Jersey Talking Magazine-August Edition. Introduction by Gordon Young. Mark Higgins, a member of St Paul's Cathedral Choir School, who is singing at the royal wedding of Prince Charles and Princess Diana, sings 'I Know that My Redeemer' and talking about how he got into the school, the levels he had to achieve in order to be accepted, how long he spends singing, the amount of boys in the school, the different time he has his holidays, preparing for the royal wedding, the songs they are going to sing at the royal wedding, whether he feels nervous about performing in front of so many people, the other occasions they sing for at the Cathedral, singing outside the Cathedral, making recordings, meeting the Queen Mother and other members of the royal family and sings another song. Norah talking to Jeremy Scriven, a Jersey boy who left the island to climb Mount Kilimanjaro in Tanzania talking about how he decided to climb the mountain, his lack of regrets of going, getting to Tanzania and the difficulty in doing so because the border of Kenya and Tanzania was closed, being arrested for crossing the border into Tanzania without realising and being put into prison for four days, the conditions in the prison, being tried in the court, being allowed free and then expelled into Kenya, managed to go through Uganda in order to get to Tanzania, buying tickets to Kilimanjaro on the black market, encountering violence in Kampala, journeying and climbing Mount Kilimanjaro, spending 4 days climbing, a member of the party suffering altitude sickness, the experience of climbing the mountain, the view from the top of the mountain and how he felt climbing down again. Katina Hervau, a french girl in the island to learn the language, talking about her first impressions of Jersey roads and the island. Horoscope Feature-Diane Postlethwaite talking about the forecast for the year for leo. June Gurdon giving some In Touch tips for the blind about cooking vegetables without water. End of Side One. Gordon Young taking a trip in a hot air balloon describing the balloon, getting into the balloon, taking off, describing the views of Jersey below including town, St Helier Harbour, Elizabeth Castle, Victoria Avenue, St Aubin's Bay, Noirmont and to the Jersey Airport to land. Gordon Young at Government House for a ball for the Royal National Lifeboat Institution describing the gardens of Government House, the food for the occasion, the scene in the marquees, the scene inside Government House. Talking to Sir Peter Whiteley about piloting in the hot air balloon and the ball for the RNLI and to Lady Whiteley about the weather and the amount of people attending the ball. Listening to the band in the marquee. End of Side Two.

Reference: R/05/B/57

Date: July 31st 1981 - July 31st 1981

Alfred Pierre Laurent, a social reformer and basket-maker, talks about his Norman father who was known as one of the finest workers in Jersey-there was only one other person who was up to his standard and workmanship of basket-making-Mr Le Cornu. He could do anything in basket-making. He was very quick tempered-once some six pences went missing-his younger brother had taken them. His father said he'd prefer to see his children dead than dishonest. Feared his father-he spoke French-his father wouldn't allow him to speak jèrriais. His father loved the British people but he wouldn't allow his children to speak jèrriais or english. He came from a large family-life was hard-his mother was a good cook and could make a good meal out very little. His mother was a breton and his father a Norman-it was unusual for the two to marry. He lived in town as a child-used to be drinking problems in town-used to charge 1d a pint. You had to make do when you were poor-he had his first cup of tea when he worked at Averty's the butcher when he was 9. A lot of children worked then-used to eat a lot of meat. In his spare time used to read second hand books and newspapers-spent all his money in book. Didn't enjoy school-some of the teachers were not very nice-children used to be beaten with a leather strap. Remembers the start of the soup kitchens in Victoria Street-a lady was making porridge in a tureen-remembers seeing Dean Falle who helped make the kitchens possible and thinking that he was God. In the age that he was brought up in there was more cruelty and interest in money-good people suffered and the richer people often took advantage. Today he thinks it has gone too far the other way-there is a lack of discipline. Ada Prouten [with a Jersey accent] lived in St Ouen all her life in later years at Ville Bagot where her husband farmed for many years. She was born Ada England 81 years ago when her father leased a farm at Vinchelez and she and her sister went to Les Landes School but she was expecting to do her bit on the farm when they got home each day. She used to pick potatoes in the summer and in the winter used to scrape the roots for the cows. On Saturdays they had extra work to