Channel Islands Occupation Society Tape 2 1) Summer of 1945-a Michael and Margaret Ginns production concerning the liberation of Jersey in the summer of 1945. Includes an introduction to the occupation of Jersey and the restrictions placed upon Channel Islanders by the Germans, the occurrence of D-Day but surrender not occurring in Jersey, the lack of supplies and fuel as a result of being cut off and the rescue of the islanders by the supplies of the SS Vega, news being gained from the crystal radio sets, listening to Churchill's speech in the Royal Square, the meeting of the German officers on the HMS Beagle and the signing of the surrender of the island, liberation forces coming onto the island and the celebrations that took place as a result, German prisoners of war being put to work to clear the devastation that had been left, parades of the British army, the thanksgiving service on the 17th May 1945 and the Royal visit on June 7th, removal and dumping of ammunition and islanders visit the previously off limits fortifications, the island returning to pre war state with the return of the mail boat and deportees and evacuees coming back to the island, finally clearing finishing in 1946 and celebrations to mark the one year anniversary of liberation-22 mins 30 secs. 2) Interned-a study of the deportations of Channel Islanders to internment camps in Southern Germany. Includes the reason islanders were deported, the serving of deportation orders, an exhibition marking the 40th anniversary of its occurrence with many paintings of interest being put on show, details of where the camps, Biberach, Laufen and Wurzach, were located, the make up of the camps, Harold Hepburn and other painters who took deportation as a chance to paint, single men being separated and taken to Laufen, different artists in the camps and examples of work done by Harold Hepburn, Henry Barnett, Sidney Dolby, Irene Grubb, and Joan Salmon, sport that took place in the camps, education, health in the camps, deaths and births of Channel Islanders in the camps, food and the assistance offered by the Red Cross, life continuing as normally as possible with celebrations of birthdays and anniversaries, liberation of the camps, freedom to move into the village and surrounding village and meet German people who had helped them, return to England and the Channel Islands, children adjusting to life without restrictions and the setting up of the Jersey Ex-Internee Association to promote greater understanding between people from Jersey and Wurzach-23 mins. [Master Copy-see L/D/25/J2/2]

Reference: Q/01/2

Date: 1984 - 1984

VHS tape of 3 separate films: 1) Filmed by the Crown Film Unit in 35mm B&W. The Channel Islands 1940 - 1945. Made by the Crown Film Unit within months of the Liberation, 9th May 1945. This is an excellent film which uses islanders to re-enact the hardships they suffered during the Occupation. The film has a detailed commentary throughout. Scenes include: Jerseymen escaping in a rowing boat from Jersey to England. People in attics listening to hidden radios, Churchill can be heard speaking. Jersey scenes showin include St Helier Harbour, Mont Orgueil Castle, Elizabeth Castle, Victoria Avenue and Bellozanne Avenue. Also requisitioning of horses, radios and transport. Description of the underground newspaper, GUNS (Guernsey Underground News Service), secret delivery of the paper. Red Cross ship Vega and unloading and opening of Red Cross food parcels. The making of crystal radios by Andre the hairdresser. Post office where letters to the Gestapo from informers were intercepted by post office staff. Rations in shops. German fortifications around the island, including L'Etacq. Making of crystal radio sets by Mr Taylor and his daughter Peggy. D-Day and Martello tower at Fliquet. Slave workers graves. Film show the improvisation of food supplies by families, Jack and Florice Teel, feeding their two children on carrots and potatoes everyday used caragreen moss. Children queuing for milk rations. Liberation scenes and St Peter Port, Guernsey. 0h 15m 32s 2) Filmed by British Paramount News in 35mm B&W. Newsreel of the surrender by the Germans of the Channel Islands aboard HMS Bulldog off Guernsey, 9th May 1945. Lieutenant Zimmerman (German officer) leaving HMS Bulldog. Brigadier Alfred Snow in charge of the liberating forces, Major-General Heine representing the German commander. Vice-Admiral Hoffmeier (German officer) leaving the island. German troops leaving the garrison on Guernsey. Liberation scenes at the court house in St Peter Port. 0h 03m 30s. 3) Filmed by PK-Filmbericht in 35mm B&W. Title - 'Englische Kanalinseln'. German propaganda film captured by the Allies in Berlin 1945. Scenes include St Helier, troops marching along the Parade, internment camp at Grouville (man playing table tennis is Ken Webb). Potatoes being exported from St Helier Harbour and apple crushing for cider making. St Peter Port, Guernsey and scenes in Sark. 0h 11m 10s This film is located in the Audio Visual Area of the Jersey Archive.

Reference: Q/05/A/58

Date: 1941 - 1945

Alexander Coutanche talks of his duties as Bailiff during the German occupation. Recording originally produced by the Channel Islands Educational Broadcasting Service. Original Reference: Res 1. Includes: concerns that war was building during the years 1935-1939; Home Office committee dealing with the Channel Islands, presided over by Norman Brook; suspension of normal government and institution of the Superior Council; proclamations for the government of the island issued on the arrival of the German forces; mentions different German officers in command of the island; initial expectations of German officers that they would soon be moving on to an occupied England; mentions Mr Prime, his interpreter; daily duties in dealing with the correspondence from the occupying forces; creation of the German field command at Victoria College House, and headquarters for the occupying forces in all the Channel Islands at Roseville Street; regular council meetings; protesting about things he objected to; setting up the Bailiff's News Office to deal with correspondence sent through the Red Cross; changes in island agriculture to become self-sufficient; supplies from France and requisition of cars to pay for this; Summerland knitwear factory set up to provide clothing; effects of D-Day; changes in the German chain of command; relief of the Red Cross ship Vega; deportations; meeting with German commanding officers immediately prior to liberation; surrender of the German forces on the HMS Beagle, and liberation; difficulties of getting the island back on its feet after the war. Recorded in 1971 by Sheila Sibson. Duration 43 minutes.

