Photographic slide of the view from Noirmont Point over Portelet Bay and Janvrin's Tomb.

Reference: P/09/A/4233

Date: 1970 - 1990

Photographic slide of the view from gardens over Gorey harbour with Grouville bay in the distance.

Reference: P/09/A/4256

Date: 1970 - 1990

Photographic slide of two chimneys which form part of the desalination plant with the sea in the background.

Reference: P/09/A/4265

Date: 1970 - 1990

Photographic slide of a view across landscape to the sea in the distance.

Reference: P/09/A/4304

Date: 1970 - 1990

Photographic slide of a seaward view of Mont Orgueil Castle.

Reference: P/09/A/519

Date: 1970 - 1990

Photographic slide of a view from a rocky shore of three towers out to sea linked together with lines - possible location of Dielette, Flamanville, in Normandy (see Item ref P/09/a/531).

Reference: P/09/A/527

Date: May 7th 1977 - May 7th 1977

Photographic slide of a view from a rock across the sea towards land in the distance - possible location of Dielette, Flamanville, in Normandy (see Item ref P/09/a/531).

Reference: P/09/A/541

Date: May 7th 1977 - May 7th 1977

Photographic slide of a view from a strip of headland out to sea - possibly in St Ouen.

Reference: P/09/A/554

Date: 1970 - 1990

Admiralty chart

Reference: PCRO 143A

Date: 1859 - 1862

Two 16mm film 1) B & W and Colour Silent filmed by Roderick Dobson. Film shows family picnic, a house [possibly in the UK], the family in the garden walking through snow, the family on bicycles, a children's party, on a beach and in a garden of an unidentified house, the children playing with goats, cycling with union jack flags and town scenes which are unidentifiable due to poor exposure-12 min 30 seconds. 2) Colour Silent filmed by George Morley. Film shows George and May Morley [his wife] in 1935 at La Hauteur, the family home on Mont Les Vaux, St Brelade. 1936, playing golf. 1937, girls on some rocks looking over the sea. 1938, George swimming off rocks. 1939, flowers on the headlands. 1940, May Morley saddling up a horse and riding it on St Brelade's Bay [note the fact that the German sea defence walls are yet to be built]. A house in England. Punting at Oxford. 22nd June 1940, people arriving at the church on the occasion of the wedding of George and May Morley at Christ Church, Victoria Road, Kensington in London. The couple on honeymoon at St Michael's Mount, Cornwall and Land's End on the beach feeding the birds, walking on the cliffs and swimming. Shots at 20, Eldon Lodge, Kelso Place, South Kensington, London. Exterior shots of the garden and house of La Hauteur, St Brelade and then b & w footage of plans of the building followed by building work on the house under way-18 min 54 seconds.

Reference: Q/05/A/131

Date: 1935 - 1946

16mm colour film by George Morley. Shows 1930s Jersey including Corbiere with a boat coming in, the island shoreline, the harbour, Jersey Airways aeroplanes flying in over the sea, coast, houses and landing at the Jersey Airport, flowers, cows in the field, horse ploughing with men. B & w film looking out to coast, showing the flora and birds on the cliffs. Colour film of a woman on the cliffs, people on the beach surfing, Corbiere lighthouse in different moods at different times of the day surrounded by the ocean and the mail boat coming in-14 mins 10 secs

