Jersey Talking Magazine-September Edition. Introduction by Gordon Young. Joan Stevens taking a tour of St Clement talking about the early history of the parish, St Clement's Church including the piscina, the font, the paintings on the wall, the line of the roof, stone seats around the base of the pillars and the priory, the size of the parish, the effects of the sea, prehistoric remains including the dolmens, menhirs and prehistoric graves of the parish. The chapel that was dedicated to St John the Evangelist before the Reformation which was destroyed, Rocqueberg which was used by a witches coven, Jean Mourant and others who were killed for being witches. Talks about 1685 when they received french refugees, Le Hocq Tower-a Jersey Round Tower, Victor Hugo who lived at Marine Terrace from 1853 to 1855, Samares Manor including the fact it took its name from the salt around the manor, the dovecote, a windmill in 1218, the chapel, the families who held the manor who were the de Ste Hilaire's, the Payn's, the Dumaresq's, the Seale's, the Hamon's, the Mourant's and Sir James Knott who renovated the garden. Before that Philippe Dumaresq built a garden, he also wrote an important survey on Jersey in the 1680s. Cooking Feature-Margaret Jenkins giving recipes for desserts. Guernsey Feature-Linda Le Vasseur talking to Joan Stockdale, a Guernsey journalist for a newspaper, asking her why she decided to become a reporter, how she started, how she felt when she started, how it developed, her women's and children's pages, the most interesting people she has interviewed, interviewing Michael Parkinson, Jimmy Saville, Frank Bough, Peter Sellers, Oliver Reed, the most difficult part of the job, coping with a career and a family, her interest in tropical birds, her collection of amber, her favourite books and her advice for the listener who wants a career in journalism. Horoscope feature-Diane Postlethwaite talking about the forecast for virgo for the year. End of Side One. Driving down to Corbiere, on top of tower-radio aerials-home of Jersey Radio, the nerve centre of Jersey shipping communications and run by the Harbours and Airport Committee-describing the structure, talking to Mr Dale about a rescue taking place of a fishing boat, the view from the tower, the wind blowing, the increased need for Jersey Radio, what Jersey Radio does and is told by boats, working with the French, dealing with a rescue, the frequencies used, what's happening with the rescue, the transmissions between the officials dealing with the rescue, the use of air rescue, the frequency and types of emergencies. Story read by Peter Gilchrist about Mike Tetley, a guide dog owner and completely blind, who appeared on This is Your Life and climbed up Mount Everest describing his life, his training and the process by which he climbed the mountain. Quiz-Gordon Young announces the winner from the previous month and sets a new quiz. End of Side Two.

Reference: R/05/B/46

Date: August 31st 1980 - August 31st 1980

Jersey Talking Magazine No 8-February 1977. Introduction by Gordon Young. Gardening Feature-talking with Les Le Vesconte of St John about growing tomatoes in greenhouses, when they're picked, how they're grown, changes in techniques, variety of tomatoes, conditions that they're kept in, cost of growing. Talk about vegetables that they are growing in the gardens. Nature Feature-Frances Le Sueur talking about crapauds-recording of their noise and story about their history and lives in Jersey. Cooking Feature-Margaret Jenkins giving recipes for baking cakes. Island Administrators-Beth Lloyd interviewing Graham Pitman-Chief Administrative Officer of the Public Works Department-part of the Dept of Public Building and Works-talks about how the department is made up, the decision making process, his position in the department, is also blind-talking about how he works within the department, how he got the job, how the job has become more difficult being blind and how he is taking over as the interviewer of the Island Administrator's series of recordings for Jersey Talking Magazine. Details given on cookery books in large print for the blind. Recordings of a party held by Jersey Talking Magazine for their readers including interviews with Mrs Ansell, Mrs Boucher, Mr Sinel and others about the party and the magazine. End of Part One. Part Two of the Island Walk through Town with Joan Stevens and Robin Cox-in the Parade having walked past Briggs and noted its demolition. Talks about the Old Prison at Charing Cross and prisons in the island, the effect of General Don, the water supplies in the town, the General Hospital building's development, the Parade-how it got its name, developments on the site from General Don's era to present day, Cannon Street, All Saint's Church, General Don's monument and his life, development in Old Street and archaeological discoveries about the areas going back to the 1200s, 15, Old Street-one of the houses visited by John Wesley and the state of buildings on Old Street, the Town Hall, the history of Hue Street nos 1, 3, 5 , 7, 9, 11-now the Post Horn Public House, Dumaresq Street and Little Pitt Street. Visit by Beth Lloyd to Orleans in France to find out about the manufacture of perfume by Christian Dior and the history and workings of the company. Humorous story by Gordon Young.

