Talk by Gordon Prigent, a prisoner in the SS camp in Alderney during the occupation, to the Channel Islands Occupation Society. Introduction and announcements by Michael Ginns. Talks about being put in the camp for being an undesirable for refusing to work for ther Germans, being sent to an OT farm in Alderney, being transferred to the soldatenheim to scrub floors, being caught listening to the news and as punishment being sent back to the OT farm, refused to work at the farm and was marched to the SS Camp Nordeney, put to work on the land, different manual works listed, length of the days growing as the days became longer, digging slip trenches around the bay after D-Day, preparing the food at the soldatenheim, digging potatoes, collecting food from Fort Albert dungeons and delivering it, stealing some of the food to survive, the food situation, working in the bakehouse, illness amongst prisoners, the OT camp commander, beatings on prisoners by the german soldiers, Russians being so hungry that they killed a dog for food and were shot as punishment, his condition since the end of the war, bombing of the soldatenheim, evacuation from the island to France but having to turn back because og the amount of ships lost, being transported to Guernsey and staying at the hospital and then onto Jersey, marched to Fort Regent, some prisoners being transported to France but boats lost so he remained in Jersey, reporting at Victoria College and being given a job which he didn't do. Questions asked on how old he was during the second world war, the circumstances of his arrest, how long he spent in Alderney, the uniform prisoners wore, messages to his family, the nationality of other prisoners, farming he undertook, criticism of a book about the Alderney concentration camps, deaths in the camps, marches undertaken by the prisoners, hospital at the camp and the treatment of the sick and starving, what he saw of the invasion in France, the building of the camps and fortifications, treatment of the prisoners, whether he worked on the harbour, an irish worker he knew, relationships with other prisoners, how he feels now, nationality of the guards, rabbits on the island and a fellow Jersey prisoner-see L/D/25/L/52.

Reference: R/02/A/1

Date: October 13th 1982 - October 13th 1982

Interview with an unidentified doctor regarding his experiences of the German Occupation. Includes: petrol rationing - lived in the country, used a car to get into town and back; towards the end of the war used a motorbike and bicycle; as a doctor had a pass to be out after curfew - was seldom called out at night anyway; had to drive on the right; lights used on vehicles and driving in the dark; medical supplies; diabetics - insulin available over the black market, if they couldn't obtain any, they died; half the General Hospital was taken over by the Germans; ulcers; passed Germans on the road frequently - Russians [forced labourers] were more dangerous; Corrugated steel put over windows at night to prevent break-ins by Russian prisoners; relates incident in which a patient's son killed two russians at night attempting to break into a farm - was not punished or arrested; people relied heavily on the black market; felt that Churchill couldn't care less about the Channel Islands - only saved from starvation by the intervention of Lord Portsea. Poor sound quality. Recorded by Sue Scott Cole circa 1973, cassette copies made by the Jersey Heritage Trust in 1993. Duration 12 Minutes.

Reference: R/03/D/2

Date: 1941 - 1945

Jersey Talking Magazine-February 1978 Edition. Introduction by Gordon Young. Nature feature-Frances Le Sueur talking about whales after a sperm whale was washed up in november at Bouley Bay. Crime feature-Detective Constable Tony Knowlton, Crime Prevention Officer talking about his job and how to look after your property. Pharmacy feature-Molly Perchard talking about herbal remedies. Cooking feature-Margaret Jenkins talking about various recipes from christmas. Tips for the blind in looking after pets. June reading from Eyes at My Feet, a true story, by Jessie Hickford, a blind woman with a guide dog. End of Side One. Di Weber being shown around St Aubin by Robin Cox and talks about the Church of the Sacred Heart and the anchor outside, Victoria Road, the history of St Brelade's Parish Hall and the railway, back of the Methodist Chapel on the bulwarks, Le Quai Bisson, work on de Bourcier's Baker Shops and Ovens to restore it, date stones on the houses, the houses and how they have been developed, Mr Derner's boat yard with an inscription above for John Leigh, outside Elliston House looking at the St Aubin Harbour and how it was built, the Royal Channel Islands Yacht Club on Le Boulevard, adaptations German's made during the occupation, the old St Aubin market now a bank, Mont Les Vaux, Raindrop Mill, St Aubin's Institute, St Aubin On the Hill (St Aubin's Church), the harbour pump, Sacred Heart School, formerly known as the Thomas Julian Bray Jubilee Hall, St Aubin's Hospital for the Sick and Aged, Hamon Memorial Hall which used to be an independent chapel, School Road on what was General Don's main road to St Peter, the Railway Walk with the four mile stone from the Royal Square, a railway quarry with a beginning of a german tunnel and St Aubin's Railway Tunnel with description of the tunnel. Humorous story from Gordon Young and an offer to have questions asked from the readers to politicians.

Reference: R/05/B/16

Date: January 31st 1978 - January 31st 1978

Jersey Talking Magazine-May Edition. Introduction by Gordon Young. Dixie Landick at a recent charity concert at the Opera House performing a humorous sketch about local radio. Nature feature-Frances Le Sueur talking about birds including the cuckoo and the collared dove. John Podmore talking about photography and a pioneering photographer, John Woolley. Cooking feature-Margaret Jenkins talking about jelly. Di Weber talking to Sister Ellen Syvret, a missionary nurse in Papua New Guinea about Papua New Guinea, her work in a hospital, the illnesses encountered, how she came to be in Papua New Guinea, giving talks about her work, learning the language, the culture and politics of Papua New Guinea and hopes for the future for Papua New Guinea. End of Side One. Guernsey feature-Linda Le Vasseur talking to the wife of the bailiff Lady Loveridge about adjusting to the position as wife of the bailiff, her background and her family, meeting her husband during the war, the things she does with the job, mastering public speaking and writing speeches, her involvement in charities especially caring for the elderly and the hospital, balancing her commitments of running the house and her job, her love of gardening, clothes and juggling her wardrobe and the visit of the Queen to Guernsey. Feature on the rugby match between Jersey and Guernsey, the Siam Cup including commentary on the plane journey across to Guernsey, a reception at the Governor's residence, talks to John Groves about his link to the Siam Cup and why it is called the Siam Cup, the Royal Thai Ambassador talking about the match, Sir John Martin, the governor of Guernsey, talking about how he used to play rugby, Dennis Hartley the President of the Jersey Rugby Club and the President of the Guernsey Rugby Club, Ernest Yates, talking about the match, John Everall talking about the match, Patrick McCeary, Guernsey captain, talking about the game, Peter Noble, the Jersey captain talking before the match, commentary on the match and Jersey receiving the trophy and Peter Noble talking about how it feels to win the trophy. Gordon Young telling a humorous story.

Reference: R/05/B/31

Date: April 30th 1979 - April 30th 1979

Jersey Talking Magazine-December Edition. Introduction by Gordon Young. Scrapbook of recordings between 1910-1935, the Jubilee Years of King John and Queen Mary including singing of famous songs and speeches of famous events including the opening and events of World War I, the pioneering of air travel and the British Empire Exhibition at Wembley Stadium. June Gurdon interviewing Phil Jakeman, who hung the bells in St John, talking about when he became a bell hanger, what skills you need, the problems that he faced, the foundries that take part in bell hanging and the competition between the two different foundries. Chris and David-tour of the Jersey Museum, looking at stones with inscriptions, the Jersey kitchen, the bedroom at the museum with a detailed description of the surroundings. Linda Le Vasseur talking to David Eaton about Jubilee Radio, the radio station in the hospital in Guernsey, about how it got started, when it went on the air, the programmes that take place, contact with the patients, the response from the general public, the involvement of youth in the station, the turn over of staff, his reaction to the progress of the radio station and the future for Jubilee Radio. End of Side One. Interview by Gordon Young with Desmond Morris about his autobiography, his family, his career, his work with animals in London Zoo and his work with pandas and chimpanzees. Phil Gurdon in St John to watch the making of black butter. Talks to Phil Romeril about the history of black butter, the ingredients of black butter, the process of making black butter, the taste of black butter and its storage, some men speaking in Jersey french and music playing at the celebrations. Joan Stevens talking about Mont Orgueil Castle including its position, its origins, it's first mentioned in 1212, built between 1180-1210, acquired present appearance in the 1600s, 1300s-1400s serious attacks on island, where the name came from, vulnerability of the castle with the creation of cannon and the building of Elizabeth Castle, intervention of Walter Raleigh that it was kept, Civil War-in use by the King's forces, used as the governor's house and prison, William Prynne held in the castle, Philippe d'Auvergne working his spy networks from the castle, States of Jersey was handed the castle in 1926 by the British Government. Gordon Young finishes with a humorous story.

