Mr Arthur Harrison, editor of the Evening Post during the occupation, recalls his experiences of those years. Recording originally produced by the Channel Islands Educational Broadcasting Service. Original reference: Res 7. Includes: choice between publishing the paper under heavy censorship or letting the Germans take it over entirely; lack of news; setting up of propaganda office; publishing news from the propaganda office and amusement caused by the bad English of these items; funeral of a German soldier killed in an air raid in France and being prevented from publishing list of people who sent wreaths (German sympathisers); staying one step ahead of the Germans; having to publish the German forces' newspaper; secretly supplying La Chronique de Jersey (a rival newspaper) with paper and allowing them to use the JEP's facilites; rationing of electricity and the difficulties this caused; doubts about whether to continue publishing; exchange and mart column being used to barter; publishing Red Cross messages and local news; story about a child who was seriously injured by treading on a mine, mentioning a Dr Mattas of Bath Street and the way the propaganda officer tried to exploit this; trying to restrict the ammount of column space given to news from the Germans; anecdote about a young German officer who used to send copies of the paper to his wife; refusal to entertain German officer in his home; liberation - saw the British ships arrive from the roof of the States building; buying wheat on the black market to make flour, which was then discovered and confiscated; being sentenced to seven weeks imprisonment at a court martial at a house at Lower King's Cliff; appealing against this and flour being returned. Sound quality slightly muffled.

Reference: R/03/A/10

Date: 1971 - 1971

Mrs Perkins talks about her experiences of the German occupation. Recording originally produced by the Channel Islands Educational Broadcasting Service. Original reference: Res 6. Aged 10 at the beginning of the occupation. Includes: earliest memories of the occupation; mother worked on a farm at Grouville, aunt at an estate agent's in Hill Street, which later became a second-hand shop; mother decided against evacuating; recalls the Islands being bombed, saw the bombers flying overhead; remembers German troops marching down the streets singing; notes the changes in ages of German troops as the war went on; accustomizing to the occupation, German lessons in schools, curfew etc; says that Germans used Jersey as a kind of holiday resort where troops were sent to recuperate between campaigns; shortage of money, making calenders and paintings etc to sell; using food substitutes and other shortages; the black market and bartering; amateur entertainments put on; concert parties put on by the Germans at the Forum, including propaganda films; effects of the deportations; arrival of slave workers, who were held in camps; helping escaped Russian prisoners (Mrs Perkins' mother and Aunt were both Russian), including Mikhail Krohin and George Koslov; Dr McKinstry, the Medical Officer of Health, helped many people by providing false ID cards etc; Mrs Perkins' mother and aunt being imprisoned around D-Day for being Russian-born; some people making large ammounts of money selling food; mentions the SS Vega; Liberation, feelings of gladness but also uncertainty for the future; remembers women who had fraternized with the Germans being victimized.

Reference: R/03/A/9

Date: 1971 - 1971

Interview with an unidentified doctor regarding his experiences of the German Occupation. Includes: petrol rationing - lived in the country, used a car to get into town and back; towards the end of the war used a motorbike and bicycle; as a doctor had a pass to be out after curfew - was seldom called out at night anyway; had to drive on the right; lights used on vehicles and driving in the dark; medical supplies; diabetics - insulin available over the black market, if they couldn't obtain any, they died; half the General Hospital was taken over by the Germans; ulcers; passed Germans on the road frequently - Russians [forced labourers] were more dangerous; Corrugated steel put over windows at night to prevent break-ins by Russian prisoners; relates incident in which a patient's son killed two russians at night attempting to break into a farm - was not punished or arrested; people relied heavily on the black market; felt that Churchill couldn't care less about the Channel Islands - only saved from starvation by the intervention of Lord Portsea. Poor sound quality. Recorded by Sue Scott Cole circa 1973, cassette copies made by the Jersey Heritage Trust in 1993. Duration 12 Minutes.

