Registration of the independence of Uganda, Jamaica and Trinidad

Reference: A/D1/A1/205

Date: July 16th 1963 - December 22nd 1976

Digital copy of Minutes of Les Chênes School Advisory Sub-Committee, 2002. [Some details redacted].

Reference: C/D/AW1/A3/9/1/WD004288

Date: February 8th 2002 - November 29th 2002

Digital copy of Exhibit BH16: Review of the Suspension Process for the Chief Officer of the States of Jeresy Police: Appointment of Commissioner. Presented to the States on 14 April 2010 by the Chief Minister. Used in relation to F J (Bob) Hill's Witness Statement to the Inquiry, dated 24 June 2014, see C/D/AW4/B2/7/WS000515.

Reference: C/D/AW4/A5/7/WD005189/16

Date: April 14th 2010 - April 14th 2010

Garrison Routine Orders by Lieutenant Colonel A B Rogers, Officer Commanding Troops, Jersey. Serial No. 76, [Garrison Routine Orders] 363-368. Signed by Captain J P Walters for Staff Captain "Q", Garrison Headquarters.

Reference: L/C/146/B3/1/76

Date: March 27th 1946 - March 27th 1946

Jersey Talking Magazine-August Edition. Introduction by Gordon Young. Mark Higgins, a member of St Paul's Cathedral Choir School, who is singing at the royal wedding of Prince Charles and Princess Diana, sings 'I Know that My Redeemer' and talking about how he got into the school, the levels he had to achieve in order to be accepted, how long he spends singing, the amount of boys in the school, the different time he has his holidays, preparing for the royal wedding, the songs they are going to sing at the royal wedding, whether he feels nervous about performing in front of so many people, the other occasions they sing for at the Cathedral, singing outside the Cathedral, making recordings, meeting the Queen Mother and other members of the royal family and sings another song. Norah talking to Jeremy Scriven, a Jersey boy who left the island to climb Mount Kilimanjaro in Tanzania talking about how he decided to climb the mountain, his lack of regrets of going, getting to Tanzania and the difficulty in doing so because the border of Kenya and Tanzania was closed, being arrested for crossing the border into Tanzania without realising and being put into prison for four days, the conditions in the prison, being tried in the court, being allowed free and then expelled into Kenya, managed to go through Uganda in order to get to Tanzania, buying tickets to Kilimanjaro on the black market, encountering violence in Kampala, journeying and climbing Mount Kilimanjaro, spending 4 days climbing, a member of the party suffering altitude sickness, the experience of climbing the mountain, the view from the top of the mountain and how he felt climbing down again. Katina Hervau, a french girl in the island to learn the language, talking about her first impressions of Jersey roads and the island. Horoscope Feature-Diane Postlethwaite talking about the forecast for the year for leo. June Gurdon giving some In Touch tips for the blind about cooking vegetables without water. End of Side One. Gordon Young taking a trip in a hot air balloon describing the balloon, getting into the balloon, taking off, describing the views of Jersey below including town, St Helier Harbour, Elizabeth Castle, Victoria Avenue, St Aubin's Bay, Noirmont and to the Jersey Airport to land. Gordon Young at Government House for a ball for the Royal National Lifeboat Institution describing the gardens of Government House, the food for the occasion, the scene in the marquees, the scene inside Government House. Talking to Sir Peter Whiteley about piloting in the hot air balloon and the ball for the RNLI and to Lady Whiteley about the weather and the amount of people attending the ball. Listening to the band in the marquee. End of Side Two.

