Photograph of a curved paved area built as part of the project to redevelop and redesignate the square at the Weighbridge as Liberation Square to mark the 50th anniversary of the Liberation of Jersey. Normans and La Collette incinerator are amongst the landmarks pictured in the background of the photograph.

Reference: P/97/A/33

Date: January 10th 1995 - January 10th 1995

Photograph of two concentric circular concrete walls, the foundations of what will become the raised area upon which Philip Jackson's sculpture Monument to Freedom will sit in Liberation Square. Part of the project to redevelop and redesignate the square at the Weighbridge as Liberation Square to mark the 50th anniversary of the Liberation of Jersey. Fort Regent, Pier Road Car Park, Normans and La Collette incinerator are amongst the landmarks pictured in the background of the photograph.

Reference: P/97/A/35

Date: January 10th 1995 - January 10th 1995

Photograph of the square at the Weighbridge prior to its redevelopment and redesignation as Liberation Square on 9 May 1995 to mark the 50th anniversary of the Liberation of Jersey. La Collette incinerator, Normans and Pier Road Car Park are amongst the landmarks pictured in the background.

Reference: P/97/A/4

Date: October 5th 1994 - October 5th 1994

Photograph of the square at the Weighbridge prior to its redevelopment and redesignation as Liberation Square on 9 May 1995 to mark the 50th anniversary of the Liberation of Jersey. Fort Regent, Pier Road Car Park and Normans are amongst the landmarks pictured in the background.

Reference: P/97/A/5

Date: October 5th 1994 - October 5th 1994

Photograph of the raised area, upon which Philip Jackson's sculpture Monument to Freedom will sit, under construction as part of the project to redevelop and redesignate the square at the Weighbridge as Liberation Square to mark the 50th anniversary of the Liberation of Jersey. Workmen are pictured in the background of the photograph. Businesses along Caledonia Place, Normans and Pier Road Car Park are amongst the landmarks pictured in the background of the photograph.

Reference: P/97/A/59

Date: January 20th 1995 - January 20th 1995

Photograph of a workman stood in front of a partially built stone wall whilst looking at the W, representing the west compass point, of a paved compass rose under construction as part of the project to redevelop and redesignate the square at the Weighbridge as Liberation Square to mark the 50th anniversary of the Liberation of Jersey. Normans at Commercial Buildings and La Collette incinerator are pictured in the background of the photograph.

Reference: P/97/A/65

Date: January 26th 1995 - January 26th 1995

Photograph of a paved compass rose and surrounding raised seating area under construction as part of the project to redevelop and redesignate the square at the Weighbridge as Liberation Square to mark the 50th anniversary of the Liberation of Jersey. Fort Regent, Pier Road Car Park, Normans and businesses along Caledonia Place are amongst the landmarks pictured in the background of the photograph.

Reference: P/97/A/73

Date: January 26th 1995 - January 26th 1995

Photograph of the raised area, upon which Philip Jackson's sculpture Monument to Freedom will sit, and surrounding moat under construction as part of the project to redevelop and redesignate the square at the Weighbridge as Liberation Square to mark the 50th anniversary of the Liberation of Jersey. The Southampton Hotel, Weighbridge bus station, Fort Regent, businesses along Caledonia Place and Normans are amongst the landmarks pictured in the background of the photograph.

Reference: P/97/A/76

Date: January 30th 1995 - January 30th 1995

Photograph of works being carried out as part of the project to redevelop and redesignate the square at the Weighbridge as Liberation Square to mark the 50th anniversary of the Liberation of Jersey. Weighbridge bus station, businesses along Caledonia Place, Fort Regent, Normans, Pier Road Car Park and La Collette incinerator are amongst the landmarks pictured in the background of the photograph.

Reference: P/97/A/78

Date: January 30th 1995 - January 30th 1995

Photograph of works being carried out, including the construction of a paved compass stone and surrounding raised seating area, as part of the project to redevelop and redesignate the square at the Weighbridge as Liberation Square to mark the 50th anniversary of the Liberation of Jersey. Weighbridge bus station, businesses along Caledonia Place, Normans at Commercial Buildings and Pier Road Car Park are amongst the landmarks pictured in the background of the photograph.

