States of Jersey Members Room

Reference: P/03/B48/08

Date: August 16th 2000 - August 16th 2000

States of Jersey Members room

Reference: P/03/B48/09

Date: August 16th 2000 - August 16th 2000

Jersey Talking Magazine-February Edition. Introduction by Gordon Young. Royal Feature-Ruby Bernstein talking about Queen Victoria, meeting her grandaughter, Princess Alice, was a press officer to the Rank Organisation and then helped a photographer, met Princess Alice at an exhibition held by the photographer and talks about Princess Alice's memories of her grandmother. Beth Lloyd interviewing Raymond Falla about how he started his political career, working for the Guernsey Growers Association, asked to join the States of Guernsey, serving on the Controlling Committee, his career after the war, President of the Island Reception Committee, his visit to Buckingham Palace, his reception of an OBE, his views on current island life and his advice to the young. Pat Dubras won the solo acting class in the Eisteddfod-performs her piece. Interview with Roy MacLoughlin about the magazine The Islander, getting items of local interest getting on to BBC regional programmes, contents of the magazine, interesting history of the island and writing about Jersey. End of Side One. Interview with Cliff Morgan, former Welsh rugby player and Head of Outside Broadcasting at the BBC, talking about his life including his childhood, playing rugby, Welsh peoples passion for rugby, playing for Wales, his parents, commentating, producing and working in television, traditions, having a stroke, his family, music, his involvement with a charity for the blind and his future. In Touch tips for the blind concerning a new cooking pan. Competition feature with Gordon Young playing records and the readers having to remember who sang it.

Reference: R/05/B/39

Date: January 31st 1980 - January 31st 1980

Personal View of Florence Bechelet [with jersey accent] interviewed by Beth Lloyd talking to her about the Battle of Flowers. She has been making floats since 1934, she decided to start when she saw a float in 1928, noticed a carnival class was being held-decided she wanted to take part in it, she made a watering can costume and showed it to a neighbour who said that she'd done very well, was going to walk in with it but it would have been too heavy. At 15 she found an old pram, which she tied with string planks and put a tower shaped clock and vases with flowers on it. With two friends she went to the Battle Of Flowers at Springfield and won 3rd Class in the class with 10 shillings prize money. She was determined to do better next time. She was not artistic at school, she put the floats together by looking at picture of animals to get ideas and cutting a piece of wire bigger than the animal and shaping it. For the first 3 years she made it with hydrangeas. She found out there was a prize for best exhibit in junior class and senior in wild flowers. In 1937 she made a weather house in heather and won first in her class and the junior wild flowers prize, which was 6 solid silver tea spoons. First record-a March from the Band of the Welsh Guards. Battle Of Flowers at Springfield was a smaller scale than today but had beautiful floats. They used a lot more hydrangeas in those days. There was more of a team effort in the past, young people used to put together exhibits, most young people were in the Battle. Springfield-used to hold up to 10,000 people who were mostly islanders but there were a few tourists. Local bands used to play. The outbreak of war stopped the Battle Of Flowers. Her family had a farm but they couldn't export produce and cattle kept being taken by the germans. They were left with 2 cattle, a severely depleted stock, in St Ouen. The Germans took 12 vergees of land in Les Landes. She didn't really deal with the Germans. Food was scarce-a lot of people were saved by the Red Cross parcels. She had planned for the Battle Of Flowers before the outbreak of war but didn't do it until 1951. It was a hunting scene, which won first prize in its class with a prize of £15, first in the junior wild flowers which was a prize of a silver tea set, the prix de merit, which was a prize of a refrigerator which still works today and the best exhibit of the whole show by an individual, which was a prize of a radiogram worth 160 guineas. Second record-Sound of Music. Battle Of Flowers started again in 1951 and went to Victoria Avenue which was a better venue and had a smooth road. She didn't know why it changed back as it started on Victoria Avenue. There hasn't been a Battle at the end of the Battle of Flowers for 7 or 8 years. At the end of the parade she used to have to protect her own float. She has started a Battle Of Flowers Museum through her interest in the event, it has proved popular after the first three years of difficulty. It was opened on 16th June 1971 with one building and then a second, third and fourth with sixteen models from the Battle Of Flowers in total. She has made 40 exhibits for the Battle Of Flowers and 13 exhibits for other fetes including on Grouville Common, St Ouen's Fete, Villa Millbrook and St Andrew's Park-in competition. Her favourite float was made for the Queen and Duke of Edinburgh's visit in 1979 with an exhibit of 40 flamingos, took it to Howard Davis Park and were introduced and talked to the Queen and Duke of Edinburgh who were easy to talk to. The President of the Battle Of Flowers' Association gave her permission to show it before the Battle Of Flowers took place and she used it in the Battle Of Flowers that year although it didn't win a prize and the Association said they couldn't give her a guarantee for it because it had been shown before but it was sorted out although she was upset and didn't exhibit for the next 2 years. Had an exhibit that became a design for a stamp, which was a float of ostriches. She later became allergic to glue. Told by Philatelic Bureau that her design was being used as a stamp-1s 9d. Third Record-Blue Danube. She makes a float by getting a book on animals, making a scene, for example, a jaguar with llamas, keeps the design in her head rather than drawing it, no help given to her-all individual work. She picks the grasses as soon as they're ready. Used to pick them at the sand dunes and now grows her own. Has to sew them each year. She makes her mind up on what the theme will be on christmas day and doesn't change her mind. The float is made from three quarter inch mesh chicken wire. On a horse and bison float-84,000 pieces of grass were used on each horse and 11,000 bunches of approx 20 each on the bison. All her spare time is spent doing things. She is not normally a patient person but enjoys doing it and never gets bored. She dyes the grasses before putting them on the float in a bucket on her gas cooker. Prefers making animals to human figures. She was especially careful when making a Jersey calf figure as she was asked to do so by the Société Jersiaise and she wanted to make sure it was right and kept checking. Fourth Record-Jimmy Shand-chose it because it has a good rhythm. She talks about her exhibits that went to Exeter for Jersey Tourism and Leeds. She went with them and got a good reaction from people as there is nothing like it in England. She went to Guernsey with the Pied Piper of Hamlyn and got first prize. Brought humour into her exhibit, the funniest was a donkey derby. The Battle Of Flowers is not as good as it used to be-early 50s used to be 80 or 90 exhibits-a lot more than today. The young people not interested. The parochial classes not as popular as they can't find a leader. Miss Battle of Flowers is a good idea and provides an extra exhibit. Visitors still very keen. New set up with the arch ways on the Victoria Avenue good. Pictures hanging in museum. Fifth Record-Mary Poppins-Chimchiminy. Went to the ball at the West Park Pavilion as a chicken and won first prize and the tortoise and the hare but she collapsed due to lack of air in the costume. She was unable to compete in the Battle Of Flowers this year because she has been in hospital, told to rest but she has an idea for next years float already. End of Side One. Personal View of Major John Riley. Born in Trinity Manor in 1925. His grandfather came to Jersey in 1908. His ancestry is from Yorkshire and later his grandfather moved to Cornwall and London and came to Jersey in 1908. He had an interest in islands and tried to buy Sark and move to Alderney but moved to Jersey. He was interested in architecture, by profession a theologian but had a love of architecture and took time and money rebuilding the manor which was near derelict when he moved in. The roof had to come off and it was reconstructed in a French style. The architect was Sir Reginald Bloomfield, a London architect. The manor goes back to 1550. It was the seat of the de Carteret family and was successfully restored and enlarged by de Carterets in 1660 and the 19th century. First memories of the manor were of his grandfather who was an imposing and a great church man-morning and evening prayers were in the chapel and many people lived there including 3 uncles and his father but mother died in an accident in 1928 but he had a largely happy childhood. In the 1930s he travelled around England as his father was in the army. It was a contrast to living in manor but it only struck him as odd later in life. Being brought up in a large house was not restrictive, the children had good fun and he had affection for certain parts of house. First Record-Carmen Jones. Schooling-he went to day school in Jersey, preparatory school in England and then school in Winchester when war broke out in 1939. He didn't enjoy school, he was not academic and not good at ball games but it was a good education. During World War 2 his grandfather was allowed to live in the Manor for the first 2 years, the grounds were used as an ammunition dump, later the garrison moved into the house and his grandfather moved to one of the lodges. House undamaged and well looked after. When he arrived back in the island day after the liberation the germans were cleaning the manor. Felt worried about being separated from the island and the only contact was red cross letters which were only 28 words long-had to be careful. Was registered by mistake as an enemy alien card in England. Ambitions-had it not been for World War 2 he may have had an academic career-unsure. Couldn't think of any other profession he would have done apart from the army. His grandfather wanted him to have a classical education, he was an academic man and had stood for parliament but didn't get in. Ended up in the Coldstream Guards-his father had been a member, he has no regrets as he lived with marvellous people. He joined in 1943 and was commissioned in 1944 and joined the forces in North West Europe as a platoon commander. He wasn't frightened of getting killed, the idea of coming home as a wounded war hero appealed, but he had a fear of being frightened. In general the sergeant runs the platoon as they have massive experience and the officers, who had more training, did the planning. He went to North West Germany and saw action for 9 days before he was wounded on 9th March 1945 and evacuated to a hospital in Nottingham 48 hours after. It was the last he saw of the second world war. After he went out to Palestine. They had been earmarked to go to Japan but the bomb was dropped before he had to go. Second Record-Underneath the Arches. He stayed in army for 20 years, working with nice people who trust in each other. He was in a brigade of guards and had a really varied time. Later he was involved in the administration of the army. When he was in the Coldstream Guards he talks about how they felt in full uniform, being very hot whilst on parade, standing still was tiring, he took part in the vigil when the king died. He served in Palestine between 1945-48, then back for 3 months then went out to Malaya for 2½ years which was exciting. As company commander he led a patrol of 14-20 men for a week-10 days in the jungle. His father was still in Jersey at this time and became a jurat in the Royal Court. He came back on leave from time to time. The Manor was not in working order till the mid 50s. When he came back he helped around the Manor. In his army career he became an instructor-dealing with officers in their early 30s who were destined for commanding positions. During the Seven Day War there was both an Israeli and Egyptian who were called back into service. Third Record-Glen Miller. Took the Coldstream Guards Band to America in 1954-for 12 weeks. 160 men would move into a hotel, play a concert, have dinner, go to bed and then move around-strenuous. He left the army in 1963, he was sad to leave but had two young children, schooling was a problem for serving officers. He came back to Trinity Manor, didn't know what he wanted to do, determined to find plenty to do. He took the dairy farm back and got involved in companies and then stood for the States. He decided to go in to politics because he felt he had a responsibility to the island and wanted to give something back. His experience outside of the island was of value. He had no ambitions as a politician-the States was more like local administration. Fourth Record-Noel Coward. Politicians work hard-especially becoming president of a major committee which holds almost a ministerial responsibility, you need to be able to communicate with people. Life going to become more difficult for people in politics. You could run the island with 20 people but would have to pay them, which is against what the island politics is about. Became President of the Defence Committee-linked to his background. Wilfred Krichefski asked him to join the committee and he was able to help because of his military background. It was not like the Ministry of Defence-more like a Committee of Public Safety. Decided to finish in politics last year as he had done 18 years and didn't want to go stale and stand in the way of other people. He wanted to clear the way for other people to be promoted and hopes people don't stay on too long. He has been able to develop Trinity Manor for people to have seminars as he has moved himself in to one end of the house and through this he meets interesting people through the functions and it keeps the Manor occupied. For relaxation he goes sailing during the summer and rides horses in the winter.

