Photographic slide of two altar boys following a clergyman into a ?Trinity Church - entitled ' Following the Plough into the Church'

Reference: P/09/A/2677

Date: 1970 - 1990

Photographic slide of a stone sculpture of a figure holding the body of Jesus Christ(?), mounted on a wall - possibly at Abbaye d'Hambye.

Reference: P/09/A/574

Date: 1970 - 1990

Photographic slide of a stone sculpture of a figure holding the body of Jesus Christ(?) - possibly at Abbaye d'Hambye

Reference: P/09/A/575

Date: 1970 - 1990

Jersey Talking Magazine-July 1978 Edition. Introduction by Gordon Young. Gadgets for the blind feature with Tim including barometers, sound beacon and liquid level indicator. Local stories feature-Roy Fauvel talking about vraic, its uses, the history of its collecting, the variants of vraic, seasons for vraic. Joan Stevens talking about St Brelade including St Brelade's Church, the saint of the parish, Fisherman's Chapel-stained glass designed by HT Bosdet, the perquage, the bells in St Brelade, Beauport, La Moie Quarries, Les Quennevais, La Corbiere and the lighthouse, Portelet Bay-story of Captain Philip Janvrin and Janvrin's tomb, martello towers at Ouaisne and St Brelade's Bay and Noirmont Point-history and german fortifications. Robin with tips for the blind about mowing the lawn. Mike Le Cocq's interview with David Haydn-Thomas talking about guide dogs for the blind. June Gurdon talking to Jessie Hickford, the author of the book about guide dogs that had been serialised on the magazine for the previous few months, 'Eyes at My Feet'. End of Side One. Mike Le Cocq interview with Peters and Lee-Lennie Peters talking about being blind, Diane Lee talking about her singing and talking about their future. Actor and performer, David Kossoff talking about his career, his life, his time on the stage, his writing work, his adaption of bible stories, the death of his son from drugs and his plans for the future.

Reference: R/05/B/21

Date: June 30th 1978 - June 30th 1978

Jersey Talking Magazine-May Edition. Introduction by Gordon Young. Talk by Sir John Wilson, President of the Royal National Institute for the Blind, talking to the Jersey Lions about his experiences of talking to Lions groups in the past, visiting Bangladesh and facing the poverty of the country and a description of the help given by the Lions worldwide to the blind including an eye clinic. Interview with Miss Cogan, the sister of the Archbishop of Canterbury, talking about her brother as a youngster, his role in the church, the worst days he had as archbishop, his career and her beliefs in God. Guernsey Feature-Reverend Kenneth Cadman, vice-dean of Guernsey and priest of St Pierre du Bois Church, giving a tour around his church giving a description of its features. Horoscope Feature-Diane Postlethwaite talking about the forecast for taurus for the year. Competition winners and a new competition. End of Side One. Beth Lloyd interviewing Frank Topping and Donald Swann. Asks Frank Topping of his job at the BBC, Donald Swann talks about his late singing partner Michael Flanders, talk about their double act writing and performing songs and stories to promote religious ideas, talks about their performances together, how they get their religious ideas over, writing, shows around the country. Simon Lloyd interviewed about his experiences sailing on HMS Jersey, a fishery protection vessel, talking about his experience on the vessel, stopping a French trawler within Jersey waters, describes the vessel HMS Jersey, his ambitions as a Naval Officer, his favourite part of the trip and radar techniques. Chris and David at Quetteville Mill, talking about the way the mill works, how the mill works and a description of the mill and other mills in the island with the noise of the mill working.

