Photograph showing the progress of works being carried out as part of the project to redevelop and redesignate the square at the Weighbridge as Liberation Square to mark the 50th anniversary of the Liberation of Jersey. Taken from the Pomme d'Or Hotel. St Helier Marina is pictured in the background of the photograph.

Reference: P/97/A/94

Date: February 2nd 1995 - February 2nd 1995

Hotel de France Summer Holiday Planner narrated by John Nettles and produced by Creative Channel Limited. Includes views of the surroundings of the Hotel de France, the conference facilities and the bedrooms.

Reference: Q/03/1

Date: 1997 - 1997

VHS Tape: 1) Filmed by Roderick Averty in 9.5mm black and white-film back to front. Scenes at La Rigondaine with Micky, Margaret, Scally, John Kempster, Bob, Arthur. Breton workers planting tomatoes in field. Picking tomatoes. French workers dancing traditional dances in farmyard. Loading lorries with tomato barrels. Baby in garden and family planting herbaceous border. 2) Filmed by Roderick Averty in 9.5mm black and white. 1933: family scenes showing Doreen, horse-rider over jumps in field. 1935: scenes in St Malo with Owen, Doreen, Tange, Michel Coquenpot, Woggy. Scenes in Jersey including JMT Double-Decker bus on road and a bull nosed Morris car. Men walking on promenade at Havre des Pas. Ship arrives in St Helier Harbour. Small boat full of people. Car draws up and couple get out. Dog on beach at south-east corner. Family gardening at house in England 'Sunneycrest'. Scenes in Trafalgar Square, London. Doreen and Owen arriving at Casa Marina Hotel, St Clement, Jersey. Scenes on beach at Havre des Pas. Boy doffs school cap and plays with dog. 3) Filmed by Roderick Averty in 9.5mm black and white. Man reading Jehovah’s Witness magazine The Watchtower. Boy wearing Victoria College Preparatory uniform. 1947: Yvonne, Brian [aged 7], Grandma, Phyllis and Ian at Belcroute with Austin 10 car (J1389). Scenes at Jersey Airport including de Havilland Rapide G-AGSK. Mowing lawn with ATCO mower at family house, 'Waverley'. Family eating Jersey wonders, boys on bikes and in pedal car. Funfair on the Albert Pier, St Helier Harbour. Fishermen in rowing boat, boys leaving home for school, swings at funfair – possibly Gorey. Children’s party at 'Waverley'. Girls on swing, boy with model boat in the sea. Scenes at the airport showing Rapide G-AGWC, BEA Dakota G-AGYX. Family on airport balcony. BEA Dakota G-AGHJ lands. Shot of Jersey Airlines Rapide G-AKNF.

Reference: Q/05/A/143

VHS tape: 1) Filmed by Basil Le Brun in 8mm colour. Film shows Boats. Basil Le Brun was a keen yachtsman and often sailed between Jersey and France. After D-Day in 1944, he had escaped from Jersey with Roger Rouille in a small wooden boat and reached the coast of Normandy. Scenes include: Merton Hotel, Jersey Swimming Club event, Men at sea in yachts Yacht race, St Aubin's Bay. This film is located in the Audio Visual Area of the Jersey Archive.