Reference: R/05/B/5

Date: January 31st 1977 - January 31st 1977

Jersey Talking Magazine-April Edition. Introduction by Gordon Young. Philip Gurdon interviewing Ken Ball, an amateur radio enthusiast, about the equipment for his amateur radio station, the regulations involved in broadcasting amateur radio, the Radio Society of Great Britain, the examinations needed to be sat to operate an amateur radio, a blind operator, communicating with people throughout the world on the radio, listening to an amateur broadcaster from London and Malta and talking to people across the world. Joan Stevens taking a tour around St Ouen about it being the biggest parish in the island but one of the smallest population, named after a 7th century bishop of Rouen with a relic that was placed in the church, St Ouen's Church-the date it was built, St Ouen's Bay which is actually in three parishes, La Rocco Tower built between 1796 and 1800-a Jersey round tower-last to be built, was falling apart-during the occupation used as target practice, tower repaired. Vinchelez de Haut and Vinchelez de Bas Manor's-architectural details of the manors, Abraham Le Sueur was killed at Vinchelez de Bas by a falling rock, St Ouen's Manor-biggest and oldest manor in island, parts that date back to 1135 to the de Carteret families, 1490-fortified and crenellated by then seigneur of St Ouen in fear of attack, over years altered a great deal, 1670-restoration, later fell into disrepair-de Carteret family important in England, passed to the Malet de Carterets-Colonel Malet de Carteret-1860s-started large scale restorations until 1880-appearance there is today, Le Pinnacle-important site-centre of pilgrimage for over 2000 years, worry of erosion and vandalism, lovely area of flora, windmills and dolmens in parish-Moulin de la Mare did exist where Val de la Mar exists-a seigneurial mill-used by the public. L'Etacq-name from an old norse name, had a martello tower on it-L'Etacquerel-removed by germans during the occupation, lead found up at L'Etacq, vraic collected from L'Etacq which was used as compost, caves, Les Mielles-being kept as conservation centre, needs to be kept natural so it is not destroyed. Excerpt from a Midsummer Night's Dream, the first time Shakespeare had been performed at the Jersey Opera House for a number of years, featuring Sonia Hamon and Rosemary and Hilary Lissenden. Horoscope Feature-Diane Postlethwaite giving a forecast for the year for aries. End of Side One. Beth Lloyd describing the view from her house and the joys of spring with Gordon Young reading the poem 'I wander lonely as a cloud'. Vicki Stuckey talking to Lloyd Cornish of Elle, who provides wedding dresses asking what brides are wearing nowadays, what they should look for in a wedding dress, the colour and length of the wedding dress, the fashions, the expense of the dress, the style of veil and headdress, the design of Lady Diana's wedding dress. Beth Lloyd talking to Jeffrey Archer about his latest book 'Cain and Abel', the research that went into the book, his university days and running, keeping fit, becoming the youngest member of the Greater London Council, becoming a member of parliament, losing a million pounds with a bad investment, writing his first book based on his experiences, deciding to continue writing, his desire to get back in to politics and his decision to put it on hold, his next book, a sequel to 'Cain and Abel', his plans for the foreseeable future, an invitation to meet the Emperor of Japan and his pride in being published in Braille. Di Weber went to the Mont Felard Hotel asking Steve, the chef, how he copes with cooking for so many people, what he enjoys cooking the most, his hours at the hotel and Renata a waitress about working as a waitress, learning how to serve people, why she likes the job and where she comes from and Jill, the receptionist talking about her duties, difficult customers and living in the hotel. Gordon Young tells a humorous story. End of Side Two.