Reference: R/07/B/1

Date: 1982 - 1982

Personal View of Bailiff Sir Peter Crill, interviewed by Hamish Marett-Crosby. Has an eclectic musical taste-chosen his records because they are a cross section of music that he likes-he enjoys singing. Used to compete in the Jersey Eisteddfod and now sings in church choirs. Was involved in theatrical productions-started acting at Victoria College-didn't take part during the occupation-didn't want to play to the german soldiers. Took it up again after the war at Oxford University. Helpful to have acted if you want to be an advocate-useful when speaking to a jury. Education suffered during the occupation-there was a shortage of teachers. Pays tribute to the headmaster Mr Tatum who stayed through the occupation. Was moved to Halkett Place Infant School in 1941. Was a teenager so remembers the occupation well-had all night parties despite the curfews. Escaped to France in a boat before the end of the occupation with two friends-between 50-60 did this. Only one real escapee, Denis Vibert, who got to England in 1941. Went to England from France-their information about the hunger in the island and a report by the Bailiff, Lord Coutanche, helped persuade the authorities to allow the red cross ship the SS Vega to come to the island. First Record-Handel's Water Music Suite. Read law at Oxford University-went up in 1945 with the aid of the Howard Davis Trust. He rowed when he was at Oxford in the Head of the River Race. Was called to the Bar in 1949 and called to the Jersey Bar in the same year. Later brought in local examination-there wasn't when he joined. Was on the committee to created the deputy bailiff and became deputy bailiff later. Second Record-Prokofiev's Romeo and Juliet. Reached the conclusion in 1954 to create the post of deputy bailiff-Mr Harrison was the first deputy bailiff, Sir Robert Le Masurier became lieutenant bailiff before becoming bailiff. The second deputy bailiff was Mr Bois [Francis de Lisle] who was appointed in 1963, then Sir Frank Ereaut and then himself. The law has a weight of tradition-he keeps up the tradition but cuts it down, for example, the assize d'héritage-lost its meaning by leaving twice a year-decided to hold it only once a year-added a service and bailiff's reception at the time of the assize d'héritage to add more importance to it. Bailiff performs the role of presiding officer of the States. He was a deputy for 9 years-took a break because his father was ill-has seen it from the benches as well. He was also solicitor and attorney general for 12 years. Finds it difficult to stop speakers repeating themselves-the bailiff has the power to stop members from speaking. There is a need to observe standing orders. There is a rule that speeches should not be read-some people do nonetheless. Third Record-Chopin's Polonaise in C Sharp Minor. Jurats left in 1948 but the constables still sit in the States-wouldn't make a difference if they were elected to the States rather than elected as heads of the parish and sit in the States as virtue of the office. Constables are the oldest members of the States-doesn't want to lose constables as it is a link to the past. The problem with constables sitting in the States is that they are police officers-there's a possible question over the fact that 12 policemen make up a quarter of the States. The country parishes have retained their former way of life more than the urban parishes-in the urban parishes the role of honorary police is much more difficult to maintain. Has noticed a change since the radio started broadcasting the States sittings-more people have started speaking and for longer. Jersey was affected by the French Revolution-progressive parties were formed although it didn't crystallise into definite parties-there was left and right within the States. The States may have been built in a circular so no people were directly facing others in opposition. Fourth Record-A Piece from Aida. The States was also designed so that all of the different groups, senators, deputies, constables, could sit together. There have been groups in the past from the left and right. During the second world war two groups emerged-the Jersey Progressive Party who wanted reform and the Jersey Democratic Movement, who were further to the left. Progressive Party got 17 members in the first post war States-carried out their reforms and then disbanded-they achieved their objective and decided that they did not want to continue as a political party. In the States today he doesn't notice any individual groupings. A difference in degree and not complete opposed political viewpoints. Fifth Record-Bach's Prelude and Fugue in G Minor. Was for 5 years the president of the Société Jersiaise-helped create the Jersey Heritage Trust. The Société wanted to remain as the learned society but could not show all of its collections off properly and in accordance with modern thinking in museums. The Société built an education room but it never got off the ground. When he took over he made it clear that members had a choice-it could remain as a learned society or it could become a trustee of all the acquisitions that they had and receive help-from this the Jersey Heritage Trust was created. The Jersey Heritage Trust was supposed to be a channel of funds from the States to other cultural bodies in the island-believes a grant should be granted to someone like the poet Jeremy Reed. Enjoys music, books, horses, boats and pottering about. Doesn't use a computer now. Does still cycle in the summer. Sixth Record-Gilbert and Sullivan-The Overture to the Gondoliers.

Reference: R/07/B/10

Date: July 11th 1982 - July 11th 1982

Personal View of Senator Reg Jeune, President of the Education Committee. Born and brought up in Jersey-remembers difficult days of the late 1920s and 1930s-early life. Remembers a home with little money but very happy. It was a strict methodist home and his parents gave him a good start in life. His father had two hobbies-his garden and prize poultry. He got involved in his father's hobbies-he got involved with prize bantams in the local agricultural show. Has carried methodism throughout his life-has been a methodist local preacher for 40 years starting in 1942. Remembers the weather being nicer in his childhood-spent a lot of time on the beach and cycling around the island. Played tennis, watched cricket matches at the Victoria College Field when some of the top cricketers came to the island. Lived in Don Road and then in Georgetown as a child. He went to the De La Salle College-he was always encouraged to read books. He remembers going to the junior library with his mother where a Miss Priestley worked-never lost that interest. Thought that he may become a teacher but it was difficult getting grants at that time. His parents were ambitious for him-gave him a lot of encouragement. First Record-The Hallelujah Chorus from Handel's Messiah. Used to sing the piece of music in a choir-enjoyed being a chorister. At school-was interested in sport but was never particularly good. Left school to go into a bank-in waiting he went into Hill Street and then fell in love with law and took that up. Many of his fellow pupils went into a bank-it's much easier now. Studying was a struggle-graduated as a solicitor of the Royal Court of Jersey in 1945-a great deal of the examination was in French-was very difficult. Learnt French in order to be a solicitor. He was an office boy in Hill Street at first-used to collect rentes and write out contracts on parchment. Still sees the contracts that he used to write out. The occupation arrived-they were looking after people's affairs who had left the island-he started taking an active interest in cases after the second world war. It could take several years to study to qualify as a lawyer-took 6-8 years. Church took up quite a bit of time-choir and lay preaching. After he'd qualified he married in 1946 to Monica Valpy. Second Record-Flight of the Bumblebee by Rimsky-Korsakov. Hill Street was quiet during the occupation-had little to do-didn't experience hassle from the germans-helped look after people's affairs who had evacuated. He became a partner in a practice with two other men Helier Mourant and Clifford du Feu and created a company called Mourant, du Feu and