Jersey Talking Magazine-June 1978 Edition. Introduction by Gordon Young. Cooking feature-Margaret Jenkins talking about making food for one. Myths and legends feature-Roy Fauvel talking of a ghost of a girl who committed suicide on her wedding day at China Quarries, St Lawrence. Health feature-Beth Lloyd talking about stomach problems to the doctor. Nature feature-Frances Le Sueur talking about white throats in Jersey and playing their birdsong. Tips for the blind from Robin on sewing seeds in the garden. June Gurdon reading from Eyes at My Feet, a true story, by Jessie Hickford who is blind and has a guide dog. End of Side One. Feature on open gardens in Jersey-Norah Bryan went to a garden in Le Val, St Brelade to be shown around by its owner-Sir Colin Anderson-he talks about the house and its garden, the work he's done in the garden, a detailed description of the garden, its flowers, plants and its position. Interview with Heather Dupré, a Jersey pianist, talking about her reasons for playing the piano, learning the instrument, playing the harpsichord, electronic instruments, writing music, modern music, composers, her future career and an extract of her playing the piano. Mike Le Cocq talking to Alan Hodgkinson-a gemmologist talking about diamonds. Gordon Young finishing off with a joke.

Reference: R/05/B/20

Date: May 31st 1978 - May 31st 1978

Jersey Talking Magazine-Battle of Flowers Special Edition with the Radio Lions and the Jersey Talking News/Magazine teams. Gordon Young watching and describing the floats being prepared the night before the battle and talking to people preparing their floats including Beeches' Old Boys Association President Norman Parslow, Peter Blake, Ronald Crane, David Binnington, Susanne Le Quesne with the Green Room Club float, Save the Whale, St John and St Martin's floats described, First Tower School of Dance-paper flower float. David and Chris commentating on the battle of flowers parade, the arrival of the VIPs, the start of the battle with Miss & Mr Battle-June Wilson and Sacha Diestel, description of the parade and floats, talks to Miss Junior Battle of Flowers-Diane, Norah Bryan, winner of the prix d'honneur-St Clement's parish float, people in the audience commenting on the battle. End of Side One. Feature on the finance industry in Jersey-review of where the island is going. Three articles read from the Jersey Evening Post's finance supplement entitled 'Finance in Jersey'-'The Intricacies of the Offshore Fund Market', 'Facts behind the boom in companies' and 'The Future of the Industry'.

Reference: R/05/B/23

Date: July 31st 1978 - July 31st 1978

Jersey Talking Magazine-April 1977 [March not recorded]. Introduction by Gordon Young and explanation for the reason that there was no March edition. Gardening Feature-walking around the garden and looking at the various vegetables, fruit and flowers that have began sprouting in springtime and in the greenhouse. Nature Feature-Frances Le Sueur discussing the chiff-chaff with an example of its bird song. The history of medicine-a doctor discussing the early history of medicine and the Hippocratic Oath. Cooking Feature-Margaret Jenkins giving a recipe for the making of bread. Island Administrators-Graham Pitman interviewing the Constable of St Helier, Peter Baker-talks about the history and role of the constable, the administration over which he presides, the work of the office and his role in the States of Jersey. Gordon Young talks about Reg Grandin, his experience during the occupation and his writing of the book 'Smiling Through' followed by a reader Mrs Renouf singing the song 'Smiling Through'. End of Side One. Acting out of a German pilot going over the Channel Islands on the 30th June 1940-1st July 1940 on an air reconnaissance and landing at the Jersey Airport linking in to a poem by Reg Grandin read by June Gurdon. Beth Lloyd talking to 17 year old Sarah Patterson, daughter of novelist Harry Patterson, regarding a novel she wrote on the second world war. Talks about whether she always wanted to be a writer, her father's influence, her book about the second world war, the research for her book, her next project and moving to Jersey with her family. The Market in St Helier that was built thanks to a lottery. Di Weber looks around the market talking about the history of markets in Jersey, the building of the markets, the centrepiece of the market, the market during the occupation, the market in 1977, a tour of the market starting in Market Street with a description of the building, stalls and things being sold including flowers, fruit and vegetables, meat, talks to the butcher about his job, talks to Mr Farley about the shop Red Triangle and leaving by Hilgrove Street. Gordon Young tells a humorous story about the market.