Reference: R/05/B/53

Date: March 31st 1981 - March 31st 1981

Jersey Talking Magazine-December Edition. Introduction by Gordon Young. Joan Stevens taking a tour of St Peter talking about the size of the parish with the sea on two sides, St Peter's Church which is mentioned in records before 1066, in 1053 it is referred to as St Pierre don la dessert because of the exposed sandy soil. Where Jersey Airport is now used to be rich corn land with massive harvests. Down near St Ouen the sand dunes are with diverse wildlife-Les Mielles is being preserved as a result. St Peter's Church-tallest spire in the island and has been hit by lightning at least 3 time, it dates from 1400s and there are some initials on some of the stones. In the church an incised tombstone has been built into the wall-marks of a blacksmiths grave. Over 100 years ago the church was too small for congregation-an extra knave was built as a result of the garrison being stationed at St Peter's Barracks. Barracks built in 1811 until 1927-they were removed to make way for Airport. Bell in church has a name incised on it, a piscina in the church was found in Les Bois when it was knocked down and was installed in church. A priory in St Peter was on land called La Flocquetterie-now Philadelphie Chapel stands on it. On the corner by Oak Walk there was a leper house. St Anastase-in Coin Varin-was a school house which was founded in 1496. Children attended from 6am-6pm and had lessons in latin and were taught latin, the classics and divinity. La Hague Manor-now changed to school, the colombiers was changed into the school library. The house itself was built in 1634, rebuilt in 1733 and in 1871 by Colonel Le Cornu. St Peter's House-originally home of Robin Family-burnt in 1754 and rebuilt-greatly altered since-used to be home of Sir William Venables Vernon-bailiff. The Rectory-moved 3 times in the parish-used to be next to La Hague Manor then moved nearer church to north of La Flocquetterie-1800s and then moved beside there and then modern rectory moved close by church. Mills-more mills than every other parish-Quetteville has been restored by the National Trust for Jersey-working mill, Tostain Mill-did belong to a lame priest. St Peter had a windmill in 1837-turned into restaurant. Parish gun-1551 at Beaumont Hill-all parishes had guns-only one that survived-made by John Owen and inscribed, in 1839-Sir John le Couteur found it in England and returned it to the parish. St Ouen's Bay-a great deal of it in St Peter-famous battle-commonwealth defeated royalists during civil war-Sir George Carteret defeated by Admiral Blake-Carteret fled to Elizabeth Castle. Jersey Airport-started 1937-extensions since. Germans dug into St Peter almost more than any other parish-headquarters at Panigo [?]-underground constructions and strongpoints in the parish. Beautiful houses in St Peter. St Peter's Valley-crowning glory of parish-Queen Victoria-visit in 1859 taken by Sir John Le Couteur for a drive there. Rachel Pirouet singing a song that she sang in the Jersey Eisteddfod followed by the presentation of the John Lobb memorial goblet to the Jersey Eisteddfod. Phil Gurdon talks to Beryl Jordan about how the Jersey Eisteddfod was going, the judge of the competition, the number of people who had entered, no class for the Jersey Norman French, how long the Eisteddfod had been going in Jersey and when they start preparing for the next years competition. Pat Dubras and Brian Le Breton singing a duet from the play 'Free as Air' performed at the Jersey Opera House. Beth Lloyd paying tribute to David Scott-Blackwell who used to present In Touch tips for the blind including quotations fro his poetry. End of Side One. Chris and David at a steam fair in Trinity in the sheds of Lyndon Charles Pallot with a steam engine threshing corn describing the scene and how the engine and the threshing machine works, what the engine is used for, looking at the steam machines in the shed, hand threshing being shown and the man being interviewed [with a Jersey accent] about the process, the threshing machine, when it would have been last used and a corn measure. A man being interviewed about bread being made and the process involved, cabbage loaves and how they are made. Description of a petrol engine and a smaller threshing machine with the noise of the machine and interviews about the machine including with Jim Purvis, description of a tractor, interview about a machine that rolls oats for the horses. Describing model steam engines made by Harold Taylor of St Ouen with the noise of the engines. Mr Pallot talking about the different machines that he owns, working with them and the steam fair. Description of different engines on display. Cynthia Reed interviewing Robert Farnon, a composer and arranger who lives in Guernsey, asking whether he came from a musical family, what musical instruments he played when he was young, having professional training, when he wrote his first piece of music, his first job in the professional world-playing in his brother's band, how he starts composing music, conducting, when he moved to Guernsey, his favourite piece of music he wrote, how much he enjoys arranging music, the music he listens to, his favourite artist to work with -Tony Bennett and what he is doing next in his career. James Clayton reading a story about 'Dinah-the Dog with a Difference'. End of Side Two.