Reference: R/03/D/2

Date: 1941 - 1945

Audio Cassette containing 2 separate sound recordings. 1) Interview with an unidentified doctor regarding his experiences of the German Occupation. Includes: intended to leave the island and join the RAF - went back to the island to see to patients and was then caught by the occupation; petrol rationing; car requisitioned - used a bicycle; had little contact with German troops; German authorities were fairly cooperative in obtaining medical supplies; didn't interfere with his practice; all calves born in the island had to be turned over to the Germans; relates how one of the narator's cows had a calf, he and a friend took it to the surgery, killed it and distributed the meat to friends; communication by Red Cross letter erratic; talks about medical matters; when it was clear that Jersey would be occupied, diabetics were advised to leave island - most did, some didn't; when insulin became scarce all diabetics were put in one ward on a strict diet; most died from lack of insulin; later on a case of insulin was shippped over but on opening the box it was empty - it had been stolen for sale on the black marked; all the diabetics died; no operations were performed unless absolutely neccessary; talks about drugs supplied; most of the General Hospital taken over by Germans; trading on the black market - cornered the snuff market; when that ran out dried cherry leaves and other things were smoked; managed to obtain tobacco seeds and harvested tobacco for sale; food very scarce; tea made from sugar-beet pulp or bought on the black market; helped to hide an escpaed russian prisoner, George [George Koslov?] - got him an identity card from a dead patient; propaganda films shown at the cinema; no light for the last 2 years of occupation - no electricity, no oil for lighting, candles too expensive; anecdote about a farmer at Mont au Prêtre who escaped being caught with the carcass of a pig by hiding it under a sheet and saying it was the body of his dead mother; russian prisoners stealing from houses - one was run through with a pitchfork by a farmer named Le Gresley; brutal treatment of Russian prisoners; rationing, bread, butter, milk, other foods and shortages; livestock kept in houses to prevent theft; food traded on black market. 2) Narration by Captain Scott-Cole (?) regarding the Second World War and occupation. Includes: was a serving soldier, not in Jersey during the occupation; mother and sisters barely left the island in time; family silver was buried in the garden but it was never found again; house had been broken into and looted the day they left; honorary policeman stopped a man stealing a chest from the house and it was stored in the Parish Hall uintil the end of the war; house taken over by the Germans, used as a small regimental hospital; furntiture listed; the house was damaged after the Germans had left; animosity between islanders who had been in the occupation and those who had not; information on goods looted from the house, including a large number of brass and bronze hindu idols, some of which reappearred when the narrator's sister told neighbours that it was unlucky for anyone other than the owner to keep them. Poor sound quality. Recorded by Sue Scott Cole circa 1973, cassette copies made by the Jersey Heritage Trust in 1993. Duration 21 Minutes.

Reference: R/03/D/3

Date: 1941 - 1945

Jersey Talking Magazine-August Edition. Introduction by Gordon Young. Mark Higgins, a member of St Paul's Cathedral Choir School, who is singing at the royal wedding of Prince Charles and Princess Diana, sings 'I Know that My Redeemer' and talking about how he got into the school, the levels he had to achieve in order to be accepted, how long he spends singing, the amount of boys in the school, the different time he has his holidays, preparing for the royal wedding, the songs they are going to sing at the royal wedding, whether he feels nervous about performing in front of so many people, the other occasions they sing for at the Cathedral, singing outside the Cathedral, making recordings, meeting the Queen Mother and other members of the royal family and sings another song. Norah talking to Jeremy Scriven, a Jersey boy who left the island to climb Mount Kilimanjaro in Tanzania talking about how he decided to climb the mountain, his lack of regrets of going, getting to Tanzania and the difficulty in doing so because the border of Kenya and Tanzania was closed, being arrested for crossing the border into Tanzania without realising and being put into prison for four days, the conditions in the prison, being tried in the court, being allowed free and then expelled into Kenya, managed to go through Uganda in order to get to Tanzania, buying tickets to Kilimanjaro on the black market, encountering violence in Kampala, journeying and climbing Mount Kilimanjaro, spending 4 days climbing, a member of the party suffering altitude sickness, the experience of climbing the mountain, the view from the top of the mountain and how he felt climbing down again. Katina Hervau, a french girl in the island to learn the language, talking about her first impressions of Jersey roads and the island. Horoscope Feature-Diane Postlethwaite talking about the forecast for the year for leo. June Gurdon giving some In Touch tips for the blind about cooking vegetables without water. End of Side One. Gordon Young taking a trip in a hot air balloon describing the balloon, getting into the balloon, taking off, describing the views of Jersey below including town, St Helier Harbour, Elizabeth Castle, Victoria Avenue, St Aubin's Bay, Noirmont and to the Jersey Airport to land. Gordon Young at Government House for a ball for the Royal National Lifeboat Institution describing the gardens of Government House, the food for the occasion, the scene in the marquees, the scene inside Government House. Talking to Sir Peter Whiteley about piloting in the hot air balloon and the ball for the RNLI and to Lady Whiteley about the weather and the amount of people attending the ball. Listening to the band in the marquee. End of Side Two.

