Jane Le Gros, Chef at the Postal Headquarters.

Reference: P/03/B99/16

Date: October 10th 2000 - October 10th 2000

Winnie Buxton, in the kitchen at Postal Headquarters.

Reference: P/03/B99/17

Date: October 10th 2000 - October 10th 2000

Gwen Glover in the kitchen at Postal Headquarters.

Reference: P/03/B99/18

Date: October 10th 2000 - October 10th 2000

Jane Le Gros, Chef at the Postal Headquarters.

Reference: P/03/B99/19

Date: October 10th 2000 - October 10th 2000

States of Jersey Fire Service. Cook Ged McBride in the kitchen of the Fire Service Headquarters in Rouge Bouillon.

Reference: p/03/D15/15

Date: December 16th 2000

Photographic slide of the monastery kitchen at Abbaye de Hambye, France.

Reference: P/09/A/933

Date: 1970 - 1990

Jersey Talking Magazine-August Edition. Introduction by Gordon Young. Linda Le Vasseur-in Guernsey interviewing Fanny Craddock about her roots, her success and how much it was due to radio and television, how they got on to television, learning to cook, creating dishes, awkward and embarrassing moments when demonstrating cooking, how long and why they moved to Guernsey, whether there are any problems working in Guernsey, any unfulfilled dreams that she has and working on a children's cooking programme. Margaret Jenkins giving some In Touch tips for the blind on how to cope in the kitchen. Gordon Young taking a tour around a railway carriage at the Jersey Motor Museum with Michael Wilcock. They talk about what is special about the carriage, how a bungalow was built around the carriage, looking inside the carriage and describing it, using the train to post and transport letters and describing the working of the train. End of Side One. Jersey Zoo-a song about Jambo the gorilla. To celebrate the zoos twentieth anniversary they take a tour with Philip Coffey, the zoo education officer, looking at the statue of a dodo and explaining its significance, describing the animals and their habits including the macaws, the tapirs, the wallabies, the marmosets and tamarins, talking about feeding the animals, education in the zoo and talking to schools, talking about the pink pigeons, flamingos, swans, a white eared pheasant, the gorillas and a new enclosure being built for the gorillas. Joan Stevens talking about Trinity including the house where the Jersey Zoo is built, describing the parish of Trinity, Trinity Church and when the States went there when George Carteret got sworn in as governor, the church being hit by lightning and the conductor being put up, a mural dedicated to Sir Edward de Carteret, who was a gentleman of the black rod, inside the church, the bell in Trinity Church, a central pillar being moved from the church, the church holding the earliest piece of church silver in the island, Trinity Manor, its residents, being extended by Amice Lempriere and rebuilt by Athelstan Riley, Ville a L'Eveque, Trinity men leading the corn riots in 1769 and Howard David Farm, the States experimental farm. Gordon Young finishing by telling a joke.

Reference: R/05/B/34

Date: July 31st 1979 - July 31st 1979

Jersey Talking Magazine-December Edition. Introduction by Gordon Young. Scrapbook of recordings between 1910-1935, the Jubilee Years of King John and Queen Mary including singing of famous songs and speeches of famous events including the opening and events of World War I, the pioneering of air travel and the British Empire Exhibition at Wembley Stadium. June Gurdon interviewing Phil Jakeman, who hung the bells in St John, talking about when he became a bell hanger, what skills you need, the problems that he faced, the foundries that take part in bell hanging and the competition between the two different foundries. Chris and David-tour of the Jersey Museum, looking at stones with inscriptions, the Jersey kitchen, the bedroom at the museum with a detailed description of the surroundings. Linda Le Vasseur talking to David Eaton about Jubilee Radio, the radio station in the hospital in Guernsey, about how it got started, when it went on the air, the programmes that take place, contact with the patients, the response from the general public, the involvement of youth in the station, the turn over of staff, his reaction to the progress of the radio station and the future for Jubilee Radio. End of Side One. Interview by Gordon Young with Desmond Morris about his autobiography, his family, his career, his work with animals in London Zoo and his work with pandas and chimpanzees. Phil Gurdon in St John to watch the making of black butter. Talks to Phil Romeril about the history of black butter, the ingredients of black butter, the process of making black butter, the taste of black butter and its storage, some men speaking in Jersey french and music playing at the celebrations. Joan Stevens talking about Mont Orgueil Castle including its position, its origins, it's first mentioned in 1212, built between 1180-1210, acquired present appearance in the 1600s, 1300s-1400s serious attacks on island, where the name came from, vulnerability of the castle with the creation of cannon and the building of Elizabeth Castle, intervention of Walter Raleigh that it was kept, Civil War-in use by the King's forces, used as the governor's house and prison, William Prynne held in the castle, Philippe d'Auvergne working his spy networks from the castle, States of Jersey was handed the castle in 1926 by the British Government. Gordon Young finishes with a humorous story.