Reference: R/03/A/5

Date: 1971 - 1971

Episodes nine and ten of the Channel Islands Educational Broadcasting Service series 'Memories of the Occupation'. Episode nine includes: the arrival of the International Red Cross Ship 'Vega' with her priceless cargo of food parcels; Bert and Lily open their Red Cross Parcel; the felling of trees in Dr Symons' garden; the replacement of Count Von Schmettow with Vizadmiral Huffmeier, a fanatic whose aim is to hold out until victory; food is short and stealing rife - a nasty incident occurs at Jack de Garis' farm whilst he and Bonamy Martel together with a German military policeman are standing guard; the narrator talks about the besieged islands, the arrival of the 'Vega', the felling of trees for fuel, the islanders and garrisons still suffer desperate shortages, Von Schmettow replaced by Huffmeier; Lily talks about malnutrition, Red Cross parcels, Fred Noyon's esape to England, escapees to France, the incident at Garis' farm, and crystal radio sets. First broacast on 27/11/1980. Episode ten includes: Baron Von Ausfess warns Duret Aubin to be wary of the fanatical Huffmeier; Von Aufsess and Von Helldorf plot the assassination of Huffmeier; Brigadier Snow sails with the British destroyers Bulldog and Beagle from Plymouth to carry out Operation Nestegg - the liberation of the Channel Islands; British soldiers arrive to liberate Sark - the Dame already has things under control; the narrator talks about the liberation, Huffmeier's fanaticism, Von Helldorf banished to Herm - M. Lambert (French Consul) also plans removal of Huffmeier, Hitler's suicide, Doenitz signs unconditional surrender, Prime Minister's broadcast, Snow receives surrender from Generalmajor Heine for Guernsey and Generalmajor Wulf for Jersey, final summing-up and quote from Jurat John Leale's report to the States of Guernsey; Lily talks about Churchill's broadcast and the liberation. First broadcast 04/12/1980.

Reference: R/03/H/5

Date: November 27th 1980 - December 4th 1980

'An Everyday Occupation' - Members of Age Concern Jersey recall personal memories of eveyday life during the German Occupation 1940 - 1945. Produced and narrated by Geraldine des Forges in conjunction with BBC Radio Jersey. For names of those who contributed, see item description. The recording provides a good summing up of people's experiences from the beginning of the occupation to the liberation. Side A includes: Jersey's situation at the beginning of the war; fears about the possibility of occupation - felt as if the islands had been deserted by the British; decision to stay with family or evacuate and be separated; air raids; arrival of Germans, fear that it caused; many recollections of food shortages, substitutes, cooking, and the black market; bicycles main mode of transport; memories of building and listening to hidden crystal radio sets and distributing news; people sheltered escaped slave workers; arrival of the slave workers and Organisation Todt guards; recollections of the emotional effects of seeing the slave workers and the appaling way in which they were treated; resistance, collaboration and women who formed relationships with German soldiers; prison overcrowding; the field police; escapes; story of being arrested by the Gestapo. Side B includes: story about breaking into communications bunker at Pont Marquet; getting into trouble for criticising 'Jerry-Bags'; informers; escapees left from beach at Fauvic; entertainment; concerts and plays put on; recollections of health problems, malnutrition and medical practitioners; memories of being deported and watching the deportations; hearing news of D-Day landings in France; story of an Algerian worker who brought bread to a local family; some German soldiers were planning a mutiny and distributed leaflets; acts of sabotage such as the blowing up of the Palace Hotel; arrival of Red Cross ship 'Vega' and unwrapping the Red Cross parcels; listening to Churchill's speech in the Royal Square and its impact; the liberation; story of a nun who was suspected of being a German soldier in disguise; arrival of the British troops and outpourings of emotion; collaborators and 'Jerry-Bags' were victimized; more memories of liberation day. Duration approx. 90 minutes.

Reference: R/03/J/3

Date: 1940 - 1945

Original cassette recording - see item description.

Reference: R/03/J/3/1

Date: 1940 - 1945

Occupation-BBC Radio Jersey tape. The story of the occupation of Jersey during World War 2 told by the people who lived through it produced by Beth Lloyd. 1) Part 13: The Todt Organisation and their Russian Slave Labourers. Eye witnesses talking about the background of the Organisation Todt, the arrival of the Russians on the island, the condition they were in, the brutality of their overseers, begging and stealing food, concentration camps, the Jersey Communist Party and other people giving shelter, food, clothes, false papers and english lessons with Mrs Metcalfe to escaped prisoners, the story of Louisa Gould, Harold Le Druillenec and Feodor Burrij and the experience of other residents who harboured escapees. 2) Part 14: Entertainment. Eye witnesses talking about the difficulties of the first show during the occupation put on by the Jersey Amateur Dramatics Club, cinemas and the films that were shown, variety entertainment at the Opera House, West's Cinema and out in the parishes, finding musicians, public dances, the Amateur Variety Band, the Green Room Club productions including pantomimes, easter productions and shows, improvisations with costumes and scenery and censorship of the shows. 3) Part 15: We Are At War. Eye witness accounts of feelings of isolation, seeing and hearing British and German aeroplanes, feeling and seeing bombing raids on the coast of France, leaflet raids, members of the royal air force being taken as prisoners of war, commando raid on Egypt, sabotage, the v sign campaign, resistance and reprisals, youth groups against the Germans, the British Patriots group and Norman Le Brocq and Leslie Huelin working with the Free Germany Movement represented by Paul Muelbach calling for a mutiny in the garrison. 4) Occupation Part 16: Escapes produced by Beth Lloyd made up of interviews of local people who were in Jersey during the Occupation. Subjects discussed include the escape of Denis Vibert to England in September 1941, tales of different escapes to France by islanders recounted by Eddie Le Corre, Basil Le Brun, Peter Crill, John Floyd, Roy Mourant and their subsequent experiences of interrogations by the Home Forces and arrival in England. 5) Part 17: D-Day and the Last Terrible Year. Eye witnesses talking about the realisation that D-Day was taking place, aeroplanes going over the island, lack of fuel and food supplies, health in island worsening, Red Cross parcels, the arrival and unloading of the SS Vega, starvation of German soldiers and waiting for liberation. 6) Part 18: Liberation. Eye witnesses including the bailiff talking about the change in the high command of the german administration and listening to Winston Churchill's speech, release of political prisoners, celebrations, surrender of Germans and arrival of royal navy officers.