Reference: R/05/B/37

Date: November 30th 1979 - November 30th 1979

Jersey Talking Magazine No 8-February 1977. Introduction by Gordon Young. Gardening Feature-talking with Les Le Vesconte of St John about growing tomatoes in greenhouses, when they're picked, how they're grown, changes in techniques, variety of tomatoes, conditions that they're kept in, cost of growing. Talk about vegetables that they are growing in the gardens. Nature Feature-Frances Le Sueur talking about crapauds-recording of their noise and story about their history and lives in Jersey. Cooking Feature-Margaret Jenkins giving recipes for baking cakes. Island Administrators-Beth Lloyd interviewing Graham Pitman-Chief Administrative Officer of the Public Works Department-part of the Dept of Public Building and Works-talks about how the department is made up, the decision making process, his position in the department, is also blind-talking about how he works within the department, how he got the job, how the job has become more difficult being blind and how he is taking over as the interviewer of the Island Administrator's series of recordings for Jersey Talking Magazine. Details given on cookery books in large print for the blind. Recordings of a party held by Jersey Talking Magazine for their readers including interviews with Mrs Ansell, Mrs Boucher, Mr Sinel and others about the party and the magazine. End of Part One. Part Two of the Island Walk through Town with Joan Stevens and Robin Cox-in the Parade having walked past Briggs and noted its demolition. Talks about the Old Prison at Charing Cross and prisons in the island, the effect of General Don, the water supplies in the town, the General Hospital building's development, the Parade-how it got its name, developments on the site from General Don's era to present day, Cannon Street, All Saint's Church, General Don's monument and his life, development in Old Street and archaeological discoveries about the areas going back to the 1200s, 15, Old Street-one of the houses visited by John Wesley and the state of buildings on Old Street, the Town Hall, the history of Hue Street nos 1, 3, 5 , 7, 9, 11-now the Post Horn Public House, Dumaresq Street and Little Pitt Street. Visit by Beth Lloyd to Orleans in France to find out about the manufacture of perfume by Christian Dior and the history and workings of the company. Humorous story by Gordon Young.

Reference: R/05/B/5

Date: January 31st 1977 - January 31st 1977

Jersey Talking Magazine-January 1983. Introduction by Gordon Young. Beth Lloyd interviewing Katie Boyle, the television personality who has written two books-Boyle's Law and her autobiography 'What this Katie did'. Talks about why she had written her autobiography, her early life was harrowing-was imprisoned and put in a mental institution-the book was a release, whether she likes her image, her father and her childhood, her book called Boyle's Law which is a tribute to her relationship between her and her readers, her heritage-born in Italy and her father was part Russian and part Italian, her ability with languages, her ability to seem calm on television, working on the Eurovision Song Contest, coming to Jersey for her honeymoon and enjoying her holidays in the island. A guide by Lloyds Bank Limited for the blind and visually handicapped presented by Malcolm [?]. Kevin Mulhern talking about the difficulties that banks can offer for the visually impaired. Peter Thomas, chairman of the Amersham and Chesham Talking Newspaper and manager of Lloyds Fenchurch Street Branch, giving advice for visually handicapped people when using a bank including ringing in advance and using the same cashier. Kevin Mulhern cashing a cheque and talking about how welcoming the bank is, how much help he needs to complete the cheque, his routine when he comes into a bank, a member of staff helping him complete the cheque and getting out his money. Kevin Mulhern interviewing Peter Thomas about the possibility having a deposit account without a cheque book, writing that you are visually handicapped on the cheque book. Ernest Watson, a customer at the Great Portland Street Lloyds, talking about how long he has had his bank account, not to be worried when coming into the bank, what the staff do to help, what he uses the bank for and having no worries about withdrawing money. Peter Thomas and Kevin Mulhern talking about the facility of standing orders, statements and guides issued in Braille and large print, being able to talk to the bank manager, the services that the bank offers and the costs of the services. Kevin Mulhern talking about if he could live without a bank account. End of Side One. Group Captain Fred Winterbottom talking about Adolf Hitler, the Nazi party in the 1930s, getting to know Alfred Rosenberg-third in power in the early Nazi party. The Foreign Office had forbidden the embassies to talk to anyone in the Nazi Party so he went to Germany to see if he could find out any information, he talks about getting to know Hitler in 1934, his cover was that he was a supporter of the Nazi regime, they wanted him to be an unofficial contact with members of government in England. Had an interview with Hitler for an hour and quarter-was told Hitler's plans for the future world and heard Hitler rant about communists. When they found out who he actually was through Italian information in 1938 Rosenberg told him not to come back to Germany again. By that time he had established number of the German Air Force, the blitzkrieg strategy of the German tanks and the dates that the russian war was due to start and he knew the mentality of the people at the top. The quality of intelligence was so good that it was difficult convincing the Allied forces that it was real. He was involved in code breaking and details tricks used, 1942-43-built the first ever computer which could run all of the possibilities quickly to break the codes. His first book-'The Ultra Secrets' says some of the Allied commanders thought it was unfair that they knew what the enemy were doing-Montgomery especially. He had to brief the commanders about the intelligence-Montgomery was the only one who was uncooperative. The intelligence was essential for the victory of the Battle of Britain. He talks about the lack of credit for the code breakers of the second world war, whether it is possible to create an unbreakable code and experimenting with aerial photography. Joan Stevens talking about Jersey doctors. 1700s-quite a number of doctors were in the island including Solomon Journeaux, Dr Sabir [?] and Dr Forbes. In 1746 Dr Forbes attended Mr de Sausmarez and charged him for 'Peruvian bark' which was a precursor to quinine and was used for fevers in the late summer. There is mention of Dr Seale who was a physician and a surgeon. In 1745 Dr Richard Smith, visitor to the island, advertised 'scurvy grass' as a cure for scurvy. Dr Philip Choué de Vaumorel was born in Jersey in 1726 and died in 1789. He was a son of french refugees from Normandy. Choué means a screech owl and Vaumorel was their home. Once in Jersey he became known as de Vaumorel. Lived in Hue Street with a garden as far as Old Street and was an island character. He married Constance Charlotte Le Hardy, daughter of the attorney general, who acted as her husband's secretary. A bill survives from 1759 signed by her for 2 years of treatment for Mrs de Sausmarez. In 1773 Dr de Vaumorel offered to attend the poor at the Hospital for no charge. He was frequently quoted in newspapers of time. The medical treatment of the time mostly consisted of vomiting, bleeding and purging. Gordon Young taking a tour around the Sacre Coeur Cathedral in Paris describing the cathedral. End of Side Two.

Reference: R/05/B/69

Date: December 31st 1982 - December 31st 1982

Jersey Talking Magazine-Christmas 1983. Introduction by Gordon Young with christmas carols sung throughout by the Jersey Festival Choir and their Junior Singers and Les Conteurs Singers. Gordon Young describing various christmas lights around Jersey including Bouley Bay, Charing Cross. Beth Lloyd reading a poem by Colin Plummer called 'Christmas Tree'. Gordon Young with a description of the christmas lights in the Childrens Ward at the Jersey General Hospital. Edgar Fryatt talking about previous christmases that he has experienced. Gordon Young describing christmas lights in an electrical shop and the entrance of Trinity Church. End of Side One. A Jersey version of 'The 12 days of Christmas' sung by the Home Chase Choir. Gordon Young describing the christmas lights at the Trinity Arms public house and the Jersey Airport. Margaret Jenkins talking about the origin of father christmas and reading 'The Night before Christmas' by Clement Clarke Moore. Gordon Young describing the light of the moon in Bouley Bay and the christmas lights in St Helier looking from Fort Regent. End of Side Two.

Reference: R/05/B/72

Date: December 25th 1983 - December 25th 1983

Jersey Talking Magazine-Mid-summer 1984. Introduction by Gordon Young. Beth Lloyd visiting Le Brun's the Bakery, which was founded 180 years ago in Hansford Lane but it wasn't until 1938 that the present managing director's Brian Le Marquand's family took it over when his father bought in. Brian Le Marquand talking about why his father bought the bakery, how much it cost, in 1938 the business was 5% of the island trade but by 1950 it had been built up to 15% of the trade when it was moved to Brighton Road, joining the company in 1958 and buying 50 % of the shareholding in 1960, how the company has changed, it now has 85% of island trade, taking over three other island bakeries, problems in putting sell by dates on the bread, trying to bake bread for when people need to use it, retail trade only one side of the business, they also serve the hotel, guest house and cafe trade and now cater for private parties. David Parmiter, the Production Director, talks about the bread bakery, the process of making bread, the people who work in the bakery, how to tell when the bread is ready, slicing and packing the bread, a new machine detecting metal in the bread, the decorating room-used for making and decorating cakes, meat preparation room-high standard of hygiene, meat delivered fresh daily, how they make and roll their pastries, the roll bakery which involved the same process as bread, 60,000-70,000 rolls made a day, half baked products been brought in and are selling well, wholemeal bread has risen tremendously. Frank Todd, Commercial Manager, in the dispatch area talking about delivering goods, the amount of deliveries a day, how long a delivery takes, the part weather plays in orders, the risk of waste at the end of the day, getting the weather forecast so they can guess how much food is going to be ordered, not freezing orders and dealing with an order-in radio contact with the drivers. Tricia Jones, a tele-sales girl, talks about ringing customers every day to ask them their orders for the next day. Nick Le Couteur, the Sales Director, explaining what happens to the orders after phone calls by the tele-sales girl in order to prepare the food, how many products Le Brun's manufacture-over 500 products, many thousands of products produced each day, modern trends, the movement towards wholemeal breads, cakes still popular, the introduction of croissants, different outlets and the use of computers within the company. Brian Le Marquand talking about future plans for the company. John Boucheré talking about coach trips-in 1946-47 there were a dozen coach companies of various sizes, he trained as a motor engineer-in the early 1950s he decided to drive a coach around the island, he was painfully shy, driving relatively easy but it was difficult to answer questions in front of everybody. He talks about the different people who he encountered on his tours, the way people used to sing after lunch, dealing with drunken passengers, carrying people on poignant journeys-parents of a soldier who died and helping a blind passenger. Stan Birch, a jazz pianist, playing a piece with Wendy Shields singing. End of Side One. Philip Gurdon taking a tour of the German Underground Hospital with Joe Mière. Joe Mière talking about the construction of the tunnels, the different workers, when the work began in 1941, Organisation Todt and the fact that it was planned as an artillery barracks but in 1943 its use was changed to be a bunker. Commenting on the exhibits, talking about ghosts in the tunnels, changes they are making to the tunnels, rock falls in the tunnels, a rest room, the dispensary-was never used, a ward with a description, the equipment in the rooms of the tunnels, an escape shaft, what happened to the Hospital at the end of the war-the company buying the tunnel and becoming more successful, a closed tunnel that has now been opened. Museum-letters by Walter Gallichan-taken to Alderney, survivors of Alderney having a reunion. Describing the exhibits in the museum, newscuttings from the newspaper, the Stranger's Cemetery, reunions with the Russians and a bouquet of flowers put up by Maud Otter. Beth Lloyd telling a story about her cat. End of Side Two.