Reference: P/97/A/80

Date: January 30th 1995 - January 30th 1995

Photograph of works being carried out, including the construction of a paved compass stone and surrounding raised seating area, as part of the project to redevelop and redesignate the square at the Weighbridge as Liberation Square to mark the 50th anniversary of the Liberation of Jersey. Weighbridge bus station, businesses along Caledonia Place, Normans at Commercial Buildings and Pier Road Car Park are amongst the landmarks pictured in the background of the photograph.

Reference: P/97/A/81

Date: January 30th 1995 - January 30th 1995

Interview with an unidentified man [probably Basil Le Brun - see item Q/05/A/79] regarding escaping to France during the German Occupation. Includes: why he wanted to escape - aged 21, feelings of frustration and claustrophobia; France was occupied by the American forces by that time, this presented the opportunity to escape; was farming for a living; mentions condtions in the island - people in the towns worse off than those on the farms; didn't have much contact with the Germans; most German troops 'humble', soldiers following orders; living with the curfew - had a girlfriend at St Saviours, used to come back late; preparations took two weeks; escaped with a frenchman named Roger [Roger Rouille?]; stole an 8 foot dinghy stored on the on New North Quay - got false papers as a French worker, went to pick boat up to be repaired, took it to Mr Le Sueur's store at Commercial Buildings and bribed a lorry driver to take it to a hut near la Rocque; some friends got 2 canoes and also tried to escape - they failed and were captured; left at highwater; no idea where they were going - just went east; were met on beach by armed frenchmen who initially thought he was a German; taken to a house and fed; they then rowed down the coast 5 miles to the American headquarters; taken to Granville - Roger was turned over to the Gendarmerie, the narrator to the Royal Naval headquarters; questioned by officers and put under close arrest; then taken to Bayeux by Royal Marines; had never seen any war machines before - felt like a different world; scenes of destruction very upsetting; went through St Lo; handed over to military police and put on parole; was used as French interpreter by the military police and spent 8 days picking up deserters; was then taken to Southampton and interrogated again - under suspicion of being a spy/plant; went to Oxford to meet his cousin and uncle; met a lot of naval.army intelligence officers who were stationed at the university; went to the War Office, then Plymouth to discuss the posssibility of allied invasion of Jersey; joined the navy and ended up in the Pacific - was in Okinawa at end of war; the narrator was only in France 2 weeks but it made a great impression on him after having been in occupied Jersey for 4 years; the narrator ultimately feels that the occupation was a positive and educational experience for him; teenagers still managed to enjoy themselves; feels that the occupation brought out the initiative in people; they talked more and were less selfish than today; occupation years some of his happiest; if you kept to yourself the Germans were no trouble. Duration 32 minutes. Terrible sound quality, background hum all through. Recorded by Sue Scott Cole circa 1973, cassette copies made by the Jersey Heritage Trust in 1993.

Reference: R/03/D/4

Date: 1941 - 1945

Marleen Hacquoil interviews George Kent, aged 90, who worked at South Pier Ship Yards, about Jersey shipping and harbours. Includes: born at the Lilacs in Gloucester Street on January 9th 1909, had one sister; father and grandfather were both seamen; talks about father's work on cargo boats; didn't see much of him until 1910 when mother was taken seriously ill; then he gave up the sea and brought a general merchants at First Tower; George left school at 15 and went to work for a coal merchant, Mr Le Sueur and Co, at Commerical Buildings; in 1919 George's father bought him a fishing boat, a 15 foot gaff cutter; learnt navigation from father and reading books; memories of sailing and storms; father's boat a 100 tonne cutter; memories of Jersey sailing ships and harbours; after Second World War there were no more sailing ships; not many pleasure craft around before the Second World War; memories of ship building; George's Uncle took over a ship reparing business on Albert Quay from Mr Watten and his son, then George's cousin Mr Coombe took over, when he died, 2 brothers and Gerald Baudains took over; memories of passenger boats between Jersey and France and the Jersey Railway; memories of ship repair in the eary days; rope makers; ship painting; mail boats; loading and unloading cargo; English and Jersey-French spoken at the harbour. Duration 35 minutes. Recorded 29/04/1991. Tape speed 3 3/4 ips. Recording is on side one , left track.

