Peter Williams sitting near a gun turret at Noirmont.

Reference: p/03/40/05

Date: January 9th 2000

Kenneth Mallett standing at Grosnez, with a view of Noirmont behind him.

Reference: p/03/436/21

Date: July 26th 2000 - July 26th 2000

Photographic slide of an aerial view of Belcroute Bay and Noirmont Point

Reference: P/09/A/2249

Date: 1970 - 1990

Photographic slide of the 1795 Duke of Richmond map of Jersey showing the Noirmont area

Reference: P/09/A/2364

Date: 1970 - 1990

Photographic slide of Icho Tower with Noirmont headland in the distance from the entrance to the passage into La Rocque Harbour - referenced Battle of Jersey

Reference: P/09/A/2806

Date: October 31st 1980 - October 31st 1980

Photographic slide of Icho Tower with Noirmont headland in the distance, west of the anchorage pool on the passage into La Rocque Harbour - referenced Battle of Jersey

Reference: P/09/A/2814

Date: October 31st 1980 - October 31st 1980

Photographic slide of an aerial photograph of Noirmont taken on 08/08/1944

Reference: P/09/A/3495

Date: 1970 - 1990

Photographic slide of an aerial view of Noirmont headland.

Reference: P/09/A/821

Date: June 10th 1977 - June 10th 1977

VHS tape: Film shot by A G 'Freddy' Averty in 16mm colour during the 1960's. Films relates to the Harbour Office. This documentary about Jersey Harbour Office was filmed by Freddy Averty [a well-known enthusiast at the harbour]. Scenes include: RNLI fast rescue boat, rescue boats off Elizabeth Castle with lifeboats of different nationalities. Euphrosyne Kendal (St Peter Port lifeboat) entering the harbour. Lifeboats tied up. Amateur boating. At sea with the States tug. Alouette helicopter of Protection Civile landing on Minquiers. Helping small French yacht. Cruise liner off Archirondel. Yachting at St Catherine. Royal barge entering St Helier Harbour with HRRH Princess Anne 1972. HMS Brittania off Corbière. States tug 'Duke of Normandy' at sea. Testing fire-fighting hoses. Corbière Lighthouse dressed overall. Religious service with Dean Very Revd Tom Goss. People crossing causeway. Boats in old harbour, St Helier. Very high tide covering land tie. St Patrick enters harbour. Caesarea arrives November 1960 (The Caesarea and Sarnia were built for the Southern Region of British Railways for Channel Island route) Caesarea off Corbière in heavy seas. Condor 1 hydrofoil in St Helier (entering service) Condor 1 at sea on hydrofoils. SS Duchess of Normandy (known as Sooty) Private boat at La Haule broken loose from mooring. Two schooners at St Helier Harbour and setting sail. Yachts at sea off Noirmont and Elizabeth Castle (races). Speedboats in Grouville Bay in races. This film is located in the Audio Visual Area of the Jersey Archive.

Reference: Q/05/A/101

Date: 1960 - 1972

VHS Tape: 1) 16mm colour film. Southern Railways ship Brittany entering St Helier Harbour, late 1940s. 1949: Havre des Pas Bathing Pool. 1950: historical pageant with characters in medieval costumes at St Ouen’s Manor. 1950: parachute descent over St Aubin’s Bay. 1950: Corbière in a storm. 1951: scenes at the Battle of Flowers, [the first after the Occupation]. 1953: decorations throughout St Helier to mark the coronation of Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth II. 1954: Battle of Flowers on Victoria Avenue. 1954: horse racing at Les Landes, scenes of the tote and spectators. 1954: sea at St Ouen’s Bay. 1956: gathering vraic at St Ouen’s Bay, including scenes of the vraic stacks. 1956: Battle of Flowers. July 1957, visit of the Queen and the Duke of Edinburgh; shows Royal Yacht Britannia arriving off Noirmont, scenes on the Albert Pier and the Queen being driven through streets of St Helier. 1957: good scenes at the sub-aqua club at Rozel and shots at the airport. 1958: scenes at the BSJA [British Show Jumping Association] gymkhana.