Reference: R/06/4

Personal View of Florence Bechelet [with jersey accent] interviewed by Beth Lloyd talking to her about the Battle of Flowers. She has been making floats since 1934, she decided to start when she saw a float in 1928, noticed a carnival class was being held-decided she wanted to take part in it, she made a watering can costume and showed it to a neighbour who said that she'd done very well, was going to walk in with it but it would have been too heavy. At 15 she found an old pram, which she tied with string planks and put a tower shaped clock and vases with flowers on it. With two friends she went to the Battle Of Flowers at Springfield and won 3rd Class in the class with 10 shillings prize money. She was determined to do better next time. She was not artistic at school, she put the floats together by looking at picture of animals to get ideas and cutting a piece of wire bigger than the animal and shaping it. For the first 3 years she made it with hydrangeas. She found out there was a prize for best exhibit in junior class and senior in wild flowers. In 1937 she made a weather house in heather and won first in her class and the junior wild flowers prize, which was 6 solid silver tea spoons. First record-a March from the Band of the Welsh Guards. Battle Of Flowers at Springfield was a smaller scale than today but had beautiful floats. They used a lot more hydrangeas in those days. There was more of a team effort in the past, young people used to put together exhibits, most young people were in the Battle. Springfield-used to hold up to 10,000 people who were mostly islanders but there were a few tourists. Local bands used to play. The outbreak of war stopped the Battle Of Flowers. Her family had a farm but they couldn't export produce and cattle kept being taken by the germans. They were left with 2 cattle, a severely depleted stock, in St Ouen. The Germans took 12 vergees of land in Les Landes. She didn't really deal with the Germans. Food was scarce-a lot of people were saved by the Red Cross parcels. She had planned for the Battle Of Flowers before the outbreak of war but didn't do it until 1951. It was a hunting scene, which won first prize in its class with a prize of £15, first in the junior wild flowers which was a prize of a silver tea set, the prix de merit, which was a prize of a refrigerator which still works today and the best exhibit of the whole show by an individual, which was a prize of a radiogram worth 160 guineas. Second record-Sound of Music. Battle Of Flowers started again in 1951 and went to Victoria Avenue which was a better venue and had a smooth road. She didn't know why it changed back as it started on Victoria Avenue. There hasn't been a Battle at the end of the Battle of Flowers for 7 or 8 years. At the end of the parade she used to have to protect her own float. She has started a Battle Of Flowers Museum through her interest in the event, it has proved popular after the first three years of difficulty. It was opened on 16th June 1971 with one building and then a second, third and fourth with sixteen models from the Battle Of Flowers in total. She has made 40 exhibits for the Battle Of Flowers and 13 exhibits for other fetes including on Grouville Common, St Ouen's Fete, Villa Millbrook and St Andrew's Park-in competition. Her favourite float was made for the Queen and Duke of Edinburgh's visit in 1979 with an exhibit of 40 flamingos, took it to Howard Davis Park and were introduced and talked to the Queen and Duke of Edinburgh who were easy to talk to. The President of the Battle Of Flowers' Association gave her permission to show it before the Battle Of Flowers took place and she used it in the Battle Of Flowers that year although it didn't win a prize and the Association said they couldn't give her a guarantee for it because it had been shown before but it was sorted out although she was upset and didn't exhibit for the next 2 years. Had an exhibit that became a design for a stamp, which was a float of ostriches. She later became allergic to glue. Told by Philatelic Bureau that her design was being used as a stamp-1s 9d. Third Record-Blue Danube. She makes a float by getting a book on animals, making a scene, for example, a jaguar with llamas, keeps the design in her head rather than drawing it, no help given to her-all individual work. She picks the grasses as soon as they're ready. Used to pick them at the sand dunes and now grows her own. Has to sew them each year. She makes her mind up on what the theme will be on christmas day and doesn't change her mind. The float is made from three quarter inch mesh chicken wire. On a horse and bison float-84,000 pieces of grass were used on each horse and 11,000 bunches of approx 20 each on the bison. All her spare time is spent doing things. She is not normally a patient person but enjoys doing it and never gets bored. She dyes the grasses before putting them on the float in a bucket on her gas cooker. Prefers making animals to human figures. She was especially careful when making a Jersey calf figure as she was asked to do so by the Société Jersiaise and she wanted to make sure it was right and kept checking. Fourth Record-Jimmy Shand-chose it because it has a good rhythm. She talks about her exhibits that went to Exeter for Jersey Tourism and Leeds. She went with them and got a good reaction from people as there is nothing like it in England. She went to Guernsey with the Pied Piper of Hamlyn and got first prize. Brought humour into her exhibit, the funniest was a donkey derby. The Battle Of Flowers is not as good as it used to be-early 50s used to be 80 or 90 exhibits-a lot more than today. The young people not interested. The parochial classes not as popular as they can't find a leader. Miss Battle of Flowers is a good idea and provides an extra exhibit. Visitors still very keen. New set up with the arch ways on the Victoria Avenue good. Pictures hanging in museum. Fifth Record-Mary Poppins-Chimchiminy. Went to the ball at the West Park Pavilion as a chicken and won first prize and the tortoise and the hare but she collapsed due to lack of air in the costume. She was unable to compete in the Battle Of Flowers this year because she has been in hospital, told to rest but she has an idea for next years float already. End of Side One. Personal View of Major John Riley. Born in Trinity Manor in 1925. His grandfather came to Jersey in 1908. His ancestry is from Yorkshire and later his grandfather moved to Cornwall and London and came to Jersey in 1908. He had an interest in islands and tried to buy Sark and move to Alderney but moved to Jersey. He was interested in architecture, by profession a theologian but had a love of architecture and took time and money rebuilding the manor which was near derelict when he moved in. The roof had to come off and it was reconstructed in a French style. The architect was Sir Reginald Bloomfield, a London architect. The manor goes back to 1550. It was the seat of the de Carteret family and was successfully restored and enlarged by de Carterets in 1660 and the 19th century. First memories of the manor were of his grandfather who was an imposing and a great church man-morning and evening prayers were in the chapel and many people lived there including 3 uncles and his father but mother died in an accident in 1928 but he had a largely happy childhood. In the 1930s he travelled around England as his father was in the army. It was a contrast to living in manor but it only struck him as odd later in life. Being brought up in a large house was not restrictive, the children had good fun and he had affection for certain parts of house. First Record-Carmen Jones. Schooling-he went to day school in Jersey, preparatory school in England and then school in Winchester when war broke out in 1939. He didn't enjoy school, he was not academic and not good at ball games but it was a good education. During World War 2 his grandfather was allowed to live in the Manor for the first 2 years, the grounds were used as an ammunition dump, later the garrison moved into the house and his grandfather moved to one of the lodges. House undamaged and well looked after. When he arrived back in the island day after the liberation the germans were cleaning the manor. Felt worried about being separated from the island and the only contact was red cross letters which were only 28 words long-had to be careful. Was registered by mistake as an enemy alien card in England. Ambitions-had it not been for World War 2 he may have had an academic career-unsure. Couldn't think of any other profession he would have done apart from the army. His grandfather wanted him to have a classical education, he was an academic man and had stood for parliament but didn't get in. Ended up in the Coldstream Guards-his father had been a member, he has no regrets as he lived with marvellous people. He joined in 1943 and was commissioned in 1944 and joined the forces in North West Europe as a platoon commander. He wasn't frightened of getting killed, the idea of coming home as a wounded war hero appealed, but he had a fear of being frightened. In general the sergeant runs the platoon as they have massive experience and the officers, who had more training, did the planning. He went to North West Germany and saw action for 9 days before he was wounded on 9th March 1945 and evacuated to a hospital in Nottingham 48 hours after. It was the last he saw of the second world war. After he went out to Palestine. They had been earmarked to go to Japan but the bomb was dropped before he had to go. Second Record-Underneath the Arches. He stayed in army for 20 years, working with nice people who trust in each other. He was in a brigade of guards and had a really varied time. Later he was involved in the administration of the army. When he was in the Coldstream Guards he talks about how they felt in full uniform, being very hot whilst on parade, standing still was tiring, he took part in the vigil when the king died. He served in Palestine between 1945-48, then back for 3 months then went out to Malaya for 2½ years which was exciting. As company commander he led a patrol of 14-20 men for a week-10 days in the jungle. His father was still in Jersey at this time and became a jurat in the Royal Court. He came back on leave from time to time. The Manor was not in working order till the mid 50s. When he came back he helped around the Manor. In his army career he became an instructor-dealing with officers in their early 30s who were destined for commanding positions. During the Seven Day War there was both an Israeli and Egyptian who were called back into service. Third Record-Glen Miller. Took the Coldstream Guards Band to America in 1954-for 12 weeks. 160 men would move into a hotel, play a concert, have dinner, go to bed and then move around-strenuous. He left the army in 1963, he was sad to leave but had two young children, schooling was a problem for serving officers. He came back to Trinity Manor, didn't know what he wanted to do, determined to find plenty to do. He took the dairy farm back and got involved in companies and then stood for the States. He decided to go in to politics because he felt he had a responsibility to the island and wanted to give something back. His experience outside of the island was of value. He had no ambitions as a politician-the States was more like local administration. Fourth Record-Noel Coward. Politicians work hard-especially becoming president of a major committee which holds almost a ministerial responsibility, you need to be able to communicate with people. Life going to become more difficult for people in politics. You could run the island with 20 people but would have to pay them, which is against what the island politics is about. Became President of the Defence Committee-linked to his background. Wilfred Krichefski asked him to join the committee and he was able to help because of his military background. It was not like the Ministry of Defence-more like a Committee of Public Safety. Decided to finish in politics last year as he had done 18 years and didn't want to go stale and stand in the way of other people. He wanted to clear the way for other people to be promoted and hopes people don't stay on too long. He has been able to develop Trinity Manor for people to have seminars as he has moved himself in to one end of the house and through this he meets interesting people through the functions and it keeps the Manor occupied. For relaxation he goes sailing during the summer and rides horses in the winter.