Reference: Q/05/A/135

Date: 1930 - 1939

Jersey Talking Magazine No 5-November 1976. Introduction by Gordon Young talking about the weather. Gardening feature-looking at the seed catalogues-beans, carrots, onions and flowers. Nature-Frances Le Sueur-interested in flora and fauna-talks about the drought-affect on the birds in St Ouen's Pond, rain after the summer-result the pond has filled up again. Movement of birds from Northern Europe southwards for the winter-rarity of an appearance of a honey buzzard excavating a wasp's nest in Fern Valley [?St Mary], asking for advice of what to mention in this regular column. Cooking feature-Margaret Jenkins giving tips on cooking with eggs. Buying a house-housing problem-Ralph Robbins-island's Housing Officer-main function of housing-allocation of housing stock and provide additional homes, waiting list for houses, programme for house building, wealthy immigrants living in Jersey-value to the island and numbers coming in, people coming in-how classified as essentially employed. Tips for blind people in picking up small metal items, using a nail gun, Braille handbook on the transfer to metric measurements. End of Part One. June Gurdon in Sark talks about the size and history of the island including the arrival of the Seigneur of St Ouen, Helier de Carteret, with his family and tenants in 1565 and agreeing to QE I to keep Sark continuously inhabited by 40 men to defend the island, within 7 years a thriving community had been established, Sark became the property of the Le Pellé family and later Sybil Hathaway-La Dame who became an iconic figure. Concerned with education and health and during the occupation stayed in the island. In 1965 she was awarded the Order of Dame of the British Empire. Talks of changes in the island. Michael Beaumont, current Seigneur of Sark, talks about his life, the length of time he had been Seigneur, the finance, legal and government systems of the island and his seigneural rights. Helen Gibson, teacher at the secondary school in Sark talks about the young of the island, teaching in Sark, the education system and the curriculum. Talks to some young people concerning their lives, future plans in the island, job prospects and the building industry in the island. Talks about the countryside and nature of the island including their experience of catching a chancre crab, describing the beauty of the island, looking out from Sark over the sea and at the other Channel Islands and France. Cottages that the Gurdon's stayed in were run by Miss Allen and Miss Webb-Miss Allen and Miss Webb talks about coming to the island, island life, differences between running hotel in Sark and England and Sark's marine life.

Reference: R/05/B/2

Date: November 12th 1976 - November 12th 1976

Jersey Talking Magazine-September Edition. Introduction by Gordon Young. Joan Stevens taking a tour of St Clement talking about the early history of the parish, St Clement's Church including the piscina, the font, the paintings on the wall, the line of the roof, stone seats around the base of the pillars and the priory, the size of the parish, the effects of the sea, prehistoric remains including the dolmens, menhirs and prehistoric graves of the parish. The chapel that was dedicated to St John the Evangelist before the Reformation which was destroyed, Rocqueberg which was used by a witches coven, Jean Mourant and others who were killed for being witches. Talks about 1685 when they received french refugees, Le Hocq Tower-a Jersey Round Tower, Victor Hugo who lived at Marine Terrace from 1853 to 1855, Samares Manor including the fact it took its name from the salt around the manor, the dovecote, a windmill in 1218, the chapel, the families who held the manor who were the de Ste Hilaire's, the Payn's, the Dumaresq's, the Seale's, the Hamon's, the Mourant's and Sir James Knott who renovated the garden. Before that Philippe Dumaresq built a garden, he also wrote an important survey on Jersey in the 1680s. Cooking Feature-Margaret Jenkins giving recipes for desserts. Guernsey Feature-Linda Le Vasseur talking to Joan Stockdale, a Guernsey journalist for a newspaper, asking her why she decided to become a reporter, how she started, how she felt when she started, how it developed, her women's and children's pages, the most interesting people she has interviewed, interviewing Michael Parkinson, Jimmy Saville, Frank Bough, Peter Sellers, Oliver Reed, the most difficult part of the job, coping with a career and a family, her interest in tropical birds, her collection of amber, her favourite books and her advice for the listener who wants a career in journalism. Horoscope feature-Diane Postlethwaite talking about the forecast for virgo for the year. End of Side One. Driving down to Corbiere, on top of tower-radio aerials-home of Jersey Radio, the nerve centre of Jersey shipping communications and run by the Harbours and Airport Committee-describing the structure, talking to Mr Dale about a rescue taking place of a fishing boat, the view from the tower, the wind blowing, the increased need for Jersey Radio, what Jersey Radio does and is told by boats, working with the French, dealing with a rescue, the frequencies used, what's happening with the rescue, the transmissions between the officials dealing with the rescue, the use of air rescue, the frequency and types of emergencies. Story read by Peter Gilchrist about Mike Tetley, a guide dog owner and completely blind, who appeared on This is Your Life and climbed up Mount Everest describing his life, his training and the process by which he climbed the mountain. Quiz-Gordon Young announces the winner from the previous month and sets a new quiz. End of Side Two.