Reference: Q/05/A/141

Date: 1949 - 1958

VHS tape of four separate films: 1) Filmed by members of the Jersey Ambulance Service. in 16mm. Film shows the visit of Edwina, Countess Mountbatten to lay foundation stone to new St John Ambulance Headquarters, Midvale Road on 15th July 1950. Arriving at the Airport , meeting St John's Ambulance cadets and officers. Ambulances. Lieutenant Governor General Sir Edward Grassett. Speeches. Trowel used for the ceremony. Garden party. West Park Pavilion. Royal Square. parade. Walking through Beresford Street. Parade at Springfield. Countess meets St John Personnel. First Aid demonstration. 0h 12m 48s 2) Filmed by the Royal Jersey Agricultural and Horticultural Society in 16mm colour. Film shows the Spring Cattle show at Springfield of 1951. Excellent footage of classes being judged. Various prize cows. Bill Perchard with his winning group. 0h 13m 47s 3) Filmed in 16mm B&W. Film shows dancing on the terrace of West Park Pavilion. Gorey Castle and harbour. gaff rigged yacht. old woman darning socks. Rozel harbour. Portelet and Janvrin's tomb. Cutting granite and dismantling German guns, Noirmont. Ship enters St Helier Harbour. Havre des Pas pool. Grosnez Castle. Yacht at sea near Elizabeth Castle. Yacht in harbour. 0h 05m 29s 4) Filmed in 16mm B&W. Film showing Algerian prisoners of war posing for the camera at Grosnez (film mainly out of focus). Family on rooftops of St Helier. Ship leaving St Helier. Boys camping. Battle of Flowers in 1939. Springfield. (Note: this film is poor quality) 0h 11m 08s. This film is located in the Audio Visual Area of the Jersey Archive.

Reference: Q/05/A/70

Date: 1939 - 1951

Jersey Talking Magazine-August Edition. Introduction by Gordon Young. Mark Higgins, a member of St Paul's Cathedral Choir School, who is singing at the royal wedding of Prince Charles and Princess Diana, sings 'I Know that My Redeemer' and talking about how he got into the school, the levels he had to achieve in order to be accepted, how long he spends singing, the amount of boys in the school, the different time he has his holidays, preparing for the royal wedding, the songs they are going to sing at the royal wedding, whether he feels nervous about performing in front of so many people, the other occasions they sing for at the Cathedral, singing outside the Cathedral, making recordings, meeting the Queen Mother and other members of the royal family and sings another song. Norah talking to Jeremy Scriven, a Jersey boy who left the island to climb Mount Kilimanjaro in Tanzania talking about how he decided to climb the mountain, his lack of regrets of going, getting to Tanzania and the difficulty in doing so because the border of Kenya and Tanzania was closed, being arrested for crossing the border into Tanzania without realising and being put into prison for four days, the conditions in the prison, being tried in the court, being allowed free and then expelled into Kenya, managed to go through Uganda in order to get to Tanzania, buying tickets to Kilimanjaro on the black market, encountering violence in Kampala, journeying and climbing Mount Kilimanjaro, spending 4 days climbing, a member of the party suffering altitude sickness, the experience of climbing the mountain, the view from the top of the mountain and how he felt climbing down again. Katina Hervau, a french girl in the island to learn the language, talking about her first impressions of Jersey roads and the island. Horoscope Feature-Diane Postlethwaite talking about the forecast for the year for leo. June Gurdon giving some In Touch tips for the blind about cooking vegetables without water. End of Side One. Gordon Young taking a trip in a hot air balloon describing the balloon, getting into the balloon, taking off, describing the views of Jersey below including town, St Helier Harbour, Elizabeth Castle, Victoria Avenue, St Aubin's Bay, Noirmont and to the Jersey Airport to land. Gordon Young at Government House for a ball for the Royal National Lifeboat Institution describing the gardens of Government House, the food for the occasion, the scene in the marquees, the scene inside Government House. Talking to Sir Peter Whiteley about piloting in the hot air balloon and the ball for the RNLI and to Lady Whiteley about the weather and the amount of people attending the ball. Listening to the band in the marquee. End of Side Two.