Reference: R/03/J/7

Date: April 29th 1991 - April 29th 1991

Personal View of Deputy Jean Le Maistre interviewed by Malcolm Gray. Was born in Millbrook at the maternity hospital and lived most of his life in St Ouen. He is called Jean and his brothers have French names-François and Edouard. His family took part in farming. Had a fortunate and happy childhood-had lots of space to play and a good community and family spirit. St Ouen has a strong community spirit but so do the other parishes. His father's life has been devoted to the recording of the Jersey language-was brought up speaking jèrriais. Went to school at the age of 5 not knowing a word of english. Jèrriais is a dying language-is a shame because it's part of our identity. There are parish variations of the language-have evolved over the centuries-the language is very rich. First Record-'Going Home' by The Shadows. Got involved in youth club work-was a member of a youth club at St George's Church. Moved on to help in youth clubs-became a youth leader in St Ouen at 17 and then moved to youth work in town at the Cellar Club in Hope Street-worked there for about 5 years-led on to his involvement in the Jersey Youth Movement-became statutory in 1973 and became its first chairman. The Jersey Youth Movement was the precursor to the Jersey Youth Service. At that point there was a lack of facilities. Got to know Cliff Richard through his church work-met him in 1969-came to his wedding. Met him in Israel in 1972 through his overseas aid work. Second Record-'Help it Along' by Cliff Richard. Religion has played a large part in his life-never considered becoming a minister but has always been involved in the church. Believes you should go to church to be a christian-you need to share your faith. Lay people are more involved in services now-he has taken part in some services but doesn't believe that is his role-was an almoner at St George's for 17 years. Second Record-Roy Castle with 'The Bread of Life'. Has travelled a great deal-had a prayer breakfast with Ronald Reagan in Washington. Has visited the Middle East especially Israel-Israel is a very enjoyable place-has organised trips to Israel-has been 14 or 15 times. Israel has had problems but he is quite happy to go because he feels safe. Third Record-'We Have Brought You Greetings'-a traditional jewish greeting song. Has been in the States of Jersey for 15 years-has enjoyed being in the States-wanted to get into the States to help with the youth service and agriculture. Agriculture has been in a difficult state-served on the Agriculture Committee for 6 years under Senator Binnington. Has been President of the Postal Committee and served on the Education Committee. Working in the States takes up a lot of time-your family have to be understanding. Is worried about the States members workload-has lodged a proposition to try and solve this. Wants to keep the honorary system but wants it to be easier for people to come forward and stand. Was born in St Ouen but has always represented St Helier as a deputy-has always worked in St Helier and has served No 3 District where he lived for 8 years. Has not thought about coming a senator at the moment. Fourth Record-Tune from a visiting African choir. Has been president of the Overseas Aid Committee for about 9 years-important to send money and good will. Loves Africa and the African people-they suffer difficulties not of their making-couldn't help but feel emotionally affected. Took the media on a trip in order to experience the conditions in Africa. Fifth Record-Born Free. End of Side One. Personal View of Deputy Jack Roche interviewed by Malcolm Gray in his garden and at Fort Regent. Was born in Jersey in 1924 in Providence Street. Had one brother and three sisters-lived in Charles Street for many years-had a brother Lewis who has passed away and three sisters called Ena, Mavis and Dorothy. His father died 6 months after he was born-was a financial struggle-his mother used to run a shop in Charles Street. Schooled at St Mark's at La Motte Street-one of the teachers was Deputy Arthur Carter. Left school at 14 and then about a year later they evacuated as war broke out. First Record-String of Pearls. His first job was at Bisson Cycle Shop which was then in Halkett Place-worked there for 12 months when the evacuation took place. Travelled as a family except his brother