Reference: Q/05/A/93

Date: 1950 - 1959

Jersey Talking Magazine No 5-November 1976. Introduction by Gordon Young talking about the weather. Gardening feature-looking at the seed catalogues-beans, carrots, onions and flowers. Nature-Frances Le Sueur-interested in flora and fauna-talks about the drought-affect on the birds in St Ouen's Pond, rain after the summer-result the pond has filled up again. Movement of birds from Northern Europe southwards for the winter-rarity of an appearance of a honey buzzard excavating a wasp's nest in Fern Valley [?St Mary], asking for advice of what to mention in this regular column. Cooking feature-Margaret Jenkins giving tips on cooking with eggs. Buying a house-housing problem-Ralph Robbins-island's Housing Officer-main function of housing-allocation of housing stock and provide additional homes, waiting list for houses, programme for house building, wealthy immigrants living in Jersey-value to the island and numbers coming in, people coming in-how classified as essentially employed. Tips for blind people in picking up small metal items, using a nail gun, Braille handbook on the transfer to metric measurements. End of Part One. June Gurdon in Sark talks about the size and history of the island including the arrival of the Seigneur of St Ouen, Helier de Carteret, with his family and tenants in 1565 and agreeing to QE I to keep Sark continuously inhabited by 40 men to defend the island, within 7 years a thriving community had been established, Sark became the property of the Le Pellé family and later Sybil Hathaway-La Dame who became an iconic figure. Concerned with education and health and during the occupation stayed in the island. In 1965 she was awarded the Order of Dame of the British Empire. Talks of changes in the island. Michael Beaumont, current Seigneur of Sark, talks about his life, the length of time he had been Seigneur, the finance, legal and government systems of the island and his seigneural rights. Helen Gibson, teacher at the secondary school in Sark talks about the young of the island, teaching in Sark, the education system and the curriculum. Talks to some young people concerning their lives, future plans in the island, job prospects and the building industry in the island. Talks about the countryside and nature of the island including their experience of catching a chancre crab, describing the beauty of the island, looking out from Sark over the sea and at the other Channel Islands and France. Cottages that the Gurdon's stayed in were run by Miss Allen and Miss Webb-Miss Allen and Miss Webb talks about coming to the island, island life, differences between running hotel in Sark and England and Sark's marine life.

Reference: R/05/B/2

Date: November 12th 1976 - November 12th 1976

Jersey Talking Magazine-July Edition. Introduction by Gordon Young. Interview with Richard Baker, a broadcaster, about his books, music, his upbringing, the Last Night of the Proms, the popularisation of classical music and popular music. Guernsey Feature-Linda Le Vasseur looking around the Tropical Vinery in St Saviour, Guernsey with the owner and talking about how it started, where the plants came from, walks on the site, describing the greenhouses and some of their contents including pineapples, coffee plants, tea plants, sugar, cotton, peppermint and bananas. Cooking Feature-Margaret Jenkins giving recipes for cooking with cabbage. End of Side One. Travel Feature-Gordon Young trip to France on Condor 5, describing the bridge of the ship, talking to the captain, Captain Robertson, about sailing the boat, describing the jobs of the people on the bridge, approaching St Malo, coming into the harbour, landing, arriving in St Malo, passport control, sitting in a pub in St Malo with three friends, playing pinball, going to a restaurant for lunch, going to Rennes and describing it, a description of the hotel where they are staying, looking around the cathedral in Rennes and describing the building and service taking place with singing from the choir, describing the journey back to St Malo, looking around Saint Sourier?, looking at the Rance estuary, walking on the beach, describing the scenery, returning to Jersey on the Condor 3, describing the journey back.

Reference: R/05/B/33

Date: June 30th 1979 - June 30th 1979

Jersey Talking Magazine-July Edition. Introduction by Gordon Young. Tom Dickinson, manager of the Opera House, talking to Beth Lloyd about whether mixing amateur and professional actors in productions will work, problems with Equity, Dick Ray and the running of productions in Jersey. Cooking feature-Margaret Jenkins talking about summer meals. Guernsey Feature-Linda Le Vasseur talking to Mr Langlois about The Gideons in Guernsey about how they began offering bibles to hotels, the forming of the movement, the work of the movement, the creation of the Guernsey branch and the aims of the Gideons. Horoscope feature-Diane Postlethwaite talking about the forecast for cancer for the next year. Letter on tape from Gladys Rogers talking about winning the quiz last month, losing her sight and hearing and the difficulty of listening to tapes, getting a hearing aid. Gordon Young setting this months quiz. Description of La Hougue Bie by Gordon Young. End of Side One. Gordon Young at La Hougue Bie with Danielle Skinner describing the agricultural museum and the different agricultural equipment on display, the archaeological part of the museum, where the pieces were excavated from, the chapels, looking out from the top of the mound, the crypt of the chapel, the prehistoric tomb, work carried out on the tomb, investigation into the burial ground, exhibits that were found in the tomb and the train on display from the last train in Jersey. End of Side Two.