Reference: R/07/B/1

Date: 1982 - 1982

Personal View of Bailiff Sir Peter Crill, interviewed by Hamish Marett-Crosby. Has an eclectic musical taste-chosen his records because they are a cross section of music that he likes-he enjoys singing. Used to compete in the Jersey Eisteddfod and now sings in church choirs. Was involved in theatrical productions-started acting at Victoria College-didn't take part during the occupation-didn't want to play to the german soldiers. Took it up again after the war at Oxford University. Helpful to have acted if you want to be an advocate-useful when speaking to a jury. Education suffered during the occupation-there was a shortage of teachers. Pays tribute to the headmaster Mr Tatum who stayed through the occupation. Was moved to Halkett Place Infant School in 1941. Was a teenager so remembers the occupation well-had all night parties despite the curfews. Escaped to France in a boat before the end of the occupation with two friends-between 50-60 did this. Only one real escapee, Denis Vibert, who got to England in 1941. Went to England from France-their information about the hunger in the island and a report by the Bailiff, Lord Coutanche, helped persuade the authorities to allow the red cross ship the SS Vega to come to the island. First Record-Handel's Water Music Suite. Read law at Oxford University-went up in 1945 with the aid of the Howard Davis Trust. He rowed when he was at Oxford in the Head of the River Race. Was called to the Bar in 1949 and called to the Jersey Bar in the same year. Later brought in local examination-there wasn't when he joined. Was on the committee to created the deputy bailiff and became deputy bailiff later. Second Record-Prokofiev's Romeo and Juliet. Reached the conclusion in 1954 to create the post of deputy bailiff-Mr Harrison was the first deputy bailiff, Sir Robert Le Masurier became lieutenant bailiff before becoming bailiff. The second deputy bailiff was Mr Bois [Francis de Lisle] who was appointed in 1963, then Sir Frank Ereaut and then himself. The law has a weight of tradition-he keeps up the tradition but cuts it down, for example, the assize d'héritage-lost its meaning by leaving twice a year-decided to hold it only once a year-added a service and bailiff's reception at the time of the assize d'héritage to add more importance to it. Bailiff performs the role of presiding officer of the States. He was a deputy for 9 years-took a break because his father was ill-has seen it from the benches as well. He was also solicitor and attorney general for 12 years. Finds it difficult to stop speakers repeating themselves-the bailiff has the power to stop members from speaking. There is a need to observe standing orders. There is a rule that speeches should not be read-some people do nonetheless. Third Record-Chopin's Polonaise in C Sharp Minor. Jurats left in 1948 but the constables still sit in the States-wouldn't make a difference if they were elected to the States rather than elected as heads of the parish and sit in the States as virtue of the office. Constables are the oldest members of the States-doesn't want to lose constables as it is a link to the past. The problem with constables sitting in the States is that they are police officers-there's a possible question over the fact that 12 policemen make up a quarter of the States. The country parishes have retained their former way of life more than the urban parishes-in the urban parishes the role of honorary police is much more difficult to maintain. Has noticed a change since the radio started broadcasting the States sittings-more people have started speaking and for longer. Jersey was affected by the French Revolution-progressive parties were formed although it didn't crystallise into definite parties-there was left and right within the States. The States may have been built in a circular so no people were directly facing others in opposition. Fourth Record-A Piece from Aida. The States was also designed so that all of the different groups, senators, deputies, constables, could sit together. There have been groups in the past from the left and right. During the second world war two groups emerged-the Jersey Progressive Party who wanted reform and the Jersey Democratic Movement, who were further to the left. Progressive Party got 17 members in the first post war States-carried out their reforms and then disbanded-they achieved their objective and decided that they did not want to continue as a political party. In the States today he doesn't notice any individual groupings. A difference in degree and not complete opposed political viewpoints. Fifth Record-Bach's Prelude and Fugue in G Minor. Was for 5 years the president of the Société Jersiaise-helped create the Jersey Heritage Trust. The Société wanted to remain as the learned society but could not show all of its collections off properly and in accordance with modern thinking in museums. The Société built an education room but it never got off the ground. When he took over he made it clear that members had a choice-it could remain as a learned society or it could become a trustee of all the acquisitions that they had and receive help-from this the Jersey Heritage Trust was created. The Jersey Heritage Trust was supposed to be a channel of funds from the States to other cultural bodies in the island-believes a grant should be granted to someone like the poet Jeremy Reed. Enjoys music, books, horses, boats and pottering about. Doesn't use a computer now. Does still cycle in the summer. Sixth Record-Gilbert and Sullivan-The Overture to the Gondoliers.