Jeune-built up a substantial partnership. Started as a family practice until the financial scene came to Jersey-he became involved. It started around the early 1960s-he got interested when he got asked advice and he gradually became interested. He became chairman of the Youth Movement in 1947 and was involved in other organisations such as the Rotary Club-was interested in politics. Has always been interested in education and youth services. At one point thought that he may have gone into the church-if the occupation hadn't come along he may have done. Hadn't travelled much at this time-he'd been to Guernsey in England and that was all-after he qualified the opportunities to travel increased. He has now made many travels including extensively around the United States of America. Third Record-The Grand March from Verdi's Aida. Has been involved as much as possible with his family-his eldest son is a partner with him who has two daughters, his second son is London and has become an actor and his daughter is a jewellery designer who has come back to Jersey. Encouraged his son to read law. Tried to become a States member of St Helier No 2 District in the late 1950s but was unsuccessful. In 1962 he was successful in a by-election of St Helier No 3 District. Wasn't put off going into the States when he didn't get in the first time. Strange to go into the States especially in a by-election-the house was already set. Was nervous and excited the first time he spoke in the States despite having done a lot of public speaking in his job and church. After six months became president of the Public Works Committee-he had attacked the spending of money at the time especially for the tunnel-the money got thrown out and as a result two committees resigned-the Island Development Committee and the Public Works Committee and he became president of the Public Works Committee-he had been president of major committee ever since. Investigated the traffic problems in St Helier and eventually decided there should be a tunnel built under Fort Regent. Fourth Record-Le Rocquier School Band with Rock Around the Clock. Has a great love of music and books-still reads a lot despite working hard. The law firm has grown-he has become detached from the day to day business of the firm-tries to get there as much as possible-misses it. Became involved with the Trustees Savings Bank-joined the local board about 25 years previously and then became chairman of the Jersey Savings Bank, chairman of the Channel Islands Savings Bank and then elected to the board in London. Goes to two meetings a month in London. Received the OBE for his services to the savings banks-was very thrilled. Enjoyed going to Buckingham Palace to receive the award. Wants Jersey to retain its character but not to be insulated-he's chairman of the Executive Committee of the Commonwealth Parliamentary Association and involved with the French side of the parliamentarians. Fifth Record-Treorky Male Voice Choir. Has been involved in bringing an ombudsman into the States-succeeded-there is now a Review Tribunal. Doesn't have many more great ambitions in the States-is at the service of the States. Thinks it would be almost impossible to set higher education up in Jersey-Highlands College and what it offers with further education is about the limit that Jersey can expect. End of Side One. Personal View of Senator Ralph Vibert, interviewed by Beth Lloyd. Is the father of the house and president of the Finance Committee. At school-pictures that he would be a teacher-went to Victoria College in the 1920s-was captain of the football and head prefect. Didn't get a scholarship to Oxford University-Lord Coutanche was reorganising the States departments and set up the Law Officers-he became a secretary for the Attorney General-decided to become a lawyer. Was secretary to Lord Coutanche during the day and studied law in the evening. Was called to the bar in 1933/34-set up a private practice on his own. First Record-Welcome Song of the Maori People of New Zealand. Has not been to New Zealand but his daughter has. Has travelled a great deal-enjoys it. Had a law practice in Hill Street in the 1930s-business was quite slow-people paid on time. His first client was the late Senator Edward Le Quesne who was trying to get compensation from a shipping company when a boat broke down travelling to France. In the 1930s became interested in the movement of Moral Rearmament-was given a new conception of Christianity-it enables Christians to work with other people of faith throughout the world. Moral Rearmament took part in the bringing of democracy to Zimbabwe. Second Record-Unofficial National Anthem of all of Africa. He is well known in the Swiss village of Caux because it is the world conference centre of Moral Rearmament. Believes that when people work together good things come of it. His wife and he went to Zimbabwe to help friends-they had met Alec Smith-the son of a prime minister and a drug addict-through the attention of Kit Prescott, a friend, he stopped being an addict and became a leading statesman. During the occupation he evacuated in order to enlist-his wife was undecided-in the end she decided to leave. His wife had a baby and he joined up-got into a school of cipher breaking-60 pupils were in the first ever course held on this and only 3 were good enough-he didn't make the grade but they wanted people who could speak french and could teach ciphers to people in the field who were behind enemy lines. Later moved to India to become instructor training people to work behind enemy lines. Worked for the Special Operations Executive-met Maurice Buckmaster who was head of the French Section. His brother Denis escaped to England during the occupation and then joined the Royal Air Force. Third Record-Beethoven's Fifth Symphony. When the war was finished he helped clear up with the courts and then he got back in late 1946. Went back into his law practice. He became solicitor-general in 1948 until 1955-decided not to continue to become bailiff-had differences with the attorney-general Cecil Harrison and decided to leave. Believes those years were wasted years-he could have built up a practice at that time. Went back into private practice with his younger brother. Decided to go into politics because he wanted a hand in running the island. Fourth Record-Mozart's Piano Sonata No 11. His wife, Muriel Vibert, née Le Gros, has been a big support all his life. Became a deputy for St Brelade in 1955 and 2 years later became a senator in an uncontested by-election. Has always been invited onto committees-the sudden death of George Troy led him to become President of Defence, the collapse of the Establishment Committee led to him taking it on and the sudden death of Cyril Le Marquand led to him being President of Finance. Also was President of the Common Market Committee. Constant change of personnel in the States-new wave of people coming to the States typified by Senator Shenton who have brought new life to the States and a desire to do things quickly. Thinks more businessmen should be in the States but it's difficult as they are often too busy to get to States sittings. Dislikes important decisions being rushed through without due consideration. Likes the Jersey system-believes it's a very democratic system. Likes the tradition of the honorary system. Instigated the concept of a minimum income for States members-people could become members of the States without fear of financial difficulties-wouldn't like to see all the States members becoming professionals. Believes the parishes should keep their autonomy. Fifth Record-Manhattan Beach by Sousa. As a hobby he enjoyed playing tennis, likes to garden and play with the grandchildren. One of his daughters is a freelance photographer-became interested in photography. Was awarded the OBE in 1977 and became father of the house in 1980-has no more political ambitions. Believes Jersey's political future should be secure. Sixth Record-An Anglican Hymn. Commentary on the Battle of Britain Red Arrow display by Squadron Leader Henry Ploszek. Talks about the distance that the Red Arrows stay away from each other in the display, the training for formation flying, as manager he organises the administrative duties. End of Side Two.