Reference: R/05/B/57

Date: July 31st 1981 - July 31st 1981

Jersey Talking Magazine-January Edition. Introduction by Gordon Young. Interview with Robert Lacey who wrote a biography regarding Queen Elizabeth II talking to Beth Lloyd about the success of the book, where he got his information from, letting the queen know he was writing the book, going into Buckingham Palace for the first time, meeting the Queen, his impressions of her, the popularity of Lady Diana, his next book about the kingdom of Saudi Arabia, the story of Saudi Arabia, how he was able to talk to the Saudi Arabian royal family, his impressions of the family, the cultural differences between the Arab and western countries and the conflict between the Arabs and the Jews. Dixie Landick and Stephen Lucas singing 'Gloom is Just Around the Corner'. Cooking Feature-Margaret Jenkins giving recipes for what to cook after christmas. End of Side One. Gordon Young visiting Noirmont Command Bunker with John Bouchere of the Channel Islands Occupation Society talking about the bunker, it being closed from 1945, describing the bunkers defences, specifications and different rooms within the bunker, the restoration of the bunker, the different objects found within the bunker, looking out from Noirmont, describing a 15cm gun that was dumped at the end of the war and retrieved by the Channel Islands Occupation Society from the bottom of a cliff at Les Landes and put at Noirmont, defences that used to exist at Noirmont, the number of guns that was controlled by the Noirmont Command Bunker. End of Side Two.