Reference: R/05/B/76

Date: May 31st 1984 - May 31st 1984

Personal View of Florence Bechelet [with jersey accent] interviewed by Beth Lloyd talking to her about the Battle of Flowers. She has been making floats since 1934, she decided to start when she saw a float in 1928, noticed a carnival class was being held-decided she wanted to take part in it, she made a watering can costume and showed it to a neighbour who said that she'd done very well, was going to walk in with it but it would have been too heavy. At 15 she found an old pram, which she tied with string planks and put a tower shaped clock and vases with flowers on it. With two friends she went to the Battle Of Flowers at Springfield and won 3rd Class in the class with 10 shillings prize money. She was determined to do better next time. She was not artistic at school, she put the floats together by looking at picture of animals to get ideas and cutting a piece of wire bigger than the animal and shaping it. For the first 3 years she made it with hydrangeas. She found out there was a prize for best exhibit in junior class and senior in wild flowers. In 1937 she made a weather house in heather and won first in her class and the junior wild flowers prize, which was 6 solid silver tea spoons. First record-a March from the Band of the Welsh Guards. Battle Of Flowers at Springfield was a smaller scale than today but had beautiful floats. They used a lot more hydrangeas in those days. There was more of a team effort in the past, young people used to put together exhibits, most young people were in the Battle. Springfield-used to hold up to 10,000 people who were mostly islanders but there were a few tourists. Local bands used to play. The outbreak of war stopped the Battle Of Flowers. Her family had a farm but they couldn't export produce and cattle kept being taken by the germans. They were left with 2 cattle, a severely depleted stock, in St Ouen. The Germans took 12 vergees of land in Les Landes. She didn't really deal with the Germans. Food was scarce-a lot of people were saved by the Red Cross parcels. She had planned for the Battle Of Flowers before the outbreak of war but didn't do it until 1951. It was a hunting scene, which won first prize in its class with a prize of £15, first in the junior wild flowers which was a prize of a silver tea set, the prix de merit, which was a prize of a refrigerator which still works today and the best exhibit of the whole show by an individual, which was a prize of a radiogram worth 160 guineas. Second record-Sound of Music. Battle Of Flowers started again in 1951 and went to Victoria Avenue which was a better venue and had a smooth road. She didn't know why it changed back as it started on Victoria Avenue. There hasn't been a Battle at the end of the Battle of Flowers for 7 or 8 years. At the end of the parade she used to have to protect her own float. She has started a Battle Of Flowers Museum through her interest in the event, it has proved popular after the first three years of difficulty. It was opened on 16th June 1971 with one building and then a second, third and fourth with sixteen models from the Battle Of Flowers in total. She has made 40 exhibits for the Battle Of Flowers and 13 exhibits for other fetes including on Grouville Common, St Ouen's Fete, Villa Millbrook and St Andrew's Park-in competition. Her favourite float was made for the Queen and Duke of Edinburgh's visit in 1979 with an exhibit of 40 flamingos, took it to Howard Davis Park and were introduced and talked to the Queen and Duke of Edinburgh who were easy to talk to. The President of the Battle Of Flowers' Association gave her permission to show it before the Battle Of Flowers took place and she used it in the Battle Of Flowers that year although it didn't win a prize and the Association said they couldn't give her a guarantee for it because it had been shown before but it was sorted out although she was upset and didn't exhibit for the next 2 years. Had an exhibit that became a design for a stamp, which was a float of ostriches. She later became allergic to glue. Told by Philatelic Bureau that her design was being used as a stamp-1s 9d. Third Record-Blue Danube. She makes a float by getting a book on animals, making a scene, for example, a jaguar with llamas, keeps the design in her head rather than drawing it, no help given to her-all individual work. She picks the grasses as soon as they're ready. Used to pick them at the sand dunes and now grows her own. Has to sew them each year. She makes her mind up on what the theme will be on christmas day and doesn't change her mind. The float is made from three quarter inch mesh chicken wire. On a horse and bison float-84,000 pieces of grass were used on each horse and 11,000 bunches of approx 20 each on the bison. All her spare time is spent doing things. She is not normally a patient person but enjoys doing it and never gets bored. She dyes the grasses before putting them on the float in a bucket on her gas cooker. Prefers making animals to human figures. She was especially careful when making a Jersey calf figure as she was asked to do so by the Société Jersiaise and she wanted to make sure it was right and kept checking. Fourth Record-Jimmy Shand-chose it because it has a good rhythm. She talks about her exhibits that went to Exeter for Jersey Tourism and Leeds. She went with them and got a good reaction from people as there is nothing like it in England. She went to Guernsey with the Pied Piper of Hamlyn and got first prize. Brought humour into her exhibit, the funniest was a donkey derby. The Battle Of Flowers is not as good as it used to be-early 50s used to be 80 or 90 exhibits-a lot more than today. The young people not interested. The parochial classes not as popular as they can't find a leader. Miss Battle of Flowers is a good idea and provides an extra exhibit. Visitors still very keen. New set up with the arch ways on the Victoria Avenue good. Pictures hanging in museum. Fifth Record-Mary Poppins-Chimchiminy. Went to the ball at the West Park Pavilion as a chicken and won first prize and the tortoise and the hare but she collapsed due to lack of air in the costume. She was unable to compete in the Battle Of Flowers this year because she has been in hospital, told to rest but she has an idea for next years float already. End of Side One. Personal View of Major John Riley. Born in Trinity Manor in 1925. His grandfather came to Jersey in 1908. His ancestry is from Yorkshire and later his grandfather moved to Cornwall and London and came to Jersey in 1908. He had an interest in islands and tried to buy Sark and move to Alderney but moved to Jersey. He was interested in architecture, by profession a theologian but had a love of architecture and took time and money rebuilding the manor which was near derelict when he moved in. The roof had to come off and it was reconstructed in a French style. The architect was Sir Reginald Bloomfield, a London architect. The manor goes back to 1550. It was the seat of the de Carteret family and was successfully restored and enlarged by de Carterets in 1660 and the 19th century. First memories of the manor were of his grandfather who was an imposing and a great church man-morning and evening prayers were in the chapel and many people lived there including 3 uncles and his father but mother died in an accident in 1928 but he had a largely happy childhood. In the 1930s he travelled around England as his father was in the army. It was a contrast to living in manor but it only struck him as odd later in life. Being brought up in a large house was not restrictive, the children had good fun and he had affection for certain parts of house. First Record-Carmen Jones. Schooling-he went to day school in Jersey, preparatory school in England and then school in Winchester when war broke out in 1939. He didn't enjoy school, he was not academic and not good at ball games but it was a good education. During World War 2 his grandfather was allowed to live in the Manor for the first 2 years, the grounds were used as an ammunition dump, later the garrison moved into the house and his grandfather moved to one of the lodges. House undamaged and well looked after. When he arrived back in the island day after the liberation the germans were cleaning the manor. Felt worried about being separated from the island and the only contact was red cross letters which were only 28 words long-had to be careful. Was registered by mistake as an enemy alien card in England. Ambitions-had it not been for World War 2 he may have had an academic career-unsure. Couldn't think of any other profession he would have done apart from the army. His grandfather wanted him to have a classical education, he was an academic man and had stood for parliament but didn't get in. Ended up in the Coldstream Guards-his father had been a member, he has no regrets as he lived with marvellous people. He joined in 1943 and was commissioned in 1944 and joined the forces in North West Europe as a platoon commander. He wasn't frightened of getting killed, the idea of coming home as a wounded war hero appealed, but he had a fear of being frightened. In general the sergeant runs the platoon as they have massive experience and the officers, who had more training, did the planning. He went to North West Germany and saw action for 9 days before he was wounded on 9th March 1945 and evacuated to a hospital in Nottingham 48 hours after. It was the last he saw of the second world war. After he went out to Palestine. They had been earmarked to go to Japan but the bomb was dropped before he had to go. Second Record-Underneath the Arches. He stayed in army for 20 years, working with nice people who trust in each other. He was in a brigade of guards and had a really varied time. Later he was involved in the administration of the army. When he was in the Coldstream Guards he talks about how they felt in full uniform, being very hot whilst on parade, standing still was tiring, he took part in the vigil when the king died. He served in Palestine between 1945-48, then back for 3 months then went out to Malaya for 2½ years which was exciting. As company commander he led a patrol of 14-20 men for a week-10 days in the jungle. His father was still in Jersey at this time and became a jurat in the Royal Court. He came back on leave from time to time. The Manor was not in working order till the mid 50s. When he came back he helped around the Manor. In his army career he became an instructor-dealing with officers in their early 30s who were destined for commanding positions. During the Seven Day War there was both an Israeli and Egyptian who were called back into service. Third Record-Glen Miller. Took the Coldstream Guards Band to America in 1954-for 12 weeks. 160 men would move into a hotel, play a concert, have dinner, go to bed and then move around-strenuous. He left the army in 1963, he was sad to leave but had two young children, schooling was a problem for serving officers. He came back to Trinity Manor, didn't know what he wanted to do, determined to find plenty to do. He took the dairy farm back and got involved in companies and then stood for the States. He decided to go in to politics because he felt he had a responsibility to the island and wanted to give something back. His experience outside of the island was of value. He had no ambitions as a politician-the States was more like local administration. Fourth Record-Noel Coward. Politicians work hard-especially becoming president of a major committee which holds almost a ministerial responsibility, you need to be able to communicate with people. Life going to become more difficult for people in politics. You could run the island with 20 people but would have to pay them, which is against what the island politics is about. Became President of the Defence Committee-linked to his background. Wilfred Krichefski asked him to join the committee and he was able to help because of his military background. It was not like the Ministry of Defence-more like a Committee of Public Safety. Decided to finish in politics last year as he had done 18 years and didn't want to go stale and stand in the way of other people. He wanted to clear the way for other people to be promoted and hopes people don't stay on too long. He has been able to develop Trinity Manor for people to have seminars as he has moved himself in to one end of the house and through this he meets interesting people through the functions and it keeps the Manor occupied. For relaxation he goes sailing during the summer and rides horses in the winter.