Reference: R/07/B/10

Date: July 11th 1982 - July 11th 1982

1) Programme about the Liberation of the Channel Islands traced through the archives of the BBC. Winston Churchill's speech on Victory in Europe and the liberation of the island. Douglas Willis, a BBC correspondent, who sailed with the liberating forces into the harbour in HMS Beagle and HMS Bulldog-comments on the arrival into the harbour in Guernsey-arrived in the afternoon but a German officer, Captain Zimmerman arrived who didn't have the power to sign the surrender. Zimmerman was told to withdraw with a copy of the surrender in german and english-he told the British forces that if they kept the ship there that it would be considered a hostile action. HMS Beagle and Bulldog withdrew until they were called to a rendez-vous at midnight so that Major General Heine could sign the surrender. For the first time in 6 years HMS Bulldog is lit up. Heine came out in a ship but did not leave in order to board the HMS Bulldog-the commander of the HMS Bulldog started to get impatient-they turned on the searchlight-the boat arrived after 10 minutes. Commentates on Major General Heine getting on the ship and going to sign the surrender-recording of the surrender. At 6.30 on May 9th Douglas Willis sent another report from HMS Bulldog commentating on the surrender of the german commander in chief and his garrison-waiting for more than 5½ hours-moved towards Guernsey. Recording of British soldier demanding the signing of the surrender. Report at 7.15 on May 9th by Douglas Willis on the surrender of the German forces. Brigadier Snow transferred to HMS Beagle to go to Jersey to receive the surrender of the German garrison-anchored off St Helier Harbour at 10am-Wolf was ordered to the ship but failed to appear immediately. Alexander Coutanche, the bailiff, explains that he was called to meet the German commander in order to accompany him to the boat. When he arrived he found Wulf had his staff officers with him and when he saw that he demanded that his officers came as well-they waited for him. The bailiff sent messages to both the King and Winston Churchill-on May 12th the King issued a royal proclamation about the freeing of the Channel Islands [which is read out]. On the 1 o'clock news on the 16th May it was reported that Herbert Morrison had a great reception on a visit to St Helier-the next day the shops were due to be filled with goods. In Guernsey Herbert Morrison talks about his visit to the Channel Islands. On the 5th June the bailiff spoke on radio-talks about the Jersey residents in the armed forces, his thanks towards the government in the UK, the force under Brigadier Snow and the Channel Islanders who were deported during the second world war and his wish to hurry their return to the island although warns that the islands may have changed from when they left them and he talks about the changes and difficulties that the island experienced during the occupation-the shortages, rationing, worsening conditions and the Red Cross. On the 7th June the royal visit of King George VI and Queen Elizabeth took place. BBC Correspondent Howard Marshall reporting about the King and Queen arriving at the States building and meeting the bailiff, the crowds in the Royal Square to see the royal visit, playing of the national anthem, going in and coming out of the States Building with a fanfare and the car being driven away. On christmas day 1945 Harold Le Druillenec, the only British survivor of Belsen, was chosen to introduce the King's message to the Commonwealth-talks about his experience in the concentration camp, the death of his sister and his survival, his life during the occupation in the Channel Islands and the freedom they now experience. 2) Tom Salmon interviewing Sir Alexander Coutanche. Talks about the office of bailiff and its 3 main functions-presiding in the court, presiding in the States and administrative work. Started as a member of the Bar during the first world war, came back to practice in Jersey in 1920 and soon after that he was elected as a deputy in St Helier. After 3 years he was appointed as the solicitor-general and then attorney-general and then bailiff. He is been a member of the States for 38 years in different capacities. Became the bailiff in 1935. When he became solicitor-general in 1925 he knew there needed to be a reorganisation of the public services-by 1935 the reorganisation had taken place. Saw the possibility of Jersey as a tourist destination-was interested in the building of the Airport and updating of the harbours. The increase in tourism meant a reorganisation in society in order to deal with visitors and hotel workers. Was responsible for the establishment of the first housing scheme. The arrival of the second world war-no one believed that there was going to be an occupation. The island was prepared to receive soldiers from St Malo as a defensive position-the Germans didn't go directly to St Malo and so the soldiers could get back to Britain safely. As a result the British troops were removed and the islands were left undefended-the Jersey people felt horror at this news. When the evacuation was completed he was ordered to take on the responsibilities of both bailiff and governor-a war time government was established to speed up the process. When the British troops left they offered to blow up the public utilities but he pointed out they'd be needed for the residents and so they decided to leave them as they were. On the day the German soldiers landed he was in his house in the morning and he received notice that papers had been dropped ordering the surrender of the island. He had told residents that when he could not guarantee their safety he would lower the flag from Fort Regent and that day he went to Fort Regent and lowered the flag. When at Fort Regent received a message saying the Germans had landed at the Jersey Airport-he went out there and the German officers explained that Jersey was occupied. The German officers were young airborne troops-later he came to the house and read proclamations. They enquired about supplies and when he told them of the stocks of food they didn't think rationing would be necessary as they were on their way to England. After the Battle of Britain he met the officer again who said he felt sorry for them as a paper war was about to begin-a large administration was then brought in. Jersey was lucky because the heads of the administration were gentlemen-he could deal with them. He was always convinced that Britain would win-never thought they'd be here for ever. As a representative of his people-he had to deal with the Germans-he had no means of letting the people know what and why he was doing things-could gain great advantages but people wouldn't know about it. Felt no moral qualms about the things they did because the one thing they wanted to do was make sure the people of the island survived. Felt lonely-his wife often felt worse. There was nothing anyone could do in terms of sabotage-punishments would follow like wirelesses were taken away. When they were taken away he didn't have a secret set but was kept up to date with news. The worst time was in 1942 when the deportations took place-wanted to resign but was persuaded to stay. The conditions after D-Day were terrible-had no gas, electricity, coal or bread or a lot of other things. Had soup rations given out. If you lived in the country you were better off than the town people. He was able to have a fire because of the trees in his garden and had candles so he was fortunate. Everybody lost weight-his wife lost a great deal. The Germans near the end changed the people in the high command-the head was an admiral who he never got on with. He was determined never to surrender-he only surrendered when he was ordered to do so-had to climb down. Addressed the people in the Royal Square-played Winston Churchill's speech over loudspeakers in the Square and celebrations took place but they were not liberated until the next day on his birthday, 9th May 1945. During the war he protested-that was all he could do. After the liberation the problems were getting people back to the island. The constitutional set up of the island were examined-were asked how to reform the States and Royal Court and most of these were approved. The great task was to put in place the political reforms-15 years later they were not quite put in place. Housing was a great problem at that time-people coming back. Proud of the changes since the war. End of Side One. 3) Deportee Bob Samson being interviewed about a society that was formed after a visit to Germany in 1971 