Reference: R/07/B/11

Date: 1982 - 1982

Personal View of Deputy Jean Le Maistre interviewed by Malcolm Gray. Was born in Millbrook at the maternity hospital and lived most of his life in St Ouen. He is called Jean and his brothers have French names-François and Edouard. His family took part in farming. Had a fortunate and happy childhood-had lots of space to play and a good community and family spirit. St Ouen has a strong community spirit but so do the other parishes. His father's life has been devoted to the recording of the Jersey language-was brought up speaking jèrriais. Went to school at the age of 5 not knowing a word of english. Jèrriais is a dying language-is a shame because it's part of our identity. There are parish variations of the language-have evolved over the centuries-the language is very rich. First Record-'Going Home' by The Shadows. Got involved in youth club work-was a member of a youth club at St George's Church. Moved on to help in youth clubs-became a youth leader in St Ouen at 17 and then moved to youth work in town at the Cellar Club in Hope Street-worked there for about 5 years-led on to his involvement in the Jersey Youth Movement-became statutory in 1973 and became its first chairman. The Jersey Youth Movement was the precursor to the Jersey Youth Service. At that point there was a lack of facilities. Got to know Cliff Richard through his church work-met him in 1969-came to his wedding. Met him in Israel in 1972 through his overseas aid work. Second Record-'Help it Along' by Cliff Richard. Religion has played a large part in his life-never considered becoming a minister but has always been involved in the church. Believes you should go to church to be a christian-you need to share your faith. Lay people are more involved in services now-he has taken part in some services but doesn't believe that is his role-was an almoner at St George's for 17 years. Second Record-Roy Castle with 'The Bread of Life'. Has travelled a great deal-had a prayer breakfast with Ronald Reagan in Washington. Has visited the Middle East especially Israel-Israel is a very enjoyable place-has organised trips to Israel-has been 14 or 15 times. Israel has had problems but he is quite happy to go because he feels safe. Third Record-'We Have Brought You Greetings'-a traditional jewish greeting song. Has been in the States of Jersey for 15 years-has enjoyed being in the States-wanted to get into the States to help with the youth service and agriculture. Agriculture has been in a difficult state-served on the Agriculture Committee for 6 years under Senator Binnington. Has been President of the Postal Committee and served on the Education Committee. Working in the States takes up a lot of time-your family have to be understanding. Is worried about the States members workload-has lodged a proposition to try and solve this. Wants to keep the honorary system but wants it to be easier for people to come forward and stand. Was born in St Ouen but has always represented St Helier as a deputy-has always worked in St Helier and has served No 3 District where he lived for 8 years. Has not thought about coming a senator at the moment. Fourth Record-Tune from a visiting African choir. Has been president of the Overseas Aid Committee for about 9 years-important to send money and good will. Loves Africa and the African people-they suffer difficulties not of their making-couldn't help but feel emotionally affected. Took the media on a trip in order to experience the conditions in Africa. Fifth Record-Born Free. End of Side One. Personal View of Deputy Jack Roche interviewed by Malcolm Gray in his garden and at Fort Regent. Was born in Jersey in 1924 in Providence Street. Had one brother and three sisters-lived in Charles Street for many years-had a brother Lewis who has passed away and three sisters called Ena, Mavis and Dorothy. His father died 6 months after he was born-was a financial struggle-his mother used to run a shop in Charles Street. Schooled at St Mark's at La Motte Street-one of the teachers was Deputy Arthur Carter. Left school at 14 and then about a year later they evacuated as war broke out. First Record-String of Pearls. His first job was at Bisson Cycle Shop which was then in Halkett Place-worked there for 12 months when the evacuation took place. Travelled as a family except his brother who had just started a business-mainly cargo boats took them across-the journey from Jersey to Weymouth took about 36 hours-it was a very difficult journey. They moved to Bury, went into some brand new houses and they were treated very kindly by the people of the north. Spent the rest of the work years in Bury-got into a reserved occupation-he joined the Air Training Corps and then the war ended. Six weeks after the island was liberated he came back home. Second Record-'A Man and a Woman'. Worked with his brother after liberation-was an electrician by trade but during the war he had invented a machine to process tobacco so he started to work on that. Once commercial cigarettes started coming into the island he was offered a job by W A Nichollas on Commercial Buildings-started work on 3rd February 1946-still with them-started as an office boy and is now the boss. Has become the Jersey Coal Distributors-used to store coal at Fort Regent-he is now the President of the Fort Regent Development Committee. His brother used to work from home in St Clement. The States of Jersey wanted Fort Regent back so a number of companied decided to build a coal store and from this they became one company. Met his wife Joan Norman at the office when he joined in 1946-they were married in 1950 and have one daughter Patricia and one granddaughter Rebecca. Decided to go into the States after getting rid of the business at Commercial Buildings-at first he spent a lot of time gardening. An opportunity came when Len Nightingale retired from the district and he and John Le Gallais, his next door neighbour, decided to stand and both got in. States work takes up enough time as members allow it-if you have spare time you can fill it in the States but if you work you can work it to fill your schedule. He sits on Finance and Economics Committee, the Prison Board, vice-President of the Housing Committee and President of the Fort Regent Development Committee. Is also a States appointed director of the Jersey New Waterworks Company and is chairman of the Joint Advisory Council. Has been vice-president of the Public Works Committee under Senator John Le Marquand Public Health Committee under Senator Gwyneth Huelin. Was Vice-President and then President of Jersey Telecoms, President of the Gambling Control Committee and Etats Civil. During his nearly 12 years he has sat on Agriculture and Fisheries, Tourism, Legislation, Establishment, Broadcasting, was a member of the Executive Committee of the Commonwealth Parliamentary Association. Before joining the States sat on the Agricultural Loans Board. In 12 years he has sat on a number of committees-believes members should move around as much as possible in order to see the way the States run. People are invited onto a committee by the president but they can express a desire to go onto that committee. Believes that people who work in the States from businesses will be able to cope with the work and that employers should be sympathetic. Some people would be able to become a full time member of the States in the future. Believes in the honorary system-thinks it could be problematic if people give up their jobs and don't get elected and as a result get in financial difficulty. Third Record-The Waltz from Masquerade by Khachaturian. Jack Roche and Malcolm Gray go to Fort Regent and are greeted by Humphrey, the mascot of Fort Regent. Go into the Rotunda of the Fort-he has been President of the Fort Regent Development Committee for 4 years-appointed a new chief officer Graeme Pitman. Fort Regent has been renovated in the piazza and the funfair and now in the rotunda. Great shows have been put on in the piazza. Fort Regent is sports orientated. Some big names have performed in the Gloucester Hall. Used to use the parade ground as a coal store and he has now gone in a complete circle and finds himself as the president of the facility as a whole. People's attitudes have changed towards the centre-there are 18,000 members. Fourth Record-Shirley Bassey singing Goldfinger. When the rotunda is completed it will become a multi purpose hall for sport and entertainment. There is more than one level in the rotunda-the roof covers 3 acres in total. The cost of the refurbishment will be £1.8 million for the rotunda. Have recently had the 10 millionth visitor to Fort Regent. Fifth Record-Tchaikovsky's 1812 Overture.