Reference: R/07/B/1

Date: 1982 - 1982

1) Programme about the Liberation of the Channel Islands traced through the archives of the BBC. Winston Churchill's speech on Victory in Europe and the liberation of the island. Douglas Willis, a BBC correspondent, who sailed with the liberating forces into the harbour in HMS Beagle and HMS Bulldog-comments on the arrival into the harbour in Guernsey-arrived in the afternoon but a German officer, Captain Zimmerman arrived who didn't have the power to sign the surrender. Zimmerman was told to withdraw with a copy of the surrender in german and english-he told the British forces that if they kept the ship there that it would be considered a hostile action. HMS Beagle and Bulldog withdrew until they were called to a rendez-vous at midnight so that Major General Heine could sign the surrender. For the first time in 6 years HMS Bulldog is lit up. Heine came out in a ship but did not leave in order to board the HMS Bulldog-the commander of the HMS Bulldog started to get impatient-they turned on the searchlight-the boat arrived after 10 minutes. Commentates on Major General Heine getting on the ship and going to sign the surrender-recording of the surrender. At 6.30 on May 9th Douglas Willis sent another report from HMS Bulldog commentating on the surrender of the german commander in chief and his garrison-waiting for more than 5½ hours-moved towards Guernsey. Recording of British soldier demanding the signing of the surrender. Report at 7.15 on May 9th by Douglas Willis on the surrender of the German forces. Brigadier Snow transferred to HMS Beagle to go to Jersey to receive the surrender of the German garrison-anchored off St Helier Harbour at 10am-Wolf was ordered to the ship but failed to appear immediately. Alexander Coutanche, the bailiff, explains that he was called to meet the German commander in order to accompany him to the boat. When he arrived he found Wulf had his staff officers with him and when he saw that he demanded that his officers came as well-they waited for him. The bailiff sent messages to both the King and Winston Churchill-on May 12th the King issued a royal proclamation about the freeing of the Channel Islands [which is read out]. On the 1 o'clock news on the 16th May it was reported that Herbert Morrison had a great reception on a visit to St Helier-the next day the shops were due to be filled with goods. In Guernsey Herbert Morrison talks about his visit to the Channel Islands. On the 5th June the bailiff spoke on radio-talks about the Jersey residents in the armed forces, his thanks towards the government in the UK, the force under Brigadier Snow and the Channel Islanders who were deported during the second world war and his wish to hurry their return to the island although warns that the islands may have changed from when they left them and he talks about the changes and difficulties that the island experienced during the occupation-the shortages, rationing, worsening conditions and the Red Cross. On the 7th June the royal visit of King George VI and Queen Elizabeth took place. BBC Correspondent Howard Marshall reporting about the King and Queen arriving at the States building and meeting the bailiff, the crowds in the Royal Square to see the royal visit, playing of the national anthem, going in and coming out of the States Building with a fanfare and the car being driven away. On christmas day 1945 Harold Le Druillenec, the only British survivor of Belsen, was chosen to introduce the King's message to the Commonwealth-talks about his experience in the concentration camp, the death of his sister and his survival, his life during the occupation in the Channel Islands and the freedom they now experience. 2) Tom Salmon interviewing Sir Alexander Coutanche. Talks about the office of bailiff and its 3 main functions-presiding in the court, presiding in the States and administrative work. Started as a member of the Bar during the first world war, came back to practice in Jersey in 1920 and soon after that he was elected as a deputy in St Helier. After 3 years he was appointed as the solicitor-general and then attorney-general and then bailiff. He is been a member of the States for 38 years in different capacities. Became the bailiff in 1935. When he became solicitor-general in 1925 he knew there needed to be a reorganisation of the public services-by 1935 the reorganisation had taken place. Saw the possibility of Jersey as a tourist destination-was interested in the building of the Airport and updating of the harbours. The increase in tourism meant a reorganisation in society in order to deal with visitors and hotel workers. Was responsible for the establishment of the first housing scheme. The arrival of the second world war-no one believed that there was going to be an occupation. The island was prepared to receive soldiers from St Malo as a defensive position-the Germans didn't go directly to St Malo and so the soldiers could get back to Britain safely. As a result the British troops were removed and the islands were left undefended-the Jersey people felt horror at this news. When the evacuation was completed he was ordered to take on the responsibilities of both bailiff and governor-a war time government was established to speed up the process. When the British troops left they offered to blow up the public utilities but he pointed out they'd be needed for the residents and so they decided to leave them as they were. On the day the German soldiers landed he was in his house in the morning and he received notice that papers had been dropped ordering the surrender of the island. He had told residents that when he could not guarantee their safety he would lower the flag from Fort Regent and that day he went to Fort Regent and lowered the flag. When at Fort Regent received a message saying the Germans had landed at the Jersey Airport-he went out there and the German officers explained that Jersey was occupied. The German officers were young airborne troops-later he came to the house and read proclamations. They enquired about supplies and when he told them of the stocks of food they didn't think rationing would be necessary as they were on their way to England. After the Battle of Britain he met the officer again who said he felt sorry for them as a paper war was about to begin-a large administration was then brought in. Jersey was lucky because the heads of the administration were gentlemen-he could deal with them. He was always convinced that Britain would win-never thought they'd be here for ever. As a representative of his people-he had to deal with the Germans-he had no means of letting the people know what and why he was doing things-could gain great advantages but people wouldn't know about it. Felt no moral qualms about the things they did because the one thing they wanted to do was make sure the people of the island survived. Felt lonely-his wife often felt worse. There was nothing anyone could do in terms of sabotage-punishments would follow like wirelesses were taken away. When they were taken away he didn't have a secret set but was kept up to date with news. The worst time was in 1942 when the deportations took place-wanted to resign but was persuaded to stay. The conditions after D-Day were terrible-had no gas, electricity, coal or bread or a lot of other things. Had soup rations given out. If you lived in the country you were better off than the town people. He was able to have a fire because of the trees in his garden and had candles so he was fortunate. Everybody lost weight-his wife lost a great deal. The Germans near the end changed the people in the high command-the head was an admiral who he never got on with. He was determined never to surrender-he only surrendered when he was ordered to do so-had to climb down. Addressed the people in the Royal Square-played Winston Churchill's speech over loudspeakers in the Square and celebrations took place but they were not liberated until the next day on his birthday, 9th May 1945. During the war he protested-that was all he could do. After the liberation the problems were getting people back to the island. The constitutional set up of the island were examined-were asked how to reform the States and Royal Court and most of these were approved. The great task was to put in place the political reforms-15 years later they were not quite put in place. Housing was a great problem at that time-people coming back. Proud of the changes since the war. End of Side One. 3) Deportee Bob Samson being interviewed about a society that was formed after a visit to Germany in 1971 with the aim to foster better relationships between Jersey and the German people. Was an internee for 3 years. He was born in Birmingham-he was the only one in his family born outside of the island. He wasn't badly treated. About 2000 people were sent out of the island in six weeks. Was given notice of a day that he was to be deported-he received it a week before he was 18. He was not worried about being sent to Germany but his mother and father were worried. They couldn't stop him being sent away. He looked after himself on the boat-he knew people on the boat from St Ouen. Deportee Maurice Hill being interviewed about being arrested in September 1942 after protesting against the deportation of English born people to Germany. Was one of 13 arrested outside of the Barra Hotel. Was sentenced in a German court for 4 months-it was reduced to a month and he was released after 3 weeks but in February 1943 he was sent to Laufen. He was sent to the local prison in Jersey and Laufen was an old castle. The guards were regular soldiers but they did have an SS search once for a radio. The head of Laufen offered to take it and return it after the SS search which they did. They were supposed to get the German front line soldier but they didn't have much. A couple of people attempted to escape including an ex island footballer Cyril Dale who left with a Guernsey boy, Bill Russell-got as far as Vienna before getting caught. Bill Russell escaped when in Yugoslavia and joined the partisans. Laufen was an all male camp, families went to Biberach originally and then most of them went to Wurzach. They had a football pitch for entertainment on a small island-if they misbehaved it would be closed. There was a concert hall, table tennis table. All the equipment came through the Red Cross-received red cross parcels. They were released on May 4th-were listening to the news and saw American troops and ran out-they didn't know their was an internment camp in the village. Got back to Jersey in September but some got back before that and some after. 4) Personal view of Michael Ginns, a founder of the Channel Islands Occupation Society (Jersey Branch), interviewed by Beth Lloyd. The CIOS was originally founded in Guernsey in 1966 and the Jersey branch was formed in 1971 for the purpose of reporting and collating all aspects of the occupation. Believes some bunkers should be preserved for posterity-one day the bunkers will be looked upon in the same way as the martello towers. The bunkers and constructions were mostly built to fortress standards-will last a long time. The Germans left the bunkers in working order-straight after the occupation people went to the bunkers and took souvenirs-when the British troops arrived they took out the hardware which was dumped in the sea. Each type of the smaller weapons were given to the States of Jersey but everything else was dumped into the sea. As the years went by the bunkers were used as rubbish tips and so in the early 1960s all bunkers on public land were sealed to the public. Some are now open because in 1976 he thought it would be a good idea to open the Noirmont Bunker to the public-wrote to the Public Works Committee and they told him that in the winter they would go and look at it to see its prospects. The committee was later taken over by Senator John Averty-he was keen to open it and allowed the CIOS to look after it. Since then they have given the responsibility for the associated observation tower nearby, the bunker at Corbière, La Carrière, St Brelade and the Gun Emplacement and Underground Bunkers at Les Landes, St Ouen. Have 170 local member in the CIOS of which a dozen are very active. Noirmont is open twice a month for visitors. First Record-A german march. He was 11 years old when the second world war started. He had just started at Victoria College in 1939. Life continued as normal at first but had to carry his gas mask. He enjoyed it as a boy-liked seeing aeroplanes fly overhead. Knew the Germans were coming-after the evacuation there was a calm. His father though of evacuating but never managed to leave. The Germans moved into Victoria College House. Carried on at school-it began at 10 o'clock. In 1941 Victoria College moved to Halkett Place as it was taken over by the Germans as a barracks. In 1941 a German schools inspector visited Victoria College. The first he knew of deportation was when he was visiting town with his mother and she was told by a friend that the deportations were to take place. They were fortunate because it was a Tuesday but they didn't leave until Friday-some had to leave within 24 hours. Had to send animals to the Animal Shelter to be put down. Had to report at Grouville Station where a bus was laid on to take them to St Helier. Had to report to the JMT Garage on the Esplanade-they were on the last bus and couldn't get on the ship. Went home-some went home to empty houses which had been looted by neighbours. When they came back 21 days later people held back and weren't deported-there was a minor deportation in February 1943. Second Record-Vera Lynn with 'The White Cliffs of Dover'. The journey from France to Germany has to be looked at in terms of the time. They were the only prisoners at the time being transported in second class railway carriages as opposed to good carriages. They got in to the train at St Malo-were warned to bring enough food for two days and were given some food by the German soldiers. Arrived at Biberach-they then walked up to the camp-it was a prisoner of war camp. Quickly organised themselves in the camp-Captain Hilton was appointed camp senior. Education was laid on for everyone in the first 6 weeks but during this time they were being sorted out. Single men over 16 went to Laufen, married couples with children went to Wurzach and single couples stayed in Biberach and were joined the Guernsey deportees who were following. The rations from the Germans left you hungry but not starving but without the red cross parcels they would have been in trouble. He preferred Wurzach where he moved to-everything was under one roof. Life for a teenage boy-there were football matches, stage shows. It was difficult for a parent with a young family and older people. His mother was matron of the camp hospital-she was asked by Dr Oliver who went with them. Mrs Hutton was the first matron of the hospital but she died in 1943 and his mother took over. His father was ill and spent time in hospital-he was repatriated in September 1943 because of ill health. He was the only child-was in a room with 20 other men and boys there own age-used to collect bread and milk from the village. Had visits from the Red Cross and they decided they needed more room to exercise. There were organised walks outside of the camp twice a week-the guard would sometimes stop at the pub and they had some money from the government. They were repatriated in March 1945 to join up with his father-Germany was falling apart at this time but they were taken on a Red Cross train through Germany, Denmark into Gothenburg, Sweden. Crossed from Gothenburg to Liverpool. They returned to Jersey on July 28th 1945. Everything was intact in their home. Third Record-The Watermill. Felt pleased to be home but was annoyed that he missed the liberation of the camp and Jersey. He and his friends went to Mr Robinson's private school in Balmoral Terrace and he took the school certificate. He joined the army and went to Bodmin-got as far as Nottingham but didn't go abroad-was a vehicle mechanic who worked on tanks-stayed for 6 years. Fourth Record-The theme from the television series We'll Meet Again. When he left the army he started to work in the post office in Nottinghamshire-worked there from Christmas 1952 until May 1953 when he came back to Jersey and became a postman and has been so ever since. Can have problems with dogs but generally are not too bad. Knows about jersey buses-is fascinated by the transport systems of Jersey-wrote a book about the buses in Jersey. Is involved with the Jersey Camera Club and with David Bishop and his wife they produce tape slide sequences. They visited the Royal Air Force base in Cranwell after the RAF visited Jersey and saw his slide show sequences about the occupation and invited them to show them at the base-enjoyed the trip. Fifth Record-Royal Air Force March Past played the Central Band of the Royal Air Force. Enjoys writing books about the occupation. Archives are still being discovered. Most of his work is taken up by running the CIOS. His wife shares his interest in the occupation. Wants to write a definitive work on the defences of the Channel Islands.

