Episodes seven and eight of the Channel Islands Schools Radio Service series 'The German Occupation of the Channel Islands'. Episode seven: Getting the News. Includes: initial German indifference to BBC broadcasts - they only imposed restricitions after the spate of German victories ended in 1940; reasons for censorship - fear of rousing the local population with news of German defeats, fear of weakening their own troops' morale, fear of spying; some stories of how Channel Islanders managed to evade the ban and hide their radios; other sources of information besides the radio - cinemas with German newsreels, news sheets dropped by British planes, special mention of the Guernsey Underground News Sheet (GUNS). First broadcast on 04/03/1969. Episode eight: Five Years of Occupation. Includes: attempts to capture some of the atmosphere of the period, how people lived, how their lives were altered by the unusual circumstances in which they found themselves; a shop assistant describes how they had to improvise to overcome shortages - tissue paper for wrappings, old bottles for containers, flowers for window-dressings when there were no goods to display; occasionally the brutality of war was brought home, especially by the presence of the slave workers and the British bombing raids, but for most people the occupation came to mean shortages and making do with self-designed substitutes; a school teacher describes shortages in schools - lessons were often improvised and interspersed with odd jobs such as chopping firewood or stoking the boiler; by the end of the war shortages were very servere, especially of food and clothes - fortunately the liberation came just in time to prevent a serious famine. First broadcast 11/03/1969. Written and produced by Jean Maiden and Neil Adams. [Copyright: States of Jersey]

Reference: R/03/G/4

Date: March 4th 1969 - March 11th 1969

Three sound recordings: 1) Recording of Winston Churchill's VE Day speech, which was broadcast by the BBC and relayed over loudspeakers in the Royal Square. 2) Same, with noise of crowds. 3) Mrs Anne Perchard, née Billot, talks about her experiences of the German Occupation [read from notes?]. Was 7 years old at the start of the war. Father became seriously ill just before the war and didn't want to evacuate, seemed to make a complete recovery. Family background - Lived at La Ville Brée, near Rozel. Tom and Eunice Billot (mother and father) had 3 children, Anne, Ruth and Mary. Uncle Charlie (dad's brother) and aunt Lilly (mum's sister), had 3 children, Doris, Lily and Charles, and lived at Holmdale, St Martin. On the day the island was bombed the family were digging potatoes. Went to Silk's School, a private school near St Martin's Church - Mr Silk an old fashioned strict disciplinarian, taught the '3 Rs'. Moved to St Martin's Elementary School aged 9, near grandparents' home at La Chasse cottage. Grandfather was Connétable of St Martin at the time. La Chasse was mostly taken over by the Germans, as the English owners had evacuated. Father had continual relapses of illness. One day Anne, Ruth and 5 other schoolchildren were walking home to La Chasse for lunch, an SS soldier cycled past, got off his bike and clouted Ruth on the head - they never really found out why. Anne Billot and Pat Deslandes both got scholarships to Jersey College for Girls, CLJ Anthony was the head. Ladies' College taken over as a hospital, so the temporary building was where Victoria College Prep is now. Bikes were ridden - eventually they ended up with hosepipe or twisted rope tyres or sometimes bare wheels. It was a good education given the circumstances. Many staff had been retired but came back to fill the gaps left by evacuated teachers. Mrs Le Feuvre taught German (which was compulsory) she was very old and deaf - they had fun at her expense. Aged 11 Anne got scarlet fever and spent 5 weeks in isolation at Overdale Hospital. Remembers Slade's buses which were powered by charcoal burners on the back. After D-Day farmers were in better circumstances than town folk. Gives details of cooking methods and food eaten. Tripwires leading to a bell in the bedroom were installed when thefts of food became more common. One night a tripwire was cut and nearly all the rabbits were stolen. After that increased security was put in place. When nearby a gun emplacement fired, the whole house used to shake. Had piglets hidden away from the Germans, tripe was made from large intestines of a pig. Dad grew tobacco. Friends and relations in town bought all the food that farmers could spare - they were never overcharged. People came with handcarts to collect kindling, also went gleaning after the harvest. Memories of harvest time; Germans began requisitioning a percentage of cows as they became short of meat. Had 2 farm horses - Germans wanted to requisition horses for meat - one horse, Dolly, was Anne's favourite animal - she was very upset when Dolly was taken away. First encounter with women fraternizing with Germans at stables when they went to get new horses, hated them more than the Germans. Clothes - wore hand-me-downs from cousins, rabbit fur gloves, wooden clogs. Grandmother involved with the Friendship League - helped less well off people. Grandfather as Connétable had to make unpalatable choices when the requisition of bicycles and deportations were ordered, this made him some enemies. Father had rifle hidden - when Germans searched for firearms it was slung into the liquid manure system and rotted away. Social life revolved around parish church, Sunday school and choir, whist drives at the Royal Hotel to raise funds for church hall. Memories of Easter day festival. A neighbour, Mr Hick, sheltered an escaped Russian and often brought him to church - many people never knew until after the war. 1943 - 1944 a Whitsun festival of choirs was organised between All Saints Church and St Martin's Church. At Christmas the family went to Holmdale for dinner, followed by card games. Went back to Ville Brée for New Year. Archirondel was the only bay that could be visited which was not mined, with barbed wire. Story about a pony bolting from its trap. Rozel Rovers football club formed - dad was first president. D Day - could see the skies over France lit up red and orange, people wondered when liberation would come. Dad made Anne a transistor radio, she used to take down the news and took it to friends in town, remembers hearing Vera Lynn songs. Winter 1944, SS Vega arrived, memories of Red Cross parcels. [Break in recording] Auction which raised £1603 for the Red Cross in 1944. Liberation day - Dad had prepared flag pole and Union Jack hidden away in readiness. Old Dodge lorry had had the wheels taken off and hidden in the barn. Radio that family never knew dad had under the pantry was brought out to hear Churchill speak - children were always sent to bed at 8:30 so they wouldn't know about it. Liberation - most important moment in Anne's life, thoughts about the importance of freedom. 32 people piled into the Dodge lorry to see the liberating forces arrive. Joy as 'tommies' came and hopefulness for the future. Good sound quality throughout. Tape speed 7½ ips.