with the aim to foster better relationships between Jersey and the German people. Was an internee for 3 years. He was born in Birmingham-he was the only one in his family born outside of the island. He wasn't badly treated. About 2000 people were sent out of the island in six weeks. Was given notice of a day that he was to be deported-he received it a week before he was 18. He was not worried about being sent to Germany but his mother and father were worried. They couldn't stop him being sent away. He looked after himself on the boat-he knew people on the boat from St Ouen. Deportee Maurice Hill being interviewed about being arrested in September 1942 after protesting against the deportation of English born people to Germany. Was one of 13 arrested outside of the Barra Hotel. Was sentenced in a German court for 4 months-it was reduced to a month and he was released after 3 weeks but in February 1943 he was sent to Laufen. He was sent to the local prison in Jersey and Laufen was an old castle. The guards were regular soldiers but they did have an SS search once for a radio. The head of Laufen offered to take it and return it after the SS search which they did. They were supposed to get the German front line soldier but they didn't have much. A couple of people attempted to escape including an ex island footballer Cyril Dale who left with a Guernsey boy, Bill Russell-got as far as Vienna before getting caught. Bill Russell escaped when in Yugoslavia and joined the partisans. Laufen was an all male camp, families went to Biberach originally and then most of them went to Wurzach. They had a football pitch for entertainment on a small island-if they misbehaved it would be closed. There was a concert hall, table tennis table. All the equipment came through the Red Cross-received red cross parcels. They were released on May 4th-were listening to the news and saw American troops and ran out-they didn't know their was an internment camp in the village. Got back to Jersey in September but some got back before that and some after. 4) Personal view of Michael Ginns, a founder of the Channel Islands Occupation Society (Jersey Branch), interviewed by Beth Lloyd. The CIOS was originally founded in Guernsey in 1966 and the Jersey branch was formed in 1971 for the purpose of reporting and collating all aspects of the occupation. Believes some bunkers should be preserved for posterity-one day the bunkers will be looked upon in the same way as the martello towers. The bunkers and constructions were mostly built to fortress standards-will last a long time. The Germans left the bunkers in working order-straight after the occupation people went to the bunkers and took souvenirs-when the British troops arrived they took out the hardware which was dumped in the sea. Each type of the smaller weapons were given to the States of Jersey but everything else was dumped into the sea. As the years went by the bunkers were used as rubbish tips and so in the early 1960s all bunkers on public land were sealed to the public. Some are now open because in 1976 he thought it would be a good idea to open the Noirmont Bunker to the public-wrote to the Public Works Committee and they told him that in the winter they would go and look at it to see its prospects. The committee was later taken over by Senator John Averty-he was keen to open it and allowed the CIOS to look after it. Since then they have given the responsibility for the associated observation tower nearby, the bunker at Corbière, La Carrière, St Brelade and the Gun Emplacement and Underground Bunkers at Les Landes, St Ouen. Have 170 local member in the CIOS of which a dozen are very active. Noirmont is open twice a month for visitors. First Record-A german march. He was 11 years old when the second world war started. He had just started at Victoria College in 1939. Life continued as normal at first but had to carry his gas mask. He enjoyed it as a boy-liked seeing aeroplanes fly overhead. Knew the Germans were coming-after the evacuation there was a calm. His father though of evacuating but never managed to leave. The Germans moved into Victoria College House. Carried on at school-it began at 10 o'clock. In 1941 Victoria College moved to Halkett Place as it was taken over by the Germans as a barracks. In 1941 a German schools inspector visited Victoria College. The first he knew of deportation was when he was visiting town with his mother and she was told by a friend that the deportations were to take place. They were fortunate because it was a Tuesday but they didn't leave until Friday-some had to leave within 24 hours. Had to send animals to the Animal Shelter to be put down. Had to report at Grouville Station where a bus was laid on to take them to St Helier. Had to report to the JMT Garage on the Esplanade-they were on the last bus and couldn't get on the ship. Went home-some went home to empty houses which had been looted by neighbours. When they came back 21 days later people held back and weren't deported-there was a minor deportation in February 1943. Second Record-Vera Lynn with 'The White Cliffs of Dover'. The journey from France to Germany has to be looked at in terms of the time. They were the only prisoners at the time being transported in second class railway carriages as opposed to good carriages. They got in to the train at St Malo-were warned to bring enough food for two days and were given some food by the German soldiers. Arrived at Biberach-they then walked up to the camp-it was a prisoner of war camp. Quickly organised themselves in the camp-Captain Hilton was appointed camp senior. Education was laid on for everyone in the first 6 weeks but during this time they were being sorted out. Single men over 16 went to Laufen, married couples with children went to Wurzach and single couples stayed in Biberach and were joined the Guernsey deportees who were following. The rations from the Germans left you hungry but not starving but without the red cross parcels they would have been in trouble. He preferred Wurzach where he moved to-everything was under one roof. Life for a teenage boy-there were football matches, stage shows. It was difficult for a parent with a young family and older people. His mother was matron of the camp hospital-she was asked by Dr Oliver who went with them. Mrs Hutton was the first matron of the hospital but she died in 1943 and his mother took over. His father was ill and spent time in hospital-he was repatriated in September 1943 because of ill health. He was the only child-was in a room with 20 other men and boys there own age-used to collect bread and milk from the village. Had visits from the Red Cross and they decided they needed more room to exercise. There were organised walks outside of the camp twice a week-the guard would sometimes stop at the pub and they had some money from the government. They were repatriated in March 1945 to join up with his father-Germany was falling apart at this time but they were taken on a Red Cross train through Germany, Denmark into Gothenburg, Sweden. Crossed from Gothenburg to Liverpool. They returned to Jersey on July 28th 1945. Everything was intact in their home. Third Record-The Watermill. Felt pleased to be home but was annoyed that he missed the liberation of the camp and Jersey. He and his friends went to Mr Robinson's private school in Balmoral Terrace and he took the school certificate. He joined the army and went to Bodmin-got as far as Nottingham but didn't go abroad-was a vehicle mechanic who worked on tanks-stayed for 6 years. Fourth Record-The theme from the television series We'll Meet Again. When he left the army he started to work in the post office in Nottinghamshire-worked there from Christmas 1952 until May 1953 when he came back to Jersey and became a postman and has been so ever since. Can have problems with dogs but generally are not too bad. Knows about jersey buses-is fascinated by the transport systems of Jersey-wrote a book about the buses in Jersey. Is involved with the Jersey Camera Club and with David Bishop and his wife they produce tape slide sequences. They visited the Royal Air Force base in Cranwell after the RAF visited Jersey and saw his slide show sequences about the occupation and invited them to show them at the base-enjoyed the trip. Fifth Record-Royal Air Force March Past played the Central Band of the Royal Air Force. Enjoys writing books about the occupation. Archives are still being discovered. Most of his work is taken up by running the CIOS. His wife shares his interest in the occupation. Wants to write a definitive work on the defences of the Channel Islands.