who had just started a business-mainly cargo boats took them across-the journey from Jersey to Weymouth took about 36 hours-it was a very difficult journey. They moved to Bury, went into some brand new houses and they were treated very kindly by the people of the north. Spent the rest of the work years in Bury-got into a reserved occupation-he joined the Air Training Corps and then the war ended. Six weeks after the island was liberated he came back home. Second Record-'A Man and a Woman'. Worked with his brother after liberation-was an electrician by trade but during the war he had invented a machine to process tobacco so he started to work on that. Once commercial cigarettes started coming into the island he was offered a job by W A Nichollas on Commercial Buildings-started work on 3rd February 1946-still with them-started as an office boy and is now the boss. Has become the Jersey Coal Distributors-used to store coal at Fort Regent-he is now the President of the Fort Regent Development Committee. His brother used to work from home in St Clement. The States of Jersey wanted Fort Regent back so a number of companied decided to build a coal store and from this they became one company. Met his wife Joan Norman at the office when he joined in 1946-they were married in 1950 and have one daughter Patricia and one granddaughter Rebecca. Decided to go into the States after getting rid of the business at Commercial Buildings-at first he spent a lot of time gardening. An opportunity came when Len Nightingale retired from the district and he and John Le Gallais, his next door neighbour, decided to stand and both got in. States work takes up enough time as members allow it-if you have spare time you can fill it in the States but if you work you can work it to fill your schedule. He sits on Finance and Economics Committee, the Prison Board, vice-President of the Housing Committee and President of the Fort Regent Development Committee. Is also a States appointed director of the Jersey New Waterworks Company and is chairman of the Joint Advisory Council. Has been vice-president of the Public Works Committee under Senator John Le Marquand Public Health Committee under Senator Gwyneth Huelin. Was Vice-President and then President of Jersey Telecoms, President of the Gambling Control Committee and Etats Civil. During his nearly 12 years he has sat on Agriculture and Fisheries, Tourism, Legislation, Establishment, Broadcasting, was a member of the Executive Committee of the Commonwealth Parliamentary Association. Before joining the States sat on the Agricultural Loans Board. In 12 years he has sat on a number of committees-believes members should move around as much as possible in order to see the way the States run. People are invited onto a committee by the president but they can express a desire to go onto that committee. Believes that people who work in the States from businesses will be able to cope with the work and that employers should be sympathetic. Some people would be able to become a full time member of the States in the future. Believes in the honorary system-thinks it could be problematic if people give up their jobs and don't get elected and as a result get in financial difficulty. Third Record-The Waltz from Masquerade by Khachaturian. Jack Roche and Malcolm Gray go to Fort Regent and are greeted by Humphrey, the mascot of Fort Regent. Go into the Rotunda of the Fort-he has been President of the Fort Regent Development Committee for 4 years-appointed a new chief officer Graeme Pitman. Fort Regent has been renovated in the piazza and the funfair and now in the rotunda. Great shows have been put on in the piazza. Fort Regent is sports orientated. Some big names have performed in the Gloucester Hall. Used to use the parade ground as a coal store and he has now gone in a complete circle and finds himself as the president of the facility as a whole. People's attitudes have changed towards the centre-there are 18,000 members. Fourth Record-Shirley Bassey singing Goldfinger. When the rotunda is completed it will become a multi purpose hall for sport and entertainment. There is more than one level in the rotunda-the roof covers 3 acres in total. The cost of the refurbishment will be £1.8 million for the rotunda. Have recently had the 10 millionth visitor to Fort Regent. Fifth Record-Tchaikovsky's 1812 Overture.