Reference: R/03/J/15

Date: 1941 - 1945

Marleen Hacquoil interviews Mrs Binda Dubras, née Blampied, aged 91, about her life [listening copy - recorded from reel-to-reel audio tape onto CD-R]. Side 1 [green leader, left track] includes: Born on island, at 1, Belevedere Terrace; 1 brother and 1 sister; her maternal grandfather came from Kent, was in the army and stationed at Elizabeth Castle - when he retired he had a chemist's shop at Beaumont, and made his own eau de cologne; her was father born in Nova Scotia, his family were chandlers, they came back to Jersey on sailing boat the 'Patrus'; the family moved into Oxford Villa, Oxford Road to be near St Mark's school when she was aged 3 or 4; memories of school life - school day started with prayers/hymn, girls school only, subjects studied; had private music lessons after leaving school; during the First World War her father sold margarine and she worked in his shop - that is where she met her husband; sister went to convent school at St Lawrence; had lessons in French; stayed at a farm, lived as a farm hand; life at home, helped around the house, no electricity; mother made own clothing; didn't feel anxious feeling to be in fashion or in style - couldn't afford it anyway; newspapers were scarce; memories of first books read; people didn't really go out anywhere; worked for father until she got married; also worked as receptionist at Halkett Hotel; never had disposable income; married at 23; made 4 sets of clothing, as well as linen; memories of wedding day; left for France the same day; stayed in Paris 3 weeks, buying furniture to be sent back to Jersey. Side 2 [red leader, left track] includes: more about buying furniture in Paris; didn't have friends back to the house very much; as a young girl was a tomboy, was one of the first to go into the dolmen at La Hougue Bie when it was discovered, also a cave in the north of the island; 3 or 4 famlies went on picnics together for recreation; in winter went caving all along the South coast; enjoyed swimming, describes bathing costumes of the times; sand boating; was given diploma by the Humane Society for saving the lives of 5 people off the Pinnacle Rock - tells the story; husband joined the French army on the outbreak of World War One as he was the first born son of a Frenchman; stories of her husband's activities during World War Two; they had a business selling perfume and doing ladies and gents hairdressing; carried on during the occupation; memories of events that took place during the war years; got in trouble with the German Authorites for refusing to pay a fine for showing a light at night, husband had to go to college house to pay - she feared that he would be taken off to a camp; memories of Mrs Gaudin of Beaumont, an old lady who never went into town her whole life; it was very rare for people from the country to come into town; memories of the Jersey railway. Side 3 [green leader] includes: first ride in car and on a motorbike; stories about driving and cars; not many women drivers of cars or horse drawn vehicles. Duration 75 minutes. Recorded 30/05/1991. Tape speed 3 3/4 ips. Poor sound quality. NB Please note that Side 3 was unable to be copied and so is not included in the listening copy.