Reference: R/05/B/57

Date: July 31st 1981 - July 31st 1981

BBC Radio Jersey-Occupation Tapes. Told by the people who lived through it produced by Beth Lloyd. 1) Part 7: Deportation. BBC Report on the deportations from the Channel Islands. Alexander Coutanche's difficulty in having to accept the order. Eye witnesses reports of discovering the order for the deportations in the Evening Post, discovery that some deportee's houses being looted, preparations for deportation, being served deportation notices, deciding what to take, going to the Weighbridge, people being turned back because the ships were full, the crowd singing the ships off, the journey to St Malo, fighting at the third deportation leading to arrests. 2) Part 8: Not a Lot of Anything. Eye witnesses talking about the lack of essential supplies such as soap, a great shortage of drugs and medicines by Dr John Lewis and others, lack of clothes, shoes and the need to mend things, improvisation with clothes, bartering economy, wood collecting, what was used for fuel and reusing razor blades. 3) Part 9: From Finance to Farming, The Island Keeps Going. A BBC Report on the currency used in the island. Eye witness accounts on the lack of english currency and the use of reichsmarks, the conversion necessary for records kept in banks and auction houses, the creation of new notes by Edmund Blampied, stocks in the shops diminshing leading to rationing control, the black market, exchange and mart in the Evening Post, farmer's experience of being told what to grow, harvesting and the inspections made by the Germans, farmers hiding extras from the Germans, investigations into a fuel that would allow tractors to run on something other than petrol, getting by, crops that were grown and giving food to others. 4) Part 10: There's Good and Bad in all Races. Eye witnesses talking about collaborators, Jerry Bags, informers, the actions of the Post Office to destroy anonymous denunciation letters or warn those who had been denounced, searches by german soldiers to follow up anonymous letters, relationships with and attitudes of the german soldiers (Poor sound quality) 5) Part 11: Government and God, How the States and the Church Survived. Eye witnesses talking about dissatisfaction with the local authorities, the difficulties faced by the bailiff Alexander Coutanche, confirming legislation in Jersey, rectors and Jurats members of the States, meetings of the States, rectors remaining in the parishes and services continuing, Canon Cohu being taken by the Germans for passing on the news from the radio, praying for the men who were fighting, banning of the Salvation Army and Jehovah Witnesses. 6) Part 12: Brushes with the German Authorities. Eye witnesses talking about being interrogated at Silvertide, experiences of confrontations with the german soldiers, being arrested and beaten, court martials and trials of local residents, listening to the radio and experiences in the prison at Gloucester Street.