Reference: R/05/B/42

Date: April 30th 1980 - April 30th 1980

Jersey Talking Magazine-September Edition. Introduction by Gordon Young. Joan Stevens taking a tour of St Clement talking about the early history of the parish, St Clement's Church including the piscina, the font, the paintings on the wall, the line of the roof, stone seats around the base of the pillars and the priory, the size of the parish, the effects of the sea, prehistoric remains including the dolmens, menhirs and prehistoric graves of the parish. The chapel that was dedicated to St John the Evangelist before the Reformation which was destroyed, Rocqueberg which was used by a witches coven, Jean Mourant and others who were killed for being witches. Talks about 1685 when they received french refugees, Le Hocq Tower-a Jersey Round Tower, Victor Hugo who lived at Marine Terrace from 1853 to 1855, Samares Manor including the fact it took its name from the salt around the manor, the dovecote, a windmill in 1218, the chapel, the families who held the manor who were the de Ste Hilaire's, the Payn's, the Dumaresq's, the Seale's, the Hamon's, the Mourant's and Sir James Knott who renovated the garden. Before that Philippe Dumaresq built a garden, he also wrote an important survey on Jersey in the 1680s. Cooking Feature-Margaret Jenkins giving recipes for desserts. Guernsey Feature-Linda Le Vasseur talking to Joan Stockdale, a Guernsey journalist for a newspaper, asking her why she decided to become a reporter, how she started, how she felt when she started, how it developed, her women's and children's pages, the most interesting people she has interviewed, interviewing Michael Parkinson, Jimmy Saville, Frank Bough, Peter Sellers, Oliver Reed, the most difficult part of the job, coping with a career and a family, her interest in tropical birds, her collection of amber, her favourite books and her advice for the listener who wants a career in journalism. Horoscope feature-Diane Postlethwaite talking about the forecast for virgo for the year. End of Side One. Driving down to Corbiere, on top of tower-radio aerials-home of Jersey Radio, the nerve centre of Jersey shipping communications and run by the Harbours and Airport Committee-describing the structure, talking to Mr Dale about a rescue taking place of a fishing boat, the view from the tower, the wind blowing, the increased need for Jersey Radio, what Jersey Radio does and is told by boats, working with the French, dealing with a rescue, the frequencies used, what's happening with the rescue, the transmissions between the officials dealing with the rescue, the use of air rescue, the frequency and types of emergencies. Story read by Peter Gilchrist about Mike Tetley, a guide dog owner and completely blind, who appeared on This is Your Life and climbed up Mount Everest describing his life, his training and the process by which he climbed the mountain. Quiz-Gordon Young announces the winner from the previous month and sets a new quiz. End of Side Two.

Reference: R/05/B/46

Date: August 31st 1980 - August 31st 1980

Jersey Talking Magazine-June Edition. Introduction by Gordon Young. Beth Lloyd talking to Maurice Gautier, a beekeeper, about why he doesn't want Queen's Valley flooded, the bees in the valley, the trees and plants that Jersey bees like, the taste of Jersey honey, the different seasons and their effects on the bees, about 80 beekeepers with up to 480 colonies of bees on the island and what to do if bees swarm. Pat Dubras reads the Joyce Grenfell poem 'Time'. Beth Lloyd interviewing Paul Birt regarding a textbook to aid the teaching of Jersey Norman French about how he came to be involved in the language, the textbook helping people to learn jèrriais, the importance of keeping the language, the teaching of jèrriais in schools, the interest in jèrriais outside of the island, working with Dr Frank Le Maistre and the length of time it will take to compile the book. Phil Gurdon talking to Don Lusher about being lead trombonist with the Ted Heath Band, working with Frank Sinatra, his three bands that he runs-the Don Lusher Big Band, the Don Lusher Quartet and the Don Lusher Trombone Ensemble together with the revival of the Ted Heath Band, named as musician of the year by the BBC Jazz Society in 1976, how you differentiate between a great and good musician, holding music clinics for brass musicians, coming to Jersey in June to do a clinic with a brass band and playing a concert, being a faculty member in Belmont College, Nashville for a trombone clinic with some of the greatest trombone players in the world and working as a session trombone musician with Don Lusher playing his own piece of music. End of Side One. Frank Korowoski, a blind man, talking about his holiday in East Germany including entering the country for the first time, the officials checking passports, reaching Berlin, seeing the Berlin Wall, getting off the train, meeting the German Red Cross who were to guide him whilst in the country, his impressions of the country, meeting an East German blind lady who he had corresponded with in Braille, staying in a hotel for western visitors, a description of his room, the cheapness of the meal, the difficulties experienced in East Germany, his journey to Poland by train, people being helpful, meeting his friends and going around Poznan in Poland, discovering the difficulty in getting food in Poland, Roman Catholicism in Poland and a church service he went to, going out for sunday lunch because of the food shortage, the places that he visited in Poland, being amazed at the spectacle of Warsaw, a school for the blind in Poland, visiting Krakow, visiting the black madonna at Czestochowa and seeing the pilgrims going to the shrine, visiting other places in Poland and then to Czechoslovakia, lack of freedom of movement in the country, more prosperity than Poland but the people wanted to live in other countries, discrimination against people believing in religion, his journey back to Britain and his hopes for the country of his father, Poland. Gordon Young with contributions from the readers and answering their questions. End of Side Two.