Reference: R/05/B/44

Date: June 30th 1980 - June 30th 1980

Jersey Talking Magazine-November Edition. Introduction by Gordon Young. Gordon Young talking to Captain Ray Huzan from St Dunstan's about what he does at St Dunstan's, recording tapes for the blind, a machine called the Kurzweil Reading Machine a computer which talks and reads the written word to aid the blind, how it works, listening to the Kurzweil working, describing the machine and its processes, its uses and demonstrating how it works by typing a piece of paper and then allowing the machine to read it. Horoscope feature-Diane Postlethwaite giving a forecast for scorpio for the year. Norah Bryan talking to Andrew Christiansen who has just completed working from Land's End to John O'Groats for charity talking about his attempt to walk across the Sahara Desert, the things he encountered on his journey, what gave him the idea in the first place, his expectations, encountering illness, walking through a sand storm, carrying 40 lbs on his back, medication, how he dealt with illness, the distance he walked, walking or charity, walking from Land's End to John O'Groats, his preparations, where he stayed during the walk, how long he walked for during the day, admiring the scenery, walking against the traffic, amusing and memorable experiences on his walk, his next plans to ride a tandem across Europe to South Africa. Results of the quiz. End of Side One. Feature on the history of St Martin's School with children singing and Miss de Gruchy, the headmistress of the school. Descriptions of the creation of the school, the building of the school, the laying of the foundation stone in 1899 which had a box behind it with items from 1899 which was moved in 1980 and opened, children acting out the laying of the original foundation stone, a poetical description of the new building work and the plans to put a new box behind the foundation stone with items from 1980. June Gurdon talking to Don Coombes of the Coombe's Trust a charity for underprivileged children about the children he brings to Jersey, where the children come from, applications for 24 places to come to Jersey, the adult helpers he has, the accommodation for the boys in a scout hut, food, the usual routine for the day, malnourished children, entertaining the children, the Hotel L'Horizon providing lunch, the experience of the boys going to the Ritz Hotel in St Helier, people donating gifts to the charity, the difficulty for the boys going back to reality, the story of a boy called Johnny Campbell who visited Jersey and came back later in life and lived here, the experience of the holiday, discipline, the background of the holidays-how they came about and the support they receive. End of Side Two.

Reference: R/05/B/48

Date: October 31st 1980 - October 31st 1980

Jersey Talking Magazine-April Edition. Introduction by Gordon Young. Philip Gurdon interviewing Ken Ball, an amateur radio enthusiast, about the equipment for his amateur radio station, the regulations involved in broadcasting amateur radio, the Radio Society of Great Britain, the examinations needed to be sat to operate an amateur radio, a blind operator, communicating with people throughout the world on the radio, listening to an amateur broadcaster from London and Malta and talking to people across the world. Joan Stevens taking a tour around St Ouen about it being the biggest parish in the island but one of the smallest population, named after a 7th century bishop of Rouen with a relic that was placed in the church, St Ouen's Church-the date it was built, St Ouen's Bay which is actually in three parishes, La Rocco Tower built between 1796 and 1800-a Jersey round tower-last to be built, was falling apart-during the occupation used as target practice, tower repaired. Vinchelez de Haut and Vinchelez de Bas Manor's-architectural details of the manors, Abraham Le Sueur was killed at Vinchelez de Bas by a falling rock, St Ouen's Manor-biggest and oldest manor in island, parts that date back to 1135 to the de Carteret families, 1490-fortified and crenellated by then seigneur of St Ouen in fear of attack, over years altered a great deal, 1670-restoration, later fell into disrepair-de Carteret family important in England, passed to the Malet de Carterets-Colonel Malet de Carteret-1860s-started large scale restorations until 1880-appearance there is today, Le Pinnacle-important site-centre of pilgrimage for over 2000 years, worry of erosion and vandalism, lovely area of flora, windmills and dolmens in parish-Moulin de la Mare did exist where Val de la Mar exists-a seigneurial mill-used by the public. L'Etacq-name from an old norse name, had a martello tower on it-L'Etacquerel-removed by germans during the occupation, lead found up at L'Etacq, vraic collected from L'Etacq which was used as compost, caves, Les Mielles-being kept as conservation centre, needs to be kept natural so it is not destroyed. Excerpt from a Midsummer Night's Dream, the first time Shakespeare had been performed at the Jersey Opera House for a number of years, featuring Sonia Hamon and Rosemary and Hilary Lissenden. Horoscope Feature-Diane Postlethwaite giving a forecast for the year for aries. End of Side One. Beth Lloyd describing the view from her house and the joys of spring with Gordon Young reading the poem 'I wander lonely as a cloud'. Vicki Stuckey talking to Lloyd Cornish of Elle, who provides wedding dresses asking what brides are wearing nowadays, what they should look for in a wedding dress, the colour and length of the wedding dress, the fashions, the expense of the dress, the style of veil and headdress, the design of Lady Diana's wedding dress. Beth Lloyd talking to Jeffrey Archer about his latest book 'Cain and Abel', the research that went into the book, his university days and running, keeping fit, becoming the youngest member of the Greater London Council, becoming a member of parliament, losing a million pounds with a bad investment, writing his first book based on his experiences, deciding to continue writing, his desire to get back in to politics and his decision to put it on hold, his next book, a sequel to 'Cain and Abel', his plans for the foreseeable future, an invitation to meet the Emperor of Japan and his pride in being published in Braille. Di Weber went to the Mont Felard Hotel asking Steve, the chef, how he copes with cooking for so many people, what he enjoys cooking the most, his hours at the hotel and Renata a waitress about working as a waitress, learning how to serve people, why she likes the job and where she comes from and Jill, the receptionist talking about her duties, difficult customers and living in the hotel. Gordon Young tells a humorous story. End of Side Two.