Reference: R/05/B/6

Date: March 31st 1977 - March 31st 1977

Jersey Talking Magazine-July Edition. Introduction by Gordon Young. Reverend Graham Long, a concologist, an expert on molluscs, talking to Beth Lloyd about how long he has been interested in molluscs, how he became interested in molluscs by finding some snails, the only collector on the island of non-marine molluscs, the interesting molluscs on the island, species we have are generally smaller in size as a result of a lack of chalk on the island, a species was found in Jersey that had only previously been seen in America, a slug of German origin that has been found in St Martin, his theory that it was brought to the island during the second world war, toads eating slugs, over 70 species of gastropods been identified, massive variety of molluscs, majority very small and his decision not eating snails. Joan Stevens talking about a famous Jerseyman who moved away from Jersey and became famous elsewhere. Thomas de Soulemont who died in 1541 and became the Dean of Jersey in 1534 but didn't stay in Jersey. Moved to England and became French Secretary for King Henry VIII, started to collect property across England, held many positions, fiercely upheld the rights of the ecclesiastical courts and took cases for the benefit of Jersey, well respected and scholarly, bought property of Jersey girls who had married Englishmen. Nicholas the brother of Thomas gave a cast iron gun to the parish of St Saviour. Chris and David at Howard Davis Park taking a tour around the gardens with descriptions of the plants and flowers, the rose garden with descriptions of the colours and smells of the roses, the entrance of the park and the beauty of the park. Margaret Jenkins giving recipes for vegetarian food. Gordon Young telling a story. End of Side One. Norah Bryan at the spring town fair which was held in the Royal Square for charity. Talks with a member of the Jersey Society for the Disabled about how the spring fair started, his part in the fair, the stalls at the fair and the amount of money that was raised for charity. Describes the stalls around the Royal Square and the different charities represented. Sue Carr talked to Brian Waites about how he became interested in golf, whether he wanted to become a player at school, becoming a golf professional, his career, the different types of golf professional-looking after a shop at the golf course and giving tuition or playing tournaments, he tries to blend them both together, the number of tournaments he takes part in a year, taking his family to tournaments, playing with Senator John Rothwell and Bill Roache in the Pro Am Tournament and other people that he has played with. Sue Carr interviews Renton Laidlaw, a golf correspondent, whether he always walks around the golf course before a tournament, research for television, the different newspapers, radio and television programmes that he reports for, who pays the expenses for his travel, the countries that he enjoys the most including Switzerland, the Philippines and Hawaii and America, the communications from different countries, the relations between the press and golfers and the younger generation of golfers. At La Moye Golf Course there is a statue of a wooden unicorn-Howard Baker wrote a story around the unicorn which is read by Stewart Lobb. End of Side Two.

Reference: R/05/B/65

Date: June 30th 1982 - June 30th 1982

Jersey Talking Magazine-June 1977 Edition. Introduction by Gordon Young. Nature Feature-Frances Le Sueur talks about wild garlic and the cuckoo with its bird call. Interview by Gordon Young of the television naturalist David Bellamy talking about what drew him into botany, his interest in flowers and the conservation of animals and plants in the garden. Cooking Feature-Margaret Jenkins talking about what recipes you can make with cheese. Beth Lloyd talking to a doctor about the use of vitamin supplements. Island Administrators-Graham Pitman talking to John Lees of Controller of Social Security about the functions of the Social Security Department, the differences between Jersey and the UK, future developments in social security, how awareness is raised of the department's work to the public. Tim giving hints on bath aids for the blind and elderly. End of Side One. June Gurdon reading Reg Grandin's poem 'Little Treasured Joys'. Commander Cruisarr from Guernsey talking about the evolution of Talking Books for the blind. Beth Lloyd talking to Frank Walker, Managing Director of the Jersey Evening Post, about the moving of the newspaper offices from Bath Street to Five Oaks, the printing of the newspaper, going on a tour of the building with descriptions of each room and the printing process. Roy Fauvel tells the history of a gold snuff box recently presented to St Helier by Eric Young which was presented to Edward Nicolle, the Constable of St Helier in the 1820s, who was censured by the States after comments made but received the box as a vote of confidence from the parish. Gordon Young with a story about the muratti.

Reference: R/05/B/8

Date: May 31st 1977 - May 31st 1977

Jersey Talking Magazine-July 1977, Jubilee Edition. Introduction by Gordon Young. Children from Mont Cantel School talking about they think the queen does, Beth Lloyd reading a reply from the queen regarding the Jubilee Edition of the Jersey Talking Magazine. Island Administrators-Sir Frank Ereaut, the Bailiff, talking to Graeme Pitman about the island's loyalty to the crown, the history of the island's link to the crown and with a message to the readers. Feature finding out where members of the radio team were on Coronation Day twenty five years previously. Di Weber talks to Mrs Hibbs at the Glory and Majesty Flower Festival at Grouville Church which was held to celebrate the jubilee with a description of the flower arrangements and their significance within the church. Gordon Young talking about the beacon of bonfires set alight to celebrate the jubilee. End of Side One. Poem on the queen read out by a child. Experiencing the events of the jubilee celebrations at Howard Davis Park for the multi-denominational service celebrating the occasion with descriptions of the surroundings and the parade taking place, the equestrian events at the People's Park with horse and carriage displays put on by the Coach Drivers Association and the Multina Riding Centre, a tug of war competition, Richard Spears talking to Beth Lloyd about the yard of ale competition and a description of the firework display. Gordon Young finishing with a humorous story.