Reference: R/05/B/61

Date: December 31st 1981 - December 31st 1981

1) Programme about the Liberation of the Channel Islands traced through the archives of the BBC. Winston Churchill's speech on Victory in Europe and the liberation of the island. Douglas Willis, a BBC correspondent, who sailed with the liberating forces into the harbour in HMS Beagle and HMS Bulldog-comments on the arrival into the harbour in Guernsey-arrived in the afternoon but a German officer, Captain Zimmerman arrived who didn't have the power to sign the surrender. Zimmerman was told to withdraw with a copy of the surrender in german and english-he told the British forces that if they kept the ship there that it would be considered a hostile action. HMS Beagle and Bulldog withdrew until they were called to a rendez-vous at midnight so that Major General Heine could sign the surrender. For the first time in 6 years HMS Bulldog is lit up. Heine came out in a ship but did not leave in order to board the HMS Bulldog-the commander of the HMS Bulldog started to get impatient-they turned on the searchlight-the boat arrived after 10 minutes. Commentates on Major General Heine getting on the ship and going to sign the surrender-recording of the surrender. At 6.30 on May 9th Douglas Willis sent another report from HMS Bulldog commentating on the surrender of the german commander in chief and his garrison-waiting for more than 5½ hours-moved towards Guernsey. Recording of British soldier demanding the signing of the surrender. Report at 7.15 on May 9th by Douglas Willis on the surrender of the German forces. Brigadier Snow transferred to HMS Beagle to go to Jersey to receive the surrender of the German garrison-anchored off St Helier Harbour at 10am-Wolf was ordered to the ship but failed to appear immediately. Alexander Coutanche, the bailiff, explains that he was called to meet the German commander in order to accompany him to the boat. When he arrived he found Wulf had his staff officers with him and when he saw that he demanded that his officers came as well-they waited for him. The bailiff sent messages to both the King and Winston Churchill-on May 12th the King issued a royal proclamation about the freeing of the Channel Islands [which is read out]. On the 1 o'clock news on the 16th May it was reported that Herbert Morrison had a great reception on a visit to St Helier-the next day the shops were due to be filled with goods. In Guernsey Herbert Morrison talks about his visit to the Channel Islands. On the 5th June the bailiff spoke on radio-talks about the Jersey residents in the armed forces, his thanks towards the government in the UK, the force under Brigadier Snow and the Channel Islanders who were deported during the second world war and his wish to hurry their return to the island although warns that the islands may have changed from when they left them and he talks about the changes and difficulties that the island experienced during the occupation-the shortages, rationing, worsening conditions and the Red Cross. On the 7th June the royal visit of King George VI and Queen Elizabeth took place. BBC Correspondent Howard Marshall reporting about the King and Queen arriving at the States building and meeting the bailiff, the crowds in the Royal Square to see the royal visit, playing of the national anthem, going in and coming out of the States Building with a fanfare and the car being driven away. On christmas day 1945 Harold Le Druillenec, the only British survivor of Belsen, was chosen to introduce the King's message to the Commonwealth-talks about his experience in the concentration camp, the death of his sister and his survival, his life during the occupation in the Channel Islands and the freedom they now experience. 2) Tom Salmon interviewing Sir Alexander Coutanche. Talks about the office of bailiff and its 3 main functions-presiding in the court, presiding in the States and administrative work. Started as a member of the Bar during the first world war, came back to practice in Jersey in 1920 and soon after that he was elected as a deputy in St Helier. After 3 years he was appointed as the solicitor-general and then attorney-general and then bailiff. He is been a member of the States for 38 years in different capacities. Became the bailiff in 1935. When he became solicitor-general in 1925 he knew there needed to be a reorganisation of the public services-by 1935 the reorganisation had taken place. Saw the possibility of Jersey as a tourist destination-was interested in the building of the Airport and updating of the harbours. The increase in tourism meant a reorganisation in society in order to deal with visitors and hotel workers. Was responsible for the establishment of the first housing scheme. The arrival of the second world war-no one believed that there was going to be an occupation. The island was prepared to receive soldiers from St Malo as a defensive position-the Germans didn't go directly to St Malo and so the soldiers could get back to Britain safely. As a result the British troops were removed and the islands were left undefended-the Jersey people felt horror at this news. When the evacuation was completed he was ordered to take on the responsibilities of both bailiff and governor-a war time government was established to speed up the process. When the British troops left they offered to blow up the public utilities but he pointed out they'd be needed for the residents and so they decided to leave them as they were. On the day the German soldiers landed he was in his house in the morning and he received notice that papers had been dropped ordering the surrender of the island. He had told residents that when he could not guarantee their safety he would lower the flag from Fort Regent and that day he went to Fort Regent and lowered the flag. When at Fort Regent received a message saying the Germans had