Reference: R/06/3

Personal View of Leslie Sinel, former Jersey Evening Post employee and occupation historian. Born in St Helier in 1906. Involved with people around you-knew everybody in the district-different today. His father was a saddler-used to do jobs at different farms-got to love horses. Not many vehicles around-1920 no one on the Jersey Evening Post owned a private car. Newspaper was distributed by horse-1910-got two delivery cars with open sides so delivery people could throw the paper out of the car. Went to the Jersey National School-church school-difficult but accepted it. Jersey french not taught in schools-French was taught-headmistress Miss Bennett was tough but she taught everybody how to read and write. First Record-The Trumpet Voluntary by Jeremiah Clarke-used to listen to it during the occupation on crystal radio sets. Childhood-holidays coincided with the potato season-worked at T & J Moor and the Great Western Railway. At 14 joined the Jersey Evening Post-father got him the job-started as an apprentice printer-Wolfdale printing machines. Newspaper only means of communication at the time. Jersey Evening Post used to be distributed by horses-1910 got first car. Newspaper printed at 3.30 so people could catch the train from Snow Hill to Gorey at 4 o'clock. 1920-took 3 hours to print 7,500 newspapers, today can print 23,000 in three quarters of an hour. Newspapers dropped off at each station both east and west. Exciting to go on the train as a child-sad but inevitable that the railways went when buses were brought in. Tourism in the summer of the 1920s and 1930s-not comparable with today-people used to stay longer. St Brelade popular for tourists. Second Record-the Radetzky March by Strauss. Radio-what he used to listen to. 1930s-became a proof reader at the Jersey Evening Post and wrote some articles-never had an ambition to become a journalist-worked mostly from the printing side. Newspapers today good quality but reporting is 'muck raking' now. Media today-good variety-modern way of life. Spent 15 years as a Constables Officer and Vingtenier in St Saviour and 21 years in St Helier as a churchwarden and on the Welfare Board and on the Battle of Flowers' Association and Jersey Eisteddfod-always involved in something. Honorary policeman-got fed up with job at the time of the prowler-stayed out watching farms at nights. Queen came-did Government House duty all night. Mostly traffic duties. States Police and Honorary Police can work together. Never wanted to leave Jersey-some travelling on the Continent. Has lived in St Helier and St Saviour. Not the same parochialism today. First buses here-used to run through Bagot-used to call it the 'Orange Box'. The JMT and Red Band Bus-opened up the island-created more movement in the island. 1925-1930s-motor cars increased in number. Third Record-Zadoc the Priest from the Coronation Anthem. Second world war-Germans swept across France getting closer to Jersey-hoped nothing would happen but thought it would. Government realised it was impossible to defend and pulled out. Germans took the island-no alternative-no question of resistance-couldn't have sabotage during the occupation-where could you go? Repercussions on other islanders. Had a guilt complex-felt if he'd gone away he may have been able to do something but if everybody had left the island it would have been destroyed. Decided against evacuation-two of his family left but the rest stayed. Continued to work at the Jersey Evening Post-censored by the Germans but the staff used to resist. On the surface looked to be agreeing with them but were resisting. Was asked to put an article in the newspaper but he took three days off and burned it. Fourth Record-Vidor's Toccata and Fugue. During the occupation worked on a farm in the afternoon-used to get some extra food-learned how to make sugar beet syrup. Meat was scarce-used to get some on the black market-used to be expensive but nothing on the price today. Used to listen to the radio every morning-every hour on the hour-would listen until 9 in the morning-used to leave the house and people would tell him the news-everybody knew it. Used to type out 3 copies of the news-took one to Captain Robin of Petit Menage, one to the Jersey Evening