Reference: R/05/B/64

Date: May 31st 1982 - May 31st 1982

BBC Radio Jersey-Occupation Tapes. Told by the people who lived through it produced by Beth Lloyd. 1) Part 7: Deportation. BBC Report on the deportations from the Channel Islands. Alexander Coutanche's difficulty in having to accept the order. Eye witnesses reports of discovering the order for the deportations in the Evening Post, discovery that some deportee's houses being looted, preparations for deportation, being served deportation notices, deciding what to take, going to the Weighbridge, people being turned back because the ships were full, the crowd singing the ships off, the journey to St Malo, fighting at the third deportation leading to arrests. 2) Part 8: Not a Lot of Anything. Eye witnesses talking about the lack of essential supplies such as soap, a great shortage of drugs and medicines by Dr John Lewis and others, lack of clothes, shoes and the need to mend things, improvisation with clothes, bartering economy, wood collecting, what was used for fuel and reusing razor blades. 3) Part 9: From Finance to Farming, The Island Keeps Going. A BBC Report on the currency used in the island. Eye witness accounts on the lack of english currency and the use of reichsmarks, the conversion necessary for records kept in banks and auction houses, the creation of new notes by Edmund Blampied, stocks in the shops diminshing leading to rationing control, the black market, exchange and mart in the Evening Post, farmer's experience of being told what to grow, harvesting and the inspections made by the Germans, farmers hiding extras from the Germans, investigations into a fuel that would allow tractors to run on something other than petrol, getting by, crops that were grown and giving food to others. 4) Part 10: There's Good and Bad in all Races. Eye witnesses talking about collaborators, Jerry Bags, informers, the actions of the Post Office to destroy anonymous denunciation letters or warn those who had been denounced, searches by german soldiers to follow up anonymous letters, relationships with and attitudes of the german soldiers (Poor sound quality) 5) Part 11: Government and God, How the States and the Church Survived. Eye witnesses talking about dissatisfaction with the local authorities, the difficulties faced by the bailiff Alexander Coutanche, confirming legislation in Jersey, rectors and Jurats members of the States, meetings of the States, rectors remaining in the parishes and services continuing, Canon Cohu being taken by the Germans for passing on the news from the radio, praying for the men who were fighting, banning of the Salvation Army and Jehovah Witnesses. 6) Part 12: Brushes with the German Authorities. Eye witnesses talking about being interrogated at Silvertide, experiences of confrontations with the german soldiers, being arrested and beaten, court martials and trials of local residents, listening to the radio and experiences in the prison at Gloucester Street.

