at that time and subsequently worked in London Zoo for a year and after that he moved to Jersey. It is difficult changing from helping domestic to exotic animals-he tries to treat similar animals for example treating a snow leopard is comparable to treating a cat. He is still learning all the time-it makes it exciting and rewarding. Recently two gorillas were exported-the day of the movement was tense and he had to do the anaesthetic but it went well. The Jersey General Hospital staff provide help in their holiday times especially with the larger primates. He qualified at Bristol but when he qualified very little time was devoted to exotic animals but it is expanding now and people can specialise earlier. Most of the zoo work is preventative rather than emergencies-they are also involved in post mortems. They are involved in the breeding process-contraception is a major part of their work. Zoo work is a growing area of expertise for vets. Third Record-Rachmaninov. Second Part. Talking to Hilary French, the parrot keeper. She has worked in Jersey for 8½ years and she is from Somerset. Before she came to Jersey she worked at a wildlife rehabilitation centre in the West Country. She decided to come to Jersey Zoo because she had heard about Gerald Durrell. Her favourite part of the job is the breeding and working with a species that gets released back into the wild. The parrots of St Lucia were a great success-she has been out to St Lucia twice for field work. The birds that they breed at the zoo won't need to be released because the programme has been successful in St Lucia. She gets attached to the individual birds. She works with the St Lucian Parrots and the Thick Billed Parrot and her favourites are the St Lucians. They recognise her and new people. Her normal day is spent in the morning cleaning aviaries, servicing aviaries, checking the birds and preparing food. The afternoon is spent with another feeding round or maintenance work. In the summer because she works on the breeding programme she has to stay late in order to feed the chicks. Different chicks eat different food. The zoo look carefully they are feeding the various species the best diet that is nutritionally available. The birds are all endangered in the zoo. The birds can be very shy-it is difficult getting a balance between birds hiding and visitors wanting to see them. Fourth Record-Mozart's Magic Flute. Stella Norcup looking after the lemurs. Diet is important for the various animals-presentation has a lot to do with the diet. Insects are bred to feed insect eaters like the aye-aye and a lot is imported. She has stuffed larvae in a piece of bamboo because aye-ayes in the wild eat insects from wood and they try to replicate that in captivity. The long finger of the aye-aye is about one and a half times the length of its other fingers. She got interested in the work because she did a degree in environmental biology and then she volunteered and got a job at London Zoo and after finishing there cam to Jersey-about 15 months previously. There is a need for zoos for captive conservation and the educational side must be realised as well. Jersey has started a keeper scientist job which means some keepers get to go on field trips. Fruit is washed to get off the pesticides. A lot of fruit and vegetables are picked from the organic farm at the zoo. Lemurs are given fruit, vegetables, nuts, seeds, leaves and wood to eat. Bread and bananas are being fed to the bears. Hard boiled eggs are fed to the macaques. You have to know how much the animals move and eat and can't feed them too much of what they like. The future holds a lot of hard work, little pay but a lot of enjoyment-she hopes to take more field trips and improving animals lives in the zoo and learning more about animals. Fifth Record-Joni Mitchell with Big Yellow Taxi. Alan Gates, a man who used to work at the zoo. He sees a lot of improvements and an increase in size. He was originally on the bird section looking after the parrots. Remembers the cages of the primates. When he was at the zoo 27 years previously he didn't think it would grow so successfully. He is walking around and surprised at the different new complexes that have been built. Quentin Bloxam talking about the building of a new complex for the bears funded by Jersey Tourism. The building sites can look bad in the winter but he hopes that people come back to see the completed version in the summer. The paying visitors are vitally important for the continuation of the zoo. There is a conflict between conservation and putting on a show but ther're not mutually exclusive. You have to stimulate the animals as if they were in the wild and then they act naturally and interest people. The work at the zoo never finishes-they are always thinking of how to push the barriers back. He misses going on extensive field trips but he is very interested in staff development. Sixth Record-Chris Rea with Daytona.

Reference: R/07/B/25

Date: January 11th 1998 - January 18th 1998

Page build time: 0.0081759333610535 seconds