do as nobody worked on Sundays. Life was hard for her mother-there were two days butter making a week, one wash day, a baking day on Friday. All the people her father employed ate at the same table as the family did. Had lunch at 9.30 in the fields, 12.30 had dinner and in the afternoon had coffee and cake in the field and at the end of the day had tea. In October her sister and her worked until 10 o'clock in the lofts. Her mother made jam, bread and cakes-never bought anything. Wash day-used to put the clothes to soak the day before, would boil water in a bath on a tripod, would then hang the clothes up. Hard work cleaning the house-there were no hoovers. Reused flour bags for various purposes including for pillow cases and aprons. Went to Les Landes School-enjoyed school-was always near the top of the class. When they were putting up St George's Church they were told not to go to the Church-she climbed up to the top of the church-she got in trouble with her teacher. Left school at 15 when the teacher was told a false story about her and when she didn't believe her she left school. Decided to help her father on the farm and used to go vraicing down at L'Etacq. Used to lease the farm-the lease was finished at 12 o'clock on christmas day-could be hard. Her sister and her were not paid-they had money when they wanted some and clothes when they wanted some. Her husband and her didn't have a very large farm. Had her first daughter a year after she was married but coped with it well-had to do your own work because you couldn't pay for anything else. She enjoyed her young life-people were friendlier in her childhood. Philip Le Troquer was born in 1896 at Le Pont, St Martin-when he was 4 his mother died-remembers being called to his mother's deathbed and her final words were 'carry on being a good boy'. Six years later his father died leaving 4 children under 10 as orphans-they went to Sacre Coeur Orphanage. His father died in April 1906 and he entered the orphanage as a 10 year old in May. He had a sister Selina and two brothers John and Frank. Life was nice but disciplined at Sacre Coeur-went to a church service first thing in the morning, had breakfast and went to school for 9 o'clock. Went to St Thomas' School-had their three meals at the orphanage. After school did his homework and cleaned the orphanage-had a rota for cleaning. The nuns were good to him. Had an uncle still alive-they were allowed out on their own once every quarter and they would go and visit him at that time. Used to visit his aunt in St Aubin once a year. Had to be back by 6 o'clock on the days they were allowed out. He left school at 13 and he decided he wanted to become a gardener. Used to have lessons from Mr Nouvel from Highlands College every night throughout the winter. Was always interested in gardening-Sacre Coeur Orphanage had a large garden. It was good training to become a gardener-trained for 4 winters. Received a certificate for finishing the course. When he finished training the first world war started-he was mobilised-was drafted to India and went through South Africa. There were about 20 boys from Jersey-stayed in India for 3-4 months then went through the Persian Gulf towards Turkey. When he returned he visited Reverend Le Grand and talked to him about his experiences-he was like a father to him. He has now worked 60 years as a gardener without a break. Enjoyed his time in the orphanage. Frank Noel [with a Jersey accent], 86 this year, has lived in Gorey all his life and is a plumber. His father worked on big racing cutters for Miles Kennedy. Frank did some work on TB Davis' yacht Westward. His father worked on the Southern Railway mailboats but they never moved from Gorey and he still lives in the same house as he moved to when he was 10 in 1908. Life in Gorey Village was quiet, some fishing took place. Gorey Pier was busy with sailing cutters but not as busy as today. Coal was brought in to Gorey by schooners for the Farmers Union that had a stall in Gorey. There was a windmill at Gorey to pump water for the train. As a child used to go to town on christmas eve as a treat and had Marett's sausages. Used to go on sunday school outings on horses and carts. Used to transport vraic using carts. After school and on Saturday he delivered beer for a shop in Gorey Village. Left school at 15 and went to Grandins to work as a plumber. He had wanted to go to sea but his father told him to learn a trade. Used his bicycle to get into work bought his mother. Joined up in the first world war-his parents were upset but proud. Landed back in Jersey on a Sunday morning-waited for the 1 o'clock train and when he got home it was one of the greatest days of his life. The first world war was frightening-not like the movies. Fought in the trenches and mountains-the worst was Belgium. Went back to Jersey on leave during the war-most of the boys in Gorey joined up. Loves low water and boat fishing-caught a 9lb lobster low water fishing and caught