Reference: R/05/B/57

Date: July 31st 1981 - July 31st 1981

Personal View of Bill Perchard interview by Beth Lloyd. Talking about how the celebrations of Royal Jersey Agricultural and Horticultural Society last week went, only a bunch of farmers-amazed it went so well-every did their job and there was no bickering and for the two days it was a grand reunion of country folk. The visitors didn't come and so the money wasn't great. Would change a few things if doing it again-would give out less free passes. Worth losing money on it because it did well for the agricultural and horticultural industry. Brought together the agricultural associations. Cattle show-exciting-more entries as usual. Sponsors for the shows-inter-parochial competitions-done 50 years ago-only one parish missing. Mr Cowdrey-the queen's manager and an australian-judging competition. Australian and New Zealand breeder comes to Jersey a lot. No thoughts about having an annual event-possibility of contributing if there was a carnival week with the Battle of Flowers. First Record-Judy Collins and Amazing Grace and his reasons for choosing his song. Went to church and sunday school as a child-had nowhere else to go-met girlfriends at church-social and religious life. Not born in Jersey-parents went to Canada for 6 or 7 years-came back to farm at St Saviour's. Remembers Canada-when he was 2½ years old, remembers meeting cattle for the first time. Always wanted to be a farmer-when he left school learned a trade-worked as a builder-eldest of 14 children. Horn Brothers-in Winchester Street for 10 years-worked as builders labourer-became an apprentice. Bought a motorbike at 17 and took his bosses daughter out and she is now his wife-went out for 6 years before they got married-got married when she was 22. When working for the firm didn't have to help on the farm. Then had dinner at his bosses house-living at Peacock Farm in Trinity. Second Record-Heykens Serenade. Got married at age of 24-felt like a long wait, his father in law bought a house in Victoria Street and they were allowed the top flat-after a year he wanted the country. He wanted to farm-La Chasse-decided to let the farm-father acted as guarantor-that was july-moved in at Christmas. Shock to Winn-who was a town girl-within a month she was looking after the farm. Had a thousand hens-Marion born 3 years later-then did more in the house and then got help in the house and helped outside. 1939-had a dozen animals-WW2 came-no exports-one good thing-had to supply an animal for slaughter-sent the worst cow-after a while had all nice ones in the stable-bought cows in order to provide them for the Germans. Had a decent herd by the end of the war-bought a cow called Keeper's Lass-built up on these during the war-after the war did well. Problem of occupation-fear-could have been deported-no direct orders-told civilian authorities-in trouble if didn't do as you were told. Always said yes and then tried it on afterwards. Spoke a lot of Jersey Norman French-if there were Germans within earshot didn't know what they were talking about-only one of his siblings that could speak Jersey french to his parents. When he first got back from Canada-went to a private school at Five Oaks-he was the only one who couldn't speak Jersey french-learnt it by being with the boys. Later in life-now all in English-thinks it is a dying language. Third Record-Edelweiss in the Sound of Music. Just celebrated his golden wedding anniversary-four children-Marion, Colin, Robin and Rosemary. Three of them interested in farming-Colin never liked the farm-disliked it from 5-didn't enjoy getting the cows in-didn't want the farm-wanted to go to university-went to Liverpool-gave him the money and invested it-graduated and went to work for the British Council-learned Spanish and went to Spain and then went to Uganda, Malawi and then came back to England, India-got married and ill having gone to Bangladesh, South Korea-set up a council. After 3 years went back to London and now is in Zimbabwe. Different from generations of farming in Jersey. After farming for 3 years-landlord said he was thinking of selling the farm-told Mr Whitel he couldn't afford it-put it up for auction-man from Rozel said he'd buy the farm and Mr Perchard could remain as tenant and he put in electricity. Two years later evacuated-came back in 1946-going to sell the farms-only had a small bit of money-bought the two farms for £1400 with rentes. Robin Perchard-interested in farming-used to help his father-natural farmer. Given up cattle and outside farming-Robin looks after it. Fourth Record-Gracie Fields. First got