Post and kept one. Many people listened to the radio-he would have been prosecuted for disseminating the news. Used to find out news from German soldiers. Fifth Record-To be a Pilgrim. Liberation-can't talk about it without emotion. Enjoyed life since the war-is retired but very active. Enjoys writing-historical and local events. Would have liked to have been a teacher. End of Side One. Personal View with Jack(John) Herbert interviewed by Beth Lloyd, the war time Airport Commander. Enjoyed working at the Jersey Airport. Was born in Bath and went to Green Park College in Bath. Was part of the choir in Bath but gave up his music-difficult to choose music for the programme. Came over to Jersey at 11-his father was an engineer on a ship-his mother wanted him to stay on shore. Worked in Bath and the Piers and Harbours Committee of 1923 advertised for a harbour engineer. Was learning about law but ended up sailing instead- helped the fishermen Tommy and Charlie King and helped the pilots in St Helier Harbour. First Record-Underneath the Arches by Flanagan and Allen. After leaving school joined his father at the Harbour Office. Worked as clerk dealing with harbour dues-counted the passengers coming in. On the Albert Pier with Captain Furzer-a ship collided with the Albert Pier-harbour had to be dredged. Mr Bill Thurgood visited the island-decided to set up an aeroplane route-administration of the aeroplanes were placed under the auspices of the Piers and Harbour Committee-staff had to check beach. First flight took place on the 18th December 1933 from Jersey to Portsmouth. The beach was cleared of people-a great local event. Had a refueler and a coach for the office work. Had to be an English customs officer, Bill Ivy, and a Jersey customs officer, Harold Robins. No aeroplane dues-the aeroplanes used to pay harbour dues. Aeroplane had a tragic accident-a little boy was sitting on the beach and was killed and a coach got trapped on the beach and was swamped by the sea. Second Record-Stranger on the Shore. Used to create a weather report at the Harbour Office by letting a balloon go into the air and timing it going in to cloud cover. Sites inspected to build Jersey Airport-a site at Grosnez turned down. Site at St Peter decided-problem with fog. No other suitable place in the island for it. Jersey Airport-Piers and Harbour Committee was put in charge of the Airport being built-plans were approved-there were four runways-Jersey Airways ran from Jersey to Portsmouth and Jersey to Heston. Air France went from the Jersey Airport. Third Record-Glenn Miller and American Patrol. Second world war-all messages came in code. Bill Lawford-an air traffic control officer came over. Had to camouflage the airport. Jersey Airways staff evacuated-was in charge of the evacuation-no panic at the Airport to get off the island-between 400-600 left by the Airport. Was ordered to stay at his post, Chris Phillips, an air traffic controller, was called back to the royal navy. Late May some French air force plane with two highly ranked officers and a ground crew. The morning of the 1st June in his office when he saw a german plane fly over and dropped a container-it was addressed to the Bailiff of Jersey. German landed and spoke to the Bailiff-wanted the island to be handed over later that afternoon-put up white flags. Jack Herbert told to cut off the electricity supply-had shipped all their radios to Bristol. Fourth Record-Luftwaffe March. Jack Herbert was transferred to the Transport Office in Bond Street during the occupation-converted some vehicles to use gas as fuel-had to improvise to create fuel as it was in such short supply. Fifth Record-It Must be Him by Vikki Carr. Liberation-transferred back to the Jersey Airport on May 10th 1945-airfields were mined and booby traps-were cleared. German officer detailed to cut the grass at the Airport. Royal air force officer was in charge of Airport and it was handed over 2nd October 1945. Civil aviation picked up between 1948 and 1952. The airport was tarmacked in 1952-the material came from the excavation of the Jersey Underground Hospital. The Jersey Airport became the second busiest airport in Britain in the 1960s. Was presented with an MBE by the Queen in 1974 and retired in 1975.