a conger of 40lb-it was hiding in a shipwreck. Professor Albert Messervy was a vet in Jersey for many years before, in 1953, he was invited to the chair of veterinary surgery at the University of Bristol. He was one of 6 children brought up in Trinity where his father was a farmer. He was 6 years old when the first world war broke out but he can remember the day. His brother and he were living at Stonewall, Mont au Prêtre with his Aunt Martha because his mother was seriously ill. They used to go to school in Trinity but on thought morning his Uncle George came in and said that war had been declared-he was horrified because their sunday school was due to have tea at Trinity Manor the next day but that had to be abandoned. Remembers in 1912 when the aircraft came from Dinard to Jersey in a race and was at West Park-remembers the pilot-on their way back to Trinity it started to thunder and lightning and somebody sheltering under a tree at Oaklands, St Saviour was killed when it collapsed on him. In 1915 they made some black butter-remembers the different kinds of apples added-in the evening a chimney caught fire-a photograph was taken which is now in Jersey Through the Lens. Was always interested in animals-especially horses. Fed ducklings foxgloves once not knowing that they were poisonous and when they died they got disciplined by their father-12 years later when he was studying to be a vet he was asked about in an examination about the effect of foxgloves on animals and he was able to answer fully. Also had a goat which had twins but she died choking on the afterbirth. The goats used to run into the house. During his childhood there was a fire at Trinity Manor-remembers horses pulling the fire engine to the manor. At the end of the first world war there was a Peace Fete which he managed to go to-his uncle bought fireworks from G D Laurens and Company-some of the fireworks didn't work properly. Jersey suffered little during the first world war-was some rationing of sugar and tea but it had no effect. After the war the farming community was hit-a depression took place and some people emigrated to find work. End of Side One. Personal View of Jurat Clarry Dupré who spent 24 years in the States of Jersey. Is retired but keeps the name jurat. Is enjoying his retirement. Was born in Jersey in 1914-had a happy childhood. Was born in Simon Place and at 6 years old he moved to Beresford Street where his father ran a fish and poultry business and lived there for the next 60 years. His father had 4 brothers and 1 sister but he only had one brother who he has worked with in the fish and poultry business for 40 years. He went to De La Salle College at 6 to 16 and then he spent a year in London learning about the fish and poultry business. After that he worked in Beresford Street from 17 to 24 until the time of the occupation when joined up with the army. He and his family are roman catholics. Played a lot of sport at school. Was the Jersey squash champion in 1938 and played for the Junior Muratti football in 1930 and 1931. First Record-Vera Lynn's 'We'll Meet Again'. When the second world war broke out he was 23/24-he evacuated from the island in June 1940 ad joined up as soon as he got into Weymouth. He was attached to the 11th Battalion of the Hampshire Regiment-he went to the Royal Military Academy at Sandhurst from where he was commissioned to the Middle East with the Cheshire Regiment. Saw active service from Alamein to Tunisia, Egypt to Sicily for the D-Day landings in Sicily. Returned to England in 1943 ready for D-Day in Normandy. Went to Sandhurst for 7 months and left as a second lieutenant and he eventually became a major. He was awarded a military cross-felt he was in the right place in the right time. Was not married when he left the island-left his fiance in Jersey and they got married in July 1945. His brother joined up and spent 4 years of his service in Malta. After he got married in 1945 he signed back with the army for two years and was stationed in the Middle East at Palestine. When he came back his son was 10 months old. Second Record-Lily Marlene with 'The Girl Underneath the Lantern'. Came out of the army in 1947 and worked with his brother for 10 years until 1957 when he went into the States. Entered as a deputy in St Helier No 1 District-was elected unopposed but three years later came second in the election and went into the States-Terry Sowden was first. A year later he stood for senator in a by-election against Senator John Venables but lost and a year after that he stood for election for senator and topped the polls and was a senator for nine years before being re-elected for six years and then losing the election as senator but became a deputy in St Helier No 1 District again before not being re-elected and retiring from politics. After not being returned as a senator decided he would stand as a deputy and was elected as the President of Tourism making it 21 years. He was also Vice-President