BBC Radio Jersey-Occupation Tapes. Told by the people who lived through it produced by Beth Lloyd. 1) Part 1: Preparing for the Inevitable. Alexander Coutanche talking about the surprise in the island when it was realised the island was not going to be defended and the evacuation was offered to the public. Eye witnesses talking about the panic of evacuation and the dilemma of whether to go or not, queuing to register, worry that the island was to be occupied, putting down of pets, Lord Coutanche being told to stay at his post and simplify the machinery of government, the potential blowing up of public utilities and the air raid on the island. 2) Part 2: The Germans Arrive. Eye witness accounts on seeing German planes flying low over the island and landing at the airport to begin the occupation, sending a message to the bailiff at the airport, meeting the germans for the first time, putting out white flags, demanding surrender, handing over the island, removal of the Union Jack from Fort Regent, BBC radio report on the start of the occupation, first impressions of the soldiers, germans buying food from the shops and the beginning of the paper war. 3) Part 3: Curbs on personal freedom. German orders being read out. Eye witnesses remember the losing of freedom, restrictions on vehicles, use of money paid for comandeered goods on essential supplies from France, orders against the use of coastal areas, changing side of the road to drive on, introduction and the experience of the curfew, life at the Evening Post, permits and other regulations. 4) Part 4: Food or the Lack of It. Poem on hunger. Eye witnesses talking about difficulty of lack of food and the improvisations with food, difficulty of feeding baby, difference between town and country people, suffering of women from malnutrition, children not knowing what food looked like, what people did to get by, food as subject of discussion, problem of lack of sugar and salt, use of potato flour, eating of seaweed, different methods of cooking and fuel, soup kitchens, bartering, farmers trying to get extra meat, getting extra eggs from chickens and keeping rabbits 5) Part 5: The wireless-Jersey's link with the outside world. Report by the BBC. Michael Ginns talking about eventual confiscation of radios. Eye witness accounts of v-signs at Rouge Bouillon, patrolling of district by islanders, confiscation and storage of radios, taking of radios from the parish hall, keeping of radios on threat of death, use of crystal radios sets, listening to the news, spreading of newsheets, the threat of being caught with radios and listening to tunes that had not been heard before the occupation 6) Part 6: Through the Eyes of a Child. Eye witness accounts of children and teenagers suffering a great deal, the fun children had, being hungry and cold, being without parents, relationships with german soldiers, schools continuing, difficulty of shortages of uniform, german lessons, soup kitchens, drilling on Victoria College playing fields, playing of sports, the Caerarean Tennis Club, riding on the german railway, mischief children got up to and scavenging for supplies. See R/06/2.

Reference: L/D/25/L/42

Occupation-BBC Radio Jersey tape. The story of the occupation of Jersey during World War 2 told by the people who lived through it produced by Beth Lloyd. 1) Part 5: The wireless-Jersey's link with the outside world. Report by the BBC. Michael Ginns talking about eventual confiscation of radios. Eye witness accounts of v-signs at Rouge Bouillon, patrolling of district by islanders, confiscation and storage of radios, taking of radios from the parish hall, keeping of radios on threat of death, use of crystal radios sets, listening to the news, spreading of newsheets, the threat of being caught with radios and listening to tunes that had not been heard before the occupation 2) Part 6: Through the Eyes of a Child. Eye witness accounts of children and teenagers suffering a great deal, the fun children had, being hungry and cold, being without parents, relationships with german soldiers, schools continuing, difficulty of shortages of uniform, german lessons, soup kitchens, drilling on Victoria College playing fields, playing of sports, the Caerarean Tennis Club, riding on the german railway, mischief children got up to and scavenging for supplies.BBC Radio Jersey-Occupation Tapes. Told by the people who lived through it produced by Beth Lloyd. 3) Part 7: Deportation. BBC Report on the deportations from the Channel Islands. Alexander Coutanche's difficulty in having to accept the order. Eye witnesses reports of discovering the order for the deportations in the Evening Post, discovery that some deportee's houses being looted, preparations for deportation, being served deportation notices, deciding what to take, going to the Weighbridge, people being turned back because the ships were full, the crowd singing the ships off, the journey to St Malo, fighting at the third deportation leading to arrests. 4) Part 8: Not a Lot of Anything. Eye witnesses talking about the lack of essential supplies such as soap, a great shortage of drugs and medicines by Dr John Lewis and others, lack of clothes, shoes and the need to mend things, improvisation with clothes, bartering economy, wood collecting, what was used for fuel and reusing razor blades.