Reference: R/05/B/53

Date: March 31st 1981 - March 31st 1981

Jersey Talking Magazine-July Edition. Introduction by Gordon Young. Margaret Jenkins reading a creative essay that she had written for a recent O Level course. Nature Feature-Frances Le Sueur talking about rare warblers with examples of bird song. Horoscope Feature-Diane Postlethwaite giving a forecast for the year for cancer. June Gurdon with In Touch tips for the blind talking about the Royal National Institute for the Blind, typewriters for the partially sighted, milk saver pans and clocks. Beth Lloyd talking to Max Robertson about commentating at Wimbledon tennis tournament, whether he used to play tennis, having knowledge of the game, commentating, how he keeps talking throughout the game, commentating on other occasions, a funny story that happened to him and the future of radio. Elizabeth Beresford, Max Robertson's wife, talking about the Wombles, how she thought up the idea, what her family think of it, whether she is still writing Wombles books, the success of the books, her roll in the television series, writing the scripts for the television programmes, the message of The Wombles to keep tidy. End of Side One. Gordon Young visiting the Durrell Wildlife Preservation Trust to see the opening of the Gorilla Breeding Centre describing the new exhibit, the visitors including Gerald Durrell, Gerald Durrell giving an opening speech for the exhibit, talking about Jambo, Lieutenant Governor Sir Peter Whiteley making a speech to open the exhibit, Gordon Young commentating on the opening of the complex. Quentin Bloxham, member of the zoo staff, talking about the importance of the breeding centre, the number of families that will use the area, the habitat provided by the centre. Nick Lindsay talking about the gorillas and the breeding centre. Gordon Young describing the inside and outside of the breeding centre and the gorillas behaviour. Anton Mosimann, head chef at the Dorchester Hotel at the age of 29, being interviewed by Beth Lloyd talking about when he decided to become a chef, other chefs he worked with, the skills that he had to learn, learning to cook as a child and giving dinner parties, how a head chef in the Dorchester Hotel checks the standard of all of the food with 80 staff working under him, looking after his staff, creating new recipes and implementing a surprise menu at the Dorchester Hotel. End of Side Two.