Reference: R/06/3

Personal View of Deputy Jean Le Maistre interviewed by Malcolm Gray. Was born in Millbrook at the maternity hospital and lived most of his life in St Ouen. He is called Jean and his brothers have French names-François and Edouard. His family took part in farming. Had a fortunate and happy childhood-had lots of space to play and a good community and family spirit. St Ouen has a strong community spirit but so do the other parishes. His father's life has been devoted to the recording of the Jersey language-was brought up speaking jèrriais. Went to school at the age of 5 not knowing a word of english. Jèrriais is a dying language-is a shame because it's part of our identity. There are parish variations of the language-have evolved over the centuries-the language is very rich. First Record-'Going Home' by The Shadows. Got involved in youth club work-was a member of a youth club at St George's Church. Moved on to help in youth clubs-became a youth leader in St Ouen at 17 and then moved to youth work in town at the Cellar Club in Hope Street-worked there for about 5 years-led on to his involvement in the Jersey Youth Movement-became statutory in 1973 and became its first chairman. The Jersey Youth Movement was the precursor to the Jersey Youth Service. At that point there was a lack of facilities. Got to know Cliff Richard through his church work-met him in 1969-came to his wedding. Met him in Israel in 1972 through his overseas aid work. Second Record-'Help it Along' by Cliff Richard. Religion has played a large part in his life-never considered becoming a minister but has always been involved in the church. Believes you should go to church to be a christian-you need to share your faith. Lay people are more involved in services now-he has taken part in some services but doesn't believe that is his role-was an almoner at St George's for 17 years. Second Record-Roy Castle with 'The Bread of Life'. Has travelled a great deal-had a prayer breakfast with Ronald Reagan in Washington. Has visited the Middle East especially Israel-Israel is a very enjoyable place-has organised trips to Israel-has been 14 or 15 times. Israel has had problems but he is quite happy to go because he feels safe. Third Record-'We Have Brought You Greetings'-a traditional jewish greeting song. Has been in the States of Jersey for 15 years-has enjoyed being in the States-wanted to get into the States to help with the youth service and agriculture. Agriculture has been in a difficult state-served on the Agriculture Committee for 6 years under Senator Binnington. Has been President of the Postal Committee and served on the Education Committee. Working in the States takes up a lot of time-your family have to be understanding. Is worried about the States members workload-has lodged a proposition to try and solve this. Wants to keep the honorary system but wants it to be easier for people to come forward and stand. Was born in St Ouen but has always represented St Helier as a deputy-has always worked in St Helier and has served No 3 District where he lived for 8 years. Has not thought about coming a senator at the moment. Fourth Record-Tune from a visiting African choir. Has been president of the Overseas Aid Committee for about 9 years-important to send money and good will. Loves Africa and the African people-they suffer difficulties not of their making-couldn't help but feel emotionally affected. Took the media on a trip in order to experience the conditions in Africa. Fifth Record-Born Free. End of Side One. Personal View of Deputy Jack Roche interviewed by Malcolm Gray in his garden and at Fort Regent. Was born in Jersey in 1924 in Providence Street. Had one brother and three sisters-lived in Charles Street for many years-had a brother Lewis who has passed away and three sisters called Ena, Mavis and Dorothy. His father died 6 months after he was born-was a financial struggle-his mother used to run a shop in Charles Street. Schooled at St Mark's at La Motte Street-one of the teachers was Deputy Arthur Carter. Left school at 14 and then about a year later they evacuated as war broke out. First Record-String of Pearls. His first job was at Bisson Cycle Shop which was then in Halkett Place-worked there for 12 months when the evacuation took place. Travelled as a family except his brother who had just started a business-mainly cargo boats took them across-the journey from Jersey to Weymouth took about 36 hours-it was a very difficult journey. They moved to Bury, went into some brand new houses and they were treated very kindly by the people of the north. Spent the rest of the work years in Bury-got into a reserved occupation-he joined the Air Training Corps and then the war ended. Six weeks after the island was liberated he came back home. Second Record-'A Man and a Woman'. Worked with his brother after liberation-was an electrician by trade but during the war he had invented a machine to process tobacco so he started to work on that. Once commercial cigarettes started coming into the island he was offered a job by W A Nichollas on Commercial Buildings-started work on 3rd February 1946-still with them-started as an office boy and is now the boss. Has become the Jersey Coal Distributors-used to store coal at Fort Regent-he is now the President of the Fort Regent Development Committee. His brother used to work from home in St Clement. The States of Jersey wanted Fort Regent back so a number of companied decided to build a coal store and from this they became one company. Met his wife Joan Norman at the office when he joined in 1946-they were married in 1950 and have one daughter Patricia and one granddaughter Rebecca. Decided to go into the States after getting rid of the business at Commercial Buildings-at first he spent a lot of time gardening. An opportunity came when Len Nightingale retired from the district and he and John Le Gallais, his next door neighbour, decided to stand and both got in. States work takes up enough time as members allow it-if you have spare time you can fill it in the States but if you work you can work it to fill your schedule. He sits on Finance and Economics Committee, the Prison Board, vice-President of the Housing Committee and President of the Fort Regent Development Committee. Is also a States appointed director of the Jersey New Waterworks Company and is chairman of the Joint Advisory Council. Has been vice-president of the Public Works Committee under Senator John Le Marquand Public Health Committee under Senator Gwyneth Huelin. Was Vice-President and then President of Jersey Telecoms, President of the Gambling Control Committee and Etats Civil. During his nearly 12 years he has sat on Agriculture and Fisheries, Tourism, Legislation, Establishment, Broadcasting, was a member of the Executive Committee of the Commonwealth Parliamentary Association. Before joining the States sat on the Agricultural Loans Board. In 12 years he has sat on a number of committees-believes members should move around as much as possible in order to see the way the States run. People are invited onto a committee by the president but they can express a desire to go onto that committee. Believes that people who work in the States from businesses will be able to cope with the work and that employers should be sympathetic. Some people would be able to become a full time member of the States in the future. Believes in the honorary system-thinks it could be problematic if people give up their jobs and don't get elected and as a result get in financial difficulty. Third Record-The Waltz from Masquerade by Khachaturian. Jack Roche and Malcolm Gray go to Fort Regent and are greeted by Humphrey, the mascot of Fort Regent. Go into the Rotunda of the Fort-he has been President of the Fort Regent Development Committee for 4 years-appointed a new chief officer Graeme Pitman. Fort Regent has been renovated in the piazza and the funfair and now in the rotunda. Great shows have been put on in the piazza. Fort Regent is sports orientated. Some big names have performed in the Gloucester Hall. Used to use the parade ground as a coal store and he has now gone in a complete circle and finds himself as the president of the facility as a whole. People's attitudes have changed towards the centre-there are 18,000 members. Fourth Record-Shirley Bassey singing Goldfinger. When the rotunda is completed it will become a multi purpose hall for sport and entertainment. There is more than one level in the rotunda-the roof covers 3 acres in total. The cost of the refurbishment will be £1.8 million for the rotunda. Have recently had the 10 millionth visitor to Fort Regent. Fifth Record-Tchaikovsky's 1812 Overture.