Reference: R/05/B/9

Date: June 30th 1977 - June 30th 1977

Personal View of Florence Bechelet [with jersey accent] interviewed by Beth Lloyd talking to her about the Battle of Flowers. She has been making floats since 1934, she decided to start when she saw a float in 1928, noticed a carnival class was being held-decided she wanted to take part in it, she made a watering can costume and showed it to a neighbour who said that she'd done very well, was going to walk in with it but it would have been too heavy. At 15 she found an old pram, which she tied with string planks and put a tower shaped clock and vases with flowers on it. With two friends she went to the Battle Of Flowers at Springfield and won 3rd Class in the class with 10 shillings prize money. She was determined to do better next time. She was not artistic at school, she put the floats together by looking at picture of animals to get ideas and cutting a piece of wire bigger than the animal and shaping it. For the first 3 years she made it with hydrangeas. She found out there was a prize for best exhibit in junior class and senior in wild flowers. In 1937 she made a weather house in heather and won first in her class and the junior wild flowers prize, which was 6 solid silver tea spoons. First record-a March from the Band of the Welsh Guards. Battle Of Flowers at Springfield was a smaller scale than today but had beautiful floats. They used a lot more hydrangeas in those days. There was more of a team effort in the past, young people used to put together exhibits, most young people were in the Battle. Springfield-used to hold up to 10,000 people who were mostly islanders but there were a few tourists. Local bands used to play. The outbreak of war stopped the Battle Of Flowers. Her family had a farm but they couldn't export produce and cattle kept being taken by the germans. They were left with 2 cattle, a severely depleted stock, in St Ouen. The Germans took 12 vergees of land in Les Landes. She didn't really deal with the Germans. Food was scarce-a lot of people were saved by the Red Cross parcels. She had planned for the Battle Of Flowers before the outbreak of war but didn't do it until 1951. It was a hunting scene, which won first prize in its class with a prize of £15, first in the junior wild flowers which was a prize of a silver tea set, the prix de merit, which was a prize of a refrigerator which still works today and the best exhibit of the whole show by an individual, which was a prize of a radiogram worth 160 guineas. Second record-Sound of Music. Battle Of Flowers started again in 1951 and went to Victoria Avenue which was a better venue and had a smooth road. She didn't know why it changed back as it started on Victoria Avenue. There hasn't been a Battle at the end of the Battle of Flowers for 7 or 8 years. At the end of the parade she used to have to protect her own float. She has started a Battle Of Flowers Museum through her interest in the event, it has proved popular after the first three years of difficulty. It was opened on 16th June 1971 with one building and then a second, third and fourth with sixteen models from the Battle Of Flowers in total. She has made 40 exhibits for the Battle Of Flowers and 13 exhibits for other fetes including on Grouville Common, St Ouen's Fete, Villa Millbrook and St Andrew's Park-in competition. Her favourite float was made for the Queen and Duke of Edinburgh's visit in 1979 with an exhibit of 40 flamingos, took it to Howard Davis Park and were introduced and talked to the Queen and Duke of Edinburgh who were easy to talk to. The President of the Battle Of Flowers' Association gave her permission to show it before the Battle Of Flowers took place and she used it in the Battle Of Flowers that year although it didn't win a prize and the Association said they couldn't give her a guarantee for it because it had been shown before but it was sorted out although she was upset and didn't exhibit for the next 2 years. Had an exhibit that became a design for a stamp, which was a float of ostriches. She later became allergic to glue. Told by Philatelic Bureau that her design was being used as a stamp-1s 9d. Third Record-Blue Danube. She makes a float by getting a book on animals, making a scene, for example, a jaguar with llamas, keeps the design in her head rather than drawing it, no help given to her-all individual work. She picks the grasses as soon as they're ready. Used to pick them at the sand dunes and now grows her own. Has to sew them each year. She makes her mind up on what the theme will be on christmas day and doesn't change her mind. The float is made from three quarter inch mesh chicken wire. On a horse and bison float-84,000 pieces of grass were used on each horse and 11,000 bunches of approx 20 each on the bison. All her spare time is spent doing things. She is not normally a patient person but enjoys doing it and never gets bored. She dyes the grasses before putting them on the float in a bucket on her gas cooker. Prefers making animals to human figures. She was especially careful when making a Jersey calf figure as she was asked to do so by the Société Jersiaise and she wanted to make sure it was right and kept checking. Fourth Record-Jimmy Shand-chose it because it has a good rhythm. She talks about her exhibits that went to Exeter for Jersey Tourism and Leeds. She went with them and got a good reaction from people as there is nothing like it in England. She went to Guernsey with the Pied Piper of Hamlyn and got first prize. Brought humour into her exhibit, the funniest was a donkey derby. The Battle Of Flowers is not as good as it used to be-early 50s used to be 80 or 90 exhibits-a lot more than today. The young people not interested. The parochial classes not as popular as they can't find a leader. Miss Battle of Flowers is a good idea and provides an extra exhibit. Visitors still very keen. New set up with the arch ways on the Victoria Avenue good. Pictures hanging in museum. Fifth Record-Mary Poppins-Chimchiminy. Went to the ball at the West Park Pavilion as a chicken and won first prize and the tortoise and the hare but she collapsed due to lack of air in the costume. She was unable to compete in the Battle Of Flowers this year because she has been in hospital, told to rest but she has an idea