Reference: R/05/B/56

Date: June 30th 1981 - June 30th 1981

Jersey Talking Magazine-June Edition. Introduction by Gordon Young. Beth Lloyd talking to Maurice Gautier, a beekeeper, about why he doesn't want Queen's Valley flooded, the bees in the valley, the trees and plants that Jersey bees like, the taste of Jersey honey, the different seasons and their effects on the bees, about 80 beekeepers with up to 480 colonies of bees on the island and what to do if bees swarm. Pat Dubras reads the Joyce Grenfell poem 'Time'. Beth Lloyd interviewing Paul Birt regarding a textbook to aid the teaching of Jersey Norman French about how he came to be involved in the language, the textbook helping people to learn jèrriais, the importance of keeping the language, the teaching of jèrriais in schools, the interest in jèrriais outside of the island, working with Dr Frank Le Maistre and the length of time it will take to compile the book. Phil Gurdon talking to Don Lusher about being lead trombonist with the Ted Heath Band, working with Frank Sinatra, his three bands that he runs-the Don Lusher Big Band, the Don Lusher Quartet and the Don Lusher Trombone Ensemble together with the revival of the Ted Heath Band, named as musician of the year by the BBC Jazz Society in 1976, how you differentiate between a great and good musician, holding music clinics for brass musicians, coming to Jersey in June to do a clinic with a brass band and playing a concert, being a faculty member in Belmont College, Nashville for a trombone clinic with some of the greatest trombone players in the world and working as a session trombone musician with Don Lusher playing his own piece of music. End of Side One. Frank Korowoski, a blind man, talking about his holiday in East Germany including entering the country for the first time, the officials checking passports, reaching Berlin, seeing the Berlin Wall, getting off the train, meeting the German Red Cross who were to guide him whilst in the country, his impressions of the country, meeting an East German blind lady who he had corresponded with in Braille, staying in a hotel for western visitors, a description of his room, the cheapness of the meal, the difficulties experienced in East Germany, his journey to Poland by train, people being helpful, meeting his friends and going around Poznan in Poland, discovering the difficulty in getting food in Poland, Roman Catholicism in Poland and a church service he went to, going out for sunday lunch because of the food shortage, the places that he visited in Poland, being amazed at the spectacle of Warsaw, a school for the blind in Poland, visiting Krakow, visiting the black madonna at Czestochowa and seeing the pilgrims going to the shrine, visiting other places in Poland and then to Czechoslovakia, lack of freedom of movement in the country, more prosperity than Poland but the people wanted to live in other countries, discrimination against people believing in religion, his journey back to Britain and his hopes for the country of his father, Poland. Gordon Young with contributions from the readers and answering their questions. End of Side Two.