Reference: R/07/B/14

Personal View of Senator Pierre Horsfall, the President of Finance and Economics, interviewed by Geraldine des Forges. His earliest memories of the island are of the occupation-remembers the red cross parcels and the liberation. Lived at Rue du Galet in Millbrook-remembers lots of aeroplanes flying over and his brother running outside and coming back and shouting, "They're ours". Didn't feel the hardship of the occupation-remembers going to the bakery to pick up his meals but never felt deprived. Had some contact with german soldiers-one used to give him presents and he considered him his friend. Went to Firmandale School at Beaumont and then he went to St Mark's Primary School which was a very good school. Moved to Victoria College Preparatory School on a scholarship-enjoyed the sciences but never worked particularly hard at them. There was more discipline in schools when he went to school-the standards have slipped since. He then went to Victoria College-enjoyed his time there-had many teachers who had been in the army so it was a good standard of discipline and teaching. First Record-Clair de Lune by Debussy. In the 1950s his mother managed the Grève de Lecq Hotel so they were allowed to do what ever they wanted at Grève de Lecq. Remembers how good the weather used to be-befriended Frank Carré, a fisherman at Grève de Lecq, who he helped going fishing. Used to swim off Grève de Lecq for an afternoon. Went in to a cave off Grève de Lecq and went through to discover a new bay-used to show guests from the hotel to the bay for money. Used to go to school on the bus and he also had a bicycle. He used to be very free-much more so than the modern world. Avoided sport as much as possible-ended up taking up shooting. From an early age he made model aeroplanes-he always wanted to be an aeronautical engineer-he decided he wanted to work for the Bristol Aeroplane Company and he achieved that aim. He never aimed to go into politics. Second Record-12th Street Rag by Peewee Hunt. Moved to England for his first job with the Bristol Aeroplane Company as a student. Did a sandwich course where he studied for six months and worked for six months in the factory-did this for 3 years and then a further 3 years after that. Worked hard on his course and job-enjoyed the experience. He often put himself forward to take part in jobs. Worked in lots of different aircraft. The design office was working on supersonic transport-worked with a french company to produce concorde. He knew french and so he made sure his managers knew this-he was taken on board by the company directors to the meeting between the British and French-he was involved for six years. He had several roles-he was at first taken because he spoke French and knew what was going on, he then went into a liaison department with the French factory-did a lot of travelling. Third Record-Music from Coppelia. In the early days there was a honeymoon with the French-when the work started there started to be differences of opinion. There were also a lot of enjoyable nights out. The language was a problem because there wasn't simultaneous translation. Feels proud when seeing concorde now. Came back to Jersey because the family business would have been sold otherwise-looked after the hotel. Tourism standards were lower in those days-standards were starting to be raised. A lot more elderly people came to the island at that time. There was always plenty of business around-people didn't realise that tourism was going to decrease. Decided to stand for the States-he was on the Jersey College for Girls PTA and from that someone suggested that he stand for politics. He was deputy of St Clement in 1975. Fourth Record-Piece from Carmina Burana. He spent six years as president of the Agriculture and Fisheries Committee and enjoyed it a great deal. He became president of the Island Development Committee, joined the Policy Advisory Committee and after Agriculture he became President of the Finance and Economics Committee. He set up an office to work at home and withdrew from the hotel business. Being President of the Finance and Economics Committee means a lot of duties-finds it challenging and tiring. He feels the greatest sense of achievement over an amendment to increase the size of the waterfront and feels good that he helps in the politics of the island. He thinks Jersey is secure but it must be careful and address the current problems. Has a happy family life-his wife is a keen horse woman-spends a lot of time watching horses. They enjoy travelling and visit London to see his daughter. Feels if he gets elected that he would stay in the States for one more term of six years. Fifth Record-Piece from Nabucco by Verdi.