for next years float already. End of Side One. Personal View of Major John Riley. Born in Trinity Manor in 1925. His grandfather came to Jersey in 1908. His ancestry is from Yorkshire and later his grandfather moved to Cornwall and London and came to Jersey in 1908. He had an interest in islands and tried to buy Sark and move to Alderney but moved to Jersey. He was interested in architecture, by profession a theologian but had a love of architecture and took time and money rebuilding the manor which was near derelict when he moved in. The roof had to come off and it was reconstructed in a French style. The architect was Sir Reginald Bloomfield, a London architect. The manor goes back to 1550. It was the seat of the de Carteret family and was successfully restored and enlarged by de Carterets in 1660 and the 19th century. First memories of the manor were of his grandfather who was an imposing and a great church man-morning and evening prayers were in the chapel and many people lived there including 3 uncles and his father but mother died in an accident in 1928 but he had a largely happy childhood. In the 1930s he travelled around England as his father was in the army. It was a contrast to living in manor but it only struck him as odd later in life. Being brought up in a large house was not restrictive, the children had good fun and he had affection for certain parts of house. First Record-Carmen Jones. Schooling-he went to day school in Jersey, preparatory school in England and then school in Winchester when war broke out in 1939. He didn't enjoy school, he was not academic and not good at ball games but it was a good education. During World War 2 his grandfather was allowed to live in the Manor for the first 2 years, the grounds were used as an ammunition dump, later the garrison moved into the house and his grandfather moved to one of the lodges. House undamaged and well looked after. When he arrived back in the island day after the liberation the germans were cleaning the manor. Felt worried about being separated from the island and the only contact was red cross letters which were only 28 words long-had to be careful. Was registered by mistake as an enemy alien card in England. Ambitions-had it not been for World War 2 he may have had an academic career-unsure. Couldn't think of any other profession he would have done apart from the army. His grandfather wanted him to have a classical education, he was an academic man and had stood for parliament but didn't get in. Ended up in the Coldstream Guards-his father had been a member, he has no regrets as he lived with marvellous people. He joined in 1943 and was commissioned in 1944 and joined the forces in North West Europe as a platoon commander. He wasn't frightened of getting killed, the idea of coming home as a wounded war hero appealed, but he had a fear of being frightened. In general the sergeant runs the platoon as they have massive experience and the officers, who had more training, did the planning. He went to North West Germany and saw action for 9 days before he was wounded on 9th March 1945 and evacuated to a hospital in Nottingham 48 hours after. It was the last he saw of the second world war. After he went out to Palestine. They had been earmarked to go to Japan but the bomb was dropped before he had to go. Second Record-Underneath the Arches. He stayed in army for 20 years, working with nice people who trust in each other. He was in a brigade of guards and had a really varied time. Later he was involved in the administration of the army. When he was in the Coldstream Guards he talks about how they felt in full uniform, being very hot whilst on parade, standing still was tiring, he took part in the vigil when the king died. He served in Palestine between 1945-48, then back for 3 months then went out to Malaya for 2½ years which was exciting. As company commander he led a patrol of 14-20 men for a week-10 days in the jungle. His father was still in Jersey at this time and became a jurat in the Royal Court. He came back on leave from time to time. The Manor was not in working order till the mid 50s. When he came back he helped around the Manor. In his army career he became an instructor-dealing with officers in their early 30s who were destined for commanding positions. During the Seven Day War there was both an Israeli and Egyptian who were called back into service. Third Record-Glen Miller. Took the Coldstream Guards Band to America in 1954-for 12 weeks. 160 men would move into a hotel, play a concert, have dinner, go to bed and then move around-strenuous. He left the army in 1963, he was sad to leave but had two young children, schooling was a problem for serving officers. He came back to Trinity Manor, didn't know what he wanted to do, determined to find plenty to do. He took the dairy farm back and got involved in companies and then stood for the States. He decided to go in to politics because he felt he had a responsibility to the island and wanted to give something back. His experience outside of the island was of value. He had no ambitions as a politician-the States was more like local administration. Fourth Record-Noel Coward. Politicians work hard-especially becoming president of a major committee which holds almost a ministerial responsibility, you need to be able to communicate with people. Life going to become more difficult for people in politics. You could run the island with 20 people but would have to pay them, which is against what the island politics is about. Became President of the Defence Committee-linked to his background. Wilfred Krichefski asked him to join the committee and he was able to help because of his military background. It was not like the Ministry of Defence-more like a Committee of Public Safety. Decided to finish in politics last year as he had done 18 years and didn't want to go stale and stand in the way of other people. He wanted to clear the way for other people to be promoted and hopes people don't stay on too long. He has been able to develop Trinity Manor for people to have seminars as he has moved himself in to one end of the house and through this he meets interesting people through the functions and it keeps the Manor occupied. For relaxation he goes sailing during the summer and rides horses in the winter.