Reference: R/07/B/12

Date: 1987 - 1987

Alfred Pierre Laurent, a social reformer and basket-maker, talks about his Norman father who was known as one of the finest workers in Jersey-there was only one other person who was up to his standard and workmanship of basket-making-Mr Le Cornu. He could do anything in basket-making. He was very quick tempered-once some six pences went missing-his younger brother had taken them. His father said he'd prefer to see his children dead than dishonest. Feared his father-he spoke French-his father wouldn't allow him to speak jèrriais. His father loved the British people but he wouldn't allow his children to speak jèrriais or english. He came from a large family-life was hard-his mother was a good cook and could make a good meal out very little. His mother was a breton and his father a Norman-it was unusual for the two to marry. He lived in town as a child-used to be drinking problems in town-used to charge 1d a pint. You had to make do when you were poor-he had his first cup of tea when he worked at Averty's the butcher when he was 9. A lot of children worked then-used to eat a lot of meat. In his spare time used to read second hand books and newspapers-spent all his money in book. Didn't enjoy school-some of the teachers were not very nice-children used to be beaten with a leather strap. Remembers the start of the soup kitchens in Victoria Street-a lady was making porridge in a tureen-remembers seeing Dean Falle who helped make the kitchens possible and thinking that he was God. In the age that he was brought up in there was more cruelty and interest in money-good people suffered and the richer people often took advantage. Today he thinks it has gone too far the other way-there is a lack of discipline. Ada Prouten [with a Jersey accent] lived in St Ouen all her life in later years at Ville Bagot where her husband farmed for many years. She was born Ada England 81 years ago when her father leased a farm at Vinchelez and she and her sister went to Les Landes School but she was expecting to do her bit on the farm when they got home each day. She used to pick potatoes in the summer and in the winter used to scrape the roots for the cows. On Saturdays they had extra work to do as nobody worked on Sundays. Life was hard for her mother-there were two days butter making a week, one wash day, a baking day on Friday. All the people her father employed ate at the same table as the family did. Had lunch at 9.30 in the fields, 12.30 had dinner and in the afternoon had coffee and cake in the field and at the end of the day had tea. In October her sister and her worked until 10 o'clock in the lofts. Her mother made jam, bread and cakes-never bought anything. Wash day-used to put the clothes to soak the day before, would boil water in a bath on a tripod, would then hang the clothes up. Hard work cleaning the house-there were no hoovers. Reused flour bags for various purposes including for pillow cases and aprons. Went to Les Landes School-enjoyed school-was always near the top of the class. When they were putting up St George's Church they were told not to go to the Church-she climbed up to the top of the church-she got in trouble with her teacher. Left school at 15 when the teacher was told a false story about her and when she didn't believe her she left school. Decided to help her father on the farm and used to go vraicing down at L'Etacq. Used to lease the farm-the lease was finished at 12 o'clock on christmas day-could be hard. Her sister and her were not paid-they had money when they wanted some and clothes when they wanted some. Her husband and her didn't have a very large farm. Had her first daughter a year after she was married but coped with it well-had to do your own work because you couldn't pay for anything else. She enjoyed her young life-people were friendlier in her childhood. Philip Le Troquer was born in 1896 at Le Pont, St Martin-when he was 4 his mother died-remembers being called to his mother's deathbed and her final words were 'carry on being a good boy'. Six years later his father died leaving 4 children under 10 as orphans-they went to Sacre Coeur Orphanage. His father died in April 1906 and he entered the orphanage as a 10 year old in May. He had a sister Selina and two brothers John and Frank. Life was nice but disciplined at Sacre Coeur-went to a church service first thing in the morning, had breakfast and went to school for 9 o'clock. Went to St Thomas' School-had their three meals at the orphanage. After school did his homework and cleaned the orphanage-had a rota for cleaning. The nuns were good to him. Had an uncle still alive-they were allowed out on their own once every quarter and they would go and visit him at that time. Used to visit his aunt in St Aubin once a year. Had to be back by 6 o'clock on the days they were allowed out. He left school at 13 and he decided he wanted to become a gardener. Used to have lessons from Mr Nouvel from Highlands College every night throughout the winter. Was always interested in gardening-Sacre Coeur Orphanage had a large garden. It was good training to become a gardener-trained for 4 winters. Received a certificate for finishing the course. When he finished training the first world war started-he was mobilised-was drafted to India and went through South Africa. There were about 20 boys from Jersey-stayed in India for 3-4 months then went through the Persian Gulf towards Turkey. When he returned he visited Reverend Le Grand and talked to him about his experiences-he was like a father to him. He has now worked 60 years as a gardener without a break. Enjoyed his time in the orphanage. Frank Noel [with a Jersey accent], 86 this year, has lived in Gorey all his life and is a plumber. His father worked on big racing cutters for Miles Kennedy. Frank did some work on TB Davis' yacht Westward. His father worked on the Southern Railway mailboats but they never moved from Gorey and he still lives in the same house as he moved to when he was 10 in 1908. Life in Gorey Village was quiet, some fishing took place. Gorey Pier was busy with sailing cutters but not as busy as today. Coal was brought in to Gorey by schooners for the Farmers Union that had a stall in Gorey. There was a windmill at Gorey to pump water for the train. As a child used to go to town on christmas eve as a treat and had Marett's sausages. Used to go on sunday school outings on horses and carts. Used to transport vraic using carts. After school and on Saturday he delivered beer for a shop in Gorey Village. Left school at 15 and went to Grandins to work as a plumber. He had wanted to go to sea but his father told him to learn a trade. Used his bicycle to get into work bought his mother. Joined up in the first world war-his parents were upset but proud. Landed back in Jersey on a Sunday morning-waited for the 1 o'clock train and when he got home it was one of the greatest days of his life. The first world war was frightening-not like the movies. Fought in the trenches and mountains-the worst was Belgium. Went back to Jersey on leave during the war-most of the boys in Gorey joined up. Loves low water and boat fishing-caught a 9lb lobster low water fishing and caught a conger of 40lb-it was hiding in a shipwreck. Professor Albert Messervy was a vet in Jersey for many years before, in 1953, he was invited to the chair