Reference: R/07/B/12

Date: 1987 - 1987

Personal View of Bob Le Brocq, Constable of St Helier, interviewed by Geraldine des Forges. His family history goes back to 1480 on a direct line and back to 1097 before that on Jersey. He was born at Millbrook Nursing Home but his family farmed at Spring Valley, St Ouen. There were eight boys and one girl in the family-he has a twin brother Lester Le Brocq. His parents separated and he came to live in St Helier with his mother in 1940 with a sister and two of his brothers. They lived in Great Union Road for 18 months and then to New Street and St Saviour's Road. During the second world war he was taken to Brighton Road School-his first taste was to get an injection which put him off. Remembers coming in to town and the area around Great Union Road, New Street and St Saviour's Road-remembers playing on the steps of number 84 with his twin brother. The occupying forces had the Woodville Hotel and they used to use a wagon and two horses and the person who was controlling the two horses collided with their railings. Remembers collecting wood from Victoria College, sea water at Havre des Pas, collecting tar from the gas works. It was a hard time-in the summer he spent all his time on the beach. Went to a variety of schools from Brighton Road School he went to Halkett Place Infants, St James' School, La Motte Street and St Helier Boys. As they moved across the town he moved to different schools-it upset his schooling. During the occupation he wasn't frightened of the german soldiers. He remembers a german soldier called Pierre Schumacher going rabbiting with his brothers in St Ouen. Remembers the liberation-a week before liberation in Simon Place the residents helped themselves from a german store of charcoal. Never knew anything else when he experienced the occupation-is now very careful of his belongings. He went to La Motte Street School as a child and did enjoy some subjects especially mathematics and geography. First Record-Killing me Softly performed by the Mantovani Orchestra. Remembers liberation day and the rushign around that took place-he went down to the Pomme d'Or Hotel. Remembers a person going across a wooden bridge by Commercial Buildings and it giving way and him breaking both his legs. Remembers going around to Pier Road and seeing the North African prisoners of war celebrating liberation. Still celebrates liberation every year. He left school at 15 and started to learn the building trade with Horn Brothers in Winchester Street. He moved on to other firms-he was working for a firm that collapsed and found himself out of work at 18 and took the first job that came along-he worked for 2 months as a kitchen porter in a hotel. He originally wanted to go into farming but his mother wanted him to learn a trade. From the hotel he joined the Telephone Department for 5½ as a cable jointer. He met his wife Eileen, who was a nurse at Overdale Hospital, while his mother was in isolation. They met in Christmas 1958 and got married in November 1959. Life was hard when they first got married-had to work 80-90 hours a week. He has two children Juliet and Carl and would have liked to have spent more time with them. Second Record-La Mere. Later he opened a guest house in St Helier after having moved from St Ouen. Took a 2 year course at Highlands College in catering and hotel management. After 10 years they moved to St John's Road, Mont à L'Abbé and then St Brelade-he has lived in 6 parishes in Jersey. When he was in a guest house he stood as deputy for St Helier No 1 District twice but didn't get in. He then served as a constables officer for 3 years and then centenier for 9 years-he enjoyed working with youngsters and helping them. Being a parent stood him in goodstead. He likes giving something back to the community. Third Record-Cherish by Kool and the Gang. He decided he would like to stand as Constable of St Helier and was successful. It's a demanding job and he's getting used to it-he hopes for a freer atmosphere in the island. Has various duties-normally starts about 8.30/9-answers enquiries, serves on committees including the Public Services Committee, Defence Committee, État Civil, the Working Party on Need, Joint Manual Workers Council and the Occupation and Liberation Committee. The Occupation and Liberation Committee is getting ready for the 50th anniversary of liberation. Battle of Flowers causes a lot of work for the parish but not for him-officials from St Helier attend the meetings for him. The job encroaches on his personal life-he has a 5 year old grandson who he plays with. He enjoys goong out for lunch with friends. He enjoys travelling-in 1973 and 1976 he went to Kenya with his children and wife, he's been to Italy, Germany, America four times, Singapore, Thailand and Hong Kong. Likes the Far East. Would like to visit New Zealand and Hawaii. Would like to see life in St Helier freer in the future and that people were more positive in Jersey. Has worked hard on the attractiveness of St Helier-thinks it has improved and hopes to make it even cleaner. Feels he has had a rewarding life with a good family-would not want to change anything. Fourth Record-Key Largo by Bertie Higgins.