Reference: R/05/B/60

Date: November 30th 1981 - November 30th 1981

Jersey Talking Magazine-March Edition. Introduction by Gordon Young. Gordon Young visiting Schruns in Austria describing the view of the village from the top of a mountain, the ski slope and ski schools, the cable car down the mountain, the scene from the cable car, arriving at the cable car station, walking around the village of Schruns describing the park, the main square, the church with its bells ringing, the school, the streets, houses and the river. Sue talking to Sergeant O'Brian about the drug problem in Jersey, the number of drug addicts in Jersey, how drug addicts start, cannabis, drug smuggling, the customs checks at the airport and harbour, the main number arrests made because of information gained from informants, the people who abuse drugs, the part of the plant that the cannabis drug comes from and the other drugs of concern in the island including amphetamines and solvent abuse and problems in the future. End of Side One. Pat Dubras talking to Beth Lloyd about the first pantomime put on by the Jersey Amateur Dramatics Club called 'Cinderladdin and his Wonderful Cat' by Ken Fletcher about the pantomime, the decision to take the production on tour to different parish halls, the difficulty of moving between different locations, playing to packed houses and singing the title song from the pantomime. Philip Gurdon talking to Roger Pratt who decided the previous summer to join the British Antarctic Survey as a pilot on his decision to go on the expedition, the preparations for the journey, the flight to Antarctica, the equipment used to get to Antarctica, his first impression of the region, the different colours of the ice, the headquarters where they were based at Adelaide Island, 24 hours of daylight, the need for self sufficiency, supplies, the occasion of a storm which resulted in the aeroplanes being blown upside down and being almost completely wrecked, taking the aeroplanes to pieces and salvaging the wreckage, the different countries represented in the region, what people do to pass the time, working in the garage and getting airlifted out by the Chilean Air Force. End of Side Two.

Reference: R/05/B/62

Date: February 28th 1982 - February 28th 1982

Jersey Talking Magazine-January 1983. Introduction by Gordon Young. Beth Lloyd interviewing Katie Boyle, the television personality who has written two books-Boyle's Law and her autobiography 'What this Katie did'. Talks about why she had written her autobiography, her early life was harrowing-was imprisoned and put in a mental institution-the book was a release, whether she likes her image, her father and her childhood, her book called Boyle's Law which is a tribute to her relationship between her and her readers, her heritage-born in Italy and her father was part Russian and part Italian, her ability with languages, her ability to seem calm on television, working on the Eurovision Song Contest, coming to Jersey for her honeymoon and enjoying her holidays in the island. A guide by Lloyds Bank Limited for the blind and visually handicapped presented by Malcolm [?]. Kevin Mulhern talking about the difficulties that banks can offer for the visually impaired. Peter Thomas, chairman of the Amersham and Chesham Talking Newspaper and manager of Lloyds Fenchurch Street Branch, giving advice for visually handicapped people when using a bank including ringing in advance and using the same cashier. Kevin Mulhern cashing a cheque and talking about how welcoming the bank is, how much help he needs to complete the cheque, his routine when he comes into a bank, a member of staff helping him complete the cheque and getting out his money. Kevin Mulhern interviewing Peter Thomas about the possibility having a deposit account without a cheque book, writing that you are visually handicapped on the cheque book. Ernest Watson, a customer at the Great Portland Street Lloyds, talking about how long he has had his bank account, not to be worried when coming into the bank, what the staff do to help, what he uses the bank for and having no worries about withdrawing money. Peter Thomas and Kevin Mulhern talking about the facility of standing orders, statements and guides issued in Braille and large print, being able to talk to the bank manager, the services that the bank offers and the costs of the services. Kevin Mulhern talking about if he could live without a bank account. End of Side One. Group Captain Fred Winterbottom talking about Adolf Hitler, the Nazi party in the 1930s, getting to know Alfred Rosenberg-third in power in the early Nazi party. The Foreign Office had forbidden the embassies to talk to anyone in the Nazi Party so he went to Germany to see if he could find out any information, he talks about getting to know Hitler in 1934, his cover was that he was a supporter of the Nazi regime, they wanted him to be an unofficial contact with members of government in England. Had an interview with Hitler for an hour and quarter-was told Hitler's plans for the future world and heard Hitler rant about communists. When they found out who he actually was through Italian information in 1938 Rosenberg told him not to come back to Germany again. By that time he had established number of the German Air Force, the blitzkrieg strategy of the German tanks and the dates that the russian war was due to start and he knew the mentality of the people at the top. The quality of intelligence was so good that it was difficult convincing the Allied forces that it was real. He was involved in code breaking and details tricks used, 1942-43-built the first ever computer which could run all of the possibilities quickly to break the codes. His first book-'The Ultra Secrets' says some of the Allied commanders thought it was unfair that they knew what the enemy were doing-Montgomery especially. He had to brief the commanders about the intelligence-Montgomery was the only one who was uncooperative. The intelligence was essential for the victory of the Battle of Britain. He talks about the lack of credit for the code breakers of the second world war, whether it is possible to create an unbreakable code and experimenting with aerial photography. Joan Stevens talking about Jersey doctors. 1700s-quite a number of doctors were in the island including Solomon Journeaux, Dr Sabir [?] and Dr Forbes. In 1746 Dr Forbes attended Mr de Sausmarez and charged him for 'Peruvian bark' which was a precursor to quinine and was used for fevers in the late summer. There is mention of Dr Seale who was a physician and a surgeon. In 1745 Dr Richard Smith, visitor to the island, advertised 'scurvy grass' as a cure for scurvy. Dr Philip Choué de Vaumorel was born in Jersey in 1726 and died in 1789. He was a son of french refugees from Normandy. Choué means a screech owl and Vaumorel was their home. Once in Jersey he became known as de Vaumorel. Lived in Hue Street with a garden as far as Old Street and was an island character. He married Constance Charlotte Le Hardy, daughter of the attorney general, who acted as her husband's secretary. A bill survives from 1759 signed by her for 2 years of treatment for Mrs de Sausmarez. In 1773 Dr de Vaumorel offered to attend the poor at the Hospital for no charge. He was frequently quoted in newspapers of time. The medical treatment of the time mostly consisted of vomiting, bleeding and purging. Gordon Young taking a tour around the Sacre Coeur Cathedral in Paris describing the cathedral. End of Side Two.