Reference: R/05/B/37

Date: November 30th 1979 - November 30th 1979

Jersey Talking Magazine-March 1984. Introduction by Gordon Young. Mary Phillips talking about her mother in law making marmalade, where her mother in law lives, her personality, her ninetieth birthday, the reorganisation of her kitchen and her mother in laws reaction to this reorganisation. Ben Fox, Crime Prevention Officer, talking about his job, the prevention of crime, gives advice about crime prevention, must not be complacent, should call the police as soon as a crime is detected, organises exhibitions in order to promote crime prevention, talks about locks for doors, meeting people in the community, supplies new material for the Schools Liaison Officers and the Crime Prevention Panel. Joan Stevens talking about sailors in Jersey who became admirals in the royal navy. The Le Hardy family had 3 admirals, Sir Charles Junior and Senior had no part in Jersey affairs. Sir Thomas Le Hardy-1666-1732 was born in St Martin-north of church. In 1700 he sold all of his Jersey property. In 1693 he commanded a ship called HMS Swallow in Guernsey to protect CI shipping. In 1702 the Spanish fleet came back with vast treasure hoards from South America. The Mediterranean was being blockaded. Beauvoir, a Channel Islander, was chaplain on board Le Hardy's ship. He spoke French and so the people on shore told him where the Spanish treasure ship could be found. Le Hardy chased it and found it and took the vast fleet which contained 13 million pieces of eight amongst other things. The silver was melted down to Britannia silver which was very valuable. Le Hardy took the news to Queen Anne who gave him a gift of 1000 guineas and knighted him. Poor account of character, he was not pleasant according to a contemporary account. Portrait of Le Hardy described. Memorial to him in Westminster Abbey-describes his Jersey ancestors-great deal of information about the Le Hardy family. Admiral Philip Durell-1707-1767 was born in St Helier and was son of the Solicitor General. He entered the navy at the age of 13. By 1745 he was at the taking of Cape Breton from the French and took part in the storming of Quebec by General Wolfe. He helped get supplies to Quebec. Philip Durell-died at sea by eating dolphin. There is a portrait of him by Reynolds. Admiral Philip de Carteret-1733-1796-son of the Seigneur of Trinity, born in Trinity and has been 'ranked amongst the greatest geographical discoverers of his time'. In 1764 he went on a expedition to Pacific. During the expedition they annexed the Falkland Islands which almost caused war with Spain who had claimed them. It was an unsuccessful mission as the admiral in charge came back as soon as he could. In 1766 he was sent out in an unsuitable vessel, the HMS Swallow, and was away for over 2 years and circumnavigated the globe. He named many islands including the Pitcairn Island. De Carteret named one group of islands after the Channel Islands and although these have not survived many of the names have. During the time that they were away they lived in poor conditions. Scurvy was rampant among the crew. De Carteret moved back to Trinity in 1769 and lived in Trinity Manor for 10 years until he was called back into service as a naval reserve for the American War of Independence. He died in Southampton at the age of 63. End of Side One. Beth Lloyd visiting a tea factory in Jersey at the Overseas Trading Corporation. Talking to John King, Managing Director of OTC, about how the firm was started in 1876 by a tea and silk merchant, Thomas Charles Staples Cook from Reading-started as a tea trader, his difficulty in beginning the factory-first factory at Cheapside before moving to First Tower, the size of the firm, how OTC grew, links with other companies, what makes OTC different from the other parts of the organisation-Lyons Tetley. Tour of the factory with production director Chris Sheehan talking about the different processes at the factory, where the tea gets exported to, where the tea comes from, quality control, the selection of flavours and explaining about the flavour of a tea that he tastes. A tea taster from France, Mr Barrer [?], commenting on the flavour of teas. Marketing director, Gerald Harrison, talking about the marketing side of the business, the different markets in different countries, the role of regional export managers, the different tastes in different countries, the increase in popularity of flavoured teas, what the role of marketing director is like, visiting different countries and funny experiences. John King talking about OTC during the occupation-the tea stores of Jersey, supplied tea to island and packing food, looked after control of wood and the future plans of the OTC. Beverley Coleman, the rector of St Saviour, talking about the reason for pancakes being made for Shrove Tuesday, what happened to the eggs that were not eaten during lent, regional variations on this theme, the origin of Ash Wednesday and what people should do for Lent. Gordon Young ends with a humorous story. End of Side Two.

Reference: R/05/B/73

Date: February 29th 1984 - February 29th 1984

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