Reference: R/05/B/64

Date: May 31st 1982 - May 31st 1982

Jersey Talking Magazine-Christmas Edition. Introduction by Gordon Young with christmas carols throughout by St John's Church Choir and Les Conteurs Singers. Poem by Gladys Rogers. Jennifer Grundy at the Met Office being interviewed, talking about what happens over christmas, the number of people on duty for shifts and keeping busy with different duties including weather forecasts. Mr Wileman, the general manager of the L'Horizon Hotel, talking about the hotel over christmas, who stays over Christmas, people going swimming in the sea, Christmas trees in the hotel, guests getting Christmas presents for christmas, going to de Gruchy after it is closed and choosing the presents and staff wrap the presents at a christmas party. David Killip at La Collette Power Station who is in charge on Christmas day describing what he has to do on christmas day, when it will be at is busiest, the number of staff in on christmas day and if there were any power cuts in the past on Christmas day. BBC Radio Jersey producer Peter Gore talking about what will be happening on the station on Christmas day-a Christmas morning programme, messages from the bailiff, the dean and the lieutenant governor on the show, getting in at 6.30, how he is spending the rest of the day and his favourite Christmas record. Quentin Bloxham, curator of reptiles at Jersey Zoo talking about what they do on Christmas day, amusing experiences on Christmas day-pythons go into the public area and his favourite Christmas carol. David Guy-Station Officer with the States of Jersey Ambulance Service-talking about working on christmas day, the staff working at the station on Christmas day, the duties carried out-checking the equipment and vehicles, having breakfast and waiting for call outs. Poem by Colin Plummer read by Pat Dubras. Beth Lloyd interviewing Joan Le Miere, at the telephone exchange, talking about the change in the telephone system, previous years when people had to book times to have a telephone call, if people are more patient on Christmas day, the number of people working on Christmas day and looking after the Christmas day. Gordon Young talking about cooking Christmas dinner. End of Side One. General Sir Peter Whiteley, lieutenant governor, with a Christmas message for the readers of the Jersey Talking Magazine. Harbour Master, Captain Bullen talking about the harbour on Christmas day, the number of people on duty including Jersey Radio, the people at the pierhead, the marina staff, the staff at Fort Regent and the police. The Islander magazine-an article written by Sonia Hillsdon called 'Christmas Past' about christmas in Jersey in previous years. Living in Jersey in past-second half of the 16th Century-islanders were not encouraged to celebrate Christmas because of Ccalvinism-worked as a normal day. 1726 a dead whale was washed up at La Pulec, St Ouen-77 foot long-declared as his by the of Seigneur of Vinchelez de Bas-two jaw bones of the whale was attached to his manor house. 1790-theatre-magic lantern show-shown by Mr Belon from France. 1799-over 6000 Russian soldiers-found all over the island-allies against the French. 19th Century-Christmas came into own-1834-a whole week of Christmas and merry making-Christmas dinner followed by cards. Used to ring the Christmas bells from midday Christmas night to midnight on Christmas day-in St Mary it got out of hand-in the 1850s Reverend Le Couteur Balleine tried to put a stop to it. In 1858 he removed the bell clapper, bell rope and the ladder to the bells and changed the locks on the church doors. A hand bell was circulated-while the door was being kicked in they got replacements for the rope clappers and managed to get in. There was no support from the parish assembly for the rector. Trevor Barette, dairy farmer of St Mary, talking about his Christmas day-milking, feeding, cleaning the cows, the cows going outside, a few hours off and then the feeding and milking the cows again and amusing experiences at Christmas. Tug Wilson, a fireman, talking about the hours he will be working on Christmas day, the duties on Christmas day and emergencies on past Christmases. Alan, a taxi driver, talking about what he does on Christmas day. Chris, an air traffic controller, talking about what he may be doing on Christmas day, being on call and trying to close the Jersey Airport. Sister Moulin, a nurse at the Jersey Maternity Hospital, talking about what she does on Christmas day, mothers, former staff and doctors bring their Christmas babies back, whether people like having Christmas babies, a special crib for a Christmas baby and a favourite Christmas carol. Michel Le Troqueur, a policeman, talking about being on duty over christmas, how he celebrates Christmas, crime over Christmas and a relaxed attitude over Christmas. End of Side Two.