Reference: R/07/B/1

Date: 1982 - 1982

Personal View of Senator Ann Bailhache, President of the Overseas Aid Committee, interviewed by Geraldine des Forges. Her maiden name is de Bourcier and she was brought up in St Aubin. She was born in a nursing home in Havre des Pas called Halesea because her brother and her were delivered by caesarean. She lived in St Aubin until she was married. She remembers the occupation and the germans arriving. The germans were billeted around them and she was the only child there. She was very ill during the occupation which meant she lost a year of her school life-she lost the use of her legs. Her father took her to Miss Le Riche's dancing classes. Dr Mortimer Evans and Nurse Payne visited her twice a day for two or three months. The germans used to march past her window. She went to dancing and held on to the bar and swung her legs as a form of physiotherapy. Within 6 to 8 months she was back dancing and performing. Were with adults most of the time although the Battrick boys dropped in to giver her shrapnel and children waved at her as they went past. She loved reading at school. Mr Poingdestre, the headmaster of her school, didn't push the children during the occupation as he didn't think they were up to it. It changed after the occupation. After the second world war her mother applied to visit England. It took about 24 hours to get to Southampton and they travelled up to Yorkshire to visit her mother's family. Her mother didn't get a permit to come back to the island so she had to write back and apply. She was sent to school in Yorkshire which she found very different. Losing the use of her legs through illness was worrying but she always thought she'd be fine-she does remember having a lumbar puncture. She loved ballet and tap dancing. She remembers after the occupation or near the end that Miss Le Riche had dancing exams in Wests Cinema and she won a medal. First Record-Piece from the Nutcracker Suite. She went to a school in Yorkshire for 3 or 4 months after the occupation before she could return to Jersey-she was introduced to the school in assembly. They used to have tests every week. Every Friday and Saturday she went to the West Park Pavilion. She went to St Brelade's Beach during the summer but she stopped playing netball. She went to night school twice a week and worked in her parents newsagents and grocers at St Aubin. She then found a job in town at John Dugue's. She had a totally different life to today's teenagers. She feels Jersey was better then but life moves on. She met her husband in 1959 and they were married in 1960. They were both in their mid 20s-he had travelled and had been in the army. Went to Paris on their honeymoon. Second Record-Rock Around the Clock by Bill Haley and the Comets. After the occupation brownies and guides were started in St Aubin and she went to brownies which was run by Mary Le Boutillier and then to girl guides which was run by May Rive. She then helped with brownies and girl guides and became Ranger Guider for Jersey and then became a public relations officer-she is not connected anymore but she still gets invited to functions. The groups give children a sense of purpose and responsibility. She took the South West to a world camp in Brighton as a Ranger Guider. Girls are able to be encouraged to think of other guides around the world. There is a difficulty in getting people to give time but she thinks that it is worth it giving time to young people. She helped found the Jersey Deaf Children's Society with her sister in law who is a health visitor who volunteered her as a secretary. The parents and children used to come to her house and somebody gave them therapy. When they started deaf children had to go to England to get help in a school-now there are god facilities-as a member of the Education Committee she could see how the facilities had moved on. Third Record-Wimboweh. She got interested in the States about 18 years previously. She used to help Senator Baal with her election campaigns. 12 years previously Ann Baal said she should stand but she didn't want to because it wasn't convenient, she decided not to three years later but three years after that she decided to stand as a deputy. She topped the poll at the election in District No 2. She felt lost at her first States sitting-now there is more information when you start. Reading all the paperwork can take up a great deal of time especially if you don't know the subject that is being written about. Debates need to be allowed to last as long as they last rather than being cut off. When she got into the States she was concerned about welfare problems especially child welfare. After a couple of months she was invited on to the Education Committee and she became chairman of the Children's Department which was hard work but exciting. Whilst she was chairman they opened a hostel for homeless teenagers in St Mark's Road and La Chasse House for support for young families. She is now a senator and President of the Overseas Aid Committee-she thinks the work with the third world is important. She feels Jersey is privileged with some poverty but when you look at the third world countries the more developed nations owe them something. She is chairman of Relate which is a marriage counselling service. She is a daughter who is a doctor and a son who is a graphic designer. She enjoys flower arranging, walking and travelling. She would have liked to have learned the piano as a child. Fourth Record-Sibelius' Symphony No 2.