involved in the RJAHS at christmas 1934-49 years-back for the centenary-went to see the show-interested when he took the farm. After WW2-Carlyle Le Gallais suggested going on the council. Became a committee member for St Martin's Agricultural Society and got in to RJAHS. Went into the States-gave up RJAHS council member-when out of States became vice-president. Enjoyed the States work for 6 years but the second 6 years was hard-was becoming a full time job-good to go back to his farmer friends-became president 6 years ago-finishing at christmas. The society-more important than ever-decided not to import semen-have to handle it right. Danger from outside-don't want open market for cattle outside of island. Fifth Record-Harry Secombe-The Old Ragged Cross and the reason that he chose it. End of Side One. Personal View of Jurat Peter Baker, Constable of St Helier. Seeing himself as a St Helier man. His early days-spent time at the Jersey Swimming Club-had a lot of fun at Havre des Pas Swimming Pool. Outdoor child. Interest in boats-from his mother's side-from the Isles of Scilly. Didn't enjoy going to school-Victoria College-not happiest days of his life. Ambition-to get out and enjoy himself-thought he may be able to go to sea professionally-changed his mind. Went to London at 16-worked at Harrods. First Record-1812 Overture by Tchaikovsky. Whether he plays an instrument, listening to music. His family owned a shop in Queen Street-Frederick Baker and Sons Limited. Harrods ran a student scheme. Joined the armed forces during the second world war and became a major by the end of the war. Joined the Territorial Army whilst in London-went into France in 1939 with the British Expeditionary Force-saw service in Dunkirk, in Northern Ireland and then Africa, Sicily, Italy, South France, Greece and finished career in Palestine. Palestine furthest east he went. Enjoyed being a parachutist-big impact on him-development of spirit in an emergency. Left army and returned to Jersey after liberation. Jersey changed after occupation-exciting atmosphere. Settled down and joined the family business. Honour of being voted Constable of St Helier-always interested in the honorary system-good to put something back. Elected to Welfare Board and then Constable. Second Record-music from Dr Zhivago. Used to be a filmgoer but with television stopped going to the cinema. Cinemas after the war-West's, Forum and New Era at Georgetown. Went straight to Constable in St Helier-not unusual in St Helier-like to vote for businessmen in St Helier-different to country parish. Excess of £3 million in budget-more than all other parishes-being constable of St Helier like running a small business. Spends more time being the Constable of St Helier than running his business-more than a full time job. Family business-sold out, now where Queen's House stands. Family owned Noel & Porter's where British Home Stores now is-that was sold out. President of Chamber of Commerce for 5 years, St Helier Welfare Board, Secretary of Jersey Lifeboat. Lifeboat-secretary virtually runs the boat-doesn't go out on operations-used to launch the boat and call the crew. Now run by the Harbour Office. St Helier Welfare Board-major part of budget of St Helier parish-concerned with individuals-good system in place-some people very difficult to help. Meet as the St Helier Welfare Board once a month-has to decide what to do in difficult situations. Third Record-Oriental Trinidad Steel Band with Jamaica Farewell. Likes hot but not humid climates. Enjoys travelling-visits friends in America. Life as Constable-office as Constable unique-look to Constable to variety of things-Constable not as political as deputy or senator-other duties. No political ambitions beyond Constable of St Helier-would not stand as senator. States work, civic duties and the parochial duties such as welfare that takes up most of his time. Concern about violence in St Helier-believes it may be exaggerated. Relationship between States and Honorary Police good-system difficult but works well in island like Jersey. Important future for honorary police. Fourth Record-Evening Hymn and Last Post by the Royal Military School of Music. Used to sail but doesn't race anymore-good way to learn to sail. Enjoys people, good food and wine and life. His wife and he swims in the sea everyday-good start to the day in the winter-used to swim for the island and Victoria College but now bathes rather than swims-took part in the Jersey Swimarathon. Describes a typical day. Fifth Record-Peter Dawson with Friend of Mine. Is going to decide whether to carry on as Constable of St Helier