Reference: R/05/B/68

Date: December 25th 1982 - December 25th 1982

Jersey Talking Magazine-Mid-summer 1984. Introduction by Gordon Young. Beth Lloyd visiting Le Brun's the Bakery, which was founded 180 years ago in Hansford Lane but it wasn't until 1938 that the present managing director's Brian Le Marquand's family took it over when his father bought in. Brian Le Marquand talking about why his father bought the bakery, how much it cost, in 1938 the business was 5% of the island trade but by 1950 it had been built up to 15% of the trade when it was moved to Brighton Road, joining the company in 1958 and buying 50 % of the shareholding in 1960, how the company has changed, it now has 85% of island trade, taking over three other island bakeries, problems in putting sell by dates on the bread, trying to bake bread for when people need to use it, retail trade only one side of the business, they also serve the hotel, guest house and cafe trade and now cater for private parties. David Parmiter, the Production Director, talks about the bread bakery, the process of making bread, the people who work in the bakery, how to tell when the bread is ready, slicing and packing the bread, a new machine detecting metal in the bread, the decorating room-used for making and decorating cakes, meat preparation room-high standard of hygiene, meat delivered fresh daily, how they make and roll their pastries, the roll bakery which involved the same process as bread, 60,000-70,000 rolls made a day, half baked products been brought in and are selling well, wholemeal bread has risen tremendously. Frank Todd, Commercial Manager, in the dispatch area talking about delivering goods, the amount of deliveries a day, how long a delivery takes, the part weather plays in orders, the risk of waste at the end of the day, getting the weather forecast so they can guess how much food is going to be ordered, not freezing orders and dealing with an order-in radio contact with the drivers. Tricia Jones, a tele-sales girl, talks about ringing customers every day to ask them their orders for the next day. Nick Le Couteur, the Sales Director, explaining what happens to the orders after phone calls by the tele-sales girl in order to prepare the food, how many products Le Brun's manufacture-over 500 products, many thousands of products produced each day, modern trends, the movement towards wholemeal breads, cakes still popular, the introduction of croissants, different outlets and the use of computers within the company. Brian Le Marquand talking about future plans for the company. John Boucheré talking about coach trips-in 1946-47 there were a dozen coach companies of various sizes, he trained as a motor engineer-in the early 1950s he decided to drive a coach around the island, he was painfully shy, driving relatively easy but it was difficult to answer questions in front of everybody. He talks about the different people who he encountered on his tours, the way people used to sing after lunch, dealing with drunken passengers, carrying people on poignant journeys-parents of a soldier who died and helping a blind passenger. Stan Birch, a jazz pianist, playing a piece with Wendy Shields singing. End of Side One. Philip Gurdon taking a tour of the German Underground Hospital with Joe Mière. Joe Mière talking about the construction of the tunnels, the different workers, when the work began in 1941, Organisation Todt and the fact that it was planned as an artillery barracks but in 1943 its use was changed to be a bunker. Commenting on the exhibits, talking about ghosts in the tunnels, changes they are making to the tunnels, rock falls in the tunnels, a rest room, the dispensary-was never used, a ward with a description, the equipment in the rooms of the tunnels, an escape shaft, what happened to the Hospital at the end of the war-the company buying the tunnel and becoming more successful, a closed tunnel that has now been opened. Museum-letters by Walter Gallichan-taken to Alderney, survivors of Alderney having a reunion. Describing the exhibits in the museum, newscuttings from the newspaper, the Stranger's Cemetery, reunions with the Russians and a bouquet of flowers put up by Maud Otter. Beth Lloyd telling a story about her cat. End of Side Two.

Reference: R/05/B/76

Date: May 31st 1984 - May 31st 1984

Personal View of Senator Pierre Horsfall, the President of Finance and Economics, interviewed by Geraldine des Forges. His earliest memories of the island are of the occupation-remembers the red cross parcels and the liberation. Lived at Rue du Galet in Millbrook-remembers lots of aeroplanes flying over and his brother running outside and coming back and shouting, "They're ours". Didn't feel the hardship of the occupation-remembers going to the bakery to pick up his meals but never felt deprived. Had some contact with german soldiers-one used to give him presents and he considered him his friend. Went to Firmandale School at Beaumont and then he went to St Mark's Primary School which was a very good school. Moved to Victoria College Preparatory School on a scholarship-enjoyed the sciences but never worked particularly hard at them. There was more discipline in schools when he went to school-the standards have slipped since. He then went to Victoria College-enjoyed his time there-had many teachers who had been in the army so it was a good standard of discipline and teaching. First Record-Clair de Lune by Debussy. In the 1950s his mother managed the Grève de Lecq Hotel so they were allowed to do what ever they wanted at Grève de Lecq. Remembers how good the weather used to be-befriended Frank Carré, a fisherman at Grève de Lecq, who he helped going fishing. Used to swim off Grève de Lecq for an afternoon. Went in to a cave off Grève de Lecq and went through to discover a new bay-used to show guests from the hotel to the bay for money. Used to go to school on the bus and he also had a bicycle. He used to be very free-much more so than the modern world. Avoided sport as much as possible-ended up taking up shooting. From an early age he made model aeroplanes-he always wanted to be an aeronautical engineer-he decided he wanted to work for the Bristol Aeroplane Company and he achieved that aim. He never aimed to go into politics. Second Record-12th Street Rag by Peewee Hunt. Moved to England for his first job with the Bristol Aeroplane Company as a student. Did a sandwich course where he studied for six months and worked for six months in the factory-did this for 3 years and then a further 3 years after that. Worked hard on his course and job-enjoyed the experience. He often put himself forward to take part in jobs. Worked in lots of different aircraft. The design office was working on supersonic transport-worked with a french company to produce concorde. He knew french and so he made sure his managers knew this-he was taken on board by the company directors to the meeting between the British and French-he was involved for six years. He had several roles-he was at first taken because he spoke French and knew what was going on, he then went into a liaison department with the French factory-did a lot of travelling. Third Record-Music from Coppelia. In the early days there was a honeymoon with the French-when the work started there started to be differences of opinion. There were also a lot of enjoyable nights out. The language was a problem because there wasn't simultaneous translation. Feels proud when seeing concorde now. Came back to Jersey because the family business would have been sold otherwise-looked after the hotel. Tourism standards were lower in those days-standards were starting to be raised. A lot more elderly people came to the island at that time. There was always plenty of business around-people didn't realise that tourism was going to decrease. Decided to stand for the States-he was on the Jersey College for Girls PTA and from that someone suggested that he stand for politics. He was deputy of St Clement in 1975. Fourth Record-Piece from Carmina Burana. He spent six years as president of the Agriculture and Fisheries Committee and enjoyed it a great deal. He became president of the Island Development Committee, joined the Policy Advisory Committee and after Agriculture he became President of the Finance and Economics Committee. He set up an office to work at home and withdrew from the hotel business. Being President of the Finance and Economics Committee means a lot of duties-finds it challenging and tiring. He feels the greatest sense of achievement over an amendment to increase the size of the waterfront and feels good that he helps in the politics of the island. He thinks Jersey is secure but it must be careful and address the current problems. Has a happy family life-his wife is a keen horse woman-spends a lot of time watching horses. They enjoy travelling and visit London to see his daughter. Feels if he gets elected that he would stay in the States for one more term of six years. Fifth Record-Piece from Nabucco by Verdi.