Reference: R/03/J/5

Date: May 30th 1991 - May 30th 1991

Original audio tapes of item R/03/J/5 - Marleen Hacquoil interviews Mrs Binda Dubras, née Blampied, aged 91, about her life.

Reference: R/03/J/5/1

Date: May 30th 1991 - May 30th 1991

Jersey Talking Magazine-April Edition. Introduction by Gordon Young. Di Weber at the Jersey Museum taking a tour of the Lillie Langtry exhibition showing some of the clothes used in the television program by London Weekend Television, talking about her life, the television programme and its success, descriptions of the clothes, paintings, set and items on show. Linda Le Vasseur in Alderney talking to Harold Egget about the book he has just written about the Channel Islands, talking about writing the book having been born in Germany, the photographs in the book, visiting the Ecrehous and meeting Alphonse Le Gastelois, the French Channel Islands called the Chausey Islands, the launch of the book in Hamburg, covering the royal visit in his book and sending a copy to the Queen, the need for a new book on the Channel Islands and when the book is going to be translated into English. Cooking feature-Margaret Jenkins talking about cooking offal. Interview with John Podmore, a photographer, talking about the part nature plays in his photography. Mike Le Cocq giving some in touch tips about books available on cassette. End of Side One. Adam Stirling, the lead in Follow That Girl that was at the Opera House, singing, talking about balancing a hairdressing and a singing and dancing career and talking about his career so far. Di Weber and Robin Cox carrying on the tour around Gorey including looking at the Linden Tree Tea Room which used to be the Roman Catholic Chapel, it then moved and took over the former Bible Christian Methodist Chapel, the houses called Hilgrove-the Hilgrove-Turner School built as a free school in 1859, the Salem Methodist Chapel now the Gorey Youth Club but formally the Gorey Telephone Exchange, Gouray Church built by the architect James Parkinson, Gouray Lodge-home of Sir Tompkins Hilgrove Turner the former Lieutenant Governor, Gorey Harbour, buildings on the quay, the oyster beds and the oyster fishermen, the Gorey Promenade where the railway used to be situated, Gorey Pier and quarries. Gordon Young finishing with a humorous story.