Reference: R/05/B/46

Date: August 31st 1980 - August 31st 1980

Jersey Talking Magazine-Christmas Edition. Introduction by Gordon Young with christmas carols throughout by St John's Church Choir and Les Conteurs Singers. Poem by Gladys Rogers. Jennifer Grundy at the Met Office being interviewed, talking about what happens over christmas, the number of people on duty for shifts and keeping busy with different duties including weather forecasts. Mr Wileman, the general manager of the L'Horizon Hotel, talking about the hotel over christmas, who stays over Christmas, people going swimming in the sea, Christmas trees in the hotel, guests getting Christmas presents for christmas, going to de Gruchy after it is closed and choosing the presents and staff wrap the presents at a christmas party. David Killip at La Collette Power Station who is in charge on Christmas day describing what he has to do on christmas day, when it will be at is busiest, the number of staff in on christmas day and if there were any power cuts in the past on Christmas day. BBC Radio Jersey producer Peter Gore talking about what will be happening on the station on Christmas day-a Christmas morning programme, messages from the bailiff, the dean and the lieutenant governor on the show, getting in at 6.30, how he is spending the rest of the day and his favourite Christmas record. Quentin Bloxham, curator of reptiles at Jersey Zoo talking about what they do on Christmas day, amusing experiences on Christmas day-pythons go into the public area and his favourite Christmas carol. David Guy-Station Officer with the States of Jersey Ambulance Service-talking about working on christmas day, the staff working at the station on Christmas day, the duties carried out-checking the equipment and vehicles, having breakfast and waiting for call outs. Poem by Colin Plummer read by Pat Dubras. Beth Lloyd interviewing Joan Le Miere, at the telephone exchange, talking about the change in the telephone system, previous years when people had to book times to have a telephone call, if people are more patient on Christmas day, the number of people working on Christmas day and looking after the Christmas day. Gordon Young talking about cooking Christmas dinner. End of Side One. General Sir Peter Whiteley, lieutenant governor, with a Christmas message for the readers of the Jersey Talking Magazine. Harbour Master, Captain Bullen talking about the harbour on Christmas day, the number of people on duty including Jersey Radio, the people at the pierhead, the marina staff, the staff at Fort Regent and the police. The Islander magazine-an article written by Sonia Hillsdon called 'Christmas Past' about christmas in Jersey in previous years. Living in Jersey in past-second half of the 16th Century-islanders were not encouraged to celebrate Christmas because of Ccalvinism-worked as a normal day. 1726 a dead whale was washed up at La Pulec, St Ouen-77 foot long-declared as his by the of Seigneur of Vinchelez de Bas-two jaw bones of the whale was attached to his manor house. 1790-theatre-magic lantern show-shown by Mr Belon from France. 1799-over 6000 Russian soldiers-found all over the island-allies against the French. 19th Century-Christmas came into own-1834-a whole week of Christmas and merry making-Christmas dinner followed by cards. Used to ring the Christmas bells from midday Christmas night to midnight on Christmas day-in St Mary it got out of hand-in the 1850s Reverend Le Couteur Balleine tried to put a stop to it. In 1858 he removed the bell clapper, bell rope and the ladder to the bells and changed the locks on the church doors. A hand bell was circulated-while the door was being kicked in they got replacements for the rope clappers and managed to get in. There was no support from the parish assembly for the rector. Trevor Barette, dairy farmer of St Mary, talking about his Christmas day-milking, feeding, cleaning the cows, the cows going outside, a few hours off and then the feeding and milking the cows again and amusing experiences at Christmas. Tug Wilson, a fireman, talking about the hours he will be working on Christmas day, the duties on Christmas day and emergencies on past Christmases. Alan, a taxi driver, talking about what he does on Christmas day. Chris, an air traffic controller, talking about what he may be doing on Christmas day, being on call and trying to close the Jersey Airport. Sister Moulin, a nurse at the Jersey Maternity Hospital, talking about what she does on Christmas day, mothers, former staff and doctors bring their Christmas babies back, whether people like having Christmas babies, a special crib for a Christmas baby and a favourite Christmas carol. Michel Le Troqueur, a policeman, talking about being on duty over christmas, how he celebrates Christmas, crime over Christmas and a relaxed attitude over Christmas. End of Side Two.