Reference: R/07/B/18

Date: September 20th 1992 - September 20th 1992

Microfiche of the 1901 Census for Guernsey, Public Record Office reference 3- RG13/5317. Forest - Part of District 2 - Boundary of Enumeration District, the 2nd enumeration District is bounded on the West by the 1st enumeration district, on the North by the Parish of St Andrews, on the East by the parish of St Martin's and on the South by the sea. Contents of Enumeration District; beginning at Mr Thomas De Mouilpieds house, Bourg, going North east by the Rue des Auberts including houses on the north side of the road, Les Roulias, retrace steps and turn on the left by the Rue des Agneaux to Mr Bisson's house, then by Le Russeau (Russel) to Chemin Le Roi to Mr Cooper's house, then turn to the right into the Military Road and on to Les Hannieres (adjoining parish of St Martin's) including houses on both sides of the road, then to the right to the Nicolles, to Petit Bot, then to the right up the main road to the Glayeuls Barras, Messuriers, Chêne, Bourg-de-Bas, Glayeuls Variouf, Fontenelles, Connellans' Cabin, Mr John Allez's house, Villets, Mr James Le Hurays, by the Rue des Fénêtres and du Gal to Les Houards, Rectory Church, Bourg to the starting point. Torteval - District 1- Boundary of Enumeration District, from Imperial Hotel along New Road to Les Galliennes to end at Imperial Hotel. Contents of Enumeration District; every House included in above boundary. Torteval - District 2 - Boundary of Enumeration District, from Torteval Church along New Road returning to Torteval Church. Contents of Enumeration District; every house included in the above boundary.

Reference: S/07/B/3

Date: 1901 - 1901

Old Pontac Hotel St Clement M. White proprietor, with gable end advertising " Croquet,lawn golf,lawn tennis,quoits, lawn skittles,badminton and other games. Refreshments at the pavilion. Tea anc coffee at the observatory in the grounds. (Teas, dinners, luncheons, suppers) Bathing tents and garden tents ready. Picnics & pleasure parties large or small. Entertained & catered for by agreement at moderate terms". Various beers and whiskey advertised on bar windows.

Reference: SJPA/000325

Date: 1910 - 00/00/1910

Imperial Hotel (now known as Hotel de France) St Helier, with shrubbery on sloping area of garden

Reference: SJPA/000399

Date: 1870 - 1873

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