Reference: R/07/B/2

Date: 1982 - 1983

Personal View of the Reverend Malcolm Beal, Rector of St Clement, interviewed by Geraldine des Forges. He was born in Weymouth and grew up seeing the Jersey boats. His father came from Sheffield and served in the navy at the end of the first world war. His father met his mother at a dance at Weymouth. When he was born his father was working as an electrician and then he became stage manager of a theatre and worked hard but died when he was 60. He used to have a love hate relationship with the theatre-he enjoyed worling there but resented it taking his father away from him. He has a brother, Colin, who lives in Canada and a sister Cora who died of cancer. They grew up in a difficult time because of the second world war and air raids but childhood seemed to be normal. They had a lot of freedom when they were children, even during the war. He was a choir boy and he used to go in the dark to choir practice. He enjoyed school and did what he had to do. He remembers being taught to pray at home and they went to sunday school. His brother and he were involved in the church choir. His parents didn't always go to church but they encouraged their children to get involved. Through his parents his sister had got involved with a bible class called the Girl Crusaders and through that they heard of a Crusaders class for boys which he joined. It was a strong influence with a bible based teaching. There was a feeling of uplift at joining the group and a sense of purpose. First Record-Parry's 'I was glad when they said unto me we will go into the house of the lord'. When he was 12 he went to a missionary meeting at his church-he felt a call to do missionary work. As he went through school it was a struggle-by the sixth form he decided to do a teacher training course. He left school and went to Bristol University to learn latin. He enjoyed his time at Bristol-he enjoyed his teaching more than his undergraduate course and his theological college best. He went to a school where Gilbert and Sullivan was very popular-the first they did was the Priates of Penzance which is very special to him now. When he was at university he was a distance from music but he enjoyed it. After national service he joined the choral society. When he was teaching he taught at a Quaker School at Somerset where music was very important. Second Record-Gilbert and Sullivan's 'With Cat-Like Tread' from the Pirates of Penzance. For national service he served 2 years in the navy from 1952. He learnt Russian for his national service. He didn't feel he was successful as a teacher but wasn't sure if he was ready for the ministry. In the end he started studying for the ministry in July 1957. He was based in Cambridge-one of the advantages of being at the theological college was being able to use the universities facilities. Towards the latter half of his college life some of his friends had started a choir and on Sundays there were a lot of ladies around involved in the singing. One of the ladies he met there later became his wife-she was a radiographer at the time. They were married in less than a year, a few months after he was ordained. Third Record-Part of Dvorak's New World Symphony. He was ordained in Wells Cathedral in September 1959 and went to be a curate in the parish of Keynsham and after 4 months they got married. His vicar was a very efficient worker-he had good ideas and knew what needed to be done. He regarded visiting as very important-the ministry should be getting in to people's homes. Mary and he were married in Cambridge and spent their honeymoon in Canterbury. Their first son David was born in Keynsham. After Keynsham he ended up with a curacy in Speke, Liverpool which was a housing estate with 27,000 people. They were placed in a pleasant council house but it could be very bleak. It wasn't an easy time for him-at first he wanted to leave but when he got to know people things changed. His second son Andrew was born in the parish. He then moved to Uganda after he received a letter from Everard Perrins, headmaster of a school in Uganda, saying that his name had been mentioned as someone with a teaching qualification who had expressed an interest in working on a mission. Once the suggestion was made it seemed to be a good idea and they applied and after six months they travelled to Uganda where he became chaplain to the school. He taught scripture at the school. He enjoyed the life in Uganda-it has a comfortable climate but no seasons, friendly people and a church that is alive. In their early years in Uganda there was a reaction against Christianity in the country but over the years the church in Uganda has started involving younger people. Fourth Record-A Piece from the Anglican Youth Fellowship Choir of Uganda. In Uganda his daughter Sarah was born in 1966 just after an earthquake in the country. Life in the school in Uganda was similar as life in an English school-the system was based on the English system. The school was founded in the 1920s by an Irishman who used to be in the navy. It was a school with a good reputation in the country and so had a good standard of pupil-the pupils really wanted to work in the country. When they first went to Uganda the President was a titular leader. After a year a coup failed and another leader took over. General Amin took over after 5 years. During Amin's time it was hard but it was mostly the people of Uganda who had it difficult-since they left it got much worse. In 1974 they returned to England but didn't know where they were going. They went to a village in Warwickshire called Salford Priors but he missed Uganda. He enjoyed getting involved in village life in Salford Priors-there were people who lived and worked in the village rather than all commuters. His wife got involved in the overseas aspects of Mothers Union. She was invited on to the Overseas Committee of Mothers' Union. Has happy memories of Salford Priors but started to wonder if they should make a move further south because of his mother's age-the suggestion of St Clement was made and they decided to move. They visited Jersey and were interviewed and they decided to come and live and work in St Clement. They were very happy to be in Jersey-he liked living near the sea again. There is a tremendous amount of work in the parish-being in touch with people who have been ill in the parish and reaching out to people in the parish. He feels that the church in Jersey is strong but has a long way to go-there are falling numbers in the church but it is not a time for despair. He is retiring to Devon but is going to miss Jersey-saying goodbye will be difficult. He doesn't have any plans for the future. It will be easier to see his family when they move to England. Fifth Record-Handel's Hallelujah Chorus.

Reference: R/07/B/23

Date: March 30th 1997 - March 30th 1997

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