Reference: R/07/B/18

Date: September 20th 1992 - September 20th 1992

Personal View of Vi Lort-Phillips, Jersey's lady of the camellias, interviewed by Beth Lloyd. Talks about her love of flowers-it came late in life. Lived in London as a child and was not born in Jersey but her maiden name, St Alban, has an Island connection. Born in London. Was in London in 1915-her uncle was the first officer VC. Met Rudolph Valentino as a teenager who kissed her hand. First Record-Mad Dogs and Englishmen by Noel Coward, who she met after going to the dentist and couldn't laugh at any of his jokes. Got married young after both her parent had died at 15 and 15-married a soldier from the Scots Guards. After they married he left the regiment and worked in London and she went travelling-was unusual. Decided to visit Russia with Primrose Harley a friend of hers-learnt russian. Used to be interested in sport-she was very interested in horses. Her husband got polio and was on sticks for a long time-had to give up shooting. She had a motor accident and her foot was crushed so she couldn't continue participating in sport. Second World War-During the Battle of Britain was playing croquet with polish pilots after they returned after their sweeps. Was an air raid warden-she resigned because she was afraid of the dark. Her husband worked in the War Office. Second Record-The Regimental March of the Scots Guards. Came to Jersey in the early 1950s-she didn't know she was going to come-her husband decided to buy a cottage in Jersey when a friend decided not to move there. Her husband had always wanted to live on an island. She sat for Augustus John who drew charcoal drawings of her-drew 12 drawings of her in 9 years-met many interesting people. Was fascinated by his fascination whenever he drew her. Bought La Colline in 1957 and the garden developed gradually. Her interest was triggered off by coming into a bit of money-decided to build a garden in memory of her brother Teddy St Alban who died whilst flying at the end of the war. Has some rare plants in the garden-when she went to Australia, Japan and America-joined the International Camellia Society-got a wonderful reception in Japan. Collected plants from around the world on her travels. Bred a flower called Magnolia Jersey Belle-was adjudged a hybrid. Third Record-Pastoral by Beethoven. President of the International Camellia Society-started in 1961/2 and has just over 1000 members from nearly all temperate zones. There are many kinds of different camellia-in China they use them for medicinal purposes in Japan they are grown as a crop for charcoal and in the west the main use is decoration. They can be flowering for six months of the year. You need to have acid soil for the flowers to grow. Has travelled with the International Camellia Society-had a conference in Jersey, visited Spain and Portugal. This year went with 40 to China for a conference-took 128 camellias to China and planted a Garden of Friendship. Fourth Record-Hole in the Road by Bernard Cribbens. Personal View of Phyllis Haines, headmistress of Helvetia House School. The school has always been run by her family-it was founded by her aunt, 16 years later her mother took it on and after the second world war she took it on. Her origins were mixed-her great great grandfather Etienne Joste on her mother's side came to Jersey in 1793 from Switzerland-set up a bakery and confectionary shop in Halkett Place and became naturalised-it cost 120 livres. He got married to a Jersey girl, Jeanne Le Bas, in 1795. Their grandson Captain Elias Joste bought the house for his elderly parents and educated his nieces, one of the nieces Eva Joste, started the school and her mother continued. Went to school at Helvetia but wasn't taught by her mother, later on went to courses in London and France. Later on specialised in maths with Mr Kellett from Victoria College. Always wanted to be a teacher-both sides of her family were teachers. Her mother and aunt were not trained as teachers. She didn't go to university-no grants. Went to England via the mailboat and went to London and later visited her father's family. First Record-'Love Is Meant to Make us Glad' from Merry England. Was brought in to teach at Helvetia when she was 21/22. The school has always done well. When her aunt started the school she had 5 pupils, before the war 80, after the war 40 and now 95-100. Used to be a secondary school but is now just a primary school. Social life-she loved dancing-used to enjoy dancing at the West Park Pavilion. Was involved in St Helier's Literary Society-flourished before the war-had Amy Johnson coming to speak to them. Before the war they were talking about getting Winston Churchill over to talk to them-would have cost £50. Involved in acting-inherited from her family-helped start a group called the Unnamed Players with Arthur Dethan and Keith Bell and others so that they could put on plays-the first one was 'The Importance of Being Earnest' at Victoria College and Pride and Prejudice for the Literary Society-both produced by Grace Pepin. It wasn't a very big club-about 10 people and stopped when the war started. Enjoyed travelling abroad-one to the Mediterranean and one to the north. Second Record-The Isle of Capri. Decided to stay in Jersey during the occupation-went out to the Jersey Airport and couldn't get an aeroplane and her mother was too old to go on the boat so stayed. Decided to keep the school open-got orders from the Germans that they had to teach German and joined together with St George's School to do so. Because of a lack of food sport was not allowed to be played in schools. She enjoyed the dances during the occupation. Drama flourished during the occupation-helped the population. She joined the Green Room Club during the war and joined the Jersey Amateur Dramatics Club after the war. Every fortnight a performance was taking place and so she appeared a great many shows. She was involved in the Children's Benefit Fund-it came about because some money was made at school and she wanted it to help children and she got in touch with the hospital and they set up a fund under Arthur Halliwell to enable parents to buy rations for their children. Red cross parcels came in at an important time. Just before the war she'd taken part in a play at West Park Pavilion to raise money for the Red Cross International Society and she was glad that they had because later they saved people's lives. During the occupation the most dramatic change was the lack of radios and letters-despite the red cross messages. A lot of her friends were deported. Were aware when D-Day took place-entertainments were stopped but started again later but often the electricity used to fail and people ended up using lighters to light up the stage. Third Record-Rachmaninov's 'Prelude in C Sharp Minor'. End of Side One. Personal View of Diane Postlethwaite, clairvoyant, astrologer and fortune teller. Was taught from an early age to read tarot cards, hands and crystals. Learnt astrology later and she combines all of the disciplines. She was born with the gift and was not well at the age of 3½-became sensitive to people. Astrology is a science and an art and you need to be slightly clairvoyant to do it. Crystal ball-people hold the crystal and then you take them from them and pick up images from it. Tarot cards-you are given formulas for their use. First Record-All Things Bright and Beautiful. Was 3½ when she was told she had the gift-her mother found her in a church sitting up by the altar being very aware. Told her mother she would have a sister and she did. During the war years was separated from her mother and was taught to read tarot cards by a gypsy. Used to read her friend's fortunes. Went to a convent and the reverend mother caught her playing cards and called her 'a child of the devil'. Became a hairdresser but still told people's fortunes. Took it up as a career in her mid 30s-lived in India with her husband and learnt astrology, she met Mother Theresa in India and some Tibetan people who encouraged her to take it up as a career. She had had her eyes opened in India seeing the poverty and suffering that people suffered. Enjoyed her life in India. Second Record-Ravi Shankar. Went to England and Bermuda after leaving India-encountered voodoo which was frightening. Was going to move to South Africa but ended up coming to Jersey. Have been in Jersey for almost 10 years. Did some fortune telling at a Jersey Choir bazaar and her career took off from there. People are interested in fortune telling now-start of the 'Age of Enlightenment'. People looking for an answer-she is used as a crutch by some people. Learnt meditation to remove herself from other people's problems. Is a practicing Christian. When people come to have their fortunes read she starts with their astrology, then reads their hands. Uses tarot cards for general reading. Tries to help people who come to her with illness-their are many psychic healers in the island. Medicine and healing should be used together. People write to her for advice including people with business contracts. Replies to people by using clairvoyance. Third Record-Bob Newhart with 'The Driving Instructor'. Has been called in to use her clairvoyance to help solve crimes. In the 1600s she could have been burnt for being a witch-has experienced witchcraft in the island-goes to the church for help. Is against the use of ouija boards and witchcraft. Can see beyond what other people sees but can switch it off when she is with her family. Has seen things about her family and herself but does not look into them. Her family are tolerant and help her with her work. They can get annoyed with people who impose on them. Fourth Record-Cosmos. Gets involved in spirits in the house-believes a poltergeist is a magnetic force or the spirit of somebody who hasn't moved on-gets a priest out to help get rid of them. Has been to an exorcism. Spiritualism-can fell when people have died. Feels she is here to help people. The church doesn't agree with astrology but she believes in it. Fifth Record-Joyce Grenfell. During the summer visits a lot of Women's Institutes and take part in bazaars. One fete she was put down by a band. Has just bought a computer to help with her job-will programme people onto her computer. Astrology in the newspaper are very general and difficult to do because of different factors. Some people use their gifts to charge a lot of money but she doesn't believe in it. Her grandmother was psychic and so is her sister. Used to play golf and paint but doesn't get time to do them now. Would like to take up art again. She gets involved in her gift when she goes on holiday. Sixth Record-Chariots of Fire by Vangelis. Tells the future of Jersey for the year including predicting vandalism on the ferries to increase, the States of Jersey defence and fisheries will be discussed and we may have a tremor, oil off the coast will be found within two years, peace and environment groups activities will increase and drugs come under jurisdiction-bright year for the Island. Runs through the horoscopes for the year and the predictions for BBC Radio Jersey.

Reference: R/07/B/8

BBC Radio Jersey-Occupation Tapes. Told by the people who lived through it produced by Beth Lloyd. Part 17: D-Day and the Last Terrible Year. Eye witnesses talking about the realisation that D-Day was taking place, aeroplanes going over the island, lack of fuel and food supplies, health in island worsening, Red Cross parcels, the arrival and unloading of the SS Vega, starvation of German soldiers and waiting for liberation. See R/06/4.

Reference: R/07/F1/17

Date: August 5th 1990 - August 5th 1990

Jersey Evening Post article : The Red Cross Ship, SS Vega, delivered desperately needed food to the Channel Islands

Reference: US/1383

Date: May 9th 2016

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