of veterinary surgery at the University of Bristol. He was one of 6 children brought up in Trinity where his father was a farmer. He was 6 years old when the first world war broke out but he can remember the day. His brother and he were living at Stonewall, Mont au Prêtre with his Aunt Martha because his mother was seriously ill. They used to go to school in Trinity but on thought morning his Uncle George came in and said that war had been declared-he was horrified because their sunday school was due to have tea at Trinity Manor the next day but that had to be abandoned. Remembers in 1912 when the aircraft came from Dinard to Jersey in a race and was at West Park-remembers the pilot-on their way back to Trinity it started to thunder and lightning and somebody sheltering under a tree at Oaklands, St Saviour was killed when it collapsed on him. In 1915 they made some black butter-remembers the different kinds of apples added-in the evening a chimney caught fire-a photograph was taken which is now in Jersey Through the Lens. Was always interested in animals-especially horses. Fed ducklings foxgloves once not knowing that they were poisonous and when they died they got disciplined by their father-12 years later when he was studying to be a vet he was asked about in an examination about the effect of foxgloves on animals and he was able to answer fully. Also had a goat which had twins but she died choking on the afterbirth. The goats used to run into the house. During his childhood there was a fire at Trinity Manor-remembers horses pulling the fire engine to the manor. At the end of the first world war there was a Peace Fete which he managed to go to-his uncle bought fireworks from G D Laurens and Company-some of the fireworks didn't work properly. Jersey suffered little during the first world war-was some rationing of sugar and tea but it had no effect. After the war the farming community was hit-a depression took place and some people emigrated to find work. End of Side One. Personal View of Jurat Clarry Dupré who spent 24 years in the States of Jersey. Is retired but keeps the name jurat. Is enjoying his retirement. Was born in Jersey in 1914-had a happy childhood. Was born in Simon Place and at 6 years old he moved to Beresford Street where his father ran a fish and poultry business and lived there for the next 60 years. His father had 4 brothers and 1 sister but he only had one brother who he has worked with in the fish and poultry business for 40 years. He went to De La Salle College at 6 to 16 and then he spent a year in London learning about the fish and poultry business. After that he worked in Beresford Street from 17 to 24 until the time of the occupation when joined up with the army. He and his family are roman catholics. Played a lot of sport at school. Was the Jersey squash champion in 1938 and played for the Junior Muratti football in 1930 and 1931. First Record-Vera Lynn's 'We'll Meet Again'. When the second world war broke out he was 23/24-he evacuated from the island in June 1940 ad joined up as soon as he got into Weymouth. He was attached to the 11th Battalion of the Hampshire Regiment-he went to the Royal Military Academy at Sandhurst from where he was commissioned to the Middle East with the Cheshire Regiment. Saw active service from Alamein to Tunisia, Egypt to Sicily for the D-Day landings in Sicily. Returned to England in 1943 ready for D-Day in Normandy. Went to Sandhurst for 7 months and left as a second lieutenant and he eventually became a major. He was awarded a military cross-felt he was in the right place in the right time. Was not married when he left the island-left his fiance in Jersey and they got married in July 1945. His brother joined up and spent 4 years of his service in Malta. After he got married in 1945 he signed back with the army for two years and was stationed in the Middle East at Palestine. When he came back his son was 10 months old. Second Record-Lily Marlene with 'The Girl Underneath the Lantern'. Came out of the army in 1947 and worked with his brother for 10 years until 1957 when he went into the States. Entered as a deputy in St Helier No 1 District-was elected unopposed but three years later came second in the election and went into the States-Terry Sowden was first. A year later he stood for senator in a by-election against Senator John Venables but lost and a year after that he stood for election for senator and topped the polls and was a senator for nine years before being re-elected for six years and then losing the election as senator but became a deputy in St Helier No 1 District again before not being re-elected and retiring from politics. After not being returned as a senator decided he would stand as a deputy and was elected as the President of Tourism making it 21 years. He was also Vice-President of the Defence Committee and Finance Committee. Follows the States on Radio Jersey-felt he was getting too old for the States. Believes people are still out there who could be politicians-wouldn't like to see party politics. Wouldn't like to see States members paid. Has served on the Tourism Committee for 24 years and as President for 21 years-it has increased massively in that time. He was elected on to the Executive of the Commonwealth Parliamentary Association-saw over 20 different countries on conferences as a result. As President of the Tourism Committee was always a great supporter of the Battle of Flowers and when he retired he was made an honorary Vice-President of the Battle of Flowers' Association-hasn't missed a Battle of Flowers in 30 years. Used to go to Battersea Park and run an exhibit in the park. Third Record-Stuart Gillies with Amanda. Stuart Gillies spent many seasons in Jersey-is a character. When he retired from the States he became a jurat-had been out of the States for only 6 months and he was asked to fill a vacancy-he filled the vacancy for 4 years until he had to retire because of his age. You keep the title of jurat for the rest of your life. Jurats sits with the bailiff in the court-they are judges of fact-they decide on the sentences-they also sit on various boards-he sat on the Prison Board for 4 years. Didn't enjoy going to the prison but found it worthwhile. Jurats are responsible in the parish for elections. Attended the assize d'héritage and the swearing in of new jurats and advocates. Still goes to the honorary occasions such as the swearing in of new people but doesn't have the power of jurats anymore. Used to wear robes as a jurat and now hats are worn. Still worked in the fishmonger because it was early mornings-especially Friday and Saturday. The business was opened by his father in Beresford Street in 1921and he closed it 2 years after his brother died 4 years previously. His father died in 1924-when he was 10-his mother ran the business until he joined it. He has never done any fishing. Enjoyed meeting people in the business. Was a very small business-had 5 staff and 2 girls in the office-there was some competition with the fish market. They didn't do any wholesaling. Fourth Record-Pretty Woman by Roy Orbison. Has an understanding wife for 41 years of marriage-has one son and two granddaughters. Used to play squash until his 40s but didn't really have many hobbies. Feels he's been very lucky-doesn't regret anything. Fifth Record-Walking in the Air with Aled Jones.