Reference: R/07/B/14

Personal View of Gordon Young, feature writer for the Jersey Evening Post, interviewed by Geraldine des Forges. Was born and bred in Warwickshire in 1933 and got into a choir school at a cathedral. Went on to public school with a bursary-found it difficult because he wasn't allowed to talk to girls. He was thrown out of the school for talking to a girl on the street. Used to get into trouble at school-didn't enjoy academic work but enjoyed sport. There was no freedom in the school so he rebelled. He spent a lot of time singing at school. He played rugby and football and other sports. When he came to Jersey he joined the Jersey Rugby Football Club. He was 6 when the second world war broke out-remembers going through the Birmingham and Coventry blitz. He remembered enjoying the war-going into the woods and finding fragments of bullets-for him it was an adventure whilst his parents were terrified. In those days you were what your parents wanted you to be-they wanted to be a doctor. He started medical school at Birmingham University but gave it up after a year-didn't enjoy studying. He enjoyed the army and had a wonderful time for 5 years. First Record-Ella and Louis with A Foggy Day. Initially when he joined the army he applied to go in to the Gordon Highlanders but he was put in the Black Watch and was sent to Fort George-he liked the army discipline. He was picked out as an officer-went to train as an officer at Eaton Hall. He applied to join the Gurkhas but he was seconded to the King's African Rifles. He loved Africa-all his soldiers were Africans-they were wonderful. Then got sent out to Malaya. It was a tough life but for a bachelor the army was good because you could see the world. The companies he joined had great traditions-he liked the discipline because you knew what you could and couldn't do. He doesn't think national service should be brought back although it is a good experience. He never played the bagpipes as a member of the Black Watch. After he left the army he came to Jersey-he met a girl in England who was coming to Jersey and he followed her over and they got married at Trinity Church. There was very little work in Jersey at the time-he worked in a market garden which got into trouble because of a poor winter. He found another job at the hospital on the Observation Ward where he worked for a couple of years. At that point he heard of a building surveyors job which he got-he loved it and spent 27 years in the business-dealt with the Island Development Committee. Has never regretted not becoming a doctor. Second Record-Kai Winding. Surveying took a lot of training but he learnt by experience. You were never stuck in an office-he surveryed the whole of the Jersey Airport which took about 3 months and St Helier Harbour. Saw the poverty in St Helier-a lot of houses were in awful conditions and had people living inside of them. The buildings in the island have improved but there are still some appalling buildings. Loved the Noel and Porter Building but the British Home Stores building replaced it getting rid of all the beauty-King Street has lost some of its character. Loves buildings with Jersey granite-architects are now doing a good job. Hue Street was a beautiful street and he is glad it is finally being renovated. Loves railways-his father was a transport manager for a steel company. As a child he used to travel a great deal on the railways. Received a clockwork train set as a child and then as an adult bought a model railway and has been building it ever since. Third Record-Jersey Bounce. George Marshman, a cameraman from Channel Television, asked him if he wanted to be on television. He went for an interview with Ward Rutherford and he got the job-for 13 years he did freelance work for Channel Television and worked on every programme they produced. The broadcasts were all live so people saw your mistakes. He then worked for the Jersey Talking Magazine for the blind with Philip Gurdon which he really enjoyed and then Radio Lions with Alastair Layzell. For Radio Lions he did a minimum of five interviews in half an hour and everyone was very good. He thinks it's one of the best things that people can do for the hospital and broadcasters could gain experience from the job. He was keen to try something new and decided to move into journalism full time. His wife worked at the Jersey Evening Post and she told him that the 'Under the Clock' column needed a new author and he went for an interview with Mike Rumfitt and got the job. Loves writing and working at the Jersey Evening Post. He likes to comment on things that people are interested in. He thrives on deadlines and meeting people. He has written a book on rugby for the Jersey Rugby Club-they researched a great deal through the newspaper and it took 10 years to write. It's hard to write a book because it takes such a long time-he needed to take a break from writing but it has now been published. He'd like to write fictional books. He also enjoys painting and reading-he now writes art and book reviews for the newspaper. Fourth Record-Frank Sinatra with New York, New York. Enjoys family life-has had two sons and a daughter who have left the island. His eldest son works at the Jersey General Hospital but is going back to England, his second son works with computers and his daughter is a journalist. He has two grandchildren-Amy and Joshua. Started playing music 2 years ago-took up the trombone and has joined the Jersey Big Band where he plays the bass trombone. Fifth Record-Kid Ory with Oh Didn't he Ramble?.