Reference: R/05/B/68

Date: December 25th 1982 - December 25th 1982

Personal View of Bill Perchard interview by Beth Lloyd. Talking about how the celebrations of Royal Jersey Agricultural and Horticultural Society last week went, only a bunch of farmers-amazed it went so well-every did their job and there was no bickering and for the two days it was a grand reunion of country folk. The visitors didn't come and so the money wasn't great. Would change a few things if doing it again-would give out less free passes. Worth losing money on it because it did well for the agricultural and horticultural industry. Brought together the agricultural associations. Cattle show-exciting-more entries as usual. Sponsors for the shows-inter-parochial competitions-done 50 years ago-only one parish missing. Mr Cowdrey-the queen's manager and an australian-judging competition. Australian and New Zealand breeder comes to Jersey a lot. No thoughts about having an annual event-possibility of contributing if there was a carnival week with the Battle of Flowers. First Record-Judy Collins and Amazing Grace and his reasons for choosing his song. Went to church and sunday school as a child-had nowhere else to go-met girlfriends at church-social and religious life. Not born in Jersey-parents went to Canada for 6 or 7 years-came back to farm at St Saviour's. Remembers Canada-when he was 2½ years old, remembers meeting cattle for the first time. Always wanted to be a farmer-when he left school learned a trade-worked as a builder-eldest of 14 children. Horn Brothers-in Winchester Street for 10 years-worked as builders labourer-became an apprentice. Bought a motorbike at 17 and took his bosses daughter out and she is now his wife-went out for 6 years before they got married-got married when she was 22. When working for the firm didn't have to help on the farm. Then had dinner at his bosses house-living at Peacock Farm in Trinity. Second Record-Heykens Serenade. Got married at age of 24-felt like a long wait, his father in law bought a house in Victoria Street and they were allowed the top flat-after a year he wanted the country. He wanted to farm-La Chasse-decided to let the farm-father acted as guarantor-that was july-moved in at Christmas. Shock to Winn-who was a town girl-within a month she was looking after the farm. Had a thousand hens-Marion born 3 years later-then did more in the house and then got help in the house and helped outside. 1939-had a dozen animals-WW2 came-no exports-one good thing-had to supply an animal for slaughter-sent the worst cow-after a while had all nice ones in the stable-bought cows in order to provide them for the Germans. Had a decent herd by the end of the war-bought a cow called Keeper's Lass-built up on these during the war-after the war did well. Problem of occupation-fear-could have been deported-no direct orders-told civilian authorities-in trouble if didn't do as you were told. Always said yes and then tried it on afterwards. Spoke a lot of Jersey Norman French-if there were Germans within earshot didn't know what they were talking about-only one of his siblings that could speak Jersey french to his parents. When he first got back from Canada-went to a private school at Five Oaks-he was the only one who couldn't speak Jersey french-learnt it by being with the boys. Later in life-now all in English-thinks it is a dying language. Third Record-Edelweiss in the Sound of Music. Just celebrated his golden wedding anniversary-four children-Marion, Colin, Robin and Rosemary. Three of them interested in farming-Colin never liked the farm-disliked it from 5-didn't enjoy getting the cows in-didn't want the farm-wanted to go to university-went to Liverpool-gave him the money and invested it-graduated and went to work for the British Council-learned Spanish and went to Spain and then went to Uganda, Malawi and then came back to England, India-got married and ill having gone to Bangladesh, South Korea-set up a council. After 3 years went back to London and now is in Zimbabwe. Different from generations of farming in Jersey. After farming for 3 years-landlord said he was thinking of selling the farm-told Mr Whitel he couldn't afford it-put it up for auction-man from Rozel said he'd buy the farm and Mr Perchard could remain as tenant and he put in electricity. Two years later evacuated-came back in 1946-going to sell the farms-only had a small bit of money-bought the two farms for £1400 with rentes. Robin Perchard-interested in farming-used to help his father-natural farmer. Given up cattle and outside farming-Robin looks after it. Fourth Record-Gracie Fields. First got involved in the RJAHS at christmas 1934-49 years-back for the centenary-went to see the show-interested when he took the farm. After WW2-Carlyle Le Gallais suggested going on the council. Became a committee member for St Martin's Agricultural Society and got in to RJAHS. Went