of the Defence Committee and Finance Committee. Follows the States on Radio Jersey-felt he was getting too old for the States. Believes people are still out there who could be politicians-wouldn't like to see party politics. Wouldn't like to see States members paid. Has served on the Tourism Committee for 24 years and as President for 21 years-it has increased massively in that time. He was elected on to the Executive of the Commonwealth Parliamentary Association-saw over 20 different countries on conferences as a result. As President of the Tourism Committee was always a great supporter of the Battle of Flowers and when he retired he was made an honorary Vice-President of the Battle of Flowers' Association-hasn't missed a Battle of Flowers in 30 years. Used to go to Battersea Park and run an exhibit in the park. Third Record-Stuart Gillies with Amanda. Stuart Gillies spent many seasons in Jersey-is a character. When he retired from the States he became a jurat-had been out of the States for only 6 months and he was asked to fill a vacancy-he filled the vacancy for 4 years until he had to retire because of his age. You keep the title of jurat for the rest of your life. Jurats sits with the bailiff in the court-they are judges of fact-they decide on the sentences-they also sit on various boards-he sat on the Prison Board for 4 years. Didn't enjoy going to the prison but found it worthwhile. Jurats are responsible in the parish for elections. Attended the assize d'héritage and the swearing in of new jurats and advocates. Still goes to the honorary occasions such as the swearing in of new people but doesn't have the power of jurats anymore. Used to wear robes as a jurat and now hats are worn. Still worked in the fishmonger because it was early mornings-especially Friday and Saturday. The business was opened by his father in Beresford Street in 1921and he closed it 2 years after his brother died 4 years previously. His father died in 1924-when he was 10-his mother ran the business until he joined it. He has never done any fishing. Enjoyed meeting people in the business. Was a very small business-had 5 staff and 2 girls in the office-there was some competition with the fish market. They didn't do any wholesaling. Fourth Record-Pretty Woman by Roy Orbison. Has an understanding wife for 41 years of marriage-has one son and two granddaughters. Used to play squash until his 40s but didn't really have many hobbies. Feels he's been very lucky-doesn't regret anything. Fifth Record-Walking in the Air with Aled Jones.

Reference: R/07/B/13

Date: 1984 - 1987

Personal View of Jurat Barbara Myles, the first woman jurat in Jersey and doctor, interviewed by Beth Lloyd. Talking about her early childhood. Education-went to nursery school, a foundations school-interrupted by the second world war which led to her going to three different grammar schools. Her father was a doctor of philosophy-worked in insecticides during the war. Her father came over to Jersey after the war to sort out the Colorado beetle problem. Always wanted to be a doctor and was encouraged. First Record-Little Sir Echo-released when the world changed. Almost got sent to America for safety but stayed. Until 1945/46 lived in Maidenhead and then moved to Kent to school. Tried to get in to train as a doctor but was rejected and then worked in a laboratory. Got a place at Trinity College, Dublin as a medical student-ended with 20 women students. Recalls a disruptive patient. Specialists-were some characters and difficult people. Second Record-Ring of Bright Water sung by Val Doonican. After finishing her medical training came to Surrey near where her parents were living to work in anaesthetics-worked in St Peter's Hospital, Cherstey. Met her husband there who was a surgeon. Worked with him in the casualty department. Got married and started working part time locum work. Had her child Caroline in the autumn of 1960 just after they'd moved house. Was in the house 4 or 5 months when a chance for a job in Jersey came up-decided to move across-had no doubts. Worked in a few locum jobs in anaesthetics in the early 1960s. Had more children-second daughter-1962, third daughter-65, son 68. It was fun but hard work-lived at La Rocque. Third Record-Misalliance sung by Flanders and Swan. Offered work-Jersey Family Welfare Association-needed doctors for their clinics-worked with Dr Crill. Now does 2 half days a week. Got involved with the Jersey College for Girls-was asked to teach health education to the students. Got involved with the Jersey College for Girls Parent Teacher Association-was the president. 