Reference: R/07/B/20

Date: April 24th 1994 - April 24th 1994

'Lunch break'-an interview of Sir Peter Crill, the former Bailiff of Jersey, by Michelle Cuthbert on his retirement from office. Talks about his childhood-had a stable, happy childhood. His grandfathers on both sides were farmers. His great grandfather on his mother's side was farming in St Helier and was a victim of two bank crashes at the end of the nineteenth century. His father had a farming background and he went into his uncle's office who was a solicitor, George Philip Crill. He later became a Jurat and had to go the Privy Council to be sworn in because there was a row after he was elected over a previous case that he had tried. Was sworn in 1913 and was later made president of the Education Committee. His father had gone into the office-he was in the militia-his father met his mother and wooed her for 10 years as she went off to America as her father emigrated to Australia. She told him that he'd need to qualify for her to marry him and he qualified and went to marry her in America in 1913. His father was constable of St Clement from 1916 until 1958. He had 2 brothers and 2 died in child birth. He was born in London as his mother went over to be careful. His eldest brother joined the firm in 1939 and was later thrown out of the army because he was going deaf. He transferred to civil affairs and was killed in his bed because he didn't hear the air raid warnings and died in Paris in 1944. He grew up spoilt and indulged. He was a lazy child-liked reading but also liked exploring the countryside of St Clement. Had a country upbringing. Remembers the railway especially using it to get into town when he was 4 without telling his parents. Great Uncle George found him and put him back on the train. Did a lot of bicycle riding and a small boat. Someone suggested he should go to the sail maker of the Westward, TB Davis' yacht and he did and got the sail designed by him, Mr Bridges. From 1937 until the war he kept her at La Hocq and got to know all of the channels in the area. Had great fun with the boat. He went to St Clement's Church. Church was an important part of his life. He started at the Dame School of Miss Le Brocq. She gave him a good grounding and then he went to Victoria College Prep where he fell under the influence of Miss Aubrey. She was a great teacher-has her reports on him and it was said that he talked too much. The Prep was in an old house called Mount Pleasant. Started with Miss Bunnett as headmistress-remembers her being scary. He was a spoilt boy who got fat. Wasn't fond of ball games although he liked swimming. Went up to Victoria College in 1935 aged 10 where he stayed until 1943. Had good masters before the war. The boarding house was big in those days-a nucleus of boys lived at the boarding house. At school he was somewhat idle-he was at least a year below the average age of the form-found it difficult. Managed to get his school certificate before he was 15. When occupation came he wasn't evacuated with the school certificate group. Stayed because his mother met the then Bailiff, Lord Coutanche, in St Helier and he told her to keep him in Jersey as the occupation wouldn't last. One of his oldest friends is Roy Mourant who he escaped with. He used to have all night parties to avoid the curfew. Had one at St James' Vicarage with boys and girls in the dormitories. Decided to escape because it became clear in the summer of 1944 that Jersey was not to be liberated. During August a few people tried to escape on a float but failed. Had to plan if you were going and so they did. In 1942 all boats had to be put into store. He kept his in the parish quarry at the top of La Hocq Hill and then put his into Norman's in Commercial Buildings. Recruited John Floyd with Roy Mourant in the plan. They had to get the boat out of Commercial Buildings. They borrowed a furniture removal van and pretended to be removal men and took the boat from Commercial Buildings. Borrowed a key from his father of a property of somebody who had left. Put his boat in the garage of the house and got his boat decked over. His parents only knew about it towards the end. They were lucky when they escaped-they made a lot of noise and were seen off by a number of people. Spent 17 hours in the boat. When they arrived in France they had taken some brandy with them which he drank and promptly fell out the boat. They went up the beach and gave themselves up to a Frenchman who kept them for the night until the Americans were due to arrive the next day. He later sold the boat and they spent 10 days in Cherbourg before being transferred to London. He planned to join up when he was in London and phoned his cousin who was in the army who told him about his brothers death. Was given 6 months rest and recreation before joining up and his elder brother told him to use it. He then met Professor Laurie Bisson, a Jerseyman, who was at Pembroke College, Oxford who persuaded him to join the University. Went to Oxford having been sponsored by Lord du Parcq and gained a scholarship. Spent two terms in the Spring and Summer of 1945 in the Officers Training Corps but before he was able to join up the war ended. Had law in his blood. Near the end of the occupation he did some local preaching in the anglican church-was licenced by the dean to take matins and even song. Had planned to become ordained but decided his father needed him to help in the family business. Went to London to take the Bar Exams and came back to Jersey in 1949 and joined his father's firm of Crill-Benest. In his approach to law Lord Denning was influential. Relied on his father's knowledge at the beginning as there weren't any advocates exams when he came back. He was the one who introduced the exam in 1954 when he was the President of Legislation in the States. He admired how Lord Coutanche ran his court. Also admired Advocates Vibert and Valpy. A learned advocate was Advocate Peter Giffard. Became a Deputy from 1951-58 and a Senator from 1960-62 before becoming solicitor general. Missed meeting clients in the private practice and had to acquire conversational skills. People unsure of how to address him when he became bailiff. Sang from 1957 in St Helier's Church Choir and later Trinity Church. Decided that the Catholic Church was the church he wanted to join and was received into the church in July 1995. Looked back with pleasure at his time as solicitor general and deputy bailiff as he was under people and was learning on the job. As attorney-general he prosecuted the Beast of Jersey, Edward Paisnel. Originally the deputy-bailiff was intended to be an alter-ego of the bailiff but it didn't work that way as there needed to be a leader of the States. Is unsure whether the bailiff would ever leave the States-it would change the constitution radically. Talks about the bailiff's role. Feels his greatest achievement was being appointed bailiff. Enjoyed the royal visit in 1989. The Bailiff of Jersey and Guernsey were invited to the Commonwealth Lawyers Conference of Presiding Officers of the Commonwealth in 1988 in London which he enjoyed. Satisfied by the judgement in the Waterworks Case on the rating assessment by the Parish of Grouville. His darkest hour was the trouble 3 years previously. For hobbies he reads, walks and gardens. Has joined a livery company in London and has been asked to be the President of the Jersey Scout Association. His unfulfilled pleasure would have been to charter a boat in the West Indies and sail around. Finishes with a piece of music.