into the States-gave up RJAHS council member-when out of States became vice-president. Enjoyed the States work for 6 years but the second 6 years was hard-was becoming a full time job-good to go back to his farmer friends-became president 6 years ago-finishing at christmas. The society-more important than ever-decided not to import semen-have to handle it right. Danger from outside-don't want open market for cattle outside of island. Fifth Record-Harry Secombe-The Old Ragged Cross and the reason that he chose it. End of Side One. Personal View of Jurat Peter Baker, Constable of St Helier. Seeing himself as a St Helier man. His early days-spent time at the Jersey Swimming Club-had a lot of fun at Havre des Pas Swimming Pool. Outdoor child. Interest in boats-from his mother's side-from the Isles of Scilly. Didn't enjoy going to school-Victoria College-not happiest days of his life. Ambition-to get out and enjoy himself-thought he may be able to go to sea professionally-changed his mind. Went to London at 16-worked at Harrods. First Record-1812 Overture by Tchaikovsky. Whether he plays an instrument, listening to music. His family owned a shop in Queen Street-Frederick Baker and Sons Limited. Harrods ran a student scheme. Joined the armed forces during the second world war and became a major by the end of the war. Joined the Territorial Army whilst in London-went into France in 1939 with the British Expeditionary Force-saw service in Dunkirk, in Northern Ireland and then Africa, Sicily, Italy, South France, Greece and finished career in Palestine. Palestine furthest east he went. Enjoyed being a parachutist-big impact on him-development of spirit in an emergency. Left army and returned to Jersey after liberation. Jersey changed after occupation-exciting atmosphere. Settled down and joined the family business. Honour of being voted Constable of St Helier-always interested in the honorary system-good to put something back. Elected to Welfare Board and then Constable. Second Record-music from Dr Zhivago. Used to be a filmgoer but with television stopped going to the cinema. Cinemas after the war-West's, Forum and New Era at Georgetown. Went straight to Constable in St Helier-not unusual in St Helier-like to vote for businessmen in St Helier-different to country parish. Excess of £3 million in budget-more than all other parishes-being constable of St Helier like running a small business. Spends more time being the Constable of St Helier than running his business-more than a full time job. Family business-sold out, now where Queen's House stands. Family owned Noel & Porter's where British Home Stores now is-that was sold out. President of Chamber of Commerce for 5 years, St Helier Welfare Board, Secretary of Jersey Lifeboat. Lifeboat-secretary virtually runs the boat-doesn't go out on operations-used to launch the boat and call the crew. Now run by the Harbour Office. St Helier Welfare Board-major part of budget of St Helier parish-concerned with individuals-good system in place-some people very difficult to help. Meet as the St Helier Welfare Board once a month-has to decide what to do in difficult situations. Third Record-Oriental Trinidad Steel Band with Jamaica Farewell. Likes hot but not humid climates. Enjoys travelling-visits friends in America. Life as Constable-office as Constable unique-look to Constable to variety of things-Constable not as political as deputy or senator-other duties. No political ambitions beyond Constable of St Helier-would not stand as senator. States work, civic duties and the parochial duties such as welfare that takes up most of his time. Concern about violence in St Helier-believes it may be exaggerated. Relationship between States and Honorary Police good-system difficult but works well in island like Jersey. Important future for honorary police. Fourth Record-Evening Hymn and Last Post by the Royal Military School of Music. Used to sail but doesn't race anymore-good way to learn to sail. Enjoys people, good food and wine and life. His wife and he swims in the sea everyday-good start to the day in the winter-used to swim for the island and Victoria College but now bathes rather than swims-took part in the Jersey Swimarathon. Describes a typical day. Fifth Record-Peter Dawson with Friend of Mine. Is going to decide whether to carry on as Constable of St Helier

Reference: R/07/B/2

Date: 1982 - 1983

Temps Passe - Jersey Mailboats - November 2007

Reference: US/347

Date: 2007 - 2007

JEP Newscutting - Photographs of various places in the Island, damaged by the effects of the combination of strong winds and high tides in March 2008 - 11/03/08

Reference: US/443

Date: 2008 - 2008

JEP Newscutting: article about the burial and commemoration locations of servicemen who died at sea in the Second World War's Operation Tunnel = 08/11/2011

Reference: US/844

Date: 2011 - 2011

Page build time: 0.01616671482722 seconds