Reference: R/05/B/69

Date: December 31st 1982 - December 31st 1982

Jersey Talking Magazine-May 1977 Edition. Introduction by Gordon Young. Nature, Gardening and Cooking Features with Frances Le Sueur, Chris and David and Margaret Jenkins-all talking about the use, growing, cooking and types of herbs. Island Administrators-Graham Pitman interviewing Senator Reg Jeune, President of the Education Committee about the responsibilities of the Education Committee, the differences between Jersey and the UK education committees, the problems for Jersey in the future, the problems of over crowding and the time that States work takes up. Eileen Le Sueur telling a humorous story of being caught for being drunk in charge in Jersey French. Gordon Young talking about the humorous story from the last edition. End of Side One. June Gurdon reading a poem by Reg Grandin about the queuing during the occupation. Interview with Molly Parker, a local artist who paints in the Chinese style. Talks about her art style, how she got into painting, different forms of Chinese art, being invited to display her art in an exhibition in Taiwan and she describes some of her painting and talks of her future plans. Di Weber visits HMS Jersey describing the ship, the activity on the ship. Talks to Mr Philips from Radio Lions about the outside broadcast that they're holding and the captain of the ship about the ship, her crew, the duties of the ship and a presentation of a bell to the ship by the island. Continues on the tour and talks to a sailor about the working of the ship, his time on the ship and his duties. Continues to describe the ship and talks to A V Tinning about the navigation and radar system on the ship and his duties. Talks about the gun on the ship, the view from St Helier Harbour, the flag, the quarter deck, the dinghies used to board other fishing vessels, the accommodation on the ship and the food. Gordon Young tells a humorous anecdote.