Reference: L/D/25/L/46

Scrapbook of the Jersey Island Cricket Club 1922 - 1930. Includes: newspaper cuttings detailing matches, social events and news relating to the club; statements of accounts; fixture lists for the Jersey and Guensey Island Cricket Clubs; annual reports; signatures and photographs of club members and visiting clubs; photographs and programmes from a stage play that took place at the Cercle St Thomas in February 1932 to raise funds for the club. Includes a report of a Ladies cricket match in 1923

Reference: L/D/27/A/1

Date: 1922 - 1930

Scrapbook of the Jersey Island Cricket Club 1931 - 1939 and 1948. Includes: newspaper cuttings detailing matches, social events and news relating to the club; fixture lists for the Jersey and Guensey Island Cricket Clubs; signatures and photographs of club members and visiting clubs; membership card for 1937 of Lieutenant-Colonel J L R Carey, who was the club's first captain; telegram from London notifying the cancellation of a tour by 'The Arabs' cricket team due to the outbreak of war.

Reference: L/D/27/A/2

Date: 1931 - 1948

Scrapbook of the Jersey Island Cricket Club 1949 - 1963. Includes: newspaper cuttings detailing matches, social events and news relating to the club; annual reports; fixture lists for the Jersey and Guensey Island Cricket Clubs; signatures and photographs of club members and visiting clubs; statisitcs including batting and bowling averages; typed notes from the captains of the club giving their thoughts on each year's cricket season; painted caricatures of cricketers including Billy Sutcliffe, Stuart Surridge, Bob Wyatt and Sir Leonard Hutton.

Reference: L/D/27/A/3

Date: 1949 - 1963

Scrapbook of the Jersey Island Cricket Club 1964 - 1971. Includes: newspaper cuttings detailing matches, social events and news relating to the club; fixture lists for the Jersey Island Cricket Club and one for the visiting Houehold Brigade Cricket Club for 1964; signatures and photographs of club members and visiting clubs; statisitcs including batting and bowling averages; painted caricatures of cricketers including A C Hallom of the Hampshire Hogs and D A R Ferguson of the Jersey Island Cricket Club.

Reference: L/D/27/A/4

Date: 1964 - 1971

Scrapbook of the Jersey Island Cricket Club 1971 - 1975. Includes: mainly newspaper cuttings detailing matches, social events and news relating to the club; fixture lists for the Jersey Island Cricket Club; signatures of club members and visiting clubs.

Reference: L/D/27/A/5

Date: 1971 - 1975

BBC Radio Jersey-Occupation Tapes. Told by the people who lived through it produced by Beth Lloyd. 1) Part 1: Preparing for the Inevitable. Alexander Coutanche talking about the surprise in the island when it was realised the island was not going to be defended and the evacuation was offered to the public. Eye witnesses talking about the panic of evacuation and the dilemma of whether to go or not, queuing to register, worry that the island was to be occupied, putting down of pets, Lord Coutanche being told to stay at his post and simplify the machinery of government, the potential blowing up of public utilities and the air raid on the island. 2) Part 2: The Germans Arrive. Eye witness accounts on seeing German planes flying low over the island and landing at the airport to begin the occupation, sending a message to the bailiff at the airport, meeting the germans for the first time, putting out white flags, demanding surrender, handing over the island, removal of the Union Jack from Fort Regent, BBC radio report on the start of the occupation, first impressions of the soldiers, germans buying food from the shops and the beginning of the paper war. 3) Part 3: Curbs on personal freedom. German orders being read out. Eye witnesses remember the losing of freedom, restrictions on vehicles, use of money paid for comandeered goods on essential supplies from France, orders against the use of coastal areas, changing side of the road to drive on, introduction and the experience of the curfew, life at the Evening Post, permits and other regulations. 4) Part 4: Food or the Lack of It. Poem on hunger. Eye witnesses talking about difficulty of lack of food and the improvisations with food, difficulty of feeding baby, difference between town and country people, suffering of women from malnutrition, children not knowing what food looked like, what people did to get by, food as subject of discussion, problem of lack of sugar and salt, use of potato flour, eating of seaweed, different methods of cooking and fuel, soup kitchens, bartering, farmers trying to get extra meat, getting extra eggs from chickens and keeping rabbits 5) Part 5: The wireless-Jersey's link with the outside world. Report by the BBC. Michael Ginns talking about eventual confiscation of radios. Eye witness accounts of v-signs at Rouge Bouillon, patrolling of district by islanders, confiscation and storage of radios, taking of radios from the parish hall, keeping of radios on threat of death, use of crystal radios sets, listening to the news, spreading of newsheets, the threat of being caught with radios and listening to tunes that had not been heard before the occupation 6) Part 6: Through the Eyes of a Child. Eye witness accounts of children and teenagers suffering a great deal, the fun children had, being hungry and cold, being without parents, relationships with german soldiers, schools continuing, difficulty of shortages of uniform, german lessons, soup kitchens, drilling on Victoria College playing fields, playing of sports, the Caerarean Tennis Club, riding on the german railway, mischief children got up to and scavenging for supplies.