Reference: R/07/B/26

Date: 1995 - 1995

Microfiche of the 1901 Census for Jersey, Public Record Office reference 2+ RG13/5311. St Helier - Part of District 4 - Houses between Gloucester Street, part of Esplanade, George Street, Kensington Place, Edward Place, including Newgate Street, Patriotic Place and Patriotic Street. St Helier - District 5 - Cheapside, Old St John's Road as far as Strangers Cemetery, Park Road and lane, West End Terrace, part of Esplanade, George Stand, Kensington Place including Lewis Street and Kensington Street. St Helier - District 6 - York Street (No 1 to 7), Seale Street (No 1 to 27), Sand Street (No 2 to 30), Charing Cross (No 13 to 19), King Street (No 46 to 99), Broad Street (No 2 to 28), Charing Cross (No 19 to 58), Pitt Street (No1 to 6), Dumaresq Street (No4 to 8), Brook Street (No1 to 3), Library Place (No14 and 14a), New Cut (to No 2), King Street (No 39 to 43). St Helier - District 7 - Houses between King Street, Queen Street, Snow Hill, Hill Street, part of Mulcaster Street, Bond Street, top of Broad Street, Library Place, Brook Street, including Morier Lane, Royal Square, Vine Street and Church Street. St Helier - Part of District 8 - Homes between Conway Street, Bond Street, Pier Road, Road at the back of the Military Hospital (West), Old Quay, Cafe Victoria Pier, Commercial Buildings, Weighbridge and part of Esplanade, including Wharf Street, Cross Street, part of Mulcaster Street, Ordnance Yard and Pier Road lanes.

Reference: S/07/A/10

Date: 1901 - 1901

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