Reference: R/05/B/7

Date: April 30th 1977 - April 30th 1977

Jersey Talking Magazine-Mid-summer 1984. Introduction by Gordon Young. Beth Lloyd visiting Le Brun's the Bakery, which was founded 180 years ago in Hansford Lane but it wasn't until 1938 that the present managing director's Brian Le Marquand's family took it over when his father bought in. Brian Le Marquand talking about why his father bought the bakery, how much it cost, in 1938 the business was 5% of the island trade but by 1950 it had been built up to 15% of the trade when it was moved to Brighton Road, joining the company in 1958 and buying 50 % of the shareholding in 1960, how the company has changed, it now has 85% of island trade, taking over three other island bakeries, problems in putting sell by dates on the bread, trying to bake bread for when people need to use it, retail trade only one side of the business, they also serve the hotel, guest house and cafe trade and now cater for private parties. David Parmiter, the Production Director, talks about the bread bakery, the process of making bread, the people who work in the bakery, how to tell when the bread is ready, slicing and packing the bread, a new machine detecting metal in the bread, the decorating room-used for making and decorating cakes, meat preparation room-high standard of hygiene, meat delivered fresh daily, how they make and roll their pastries, the roll bakery which involved the same process as bread, 60,000-70,000 rolls made a day, half baked products been brought in and are selling well, wholemeal bread has risen tremendously. Frank Todd, Commercial Manager, in the dispatch area talking about delivering goods, the amount of deliveries a day, how long a delivery takes, the part weather plays in orders, the risk of waste at the end of the day, getting the weather forecast so they can guess how much food is going to be ordered, not freezing orders and dealing with an order-in radio contact with the drivers. Tricia Jones, a tele-sales girl, talks about ringing customers every day to ask them their orders for the next day. Nick Le Couteur, the Sales Director, explaining what happens to the orders after phone calls by the tele-sales girl in order to prepare the food, how many products Le Brun's manufacture-over 500 products, many thousands of products produced each day, modern trends, the movement towards wholemeal breads, cakes still popular, the introduction of croissants, different outlets and the use of computers within the company. Brian Le Marquand talking about future plans for the company. John Boucheré talking about coach trips-in 1946-47 there were a dozen coach companies of various sizes, he trained as a motor engineer-in the early 1950s he decided to drive a coach around the island, he was painfully shy, driving relatively easy but it was difficult to answer questions in front of everybody. He talks about the different people who he encountered on his tours, the way people used to sing after lunch, dealing with drunken passengers, carrying people on poignant journeys-parents of a soldier who died and helping a blind passenger. Stan Birch, a jazz pianist, playing a piece with Wendy Shields singing. End of Side One. Philip Gurdon taking a tour of the German Underground Hospital with Joe Mière. Joe Mière talking about the construction of the tunnels, the different workers, when the work began in 1941, Organisation Todt and the fact that it was planned as an artillery barracks but in 1943 its use was changed to be a bunker. Commenting on the exhibits, talking about ghosts in the tunnels, changes they are making to the tunnels, rock falls in the tunnels, a rest room, the dispensary-was never used, a ward with a description, the equipment in the rooms of the tunnels, an escape shaft, what happened to the Hospital at the end of the war-the company buying the tunnel and becoming more successful, a closed tunnel that has now been opened. Museum-letters by Walter Gallichan-taken to Alderney, survivors of Alderney having a reunion. Describing the exhibits in the museum, newscuttings from the newspaper, the Stranger's Cemetery, reunions with the Russians and a bouquet of flowers put up by Maud Otter. Beth Lloyd telling a story about her cat. End of Side Two.

Reference: R/05/B/76

Date: May 31st 1984 - May 31st 1984

Jersey Talking Magazine-June 1977 Edition. Introduction by Gordon Young. Nature Feature-Frances Le Sueur talks about wild garlic and the cuckoo with its bird call. Interview by Gordon Young of the television naturalist David Bellamy talking about what drew him into botany, his interest in flowers and the conservation of animals and plants in the garden. Cooking Feature-Margaret Jenkins talking about what recipes you can make with cheese. Beth Lloyd talking to a doctor about the use of vitamin supplements. Island Administrators-Graham Pitman talking to John Lees of Controller of Social Security about the functions of the Social Security Department, the differences between Jersey and the UK, future developments in social security, how awareness is raised of the department's work to the public. Tim giving hints on bath aids for the blind and elderly. End of Side One. June Gurdon reading Reg Grandin's poem 'Little Treasured Joys'. Commander Cruisarr from Guernsey talking about the evolution of Talking Books for the blind. Beth Lloyd talking to Frank Walker, Managing Director of the Jersey Evening Post, about the moving of the newspaper offices from Bath Street to Five Oaks, the printing of the newspaper, going on a tour of the building with descriptions of each room and the printing process. Roy Fauvel tells the history of a gold snuff box recently presented to St Helier by Eric Young which was presented to Edward Nicolle, the Constable of St Helier in the 1820s, who was censured by the States after comments made but received the box as a vote of confidence from the parish. Gordon Young with a story about the muratti.

Reference: R/05/B/8

Date: May 31st 1977 - May 31st 1977

Notebook recording daily expenses incurred on a tour from Jersey through France, Switzerland and Italy, 23 June 1840. Includes comments on the weather, food, accommodation, purchases of pictures, prints, drawings and antique sculpture. At the front is a summary of journeys from Jersey to France and London 1834-1855. The writer is unknown, female, and apparently resident in Jersey.

Reference: WRO 727/2/20

Date: 1839 - 1840

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