Reference: R/06/2

Personal View of Senator Reg Jeune, President of the Education Committee. Born and brought up in Jersey-remembers difficult days of the late 1920s and 1930s-early life. Remembers a home with little money but very happy. It was a strict methodist home and his parents gave him a good start in life. His father had two hobbies-his garden and prize poultry. He got involved in his father's hobbies-he got involved with prize bantams in the local agricultural show. Has carried methodism throughout his life-has been a methodist local preacher for 40 years starting in 1942. Remembers the weather being nicer in his childhood-spent a lot of time on the beach and cycling around the island. Played tennis, watched cricket matches at the Victoria College Field when some of the top cricketers came to the island. Lived in Don Road and then in Georgetown as a child. He went to the De La Salle College-he was always encouraged to read books. He remembers going to the junior library with his mother where a Miss Priestley worked-never lost that interest. Thought that he may become a teacher but it was difficult getting grants at that time. His parents were ambitious for him-gave him a lot of encouragement. First Record-The Hallelujah Chorus from Handel's Messiah. Used to sing the piece of music in a choir-enjoyed being a chorister. At school-was interested in sport but was never particularly good. Left school to go into a bank-in waiting he went into Hill Street and then fell in love with law and took that up. Many of his fellow pupils went into a bank-it's much easier now. Studying was a struggle-graduated as a solicitor of the Royal Court of Jersey in 1945-a great deal of the examination was in French-was very difficult. Learnt French in order to be a solicitor. He was an office boy in Hill Street at first-used to collect rentes and write out contracts on parchment. Still sees the contracts that he used to write out. The occupation arrived-they were looking after people's affairs who had left the island-he started taking an active interest in cases after the second world war. It could take several years to study to qualify as a lawyer-took 6-8 years. Church took up quite a bit of time-choir and lay preaching. After he'd qualified he married in 1946 to Monica Valpy. Second Record-Flight of the Bumblebee by Rimsky-Korsakov. Hill Street was quiet during the occupation-had little to do-didn't experience hassle from the germans-helped look after people's affairs who had evacuated. He became a partner in a practice with two other men Helier Mourant and Clifford du Feu and created a company called Mourant, du Feu and Jeune-built up a substantial partnership. Started as a family practice until the financial scene came to Jersey-he became involved. It started around the early 1960s-he got interested when he got asked advice and he gradually became interested. He became chairman of the Youth Movement in 1947 and was involved in other organisations such as the Rotary Club-was interested in politics. Has always been interested in education and youth services. At one point thought that he may have gone into the church-if the occupation hadn't come along he may have done. Hadn't travelled much at this time-he'd been to Guernsey in England and that was all-after he qualified the opportunities to travel increased. He has now made many travels including extensively around the United States of America. Third Record-The Grand March from Verdi's Aida. Has been involved as much as possible with his family-his eldest son is a partner with him who has two daughters, his second son is London and has become an actor and his daughter is a jewellery designer who has come back to Jersey. Encouraged his son to read law. Tried to become a States member of St Helier No 2 District in the late 1950s but was unsuccessful. In 1962 he was successful in a by-election of St Helier No 3 District. Wasn't put off going into the States when he didn't get in the first time. Strange to go into the States especially in a by-election-the house was already set. Was nervous and excited the first time he spoke in the States despite having done a lot of public speaking in his job and church. After six months became president of the Public Works Committee-he had attacked the spending of money at the time especially for the tunnel-the money got thrown out and as a result two committees resigned-the Island Development Committee and the Public Works Committee and he became president of the Public Works Committee-he had been president of major committee ever since. Investigated the traffic problems in St Helier and eventually decided there should be a tunnel built under Fort Regent. Fourth Record-Le Rocquier School Band with Rock Around the Clock. Has a great love of music and books-still reads a lot despite working hard. The law firm has grown-he has become detached from the day to day business of the firm-tries to get there as much as possible-misses it. Became involved with the Trustees Savings Bank-joined the local board about 25 years previously and then became chairman of the Jersey Savings Bank, chairman of the Channel Islands Savings Bank and then elected to the board in London. Goes to two meetings a month in London. Received the OBE for his services to the savings banks-was very thrilled. Enjoyed going to Buckingham Palace to receive the award. Wants Jersey to retain its character but not to be insulated-he's chairman of the Executive Committee of the Commonwealth Parliamentary Association and involved with the French side of the parliamentarians. Fifth Record-Treorky Male Voice Choir. Has been involved in bringing an ombudsman into the States-succeeded-there is now a Review Tribunal. Doesn't have many more great ambitions in the States-is at the service of the States. Thinks it would be almost