Reference: R/05/B/30

Date: March 31st 1979 - March 31st 1979

Jersey Talking Magazine-May Edition. Introduction by Gordon Young. Dixie Landick at a recent charity concert at the Opera House performing a humorous sketch about local radio. Nature feature-Frances Le Sueur talking about birds including the cuckoo and the collared dove. John Podmore talking about photography and a pioneering photographer, John Woolley. Cooking feature-Margaret Jenkins talking about jelly. Di Weber talking to Sister Ellen Syvret, a missionary nurse in Papua New Guinea about Papua New Guinea, her work in a hospital, the illnesses encountered, how she came to be in Papua New Guinea, giving talks about her work, learning the language, the culture and politics of Papua New Guinea and hopes for the future for Papua New Guinea. End of Side One. Guernsey feature-Linda Le Vasseur talking to the wife of the bailiff Lady Loveridge about adjusting to the position as wife of the bailiff, her background and her family, meeting her husband during the war, the things she does with the job, mastering public speaking and writing speeches, her involvement in charities especially caring for the elderly and the hospital, balancing her commitments of running the house and her job, her love of gardening, clothes and juggling her wardrobe and the visit of the Queen to Guernsey. Feature on the rugby match between Jersey and Guernsey, the Siam Cup including commentary on the plane journey across to Guernsey, a reception at the Governor's residence, talks to John Groves about his link to the Siam Cup and why it is called the Siam Cup, the Royal Thai Ambassador talking about the match, Sir John Martin, the governor of Guernsey, talking about how he used to play rugby, Dennis Hartley the President of the Jersey Rugby Club and the President of the Guernsey Rugby Club, Ernest Yates, talking about the match, John Everall talking about the match, Patrick McCeary, Guernsey captain, talking about the game, Peter Noble, the Jersey captain talking before the match, commentary on the match and Jersey receiving the trophy and Peter Noble talking about how it feels to win the trophy. Gordon Young telling a humorous story.

Reference: R/05/B/31

Date: April 30th 1979 - April 30th 1979

BBC Radio Jersey-Occupation Tapes. Told by the people who lived through it produced by Beth Lloyd. 1) Part 7: Deportation. BBC Report on the deportations from the Channel Islands. Alexander Coutanche's difficulty in having to accept the order. Eye witnesses reports of discovering the order for the deportations in the Evening Post, discovery that some deportee's houses being looted, preparations for deportation, being served deportation notices, deciding what to take, going to the Weighbridge, people being turned back because the ships were full, the crowd singing the ships off, the journey to St Malo, fighting at the third deportation leading to arrests. 2) Part 8: Not a Lot of Anything. Eye witnesses talking about the lack of essential supplies such as soap, a great shortage of drugs and medicines by Dr John Lewis and others, lack of clothes, shoes and the need to mend things, improvisation with clothes, bartering economy, wood collecting, what was used for fuel and reusing razor blades. 3) Part 9: From Finance to Farming, The Island Keeps Going. A BBC Report on the currency used in the island. Eye witness accounts on the lack of english currency and the use of reichsmarks, the conversion necessary for records kept in banks and auction houses, the creation of new notes by Edmund Blampied, stocks in the shops diminshing leading to rationing control, the black market, exchange and mart in the Evening Post, farmer's experience of being told what to grow, harvesting and the inspections made by the Germans, farmers hiding extras from the Germans, investigations into a fuel that would allow tractors to run on something other than petrol, getting by, crops that were grown and giving food to others. 4) Part 10: There's Good and Bad in all Races. Eye witnesses talking about collaborators, Jerry Bags, informers, the actions of the Post Office to destroy anonymous denunciation letters or warn those who had been denounced, searches by german soldiers to follow up anonymous letters, relationships with and attitudes of the german soldiers (Poor sound quality) 5) Part 11: Government and God, How the States and the Church Survived. Eye witnesses talking about dissatisfaction with the local authorities, the difficulties faced by the bailiff Alexander Coutanche, confirming legislation in Jersey, rectors and Jurats members of the States, meetings of the States, rectors remaining in the parishes and services continuing, Canon Cohu being taken by the Germans for passing on the news from the radio, praying for the men who were fighting, banning of the Salvation Army and Jehovah Witnesses. 6) Part 12: Brushes with the German Authorities. Eye witnesses talking about being interrogated at Silvertide, experiences of confrontations with the german soldiers, being arrested and beaten, court martials and trials of local residents, listening to the radio and experiences in the prison at Gloucester Street.