landed at the Jersey Airport-he went out there and the German officers explained that Jersey was occupied. The German officers were young airborne troops-later he came to the house and read proclamations. They enquired about supplies and when he told them of the stocks of food they didn't think rationing would be necessary as they were on their way to England. After the Battle of Britain he met the officer again who said he felt sorry for them as a paper war was about to begin-a large administration was then brought in. Jersey was lucky because the heads of the administration were gentlemen-he could deal with them. He was always convinced that Britain would win-never thought they'd be here for ever. As a representative of his people-he had to deal with the Germans-he had no means of letting the people know what and why he was doing things-could gain great advantages but people wouldn't know about it. Felt no moral qualms about the things they did because the one thing they wanted to do was make sure the people of the island survived. Felt lonely-his wife often felt worse. There was nothing anyone could do in terms of sabotage-punishments would follow like wirelesses were taken away. When they were taken away he didn't have a secret set but was kept up to date with news. The worst time was in 1942 when the deportations took place-wanted to resign but was persuaded to stay. The conditions after D-Day were terrible-had no gas, electricity, coal or bread or a lot of other things. Had soup rations given out. If you lived in the country you were better off than the town people. He was able to have a fire because of the trees in his garden and had candles so he was fortunate. Everybody lost weight-his wife lost a great deal. The Germans near the end changed the people in the high command-the head was an admiral who he never got on with. He was determined never to surrender-he only surrendered when he was ordered to do so-had to climb down. Addressed the people in the Royal Square-played Winston Churchill's speech over loudspeakers in the Square and celebrations took place but they were not liberated until the next day on his birthday, 9th May 1945. During the war he protested-that was all he could do. After the liberation the problems were getting people back to the island. The constitutional set up of the island were examined-were asked how to reform the States and Royal Court and most of these were approved. The great task was to put in place the political reforms-15 years later they were not quite put in place. Housing was a great problem at that time-people coming back. Proud of the changes since the war. End of Side One. 3) Deportee Bob Samson being interviewed about a society that was formed after a visit to Germany in 1971 with the aim to foster better relationships between Jersey and the German people. Was an internee for 3 years. He was born in Birmingham-he was the only one in his family born outside of the island. He wasn't badly treated. About 2000 people were sent out of the island in six weeks. Was given notice of a day that he was to be deported-he received it a week before he was 18. He was not worried about being sent to Germany but his mother and father were worried. They couldn't stop him being sent away. He looked after himself on the boat-he knew people on the boat from St Ouen. Deportee Maurice Hill being interviewed about being arrested in September 1942 after protesting against the deportation of English born people to Germany. Was one of 13 arrested outside of the Barra Hotel. Was sentenced in a German court for 4 months-it was reduced to a month and he was released after 3 weeks but in February 1943 he was sent to Laufen. He was sent to the local prison in Jersey and Laufen was an old castle. The guards were regular soldiers but they did have an SS search once for a radio. The head of Laufen offered to take it and return it after the SS search which they did. They were supposed to get the German front line soldier but they didn't have much. A couple of people attempted to escape including an ex island footballer Cyril Dale who left with a Guernsey boy, Bill Russell-got as far as Vienna before getting caught. Bill Russell escaped when in Yugoslavia and joined the partisans. Laufen was an all male camp, families went to Biberach originally and then most of them went to Wurzach. They had a football pitch for entertainment on a small island-if they misbehaved it would be closed. There was a concert hall, table tennis table. All the equipment came through the Red Cross-received red cross parcels. They were released on May 4th-were listening to the news and saw American troops and ran out-they didn't know their was an internment camp in the village. Got back to Jersey in September but some got back before that and some after. 4) Personal view of Michael Ginns, a founder of the Channel Islands Occupation Society (Jersey Branch), interviewed by Beth Lloyd. The CIOS was originally founded in Guernsey in 1966 and the Jersey branch was formed in 1971 for the purpose of reporting and collating all aspects of the occupation. Believes some bunkers should be preserved for posterity-one day the bunkers will be looked upon in the same way as the martello towers. The bunkers and constructions were mostly built to fortress standards-will last a long time. The Germans left the bunkers in working order-straight after the occupation people went to the bunkers and took souvenirs-when the British troops arrived they took out the hardware which was dumped in the sea. Each type of the smaller weapons were given to the States of Jersey but everything else was dumped into the sea. As the years went by the bunkers were used as rubbish tips and so in the early 1960s all bunkers on public land were sealed to the public. Some are now open because in 1976 he thought it would be a good idea to open the