Reference: R/07/B/3

Date: 1982 - 1982

Personal View of Rene Liron, official of the Jersey Transport and General Workers Union, interviewed by Beth Lloyd. Represents 6,000 people in the union in all different industries. Not as political as UK but did protest over the pensioner's bonuses getting cut-no party politics in Jersey. Never had a political strike. Workers better off in Jersey compared to the UK-higher wages. His relationship with management-some rows. First record-The Strawbs with Part of the Union. Born in Grouville and went to school and left at 14. Occupation-had to earn his living as a baker's boy for Tom Gilbert-delivered bread. Not enough flour to do the baking-bread was rationed. People used to buy bread from the black market. Occupation-people were very friendly-made his own fun. Lack of freedom-angry and patriotic. Was caught out after curfew with Gordon Rabet and 7 other friends and had to go to Bagatelle House-were fined. Was summoned to College House and asked if he wanted to work in Alderney as a baker but refused. Thought about escaping but decided against it. Second Record-Louise by Maurice Chevalier. Joined the Royal Air Force after the occupation-wanted to get away. Was trained at Greenham Common. Came back to Jersey as his mother was dying of cancer. Was in the RAF for three years but didn't go abroad. Took up a variety of jobs-parish of St Helier-introduced to the trade union-become a shop steward and chairman of the district committee. Monty Purse retired as official of the TGWU-didn't think he had a chance-was interviewed in Southampton by Jack Jones and was named as successor a fortnight later. Gave up his job and became the official. Third Record-Roses of Picady. The union has grown since he took over through hard work. Less disputes in Jersey than in the UK because we are an island and know each other better. Difficulty in seeing everybody's point of view-some people don't tell him the truth. Strikes are a calculated risk-people need to have the right to strike. The union is still as important today as ever-people need protecting. Needs protection in the weaker areas-hotel workers. Interested in the Portuguese community-were treated badly-now they're member of the union. Doesn't think the freedom of movement in Europe will make a difference to people. Fourth Record-Nine to Five by Sheena Easton. He doesn't visit the UK to meet other officials-they run the island without outside interference. Two Labour MPs visited the island on a fact finding mission-he told them to deal with their problems in the UK. Ran for senator and deputy but didn't get in-learned a lot from the election-an opportunity to say what you want. Room for improvement in the States of Jersey. May run for the States again. Fifth Record-'The Heat Is On'. Never wanted to leave the island to further his career. Hasn't decided how long he is going to stay as the representative of the trade union. Fishes on his boat in his spare time. Tries not to show it when he loses his cool. Sixth Record-You by Andy Williams. Gets satisfaction from working and satisfying his members and then handing over to somebody else. End of Side One. Personal View of John Stebbings, 'Mr Sea Link'. Came from Yorkshire-son of a railwayman-used to ride and drive the steam engines. Born in Thornton outside of Bradford and moved to the outskirts of Bradford until he got married. Joined the railways when he was 14. Remembers going to work in short trousers. Used to take the chain horse down to the bottom of the hill-happy days-beginning of the second world war. Then moved over to be a messenger boy. Worked short hours-the railway unions were good-used to work an 8 hour day. As a porter-train loads of traffic came into the shed in the morning and was then sorted and delivered and as a messenger boy he took letters about. First Record-Love Divine all Loves Excelling. Never wanted to become an engine driver. Always believed he'd achieve what he wanted to do-went into management. Joined the Royal Navy-was a stores assistant-looked after the food and drink and then went on to an aircraft carrier-HMS Ocean-joined after the second world war. Was in Palestine when the Jews were moving in. He enjoyed his time in the Royal Navy a great deal. Second Record-The Brighouse and Rastrick Brass Band with 'The Solitaire'. His love for brass bands. After he left the Royal Navy in 1947 he went back home and got married in 1950. Worked as a station master at Alverthorp and then Haig-used to get up at 4 o'clock to open the station-was the youngest station master in Britain at this time. Wore a station master uniform. Had a station master's house in 1950-was his first step in railway management. Changed the region he was working in. Duties as a station master-attending trains, selling tickets, budget control of the station and getting involved with the trains. Third Record-Billy Cotton with the Dam Busters March. Had 170 staff under his control working at South Bank-the steelworks area-marshalling trains. Assistant to the divisional manager of sales in Middlesbrough. 1966-came to Jersey to look after the sea links with the island. Similar to his old job but on ships rather than trains. Had intended to leave after 2 years but fell in love with Jersey. Fourth Record-The Anvil Chorus. He settled into Jersey quickly-he was prepared to work hard-got involved in the community. Believes in the honorary system. The boss of Sea Link-get knocked but you learn to deal with it-loves dealing with people. Was excited when the roll on roll off links were brought in-saved the route. Fifth Record-The Brighouse and Rastrick Brass Band with 'Melodies from the Merry Widow'. Helps with the Battle of Flowers-helps with the administration and loves the exhibits. Has a great community spirit-a family event. Was chairman of the Battle of Flowers' Association-takes up a lot of time. Work starts for the Battle of Flowers on the day after the Battles of Flowers from the previous year. Two daughters-one in Southampton and one in Jersey. Enjoys working on houses and DIY.

Reference: R/07/B/4

Date: 1982 - 1983

Page build time: 0.010379433631897 seconds