Reference: R/07/B/19

Date: December 20th 1992 - December 20th 1992

Personal View of the Durrell Wildlife Conservation Trust by Hamish Marett-Crosby. Talks to Quentin Bloxam, Zoo Project Director. There is a staff of 70 including everybody and there are thousands of animals. There are a wide range of skills that have to be catered for but the staff are well trained and take the pressure off you. Martin Syvret, groundsman, looks after 32 acres of grounds. You need a diverse range of skills to work there. An average day involves checking the grounds are clear, that the paths are walkable and then general gardening walk. He is laying a temporary path in front of the bear enclosure to give people a firmer footing. Doesn't enjoy clearing up after the public but enjoys developing the enclosures in the animal areas-growing rainforest plants in a Jersey winter is difficult. He has learnt a great deal since working in the zoo. First Record-Blur with Girls and Boys. Quentin Bloxam talks about the increase in size of the zoo but the philosophy is still the same. The zoo hasn't got commercialised-the family atmosphere has been maintained. Donna Preece, the junior reptile keeper, talks about the radiated tortoise-they come from Madagascar and enjoy the sun. They provide heating for tortoises so that they don't go into hibernation. The morning starts with the maintenance of the exhibition area, clearing up and when the public are let in the conservation projects are undertaken. A lot of time is spent observing the animals. They participate in special projects. She hasn't travelled yet but there have been trips to St Lucia and Madagascar. She has always been interested in animals and started volunteering in zoos from 13 and she has worked her way up the ladder until being offered a job in Jersey. She has been in Jersey for a year. Her favourite animals are the iguanas because they have their own individual characters. They try not to interfere with the animals and mimic nature as much as possible. Second Record-Peter And the Wolf. Mark Brayshaw, in charge of the marmoset rangers. Over the previous year that redeveloped the marmoset areas to increase their space so they are redeveloping another area this year. The marmosets use all of the space that is provided. They are allowed out in to the wood-they are checked 4 or 5 times a day and they are always fed at the same time of the day. When they're first let out they are observed. The breed in the woods-there was a birth of a black lion tamarin today. They try not to get involved in the process of the animals giving birth although a marmoset did have to have a caesarean section a couple of weeks previously. Not all of the marmosets have names but they have there own personalities. You can get attached to the marmosets and it is sad to see them go although it's for the greater good. He hasn't been involved in releasing any animals back into the wild but he hopes to in the future. He studied zoology and always wanted to work in a zoo. His favourite breed of animals that he looks after are the pied and black lion tamarins. Chris Dutton, a vet, has been at the Zoo for just over a year. He qualified in Bristol and worked in a normal veterinary practice but he got very interested in exotic animals at that time and subsequently worked in London Zoo for a year and after that he moved to Jersey. It is difficult changing from helping domestic to exotic animals-he tries to treat similar animals for example treating a snow leopard is comparable to treating a cat. He is still learning all the time-it makes it exciting and rewarding. Recently two gorillas were exported-the day of the movement was tense and he had to do the anaesthetic but it went well. The Jersey General Hospital staff provide help in their holiday times especially with the larger primates. He qualified at Bristol but when he qualified very little time was devoted to exotic animals but it is expanding now and people can specialise earlier. Most of the zoo work is preventative rather than emergencies-they are also involved in post mortems. They are involved in the breeding process-contraception is a major part of their work. Zoo work is a growing area of expertise for vets. Third Record-Rachmaninov. Second Part. Talking to Hilary French, the parrot keeper. She has worked in Jersey for 8½ years and she is from Somerset. Before she came to Jersey she worked at a wildlife rehabilitation centre in the West Country. She decided to come to Jersey Zoo because she had heard about Gerald Durrell. Her favourite part of the job is the breeding and working with a species that gets released back into the wild. The parrots of St Lucia were a great success-she has been out to St Lucia twice for field work. The birds that they breed at the zoo won't need to be released because the programme has been successful in St Lucia. She gets attached to the individual birds. She works with the St Lucian Parrots and the Thick Billed Parrot and her favourites are the St Lucians. They recognise her and new people. Her normal day is spent in the morning cleaning aviaries, servicing aviaries, checking the birds and preparing food. The afternoon is spent with another feeding round or maintenance work. In the summer because she works on the breeding programme she has to stay late in order to feed the chicks. Different chicks eat different food. The zoo look carefully they are feeding the various species the best diet that is nutritionally available. The birds are all endangered in the zoo. The birds can be very shy-it is difficult getting a balance between birds hiding and visitors wanting to see them. Fourth Record-Mozart's Magic Flute. Stella Norcup looking after the lemurs. Diet is important for the various animals-presentation has a lot to do with the diet. Insects are bred to feed insect eaters like the aye-aye and a lot is imported. She has stuffed larvae in a piece of bamboo because aye-ayes in the wild eat insects from wood and they try to replicate that in captivity. The long finger of the aye-aye is about one and a half times the length of its other fingers. She got interested in the work because she did a degree in environmental biology and then she volunteered and got a job at London Zoo and after finishing there cam to Jersey-about 15 months previously. There is a need for zoos for captive conservation and the educational side must be realised as well. Jersey has started a keeper scientist job which means some keepers get to go on field trips. Fruit is washed to get off the pesticides. A lot of fruit and vegetables are picked from the organic farm at the zoo. Lemurs are given fruit, vegetables, nuts, seeds, leaves and wood to eat. Bread and bananas are being fed to the bears. Hard boiled eggs are fed to the macaques. You have to know how much the animals move and eat and can't feed them too much of what they like. The future holds a lot of hard work, little pay but a lot of enjoyment-she hopes to take more field trips and improving animals lives in the zoo and learning more about animals. Fifth Record-Joni Mitchell with Big Yellow Taxi. Alan Gates, a man who used to work at the zoo. He sees a lot of improvements and an increase in size. He was originally on the bird section looking after the parrots. Remembers the cages of the primates. When he was at the zoo 27 years previously he didn't think it would grow so successfully. He is walking around and surprised at the different new complexes that have been built. Quentin Bloxam talking about the building of a new complex for the bears funded by Jersey Tourism. The building sites can look bad in the winter but he hopes that people come back to see the completed version in the summer. The paying visitors are vitally important for the continuation of the zoo. There is a conflict between conservation and putting on a show but ther're not mutually exclusive. You have to stimulate the animals as if they were in the wild and then they act naturally and interest people. The work at the zoo never finishes-they are always thinking of how to push the barriers back. He misses going on extensive field trips but he is very interested in staff development. Sixth Record-Chris Rea with Daytona.

Reference: R/07/B/25

Date: January 11th 1998 - January 18th 1998

Personal View of Jurat Barbara Myles, the first woman jurat in Jersey and doctor, interviewed by Beth Lloyd. Talking about her early childhood. Education-went to nursery school, a foundations school-interrupted by the second world war which led to her going to three different grammar schools. Her father was a doctor of philosophy-worked in insecticides during the war. Her father came over to Jersey after the war to sort out the Colorado beetle problem. Always wanted to be a doctor and was encouraged. First Record-Little Sir Echo-released when the world changed. Almost got sent to America for safety but stayed. Until 1945/46 lived in Maidenhead and then moved to Kent to school. Tried to get in to train as a doctor but was rejected and then worked in a laboratory. Got a place at Trinity College, Dublin as a medical student-ended with 20 women students. Recalls a disruptive patient. Specialists-were some characters and difficult people. Second Record-Ring of Bright Water sung by Val Doonican. After finishing her medical training came to Surrey near where her parents were living to work in anaesthetics-worked in St Peter's Hospital, Cherstey. Met her husband there who was a surgeon. Worked with him in the casualty department. Got married and started working part time locum work. Had her child Caroline in the autumn of 1960 just after they'd moved house. Was in the house 4 or 5 months when a chance for a job in Jersey came up-decided to move across-had no doubts. Worked in a few locum jobs in anaesthetics in the early 1960s. Had more children-second daughter-1962, third daughter-65, son 68. It was fun but hard work-lived at La Rocque. Third Record-Misalliance sung by Flanders and Swan. Offered work-Jersey Family Welfare Association-needed doctors for their clinics-worked with Dr Crill. Now does 2 half days a week. Got involved with the Jersey College for Girls-was asked to teach health education to the students. Got involved with the Jersey College for Girls Parent Teacher Association-was the president. 1970-asked to work on the Juvenile Court-12 lay members sat with a magistrate-was trained in it. Working in the juvenile court was distressing-difficult to try and change a child's background. There are no easy answers to help the children-have to get the children at an early age. Fourth Record-Mozart's Symphony No 40. Decided to stand for jurat because of the lack of women in the Royal Court. When the time came at the end of her time in the Juvenile Court was asked to become a jurat by Jurat Hamilton. Stood for jurat but did not get in the first time. Decided to stand again because of the support she received. Was nervous when she became a jurat. Jurats sit in the Royal Court as the Inferior and Superior Number, work on the licensing bench, overseeing the job of curator for people who can't manage their own affairs. When trying a criminal case-can worry her-have to work out what you believe. Retirement of Lester Bailhache there are now no lawyers as jurats-thinks there is a case to have lawyers as jurats. Jurats get together to discuss law changes. Nothing had to change when she became the first woman jurat-big change for the other jurats. Fifth Record-Menuhin and Grapelli with Jealousy. Hobbies-sailing-likes to have a break from the island-visits the Ecréhous and the South of Brittany. Ambitions-would like to write. Used to sing in a quartet. Sixth Record-Vera Lynn with When I Grow too Old to Dream. End of Side One. Personal View with Betty Brooke. Started writing a column for the Evening Post in 1966. Asked by Jim Scriven, the editor of the time, to write a column to interest people in island politics. Considered standing for election-is not a committee person. Has more power as a writer than as a politician. Was born and raised in Aberdeen and when the second world war came she became a wren where she met her husband who was a navy chaplain. Wrote and edited for ship's magazines. Her husband retired from the royal navy in 1957 and came to Jersey to a church. Liked the States of Jersey because the people could make a difference. Started as a signals wren, trained at Rosyth and then moved to Liverpool-difficult time-worked 72 hours a week-lost many friends. Became an instructor in London and trained people for D Day. Was going to marry somebody else and he was supposed to conduct the ceremony before they realised they loved each other. First Record-Kathleen Ferrier with Blow the Wind Southerly. Became a naval chaplain's wife-stationed at HMS Royal Arthur and then moved to Leigh on Solent and then to Malta for 4 years. Became a snooker player of some repute. Became a sort of surrogate mother to the naval recruits. Had to move on after 4 years-adopted a baby at this time. Posted to Devenport and after two years retired and was invited to move to the Aquila Road Methodist Church-became a methodist lay preacher soon after she was married. Second Record-Mozart's Ave Verum. Impressions of Jersey-had always wanted to come to the Channel Islands-had organised to come to Jersey and as they were organising it had an invitation from Aquila Road Church to come and preach. Simon, her son was 3, and they lived at West Park Avenue in The Manse. Loved living in Jersey especially the Jersey people-warmth and friendship. Preached in the methodist churches-in 1966 Barry, her husband, collapsed in the pulpit and died. Life changed dramatically-was widowed with a 12 year old son-was necessary to look at life again. Continued in the church for 11 months until another minister was appointed. Grieved with the congregation. Third Record-Frankie Lane with Do Not Forsake Me from High Noon. In 1966 her life took a new turn-had to work-worked as a freelance journalist-wrote two columns for the Jersey Evening Post. Wrote articles for the Daily Telegraph and for women's magazines. Was correspondent for the South West region in Jersey before Radio Jersey was set up and interviewed people for Channel Television. Fourth Record-Mozart's Violin Concerto. Never felt she wanted to publish a permanent record of her thoughts-has written two books-a thriller and her autobiography-may publish it at some point. Doesn't travel a lot but has relatives in America and loves France. Fifth Record-Pie Jesu. Doesn't like to plan for the future-lives for the present. Would like the prosperity of Jersey to continue. Sixth Record-Nat King Cole with Ramblin' Rose. End of Side Two.