Reference: R/07/B/13

Date: 1984 - 1987

Personal View of the Reg Jeune, recorded a week after his retirement from the States of Jersey after 35 years, interviewed by Hamish Marett-Crosby. He had good parents although they were not wealthy. It was a strict methodist upbringing-the only liqueur in the house was for the christmas pudding or for medicine. Remembers that he wanted to go and swim on a Sunday and he was forbidden to do that. He went to a Dame School in Vauxhall run by Miss Le Sauteur-she was a great disciplinarian but she was a good teacher. Miss Le Sauteur used a ruler on your knuckles-years later he became her lawyer and when he visited her she told him that she was terrified by the visit of her lawyer and he replied that the roles were reversed from years ago. He started as a solicitor's clerk-his parents couldn't afford further education after he left De La Salle College at 15½. The intention was for him to go into Lloyds Bank like many of his contemporaries but he went into the offices of Crill and Benest and after the occupation he moved to Oliver Mourant's office. First Record-Guide Me O Thou Great Jehovah. He went to De La Salle, a Catholic school, despite being a strict metodist and he married into an anglican family and he is proud that he is now Vice Chairman of the Governing Body. He is a lay brother of the De La Salle Order-he believes in the ecumenical movement and hopes the churches continue to get closer together. He met his wife Monica at the Food Office. Her father farmed at Rozel and he used to ride up there from town. They were engaged in 1943-she worked as secretary to the Medical Officer of Health and he wrote a presciption for some alcohol for the to celebrate. He started to get involved in a society called Toc H which encouraged public service. They moved to Bagot and he got involved in Georgetown Methodist Church becoming the superintendent of the sunday school and after the war he became chairman of the Jersey Youth Movement. At that stage people were rebuilding and weren't thinking about helping individuals. Harold Stephens and he started to visit the prison to entertain the prisoners. He became a lawyer without qualifications but he learned a great deal through experience. On the 1st January 1947 Mourant, du Feu and Jeune was set up with 39 articles of partnership. He stood in No 2 District unsuccessfully in the late 1950s but he lost. Second Record-Jacqueline du Pré playing Elgar's Cello Concerto. He stood in a by-election in St Helier District No 3 after much persuasion. His main opponent was Norman Le Brocq and he won comfortably and stayed as deputy in No 3 District for 10 years. He was stirred to stand because of the bad housing situation in St Helier. He thought the priorities were in the wrong place like spending money on the tunnel-he brought down two committees at the time. He took on the Presidency of Public Works and decided that the traffic meant that the tunnel was needed. Third Record-The Beatles with It's been a Hard Days Night. In the 1960s he was involved in the baking world and became chairman of the Royal Trust Company of Canada and TSB and the Jersey Savings Bank as it was known then. He finds life fascinating and like to be involved in things. He will carry on working rather than retire. He pushed for an ombudsman when he came into the States because there wasn't an appeal process-eventually a process was brought in. He thinks that the panel should now be made up from people who aren't in the States and it has been approved that he be the first chairman of the body now he has left the States. He once stood for constable of St Saviour when he was deputy of St Helier but Gordon Le Breton, a centenier, won the seat. He enjoyed working on the Education Committee for 15 years and he helped bring in Highlands College, the 14 plus transfer, Le Rocquier School was built and Grainville was bought. Highlands College has pushed on further education. He was worried that Hautlieu was going to be changed from a 14 plus transfer system and still believes in the system. At the start of his presidential career in the States he saw the end of the big politicians from 1948. He has remained a methodist lay preacher-at the beginning of the war he was singing in the choir of the methodist church. Fourth Record-Hallelujah Chorus. Believes in the importance of the Commonwealth Parliamentary Association-he went on his first conference to Canada in 1966. It is one of the few organisations in the world where everybody is equal-he was asked to join the finance committee in London and subsequently they elected him to be the International Treasurer. When he gave up being Treasurer he was one of the Trustees of their investment funds. The value for Jersey going to the conferences are the contacts made, the States members getting a wider perspective of life. He learned that the same kind of problems exist in other jurisdictions. People visit the island in association with the CPA. Wilfred Krichefski and Clarry Dupré were the only people prior to himself who were President of the CPA. Fifth Record-Music of the Night from Phantom of the Opera. Doesn't know what Jersey would have been like if the finance industry hadn't come to the island-in 1962 his first budget was £6 million income and £5 million expenditure-a tight hold were kept on finances. The budgets took time to debate and balance. He is happy with the creation of the Policy and Resources Committee. He implemented the idea of zero job growth in order to lower immigration. Has tried to persuade the States committees to think corporately but hasn't been entirely successful. Fifth Record-St Michael's Choir with 'What a Wonderful World'.