impossible to set higher education up in Jersey-Highlands College and what it offers with further education is about the limit that Jersey can expect. End of Side One. Personal View of Senator Ralph Vibert, interviewed by Beth Lloyd. Is the father of the house and president of the Finance Committee. At school-pictures that he would be a teacher-went to Victoria College in the 1920s-was captain of the football and head prefect. Didn't get a scholarship to Oxford University-Lord Coutanche was reorganising the States departments and set up the Law Officers-he became a secretary for the Attorney General-decided to become a lawyer. Was secretary to Lord Coutanche during the day and studied law in the evening. Was called to the bar in 1933/34-set up a private practice on his own. First Record-Welcome Song of the Maori People of New Zealand. Has not been to New Zealand but his daughter has. Has travelled a great deal-enjoys it. Had a law practice in Hill Street in the 1930s-business was quite slow-people paid on time. His first client was the late Senator Edward Le Quesne who was trying to get compensation from a shipping company when a boat broke down travelling to France. In the 1930s became interested in the movement of Moral Rearmament-was given a new conception of Christianity-it enables Christians to work with other people of faith throughout the world. Moral Rearmament took part in the bringing of democracy to Zimbabwe. Second Record-Unofficial National Anthem of all of Africa. He is well known in the Swiss village of Caux because it is the world conference centre of Moral Rearmament. Believes that when people work together good things come of it. His wife and he went to Zimbabwe to help friends-they had met Alec Smith-the son of a prime minister and a drug addict-through the attention of Kit Prescott, a friend, he stopped being an addict and became a leading statesman. During the occupation he evacuated in order to enlist-his wife was undecided-in the end she decided to leave. His wife had a baby and he joined up-got into a school of cipher breaking-60 pupils were in the first ever course held on this and only 3 were good enough-he didn't make the grade but they wanted people who could speak french and could teach ciphers to people in the field who were behind enemy lines. Later moved to India to become instructor training people to work behind enemy lines. Worked for the Special Operations Executive-met Maurice Buckmaster who was head of the French Section. His brother Denis escaped to England during the occupation and then joined the Royal Air Force. Third Record-Beethoven's Fifth Symphony. When the war was finished he helped clear up with the courts and then he got back in late 1946. Went back into his law practice. He became solicitor-general in 1948 until 1955-decided not to continue to become bailiff-had differences with the attorney-general Cecil Harrison and decided to leave. Believes those years were wasted years-he could have built up a practice at that time. Went back into private practice with his younger brother. Decided to go into politics because he wanted a hand in running the island. Fourth Record-Mozart's Piano Sonata No 11. His wife, Muriel Vibert, née Le Gros, has been a big support all his life. Became a deputy for St Brelade in 1955 and 2 years later became a senator in an uncontested by-election. Has always been invited onto committees-the sudden death of George Troy led him to become President of Defence, the collapse of the Establishment Committee led to him taking it on and the sudden death of Cyril Le Marquand led to him being President of Finance. Also was President of the Common Market Committee. Constant change of personnel in the States-new wave of people coming to the States typified by Senator Shenton who have brought new life to the States and a desire to do things quickly. Thinks more businessmen should be in the States but it's difficult as they are often too busy to get to States sittings. Dislikes important decisions being rushed through without due consideration. Likes the Jersey system-believes it's a very democratic system. Likes the tradition of the honorary system. Instigated the concept of a minimum income for States members-people could become members of the States without fear of financial difficulties-wouldn't like to see all the States members becoming professionals. Believes the parishes should keep their autonomy. Fifth Record-Manhattan Beach by Sousa. As a hobby he enjoyed playing tennis, likes to garden and play with the grandchildren. One of his daughters is a freelance photographer-became interested in photography. Was awarded the OBE in 1977 and became father of the house in 1980-has no more political ambitions. Believes Jersey's political future should be secure. Sixth Record-An Anglican Hymn. Commentary on the Battle of Britain Red Arrow display by Squadron Leader Henry Ploszek. Talks about the distance that the Red Arrows stay away from each other in the display, the training for formation flying, as manager he organises the administrative duties. End of Side Two.

Reference: R/07/B/11

Date: 1982 - 1982

BBC Radio Jersey-Occupation Tapes. Told by the people who lived through it produced by Beth Lloyd. Part 6: Through the Eyes of a Child. Eye witness accounts of children and teenagers suffering a great deal, the fun children had, being hungry and cold, being without parents, relationships with german soldiers, schools continuing, difficulty of shortages of uniform, german lessons, soup kitchens, drilling on Victoria College playing fields, playing of sports, the Caerarean Tennis Club, riding on the german railway, mischief children got up to and scavenging for supplies. See R/06/2.

Reference: R/07/F1/6

Date: May 20th 1990 - May 20th 1990

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