Reference: R/07/B/5

Personal View of Jeremy Mallinson, Director of the Jersey Zoo, interviewed by Beth Lloyd. Lived in Jersey for almost 35 years-came over as a youngster with his parents. His father started a wine and spirits business-when he first left school he went into the wine and spirit business. When he came to Jersey he had started boarding school at King's, Canterbury-enjoyed his school life and holiday life. His father and brother was a cricketer-both members of the Jersey Island Cricket Club-his father was the organising match secretary for 12 years-took part in matches. Remembers Ronnie Postill writing an article complimenting him. Also played hockey and took part with boating with the cadet club at St Aubin's-was voted as cadet secretary. His father bought a 1906 cadillac car and he restored it-used to take part in the Battle of Flowers and St Aubin's Fete-it eventually went to America. Was always interested in animals as a child-used to take part in horse riding and took people's dogs for a walk. Wanted to go to Africa to see the animals. When he left school he went into his father's wine business but he was a bad salesman. Met a person on a cricket tour in Jersey who told him he was going to join the Rhodesia and Nyasaland Staff Corps-decided that he would join in order to see Africa. First Record-Music Maestro Please by Bud Flanagan and Chesney Allen. The Rhodesia and Nyasaland Staff Corps were a small body of trained men that were the regular army of the federation-provided the officers for the Army. His whole objective was to see as many animals as possible. Never can get Africa out of your system. Always had an enthusiasm about animals-was taught by friends in Lusaka. Saw Operation Noah [an operation to save as many animals as possible from an area that was being dammed] in action. Was not a military person-wanted to leave after 3 years although he had enjoyed himself. Was interested in joining the game department but wanted to come back to Jersey and he did in 1958. Second Record-As Time Goes By from Casablanca. Had not heard of Gerald Durrell until his brother gave him 'My Family and Other Animals' in Christmas 1958-was fascinated by the book. Heard Gerald Durrell was going to open a zoo and visited the zoo the second day it opened and wrote to the Superintendent of the Zoo, Kenneth Smith. He was interviewed and given a temporary job during the summer of 1959. He first met Gerald Durrell when he came back from Argentina with his collection on the 9th June 1959. Has gone the whole way through the ranks of the zoo-worked in the bird section for his first 18 months and then the mammals. Important to know what everybody does in a business-good to start at the bottom. The early days of the zoo were exciting and a struggle-had financial difficulty but Gerald Durrell wanted to stay in Jersey. Formed the Trust and gave all of his holdings to it and the proceeds of two books that he had yet to write. He was the founder and director but never got paid for that. Always been interested in primates all the way up to gorillas-his first love at the zoo was Npongo. When a film about gorillas was being shown he took Npongo and held her outside West's Cinema collecting for a mate for her. Third Record-Zambeze. Personal View of Ron Hickman, inventor of the workmate, interviewed by Beth Lloyd. Born in South Africa and he was inventing from an early age. Remembers his first invention was a car that had a bridge over them so cars could travel on the same road. His family thought he was a bit made until he had his first burglar alarm that worked well at the age of 16. Was an outdoor person and he enjoyed music-playing the piano and violin. At 12 he became the local church organist. If he didn't become an inventor wanted to become an engineer. When he was 18 he qualified as an associate of the Trinity College of Music in London. Never got as far with the violin. First Record-Mozart's Piano Sonata in A Minor. When he left school he decided to go into the magistrate's office-moved around in different towns for 6 years-enjoyed the experience. Decided to come to England in order to pursue his desires to be come a car designer. When he first arrived in London he got a job in a music store and studied the organ part time. Talked his way into a job with Ford as a model maker-was rejected several times but eventually gave him a chance. Nine months later was promoted on to the drawing boards as a designer and he stayed with Ford for 3 years. Met Colin Chapman who had created the Lotus Car Company and was hired to help. Soon found himself as chief designer and stayed for 9 years. Got on well with Colin Chapman-respected you if you knew what you were doing. Owns a Lotus now. Bought a 1931 V16 Cadillac the previous year-drives around the Jersey roads in it. Second Record-Windmills Of Your Mind by Noel Harrison. Decided to leave Lotus Cars because of the responsibilities-decided to make a break from car design and tried to invent things. The first two inventions-one was a failure and the other was the workmate. His wife Helen backed him in his decision to leave his job. An inventor's working day is varied-have to have an idea, try it out-it gets a life of itself. Thought up the workmate because he was assembling a wardrobe and cut through a chair. There is a need to patent the invention or it becomes public property. The workmate was rejected by 7 British manufacturers and 3 American manufacturers. Black and Decker turned him down but came back to him 4 years later after he had put it into production himself. Had to put his money into it in order to put it into production. It took 6 years to start making money for him. Third Record-An Die Musik sung by Elizabeth Schwarzkopf. Decided to come to Jersey after he made licensing arrangements with Black and Decker-a nice environment to continue inventing in. Found it easy settling in Jersey-tried to run a Jersey company Techron but it lost money and now he runs it on his own. Is working on two major new inventions but are kept secret. He designed his own house in St Brelade-bought an old house with a good site and then designed his house with his wife and the architect. Have many inventions in the house-all for practical use. Created a fault reporting panel and an error took place without being reported-he discovered it was the fault reporting panel that had gone wrong. His most useful invention is a panel that tells him what doors and windows have been left open. Fourth Record-Morning in Cornwall by James Last. End of Side One. Personal View of Colonel Bill Hall, the Island Commissioner of Scouts who is about to retire, interviewed by Beth Lloyd. He was a scout as a boy-started in 1930. Had an older brother but he wasn't a scout. Joined at 13 and was very enthusiastic. He became involved with the troop after he left school-he was allowed to run the meetings-progressively wanted to start a troop. He persuaded his headmaster to let him run a troop in opposition to the school's troop run by the old boys. Has kept in touch with old boys from the troop. The troop was set up in 1937-he had joined the Territorial Army because he could tell war was coming. In 1938 the scouts were evacuated and when he went off to war the boys carried on running the scout group. Never thought of a career other than scouting-went to a stockbroker's office after finishing school. First Record-Colonel Bogie's March. Was an officer of the Royal Army Service Corps of the Army. Was a captain at the start of the war at the age of 22-was responsible for the supply of ammunition of the defences of the Thames. Later went into the Western Desert-was responsible for carrying ammunition in the second line. The Western Desert was a good place to fight the war-wide open spaces. Met General Charles de Gaulle in Damascus. Later had a similar job in Western Europe-went to Malta for a while and later to France after D-Day. Second Record-The Slave's Chorus from Nabucco. After the war had ended-came out in the Spring of 1946-was given an office in Phillips and Drew and worked there for 25 years. Rejoined the Scouts and became a Commissioner in Camberwell and rejoined the Territorial Army. Got married in 1953. His role as a stockbroker was to advice people what to do with their money. Was involved in magistrate's court and the youth court in London-became a JP. In a court if a punishment is imprisonment they can challenge the decision in a higher court. Realised that deprived children often suffered from a lack of parental control. Third Record-Music recorded at a Greek jamboree. Has been on two jamborees-a jamboree in Greece was exciting-took on the task of a World Jamboree in Marathon, Greece-helped organise the camp, had good fun, Prince Constantine opened the Jamboree. Went to Corfu after the Jamboree. Personal View of Dr Anthony Essex-Cater, Jersey's Medical Officer of Health, interviewed by Beth Lloyd. The role of Medical Officer of Health is looking at the community from a preventative point of view-establish the patterns and causes of diseases. The doctors don't come under his jurisdiction-their help is important to him in his work and vice versa. Medical Officers of Health are long established appointments-go back a 100 years-dropped the name in England in the 1970s reforms. Jersey decided to stick to the old title. Didn't always want to study medicine-his father was a writer and journalist but he also had an interest in medicine and decided to go into that area of work. He was at school during the war and had to make the decision whether to continue. Originally thought of going on a short service commission to Oxford and was interviewed by Wing Commander Cecil Wright who suggested to learn medicine. First Record-A Symphonic Study by Elgar. Was in London at the end of the war studying to be a doctor-was interested in sport, played a lot of rugby. Was a general course for training so didn't have to decide a speciality until later but was interested in paediatrics. Before he qualified he got married-his wife Jane was a student nurse at Charing Cross Hospital and because she married him she was forced to leave the hospital as it was not allowed. He went into the Royal Air Force Medical Branch for 18 months and was stationed in Wiltshire. When he left he got a job in a hospital in Bath. He joined up as part of his national service. His role at Bath was as a house officer and then he moved to London to a paediatric hospital. When he was in London he did a diploma in Child Health. Decided to move from child health to public health because of the lack of prospects in paediatrics. Got a public health job in Croydon. Needed to get further qualification-gained a scholarship for the London School of Hygiene at the University of London. Was there for a year and also studied occupational health. After that year had to refuse an opportunity to go to Harvard University. Second Record-Prelude No 1 by Villa Lobos. Left Croydon and went to Swansea where he was Deputy Medical Officer of Health-very pleasant place to live. His 3 children enjoyed living in Swansea-stayed for 5 years. He then moved to Birmingham in order to progress-began to lecture at the Children's Hospital in Birmingham about the health of children. Interest in anthropology-has been a fellow of the Royal Anthropological Institute of Great Britain for nearly 40 years. Has an interest in races-now medical anthropology is now recognised as an important discipline. Then moved to Manchester to become Deputy Medical Officer of Health-enjoyed the theatre of music of Manchester-the problems were similar to those in Birmingham. He was awarded a Council of Europe Medical Fellowship-gave him an opportunity to travel in Scandinavia to study their health system-looked at port health and child health. After Manchester went to Monmouthshire. He was only one of three Medical Officer of Health in a 90 year period. In 1974 took part in the reorganisation of the National Health Service-he was appointed a Member of the Steering Committee for Wales to work out the details of the reorganisation. Felt there was a failure by the government to listen to the steering committee. Fourth Record-Weber's Clarinet Quintet in B Flat Major