Reference: R/07/B/21

Date: July 10th 1994 - July 10th 1994

Visit of His Royal Highness the Duke of Edinburgh to the St John's Youth and Community Centre to open the Billy Butlin Memorial Hall commentated on by Mike Vibert on 29/03/1983. Description of the visit of the Prince, a description of the youth centre, children playing badminton, all the St John's School pupils at the event, Le Rocquier Band playing the national anthem. The main building of the centre was open on September 7th 1980 by Wilfred Tomes. Diane Smith commentates outside the centre waiting for the Prince to arrive describing the crowd. Famous visitors to the opening. Cost of the centre-£300,000. Mike Vibert-Duke's 6th visit to the island-describes the other visits. Diane Smith-Prince Philip's car just pulled up-accompanied by Sir Peter Whiteley and Sir Frank Ereaut, the Lieutenant Governor and Bailiff. Welcomed by Constable John Le Sueur and Lady Sheila Butlin, Mrs Le Sueur, Deputy Fred le Brocq, Senator Reg Jeune, head of the Education Committee-unveils the plaque. Prince being guided around the centre. Sees squash being played by Gillian Ferguson and her father and coach Doug Ferguson. Doug Ferguson talking about coaching his daughter, the championships she holds, how she feels about playing in front of Prince Philip. Prince Philip then making his way to the scout room to see demonstrations by the scouts. Beth Lloyd commentating on the Prince's visit to the scout room, Prince Philip meeting Colonel Bill Hall, the Scout Commissioner, talking about the different activities the scouts take part in, looking at tying knot demonstrations, first aid demonstrations, trip to Kenya to build a community building there, Duke of Edinburgh leaves the scout room. Mike Vibert-Duke of Edinburgh viewing a game of badminton, Barry Smith says who is playing in the demonstration games and the badminton club. Famous guests Morecambe and Wise, Dickie Henderson and Danny La Rue. Diane Smith-Prince entering club room, describing the club room. Mike Vibert-Prince standing on the balcony looking at the hall watching the men's badminton. Diane Smith-Prince introduced to the president and chairperson of the Jersey Flower Club Leah Samson and Viola Trenchard who helped decorate the centre. Diane Smith talking to Leah Samson and Viola Trenchard about the amount of members involved in arranging the flowers for the decoration, the time it took, the kind of flowers used and the theme of the decoration, the club which has been going since 1960 with almost 200 members, raising money for charity, organising flower and church festivals and fundraisers and the Woman's Institute of the island deciding to set up the Jersey Flower Club. Prince Philip leaving the club room-heading to the Billy Butlin Memorial Hall. Mike Vibert-waiting for the royal party to enter, La Rocquier School Band play the national anthem. Prince Philip being introduced to the officials of the Centre including Centenier Carl Hinault and Daphne Hinault, Mr and Mrs Angus Spencer-Nairn, Mr and Mrs Richard Dupré. Prince Philip meets officials of St John's School Ron Smith and David Rogers and meeting the school's football team. Meets celebrities and the Committe of the Centre, the Duke of Edinburgh award scheme winners. Speech made about the Duke of Edinburgh award scheme and each person is called up to collect their awards including Russell Gibaut, Steven Davidson, Duncan Gibaut, Steven Rondel, Alan Cadoret, Lloyd Pinel and Collette Le Riche. Constable of St John, John Le Sueur making a speech about the centre. Prince Philip making a speech about the Duke of Edinburgh award scheme and the opening of the centre. The Royal Party departing and an overview of the rest of the programme being undertaken by the Duke of Edinburgh. The bailiff giving a speech about the islanders leaving to take part in the Falklands War wishing them luck and a safe return. Recording of Winston Churchill's speech announcing Victory in Europe including the liberation of 'our dear Channel Islands'. End of Side One. Personal View of Joan Stevens interviewed by Beth Lloyd. Talking about her love of history. Had a happy childhood-was an only child. In the early years moved around a lot as her father was in the army-moved wherever her father's regiment was sent. Moved back to Jersey when she was 12. Jersey became home quickly-lived in Les Pins in Millbrook. Went to school at Jersey College for Girls-was smaller in those days-arrived with French being her worst subject and left with it being her best thanks to Miss Holt. After leaving school went to a family in Lausanne, Switzerland to practice her french. When she came back she got a job at the Société Jersiaise Museum as a secretary typist-became fond of the museum. First Record-Scarlet Ribbons by Kenneth McKellar. Went to West Park Pavilion as a girl and went surfing. Met her husband, Charles Stevens, soon after starting at the museum. He was about to go to Africa with the Administration Service. Met five times before they got engaged and then he went away for 3 years-was love at first sight. Knew he was coming back and so didn't mind that he went away-got married as soon as he got back and then went straight back to Zambia. He travelled around the country-went with him on tour but after having children didn't go with him. Had a number of servants. Enjoyed life in Africa in retrospect but longed for Jersey. Was out in Africa during the occupation. Second world war-was worried about everybody in Jersey-was 18 months before they discovered there second son was born. Heard from them through the red cross messages. War didn't touch them directly in Zambia but saw a great deal of troop movements-was a transit camp-helped the troops as they passed through. Second Record-Impatience by Schubert. Came back to Jersey on leave after the war to see her family in 1947. Came back for good in 1949 so the children could be educated. Her time was taken up with bringing up the family. Took part in some farming on their farm in St Mary on a modest scale. Started researching into old Jersey houses and decided to write a book on the subject. Researched by talking to people in Jersey. Wrote Old Jersey Houses and then 'Victorian Voices'-the Sumner family had papers in their house Belle Vue-gave it to the Museum and was asked to catalogue it. It was made up mainly of the diaries and letter books of Sir John Le Couteur and his family. Books about Jersey don't traditionally sell well but her 'Short History' sold well. Third Record-Silver Swan by Orlando Gibbons. Interested in Jerseymen from the past but wouldn't write about it because it has been covered by Mr Balleine's Biographical Dictionary. Her favourite historical Jersey figure is Sir John Dumaresq who was the lieutenant bailiff-an important figure of the time-was Sir John Le Couteur's grandfather-was the head of the liberal party in Jersey-was a great orator-was sent to plead for the island on 23 occasions-kept diaries in the late 1700s and showed a very human side. Had a large family that he brought up after his wife died when his family was still quite young. Collects a lot of information about individuals and then puts it together to form a picture. Fourth Record-The Gondeliers with 'Take a Pair of Sparkling Eyes'. Balleine's History-it had been out of print for 20 years and nothing had replaced it so they decided to rewrite Balleine-decided to reprint it with additions-things that have happened since Mr Balleine had written and the need to emphasise certain aspects of the book. Marguerite Syvret and her worked together-good to work as a team. Added a great deal but it was woven in to the text. Mr Balleine was not very good at listing his sources and so they had to find all of the sources that he mentioned. Brought out a book with Richard Mayne called 'Jersey Through the Lens' with photographs and explanations. She is working with Jean Arthur on the place names of Jersey. Has three sons in England and a daughter in Jersey-one son is an architect, one is in the Homes Office and one is a freelance cabinetmaker-she tries to see her grandchildren as much as possible. Fifth Record-Danny Kay with Inch Worm. Her daughter lives with her in Jersey-she teaches riding. Jersey has changed a lot-the pressure of population. Believes there is a need to give something back to the community. At the Société Jersiaise Museum-goes to a lot of meetings-very alive in the community-trying to get younger people involved. Involved with the National Trust for Jersey-has the same aims of as the Trust in Britain but is autonomous. Is unhappy that the Queen's Valley flooding has gone through the States with a small majority-would like to see an alternative. Doesn't like the fact that the land is going to be bought by compulsory purchase. Sixth Record-Mario Lanza with Ave Maria.