Reference: R/07/B/12

Date: 1987 - 1987

'Lunch break'-an interview of Sir Peter Crill, the former Bailiff of Jersey, by Michelle Cuthbert on his retirement from office. Talks about his childhood-had a stable, happy childhood. His grandfathers on both sides were farmers. His great grandfather on his mother's side was farming in St Helier and was a victim of two bank crashes at the end of the nineteenth century. His father had a farming background and he went into his uncle's office who was a solicitor, George Philip Crill. He later became a Jurat and had to go the Privy Council to be sworn in because there was a row after he was elected over a previous case that he had tried. Was sworn in 1913 and was later made president of the Education Committee. His father had gone into the office-he was in the militia-his father met his mother and wooed her for 10 years as she went off to America as her father emigrated to Australia. She told him that he'd need to qualify for her to marry him and he qualified and went to marry her in America in 1913. His father was constable of St Clement from 1916 until 1958. He had 2 brothers and 2 died in child birth. He was born in London as his mother went over to be careful. His eldest brother joined the firm in 1939 and was later thrown out of the army because he was going deaf. He transferred to civil affairs and was killed in his bed because he didn't hear the air raid warnings and died in Paris in 1944. He grew up spoilt and indulged. He was a lazy child-liked reading but also liked exploring the countryside of St Clement. Had a country upbringing. Remembers the railway especially using it to get into town when he was 4 without telling his parents. Great Uncle George found him and put him back on the train. Did a lot of bicycle riding and a small boat. Someone suggested he should go to the sail maker of the Westward, TB Davis' yacht and he did and got the sail designed by him, Mr Bridges. From 1937 until the war he kept her at La Hocq and got to know all of the channels in the area. Had great fun with the boat. He went to St Clement's Church. Church was an important part of his life. He started at the Dame School of Miss Le Brocq. She gave him a good grounding and then he went to Victoria College Prep where he fell under the influence of Miss Aubrey. She was a great teacher-has her reports on him and it was said that he talked too much. The Prep was in an old house called Mount Pleasant. Started with Miss Bunnett as headmistress-remembers her being scary. He was a spoilt boy who got fat. Wasn't fond of ball games although he liked swimming. Went up to Victoria College in 1935 aged 10 where he stayed until 1943. Had good masters before the war. The boarding house was big in those days-a nucleus of boys lived at the boarding house. At school he was somewhat idle-he was at least a year below the average age of the form-found it difficult. Managed to get his school certificate before he was 15. When occupation came he wasn't evacuated with the school certificate group. Stayed because his mother met the then Bailiff, Lord Coutanche, in St Helier and he told her to keep him in Jersey as the occupation wouldn't last. One of his oldest friends is Roy Mourant who he escaped with. He used to have all night parties to avoid the curfew. Had one at St James' Vicarage with boys and girls in the dormitories. Decided to escape because it became clear in the summer of 1944 that Jersey was not to be liberated. During August a few people tried to escape on a float but failed. Had to plan if you were going and so they did. In 1942 all boats had to be put into store. He kept his in the parish quarry at the top of La Hocq Hill and then put his into Norman's in Commercial Buildings. Recruited John Floyd with Roy Mourant in the plan. They had to get the boat out of Commercial Buildings. They borrowed a furniture removal van and pretended to be removal men and took the boat from Commercial Buildings. Borrowed a key from his father of a property of somebody who had left. Put his boat in the garage of the house and got his boat decked over. His parents only knew about it towards the end. They were lucky when they escaped-they made a lot of noise and were seen off by a number of people. Spent 17 hours in the boat. When they arrived in France they had taken some brandy with them which he drank and promptly fell out the boat. They went up the beach and gave themselves up to a Frenchman who kept them for the night until the Americans were due to arrive the next day. He later sold the boat and they spent 10 days in Cherbourg before being transferred to London. He planned to join up when he was in London and phoned his cousin who was in the army who told him about his brothers death. Was given 6 months rest and recreation before joining up and his elder brother told him to use it. He then met Professor Laurie Bisson, a Jerseyman, who was at Pembroke College, Oxford who persuaded him to join the University. Went to Oxford having been sponsored by Lord du Parcq and gained a scholarship. Spent two terms in the Spring and Summer of 1945 in the Officers Training Corps but before he was able to join up the war ended. Had law in his blood. Near the end of the occupation he did some local preaching in the anglican church-was licenced by the dean to take matins and even song. Had planned to become ordained but decided his father needed him to help in the family business. Went to London to take the Bar Exams and came back to Jersey in 1949 and joined his father's firm of Crill-Benest. In his approach to law Lord Denning was influential. Relied on his father's knowledge at the beginning as there weren't any advocates exams when he came back. He was the one who introduced the exam in 1954 when he was the President of Legislation in the States. He admired how Lord Coutanche ran his court. Also admired Advocates Vibert and Valpy. A learned advocate was Advocate Peter Giffard. Became a Deputy from 1951-58 and a Senator from 1960-62 before becoming solicitor general. Missed meeting clients in the private practice and had to acquire conversational skills. People unsure of how to address him when he became bailiff. Sang from 1957 in St Helier's Church Choir and later Trinity Church. Decided that the Catholic Church was the church he wanted to join and was received into the church in July 1995. Looked back with pleasure at his time as solicitor general and deputy bailiff as he was under people and was learning on the job. As attorney-general he prosecuted the Beast of Jersey, Edward Paisnel. Originally the deputy-bailiff was intended to be an alter-ego of the bailiff but it didn't work that way as there needed to be a leader of the States. Is unsure whether the bailiff would ever leave the States-it would change the constitution radically. Talks about the bailiff's role. Feels his greatest achievement was being appointed bailiff. Enjoyed the royal visit in 1989. The Bailiff of Jersey and Guernsey were invited to the Commonwealth Lawyers Conference of Presiding Officers of the Commonwealth in 1988 in London which he enjoyed. Satisfied by the judgement in the Waterworks Case on the rating assessment by the Parish of Grouville. His darkest hour was the trouble 3 years previously. For hobbies he reads, walks and gardens. Has joined a livery company in London and has been asked to be the President of the Jersey Scout Association. His unfulfilled pleasure would have been to charter a boat in the West Indies and sail around. Finishes with a piece of music.