Noirmont Bunker to the public-wrote to the Public Works Committee and they told him that in the winter they would go and look at it to see its prospects. The committee was later taken over by Senator John Averty-he was keen to open it and allowed the CIOS to look after it. Since then they have given the responsibility for the associated observation tower nearby, the bunker at Corbière, La Carrière, St Brelade and the Gun Emplacement and Underground Bunkers at Les Landes, St Ouen. Have 170 local member in the CIOS of which a dozen are very active. Noirmont is open twice a month for visitors. First Record-A german march. He was 11 years old when the second world war started. He had just started at Victoria College in 1939. Life continued as normal at first but had to carry his gas mask. He enjoyed it as a boy-liked seeing aeroplanes fly overhead. Knew the Germans were coming-after the evacuation there was a calm. His father though of evacuating but never managed to leave. The Germans moved into Victoria College House. Carried on at school-it began at 10 o'clock. In 1941 Victoria College moved to Halkett Place as it was taken over by the Germans as a barracks. In 1941 a German schools inspector visited Victoria College. The first he knew of deportation was when he was visiting town with his mother and she was told by a friend that the deportations were to take place. They were fortunate because it was a Tuesday but they didn't leave until Friday-some had to leave within 24 hours. Had to send animals to the Animal Shelter to be put down. Had to report at Grouville Station where a bus was laid on to take them to St Helier. Had to report to the JMT Garage on the Esplanade-they were on the last bus and couldn't get on the ship. Went home-some went home to empty houses which had been looted by neighbours. When they came back 21 days later people held back and weren't deported-there was a minor deportation in February 1943. Second Record-Vera Lynn with 'The White Cliffs of Dover'. The journey from France to Germany has to be looked at in terms of the time. They were the only prisoners at the time being transported in second class railway carriages as opposed to good carriages. They got in to the train at St Malo-were warned to bring enough food for two days and were given some food by the German soldiers. Arrived at Biberach-they then walked up to the camp-it was a prisoner of war camp. Quickly organised themselves in the camp-Captain Hilton was appointed camp senior. Education was laid on for everyone in the first 6 weeks but during this time they were being sorted out. Single men over 16 went to Laufen, married couples with children went to Wurzach and single couples stayed in Biberach and were joined the Guernsey deportees who were following. The rations from the Germans left you hungry but not starving but without the red cross parcels they would have been in trouble. He preferred Wurzach where he moved to-everything was under one roof. Life for a teenage boy-there were football matches, stage shows. It was difficult for a parent with a young family and older people. His mother was matron of the camp hospital-she was asked by Dr Oliver who went with them. Mrs Hutton was the first matron of the hospital but she died in 1943 and his mother took over. His father was ill and spent time in hospital-he was repatriated in September 1943 because of ill health. He was the only child-was in a room with 20 other men and boys there own age-used to collect bread and milk from the village. Had visits from the Red Cross and they decided they needed more room to exercise. There were organised walks outside of the camp twice a week-the guard would sometimes stop at the pub and they had some money from the government. They were repatriated in March 1945 to join up with his father-Germany was falling apart at this time but they were taken on a Red Cross train through Germany, Denmark into Gothenburg, Sweden. Crossed from Gothenburg to Liverpool. They returned to Jersey on July 28th 1945. Everything was intact in their home. Third Record-The Watermill. Felt pleased to be home but was annoyed that he missed the liberation of the camp and Jersey. He and his friends went to Mr Robinson's private school in Balmoral Terrace and he took the school certificate. He joined the army and went to Bodmin-got as far as Nottingham but didn't go abroad-was a vehicle mechanic who worked on tanks-stayed for 6 years. Fourth Record-The theme from the television series We'll Meet Again. When he left the army he started to work in the post office in Nottinghamshire-worked there from Christmas 1952 until May 1953 when he came back to Jersey and became a postman and has been so ever since. Can have problems with dogs but generally are not too bad. Knows about jersey buses-is fascinated by the transport systems of Jersey-wrote a book about the buses in Jersey. Is involved with the Jersey Camera Club and with David Bishop and his wife they produce tape slide sequences. They visited the Royal Air Force base in Cranwell after the RAF visited Jersey and saw his slide show sequences about the occupation and invited them to show them at the base-enjoyed the trip. Fifth Record-Royal Air Force March Past played the Central Band of the Royal Air Force. Enjoys writing books about the occupation. Archives are still being discovered. Most of his work is taken up by running the CIOS. His wife shares his interest in the occupation. Wants to write a definitive work on the defences of the Channel Islands.

Reference: R/07/B/14

JEP cutting: Feudal Law and old estates in Jersey

Reference: US/1296

Date: 2015 - 2015
30th May 2015

JEP Newscutting: article about the development of Warren Farm at Noirmont, which has been designated a Site of Special Interest - 07/09/2011

Reference: US/962

Date: 2011 - 2011

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