Reference: R/07/B/7

Date: 1982 - 1983

Personal View of Vi Lort-Phillips, Jersey's lady of the camellias, interviewed by Beth Lloyd. Talks about her love of flowers-it came late in life. Lived in London as a child and was not born in Jersey but her maiden name, St Alban, has an Island connection. Born in London. Was in London in 1915-her uncle was the first officer VC. Met Rudolph Valentino as a teenager who kissed her hand. First Record-Mad Dogs and Englishmen by Noel Coward, who she met after going to the dentist and couldn't laugh at any of his jokes. Got married young after both her parent had died at 15 and 15-married a soldier from the Scots Guards. After they married he left the regiment and worked in London and she went travelling-was unusual. Decided to visit Russia with Primrose Harley a friend of hers-learnt russian. Used to be interested in sport-she was very interested in horses. Her husband got polio and was on sticks for a long time-had to give up shooting. She had a motor accident and her foot was crushed so she couldn't continue participating in sport. Second World War-During the Battle of Britain was playing croquet with polish pilots after they returned after their sweeps. Was an air raid warden-she resigned because she was afraid of the dark. Her husband worked in the War Office. Second Record-The Regimental March of the Scots Guards. Came to Jersey in the early 1950s-she didn't know she was going to come-her husband decided to buy a cottage in Jersey when a friend decided not to move there. Her husband had always wanted to live on an island. She sat for Augustus John who drew charcoal drawings of her-drew 12 drawings of her in 9 years-met many interesting people. Was fascinated by his fascination whenever he drew her. Bought La Colline in 1957 and the garden developed gradually. Her interest was triggered off by coming into a bit of money-decided to build a garden in memory of her brother Teddy St Alban who died whilst flying at the end of the war. Has some rare plants in the garden-when she went to Australia, Japan and America-joined the International Camellia Society-got a wonderful reception in Japan. Collected plants from around the world on her travels. Bred a flower called Magnolia Jersey Belle-was adjudged a hybrid. Third Record-Pastoral by Beethoven. President of the International Camellia Society-started in 1961/2 and has just over 1000 members from nearly all temperate zones. There are many kinds of different camellia-in China they use them for medicinal purposes in Japan they are grown as a crop for charcoal and in the west the main use is decoration. They can be flowering for six months of the year. You need to have acid soil for the flowers to grow. Has travelled with the International Camellia Society-had a conference in Jersey, visited Spain and Portugal. This year went with 40 to China for a conference-took 128 camellias to China and planted a Garden of Friendship. Fourth Record-Hole in the Road by Bernard Cribbens. Personal View of Phyllis Haines, headmistress of Helvetia House School. The school has always been run by her family-it was founded by her aunt, 16 years later her mother took it on and after the second world war she took it on. Her origins were mixed-her great great grandfather Etienne Joste on her mother's side came to Jersey in 1793 from Switzerland-set up a bakery and confectionary shop in Halkett Place and became naturalised-it cost 120 livres. He got married to a Jersey girl, Jeanne Le Bas, in 1795. Their grandson Captain Elias Joste bought the house for his elderly parents and educated his nieces, one of the nieces Eva Joste, started the school and her mother continued. Went to school at Helvetia but wasn't taught by her mother, later on went to courses in London and France. Later on specialised in maths with Mr Kellett from Victoria College. Always wanted to be a teacher-both sides of her family were teachers. Her mother and aunt were not trained as teachers. She didn't go to university-no grants. Went to England via the mailboat and went to London and later visited her father's family. First Record-'Love Is Meant to Make us Glad' from Merry England. Was brought in to teach at Helvetia when she was 21/22. The school has always done well. When her aunt started the school she had 5 pupils, before the war 80, after the war 40 and now 95-100. Used to be a secondary school but is now just a primary school. Social life-she loved dancing-used to enjoy dancing at the West Park Pavilion. Was involved in St Helier's Literary Society-flourished before the war-had Amy Johnson coming to speak to them. Before the war they were talking about getting Winston Churchill over to talk to them-would have cost £50. Involved in acting-inherited from her family-helped start a group called the Unnamed Players with Arthur Dethan and Keith Bell and others so that they could put on plays-the first one was 'The Importance of Being Earnest' at Victoria College and Pride and Prejudice for the Literary Society-both produced by Grace Pepin. It wasn't a very big club-about 10 people and stopped when the war started. Enjoyed travelling abroad-one to the Mediterranean and one to the north. Second Record-The Isle of Capri. Decided to stay in Jersey during the occupation-went out to the Jersey Airport and couldn't get an aeroplane and her mother was too old to go on the boat so stayed. Decided to keep the school open-got orders from the Germans that they had to teach German and joined together with St George's School to do so. Because of a lack of food sport was not allowed to be played in schools. She enjoyed the dances during the occupation. Drama flourished during the occupation-helped the population. She joined the Green Room Club during the war and joined the Jersey Amateur Dramatics Club after the war. Every fortnight a performance was taking place and so