Reference: R/06/3

Occupation-BBC Radio Jersey tape. The story of the occupation of Jersey during World War 2 told by the people who lived through it produced by Beth Lloyd. 1) Part 13: The Todt Organisation and their Russian Slave Labourers. Eye witnesses talking about the background of the Organisation Todt, the arrival of the Russians on the island, the condition they were in, the brutality of their overseers, begging and stealing food, concentration camps, the Jersey Communist Party and other people giving shelter, food, clothes, false papers and english lessons with Mrs Metcalfe to escaped prisoners, the story of Louisa Gould, Harold Le Druillenec and Feodor Burrij and the experience of other residents who harboured escapees. 2) Part 14: Entertainment. Eye witnesses talking about the difficulties of the first show during the occupation put on by the Jersey Amateur Dramatics Club, cinemas and the films that were shown, variety entertainment at the Opera House, West's Cinema and out in the parishes, finding musicians, public dances, the Amateur Variety Band, the Green Room Club productions including pantomimes, easter productions and shows, improvisations with costumes and scenery and censorship of the shows. 3) Part 15: We Are At War. Eye witness accounts of feelings of isolation, seeing and hearing British and German aeroplanes, feeling and seeing bombing raids on the coast of France, leaflet raids, members of the royal air force being taken as prisoners of war, commando raid on Egypt, sabotage, the v sign campaign, resistance and reprisals, youth groups against the Germans, the British Patriots group and Norman Le Brocq and Leslie Huelin working with the Free Germany Movement represented by Paul Muelbach calling for a mutiny in the garrison. 4) Occupation Part 16: Escapes produced by Beth Lloyd made up of interviews of local people who were in Jersey during the Occupation. Subjects discussed include the escape of Denis Vibert to England in September 1941, tales of different escapes to France by islanders recounted by Eddie Le Corre, Basil Le Brun, Peter Crill, John Floyd, Roy Mourant and their subsequent experiences of interrogations by the Home Forces and arrival in England. 5) Part 17: D-Day and the Last Terrible Year. Eye witnesses talking about the realisation that D-Day was taking place, aeroplanes going over the island, lack of fuel and food supplies, health in island worsening, Red Cross parcels, the arrival and unloading of the SS Vega, starvation of German soldiers and waiting for liberation. 6) Part 18: Liberation. Eye witnesses including the bailiff talking about the change in the high command of the german administration and listening to Winston Churchill's speech, release of political prisoners, celebrations, surrender of Germans and arrival of royal navy officers.

Reference: R/06/4

BBC Radio Jersey-Occupation Tapes. Told by the people who lived through it produced by Beth Lloyd. Part 13: The Todt Organisation and their Russian Slave Labourers. Eye witnesses talking about the background of the Organisation Todt, the arrival of the Russians on the island, the condition they were in, the brutality of their overseers, begging and stealing food, concentration camps, the Jersey Communist Party and other people giving shelter, food, clothes, false papers and english lessons with Mrs Metcalfe to escaped prisoners, the story of Louisa Gould, Harold Le Druillenec and Feodor Burrij and the experience of other residents who harboured escapees. See R/06/4.

Reference: R/07/F1/13

Date: July 8th 1990 - July 8th 1990

BBC Radio Jersey-Occupation Tapes. Told by the people who lived through it produced by Beth Lloyd. Part 8: Not a Lot of Anything. Eye witnesses talking about the lack of essential supplies such as soap, a great shortage of drugs and medicines by Dr John Lewis and others, lack of clothes, shoes and the need to mend things, improvisation with clothes, bartering economy, wood collecting, what was used for fuel and re-using razor blades. See R/06/3.

Reference: R/07/F1/8

Date: June 3rd 1990 - June 3rd 1990

Jersey Evening Post Newspaper article : 'A bitter-sweet festive celebration' - Jersey Heritage's outreach curator, Lucy Layton, looks back at the first season of goodwill after the German Occupation

Reference: US/1570

Date: December 2nd 2020

Jersey Evening Post Article : Jersey Heritage's webiste is updated

Reference: US/966

Date: 2011 - 2011

JEP Newscutting: article about the Diamond year for the family firm Lancashire Texstyles - 31/05/2012

Reference: US/980

Date: 2012 - 2012

Page build time: 0.011962119738261 seconds