Reference: R/07/B/26

Date: 1995 - 1995

Personal View of Leslie Sinel, former Jersey Evening Post employee and occupation historian. Born in St Helier in 1906. Involved with people around you-knew everybody in the district-different today. His father was a saddler-used to do jobs at different farms-got to love horses. Not many vehicles around-1920 no one on the Jersey Evening Post owned a private car. Newspaper was distributed by horse-1910-got two delivery cars with open sides so delivery people could throw the paper out of the car. Went to the Jersey National School-church school-difficult but accepted it. Jersey french not taught in schools-French was taught-headmistress Miss Bennett was tough but she taught everybody how to read and write. First Record-The Trumpet Voluntary by Jeremiah Clarke-used to listen to it during the occupation on crystal radio sets. Childhood-holidays coincided with the potato season-worked at T & J Moor and the Great Western Railway. At 14 joined the Jersey Evening Post-father got him the job-started as an apprentice printer-Wolfdale printing machines. Newspaper only means of communication at the time. Jersey Evening Post used to be distributed by horses-1910 got first car. Newspaper printed at 3.30 so people could catch the train from Snow Hill to Gorey at 4 o'clock. 1920-took 3 hours to print 7,500 newspapers, today can print 23,000 in three quarters of an hour. Newspapers dropped off at each station both east and west. Exciting to go on the train as a child-sad but inevitable that the railways went when buses were brought in. Tourism in the summer of the 1920s and 1930s-not comparable with today-people used to stay longer. St Brelade popular for tourists. Second Record-the Radetzky March by Strauss. Radio-what he used to listen to. 1930s-became a proof reader at the Jersey Evening Post and wrote some articles-never had an ambition to become a journalist-worked mostly from the printing side. Newspapers today good quality but reporting is 'muck raking' now. Media today-good variety-modern way of life. Spent 15 years as a Constables Officer and Vingtenier in St Saviour and 21 years in St Helier as a churchwarden and on the Welfare Board and on the Battle of Flowers' Association and Jersey Eisteddfod-always involved in something. Honorary policeman-got fed up with job at the time of the prowler-stayed out watching farms at nights. Queen came-did Government House duty all night. Mostly traffic duties. States Police and Honorary Police can work together. Never wanted to leave Jersey-some travelling on the Continent. Has lived in St Helier and St Saviour. Not the same parochialism today. First buses here-used to run through Bagot-used to call it the 'Orange Box'. The JMT and Red Band Bus-opened up the island-created more movement in the island. 1925-1930s-motor cars increased in number. Third Record-Zadoc the Priest from the Coronation Anthem. Second world war-Germans swept across France getting closer to Jersey-hoped nothing would happen but thought it would. Government realised it was impossible to defend and pulled out. Germans took the island-no alternative-no question of resistance-couldn't have sabotage during the occupation-where could you go? Repercussions on other islanders. Had a guilt complex-felt if he'd gone away he may have been able to do something but if everybody had left the island it would have been destroyed. Decided against evacuation-two of his family left but the rest stayed. Continued to work at the Jersey Evening Post-censored by the Germans but the staff used to resist. On the surface looked to be agreeing with them but were resisting. Was asked to put an article in the newspaper but he took three days off and burned it. Fourth Record-Vidor's Toccata and Fugue. During the occupation worked on a farm in the afternoon-used to get some extra food-learned how to make sugar beet syrup. Meat was scarce-used to get some on the black market-used to be expensive but nothing on the price today. Used to listen to the radio every morning-every hour on the hour-would listen until 9 in the morning-used to leave the house and people would tell him the news-everybody knew it. Used to type out 3 copies of the news-took one to Captain Robin of Petit Menage, one to the Jersey