Reference: R/07/B/24

Date: 1997 - 1997

Personal View of Jurat Barbara Myles, the first woman jurat in Jersey and doctor, interviewed by Beth Lloyd. Talking about her early childhood. Education-went to nursery school, a foundations school-interrupted by the second world war which led to her going to three different grammar schools. Her father was a doctor of philosophy-worked in insecticides during the war. Her father came over to Jersey after the war to sort out the Colorado beetle problem. Always wanted to be a doctor and was encouraged. First Record-Little Sir Echo-released when the world changed. Almost got sent to America for safety but stayed. Until 1945/46 lived in Maidenhead and then moved to Kent to school. Tried to get in to train as a doctor but was rejected and then worked in a laboratory. Got a place at Trinity College, Dublin as a medical student-ended with 20 women students. Recalls a disruptive patient. Specialists-were some characters and difficult people. Second Record-Ring of Bright Water sung by Val Doonican. After finishing her medical training came to Surrey near where her parents were living to work in anaesthetics-worked in St Peter's Hospital, Cherstey. Met her husband there who was a surgeon. Worked with him in the casualty department. Got married and started working part time locum work. Had her child Caroline in the autumn of 1960 just after they'd moved house. Was in the house 4 or 5 months when a chance for a job in Jersey came up-decided to move across-had no doubts. Worked in a few locum jobs in anaesthetics in the early 1960s. Had more children-second daughter-1962, third daughter-65, son 68. It was fun but hard work-lived at La Rocque. Third Record-Misalliance sung by Flanders and Swan. Offered work-Jersey Family Welfare Association-needed doctors for their clinics-worked with Dr Crill. Now does 2 half days a week. Got involved with the Jersey College for Girls-was asked to teach health education to the students. Got involved with the Jersey College for Girls Parent Teacher Association-was the president. 1970-asked to work on the Juvenile Court-12 lay members sat with a magistrate-was trained in it. Working in the juvenile court was distressing-difficult to try and change a child's background. There are no easy answers to help the children-have to get the children at an early age. Fourth Record-Mozart's Symphony No 40. Decided to stand for jurat because of the lack of women in the Royal Court. When the time came at the end of her time in the Juvenile Court was asked to become a jurat by Jurat Hamilton. Stood for jurat but did not get in the first time. Decided to stand again because of the support she received. Was nervous when she became a jurat. Jurats sit in the Royal Court as the Inferior and Superior Number, work on the licensing bench, overseeing the job of curator for people who can't manage their own affairs. When trying a criminal case-can worry her-have to work out what you believe. Retirement of Lester Bailhache there are now no lawyers as jurats-thinks there is a case to have lawyers as jurats. Jurats get together to discuss law changes. Nothing had to change when she became the first woman jurat-big change for the other jurats. Fifth Record-Menuhin and Grapelli with Jealousy. Hobbies-sailing-likes to have a break from the island-visits the Ecréhous and the South of Brittany. Ambitions-would like to write. Used to sing in a quartet. Sixth Record-Vera Lynn with When I Grow too Old to Dream. End of Side One. Personal View with Betty Brooke. Started writing a column for the Evening Post in 1966. Asked by Jim Scriven, the editor of the time, to write a column to interest people in island politics. Considered standing for election-is not a committee person. Has more power as a writer than as a politician. Was born and raised in Aberdeen and when the second world war came she became a wren where she met her husband who was a navy chaplain. Wrote and edited for ship's magazines. Her husband retired from the royal navy in 1957 and came to Jersey to a church. Liked the States of Jersey because the people could make a difference. Started as a signals wren, trained at Rosyth and then moved to Liverpool-difficult time-worked 72 hours a week-lost many friends. Became an instructor in London and trained people for D Day. Was going to marry somebody else and he was supposed to conduct the ceremony before they realised they loved each other. First Record-Kathleen Ferrier with Blow the Wind Southerly. Became a naval chaplain's wife-stationed at HMS Royal Arthur and then moved to Leigh on Solent and then to Malta for 4 years. Became a snooker player of some repute. Became a sort of surrogate mother to the naval recruits. Had to move on after 4 years-adopted a baby at this time. Posted to Devenport and after two years retired and was invited to move to the Aquila Road Methodist Church-became a methodist lay preacher soon after she was married. Second Record-Mozart's Ave Verum. Impressions of Jersey-had always wanted to come to the Channel Islands-had organised to come to Jersey and as they were organising it had an invitation from Aquila Road Church to come and preach. Simon, her son was 3, and they lived at West Park Avenue in The Manse. Loved living in Jersey especially the Jersey people-warmth and friendship. Preached in the methodist churches-in 1966 Barry, her husband, collapsed in the pulpit and died. Life changed dramatically-was widowed with a 12 year old son-was necessary to look at life again. Continued in the church for 11 months until another minister was appointed. Grieved with the congregation. Third Record-Frankie Lane with Do Not Forsake Me from High Noon. In 1966 her life took a new turn-had to work-worked as a freelance journalist-wrote two columns for the Jersey Evening Post. Wrote articles for the Daily Telegraph and for women's magazines. Was correspondent for the South West region in Jersey before Radio Jersey was set up and interviewed people for Channel Television. Fourth Record-Mozart's Violin Concerto. Never felt she wanted to publish a permanent record of her thoughts-has written two books-a thriller and her autobiography-may publish it at some point. Doesn't travel a lot but has relatives in America and loves France. Fifth Record-Pie Jesu. Doesn't like to plan for the future-lives for the present. Would like the prosperity of Jersey to continue. Sixth Record-Nat King Cole with Ramblin' Rose. End of Side Two.

Reference: R/07/B/5

Jersey Evening Post Obituary: Jersey politician Reginial R Jeune CBE

Reference: US/1415

Date: April 16th 2015

Jersey Evening Post Newspaper article : A new book, 'A Jerseyman's Journey', detailing the life of one of Jersey's most prominent politicians, Pierre Horsfall, is published

Reference: US/1565

Date: November 24th 2020

JEP Newscutting - Obituary of Betty Brooke, journalist, politician and preacher

Reference: US/668

Date: 2010 - 2010

Jersey Evening Post Newspaper archive article: Photograph showing the removal of Edmund Blampied's cartoons from a shed behind Augrès Post Office wall to La Société Jersiaise's Museum at La Hougue Bie

Reference: US/782

Date: December 6th 2010 - 2010

JEP Newscutting: article about the Baliff paying tribute to two recently deceased Jersey politicians, Helen Baker and Mike Wavell

Reference: US/818

Date: 2011 - 2011

JEP Newscutting: Obituary of Helen Baker, former St Martin's Deputy

Reference: US/898

Date: 2011 - 2011

Page build time: 0.013184785842896 seconds