Reference: R/07/B/9

Date: 1983 - 1985

Microfiche of the 1901 Census for Guernsey, Public Record Office reference 3+ RG13/5320. St Peter Port (part of) District 10. Boundary of Enumeration District from bottom of Rouge Rue upon the right, Amherst Road, Guelles Road, Upper Vrangue, Vrangue Road [La Vrangue?], through Bouet all on the right & back to Rouge Rue. Contents of Enumeration District - all within the above named boundary, including Norman Terrace, Guelles Road, Upper Vrangue, Vrangue Road, Brickfield Cottages, Orangeville, Arculon Farm & Mont Arrivé. St Peter Port, District 11. Boundary of Enumeration District from the Brick House Long Store going through Bouet Gas Works on the right including Elim Chapel as far as Hougue à la Perre taking in the First Tower along the Banks back to the Brick House all on the right within these limits. Contents of Enumeration District - all within the above boundary including Long Store, Gas Lane, Bouet, Grande Bouet, First Tower Lane, Hougue à la Perre Banks, First Tower, Elim Chapel and Gas Works. St Peter Port, District 12. Boundary of Enumeration District - Red Lion Corner, Grand Bouet on the right to Vrangue Lane, Vrangue Lane right & left, Vrangue on the right to Vrangue Manor & from Vrangue Manor to end of road both right & left, Amherst, Fosse Landry [La Fosse André?], Couture & Ramée Road [La Ramée?] to Parish Boundaries on the right - Coutanchez Road [La Route des Coutanchez?] from Parish Boundaries to Vrangue Manor right & left. Islands of Herm, Jethou & Berhou Tower, Dictrict 13. St Peter Port. Sub-district Hospital and Asylum.

Reference: S/07/B/13

Date: 1901 - 1901

Microfiche of the 1901 Census for Alderney, Public Record Office reference 1+ RG13/5324. St Annes - District 1 - Boundary of Enumeration District - North Butes Hill, South by the centre of High Street, East by the Val and Rochers and on the West by the centre of Victoria Street. Contents of Enumeration District - Butes, Roquettes, East side of Victoria Street, north side of High Street, Val Road, Oliver Street, Braye Road as far as Mr Hyatts House, the whole of New Town and the Roilers? St Annes - District 2 - Boundary of Enumeration District - Bounded on the East by the centre of Victoria Street, on the West by St Martin's, on the North by Church Yard and Valley, and on the South by the centre of High Street. Contents of Enumeration District - Beginning at Wesleyan Ministers House, West side of Victoria Street, New Street, Church Street, The Square, North Side of High Street as far as Mr Gallichan's House and West Side of Victoria Street finishing at Mr Martyn's House, corner of New Street. St Annes - District 3 - Boundary of Enumeration District - Bounded on the North by the Huret, South and West by the Blaye[La Petite Blaye & La Grande Blaye?] and East by Preche Philippe? Contents of Enumeration District - Begining at Mr Bailly's House on the Huret, both sides of Marais Little Street [La Marette?] as far as Chardines House, Columbot [La Colin-Bott?], Venelle et Gaudions [Venelle des Gaudions?], Trigalle Street and Trigalle [La Trigale?], Marre Jean Bott?, Coin des Ecailles, Saint Martins and Mouriaux. St Annes - District 4 - Boundary of Enumeration District - Bounded on the East and South by the Blaye [La Petite Blaye and La Grande Blaye?], on the West by the Marais [La Marette?], and on the North by the centre of High Street. Contents of Enumeration District - Beginning at the top of High Street, Courtil Lubin, Preche Philippe, Bourgage, Venelle Sauchet, Venelle du Puit, Venelle des Simons as far as Mr Mesny's House, Huret and South side of High Street as far as Scotch Church. St Annes - District 5 - Boundary of Enumeration District - Bounded on the North and West by the sea, on the South, Butes Hill and York Hill and on the East by Braye Beach. Contents of Enumeration District - Rose Farm, Tolvat ? Watermill [Watermill Farm?], Tourgis, Clonque, Picaterre [Route de Picaterre?], Platte Saline, Crabby, York Hill, Braye Street [Rue de Braye?], Braye Road [Route de Braye?] as far as New Town Road. St Annes - Part of District 6 - Boundary of Enumeration District - Bounded on the North by the Roiters? and the Rochers, on the South by the Blaye and Fort Essex [Essex Castle?]. on the East by the sea and on the West by the town of St Anne. Contents of Enumeration District - Begining at the top of Longy Road [Rue de Longis?], Rochers [Les Rochers?], Valongis?, St Michels, Essex House, Simon's Place, White Gates, Nunnery, Longy lanes [Rue de Longis?], Mannez, Chateau a l'Etoc Farm and Essex Hospital.

Reference: S/07/B/26

Date: 1901 - 1901

Microfiche of the 1901 Census for Guernsey, Public Record Office reference 4- RG13/5318. St Mary de Caste [Castel Parish] - Part of District 3 - Boundary of Enumeration District, north bounded by No4, East by No1, South by St Andrews and St Saviour's, West by the sea comprising from the cross road de la Houguette to Vazon Martello Tower along the sea side to join the boundary of the parish of St Saviour's near the Hamel, then following said boundary of St Saviour's Parish by the Wind Mill Du Mont Saint, the Wind Mill Les Hougues to the Hechet by the Grantez and Fauxquets road to the Valinguet, then back by the Friquet Road and Videclins, road to Petites Vallee, to the Groignet estate and the King's Mills, to the cross road de la Houguette with every house within and bordering said boundaries. Castel Parish or St Mary de Caste - District 4 - Boundary of Enumeration District, north bounded by No2, East by No1, South by No3, West by the sea. Comprising from the cross road de la Houguette to the Vazon Martello Tower, along the seaside from the cross road of Cobo, by the Pens, to the cross road de la Planque, then take the road des Plataines and Mont de Val [Mont d'Aval?] by the Delisles, to the cross road de la Houguette with every house within and bordering said boundaries. St Mary de Caste [Castel Parish] - Sub district - The Connery Hospital

Reference: S/07/B/7

Date: 1901 - 1901

View across St Helier from Westmount showing the Hospital, Newgate Street Prison, Parade gardens and All Saints Church looking towards Fort Regent with the Strangers' and Jewish Cemeteries in the foreground

Reference: SJPA/000394

Date: 1869 - 1872

Jersey Evening Post Article : 'What's Your Street's Story' - Gloucester Street

Reference: US/1412

Date: September 14th 2016

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