Evening Post and kept one. Many people listened to the radio-he would have been prosecuted for disseminating the news. Used to find out news from German soldiers. Fifth Record-To be a Pilgrim. Liberation-can't talk about it without emotion. Enjoyed life since the war-is retired but very active. Enjoys writing-historical and local events. Would have liked to have been a teacher. End of Side One. Personal View with Jack(John) Herbert interviewed by Beth Lloyd, the war time Airport Commander. Enjoyed working at the Jersey Airport. Was born in Bath and went to Green Park College in Bath. Was part of the choir in Bath but gave up his music-difficult to choose music for the programme. Came over to Jersey at 11-his father was an engineer on a ship-his mother wanted him to stay on shore. Worked in Bath and the Piers and Harbours Committee of 1923 advertised for a harbour engineer. Was learning about law but ended up sailing instead- helped the fishermen Tommy and Charlie King and helped the pilots in St Helier Harbour. First Record-Underneath the Arches by Flanagan and Allen. After leaving school joined his father at the Harbour Office. Worked as clerk dealing with harbour dues-counted the passengers coming in. On the Albert Pier with Captain Furzer-a ship collided with the Albert Pier-harbour had to be dredged. Mr Bill Thurgood visited the island-decided to set up an aeroplane route-administration of the aeroplanes were placed under the auspices of the Piers and Harbour Committee-staff had to check beach. First flight took place on the 18th December 1933 from Jersey to Portsmouth. The beach was cleared of people-a great local event. Had a refueler and a coach for the office work. Had to be an English customs officer, Bill Ivy, and a Jersey customs officer, Harold Robins. No aeroplane dues-the aeroplanes used to pay harbour dues. Aeroplane had a tragic accident-a little boy was sitting on the beach and was killed and a coach got trapped on the beach and was swamped by the sea. Second Record-Stranger on the Shore. Used to create a weather report at the Harbour Office by letting a balloon go into the air and timing it going in to cloud cover. Sites inspected to build Jersey Airport-a site at Grosnez turned down. Site at St Peter decided-problem with fog. No other suitable place in the island for it. Jersey Airport-Piers and Harbour Committee was put in charge of the Airport being built-plans were approved-there were four runways-Jersey Airways ran from Jersey to Portsmouth and Jersey to Heston. Air France went from the Jersey Airport. Third Record-Glenn Miller and American Patrol. Second world war-all messages came in code. Bill Lawford-an air traffic control officer came over. Had to camouflage the airport. Jersey Airways staff evacuated-was in charge of the evacuation-no panic at the Airport to get off the island-between 400-600 left by the Airport. Was ordered to stay at his post, Chris Phillips, an air traffic controller, was called back to the royal navy. Late May some French air force plane with two highly ranked officers and a ground crew. The morning of the 1st June in his office when he saw a german plane fly over and dropped a container-it was addressed to the Bailiff of Jersey. German landed and spoke to the Bailiff-wanted the island to be handed over later that afternoon-put up white flags. Jack Herbert told to cut off the electricity supply-had shipped all their radios to Bristol. Fourth Record-Luftwaffe March. Jack Herbert was transferred to the Transport Office in Bond Street during the occupation-converted some vehicles to use gas as fuel-had to improvise to create fuel as it was in such short supply. Fifth Record-It Must be Him by Vikki Carr. Liberation-transferred back to the Jersey Airport on May 10th 1945-airfields were mined and booby traps-were cleared. German officer detailed to cut the grass at the Airport. Royal air force officer was in charge of Airport and it was handed over 2nd October 1945. Civil aviation picked up between 1948 and 1952. The airport was tarmacked in 1952-the material came from the excavation of the Jersey Underground Hospital. The Jersey Airport became the second busiest airport in Britain in the 1960s. Was presented with an MBE by the Queen in 1974 and retired in 1975.