she appeared a great many shows. She was involved in the Children's Benefit Fund-it came about because some money was made at school and she wanted it to help children and she got in touch with the hospital and they set up a fund under Arthur Halliwell to enable parents to buy rations for their children. Red cross parcels came in at an important time. Just before the war she'd taken part in a play at West Park Pavilion to raise money for the Red Cross International Society and she was glad that they had because later they saved people's lives. During the occupation the most dramatic change was the lack of radios and letters-despite the red cross messages. A lot of her friends were deported. Were aware when D-Day took place-entertainments were stopped but started again later but often the electricity used to fail and people ended up using lighters to light up the stage. Third Record-Rachmaninov's 'Prelude in C Sharp Minor'. End of Side One. Personal View of Diane Postlethwaite, clairvoyant, astrologer and fortune teller. Was taught from an early age to read tarot cards, hands and crystals. Learnt astrology later and she combines all of the disciplines. She was born with the gift and was not well at the age of 3½-became sensitive to people. Astrology is a science and an art and you need to be slightly clairvoyant to do it. Crystal ball-people hold the crystal and then you take them from them and pick up images from it. Tarot cards-you are given formulas for their use. First Record-All Things Bright and Beautiful. Was 3½ when she was told she had the gift-her mother found her in a church sitting up by the altar being very aware. Told her mother she would have a sister and she did. During the war years was separated from her mother and was taught to read tarot cards by a gypsy. Used to read her friend's fortunes. Went to a convent and the reverend mother caught her playing cards and called her 'a child of the devil'. Became a hairdresser but still told people's fortunes. Took it up as a career in her mid 30s-lived in India with her husband and learnt astrology, she met Mother Theresa in India and some Tibetan people who encouraged her to take it up as a career. She had had her eyes opened in India seeing the poverty and suffering that people suffered. Enjoyed her life in India. Second Record-Ravi Shankar. Went to England and Bermuda after leaving India-encountered voodoo which was frightening. Was going to move to South Africa but ended up coming to Jersey. Have been in Jersey for almost 10 years. Did some fortune telling at a Jersey Choir bazaar and her career took off from there. People are interested in fortune telling now-start of the 'Age of Enlightenment'. People looking for an answer-she is used as a crutch by some people. Learnt meditation to remove herself from other people's problems. Is a practicing Christian. When people come to have their fortunes read she starts with their astrology, then reads their hands. Uses tarot cards for general reading. Tries to help people who come to her with illness-their are many psychic healers in the island. Medicine and healing should be used together. People write to her for advice including people with business contracts. Replies to people by using clairvoyance. Third Record-Bob Newhart with 'The Driving Instructor'. Has been called in to use her clairvoyance to help solve crimes. In the 1600s she could have been burnt for being a witch-has experienced witchcraft in the island-goes to the church for help. Is against the use of ouija boards and witchcraft. Can see beyond what other people sees but can switch it off when she is with her family. Has seen things about her family and herself but does not look into them. Her family are tolerant and help her with her work. They can get annoyed with people who impose on them. Fourth Record-Cosmos. Gets involved in spirits in the house-believes a poltergeist is a magnetic force or the spirit of somebody who hasn't moved on-gets a priest out to help get rid of them. Has been to an exorcism. Spiritualism-can fell when people have died. Feels she is here to help people. The church doesn't agree with astrology but she believes in it. Fifth Record-Joyce Grenfell. During the summer visits a lot of Women's Institutes and take part in bazaars. One fete she was put down by a band. Has just bought a computer to help with her job-will programme people onto her computer. Astrology in the newspaper are very general and difficult to do because of different factors. Some people use their gifts to charge a lot of money but she doesn't believe in it. Her grandmother was psychic and so is her sister. Used to play golf and paint but doesn't get time to do them now. Would like to take up art again. She gets involved in her gift when she goes on holiday. Sixth Record-Chariots of Fire by Vangelis. Tells the future of Jersey for the year including predicting vandalism on the ferries to increase, the States of Jersey defence and fisheries will be discussed and we may have a tremor, oil off the coast will be found within two years, peace and environment groups activities will increase and drugs come under jurisdiction-bright year for the Island. Runs through the horoscopes for the year and the predictions for BBC Radio Jersey.

Reference: R/07/B/8

Jersey Evening Post Newscutting : The country life museum at Hamptonne opens for the summer season.

Reference: US/911

Date: June 1st 2011

Jersey Evening Post Newscutting: The Sinkins family donate 2 meadows in Waterworks Valley which will be used by the National Trust to create a new public footpath in memory of the late Richard Sinkins.

Reference: US/935

Date: July 30th 2011

JEP Newscutting: article about Prince Charles and the Duchess of Cornwall's visit to Jersey - 10/07/2012

Reference: US/996

Date: 2012 - 2012

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