Reference: R/07/B/3

Date: 1982 - 1982

Gravestone of Charles William Brown Born 26 November 1837 Died 14 August 1884

Reference: SJPA/000287

Date: 1884 - 1887

Portrait of Rev Hamlin wearing black biretta and clerical garments.

Reference: SJPA/000693

Date: 1880 - 1881

Portrait of Revd Allain wearing coat with black velvet collar.

Reference: SJPA/000753

Date: 1878 - 1881

Portrait of Revd Morin wearing fine wool jacket with Prussian collar

Reference: SJPA/000756

Date: 1878 - 1881

Granite facade of the Convent of the Dames de St. Andre, Val Plaisant, St Helier, newly completed. House named Mon Sejour to right (built by Mons. Thoreau). Trees and shrubs in grounds.

Reference: SJPA/000789

Date: 1872 - 1876

Studio portrait of Rev Falle

Reference: SJPA/001498

Date: 1878 - 1878

South front of Trinity Parish Church with cemetry in foreground

Reference: SJPA/001540

Date: 1886 - 1887

Interior of St. Luke's Church showing rood screen with text in front of chancel, 'I know that my Redeemer liveth' 'NOW IS CHRIST RISEN' 'LET US KEEP THE FEAST' 'HOLY+HOLY+HOLY'.Three narrow stained glass windows behind altar

Reference: SJPA/001754

Date: 1875 - 1880

View west across St. Aubin's Harbour at low tide. Houses, St Aubin Methodist Chapel and boathouses on Le Boulevard (The Bulwarks) with other houses up hillside. People, hand carts and carriage on quayside.

Reference: SJPA/002167

Date: 1870 - 1873

Search query time: 0.8280971 seconds • Page build time: 0.025831349690755 seconds