1970-asked to work on the Juvenile Court-12 lay members sat with a magistrate-was trained in it. Working in the juvenile court was distressing-difficult to try and change a child's background. There are no easy answers to help the children-have to get the children at an early age. Fourth Record-Mozart's Symphony No 40. Decided to stand for jurat because of the lack of women in the Royal Court. When the time came at the end of her time in the Juvenile Court was asked to become a jurat by Jurat Hamilton. Stood for jurat but did not get in the first time. Decided to stand again because of the support she received. Was nervous when she became a jurat. Jurats sit in the Royal Court as the Inferior and Superior Number, work on the licensing bench, overseeing the job of curator for people who can't manage their own affairs. When trying a criminal case-can worry her-have to work out what you believe. Retirement of Lester Bailhache there are now no lawyers as jurats-thinks there is a case to have lawyers as jurats. Jurats get together to discuss law changes. Nothing had to change when she became the first woman jurat-big change for the other jurats. Fifth Record-Menuhin and Grapelli with Jealousy. Hobbies-sailing-likes to have a break from the island-visits the Ecréhous and the South of Brittany. Ambitions-would like to write. Used to sing in a quartet. Sixth Record-Vera Lynn with When I Grow too Old to Dream. End of Side One. Personal View with Betty Brooke. Started writing a column for the Evening Post in 1966. Asked by Jim Scriven, the editor of the time, to write a column to interest people in island politics. Considered standing for election-is not a committee person. Has more power as a writer than as a politician. Was born and raised in Aberdeen and when the second world war came she became a wren where she met her husband who was a navy chaplain. Wrote and edited for ship's magazines. Her husband retired from the royal navy in 1957 and came to Jersey to a church. Liked the States of Jersey because the people could make a difference. Started as a signals wren, trained at Rosyth and then moved to Liverpool-difficult time-worked 72 hours a week-lost many friends. Became an instructor in London and trained people for D Day. Was going to marry somebody else and he was supposed to conduct the ceremony before they realised they loved each other. First Record-Kathleen Ferrier with Blow the Wind Southerly. Became a naval chaplain's wife-stationed at HMS Royal Arthur and then moved to Leigh on Solent and then to Malta for 4 years. Became a snooker player of some repute. Became a sort of surrogate mother to the naval recruits. Had to move on after 4 years-adopted a baby at this time. Posted to Devenport and after two years retired and was invited to move to the Aquila Road Methodist Church-became a methodist lay preacher soon after she was married. Second Record-Mozart's Ave Verum. Impressions of Jersey-had always wanted to come to the Channel Islands-had organised to come to Jersey and as they were organising it had an invitation from Aquila Road Church to come and preach. Simon, her son was 3, and they lived at West Park Avenue in The Manse. Loved living in Jersey especially the Jersey people-warmth and friendship. Preached in the methodist churches-in 1966 Barry, her husband, collapsed in the pulpit and died. Life changed dramatically-was widowed with a 12 year old son-was necessary to look at life again. Continued in the church for 11 months until another minister was appointed. Grieved with the congregation. Third Record-Frankie Lane with Do Not Forsake Me from High Noon. In 1966 her life took a new turn-had to work-worked as a freelance journalist-wrote two columns for the Jersey Evening Post. Wrote articles for the Daily Telegraph and for women's magazines. Was correspondent for the South West region in Jersey before Radio Jersey was set up and interviewed people for Channel Television. Fourth Record-Mozart's Violin Concerto. Never felt she wanted to publish a permanent record of her thoughts-has written two books-a thriller and her autobiography-may publish it at some point. Doesn't travel a lot but has relatives in America and loves France. Fifth Record-Pie Jesu. Doesn't like to plan for the future-lives for the present. Would like the prosperity of Jersey to continue. Sixth Record-Nat King Cole with Ramblin' Rose. End of Side Two.

Reference: R/07/B/5

Personal View of Jeremy Mallinson, Director of the Jersey Zoo, interviewed by Beth Lloyd. Lived in Jersey for almost 35 years-came over as a youngster with his parents. His father started a wine and spirits business-when he first left school he went into the wine and spirit business. When he came to Jersey he had started boarding school at King's, Canterbury-enjoyed his school life and holiday life. His father and brother was a cricketer-both members of the Jersey Island Cricket Club-his father was the organising match secretary for 12 years-took part in matches. Remembers Ronnie Postill writing an article complimenting him. Also played hockey and took part with boating with the cadet club at St Aubin's-was voted as cadet secretary. His father bought a 1906 cadillac car and he restored it-used to take part in the Battle of Flowers and St Aubin's Fete-it eventually went to America. Was always interested in animals as a child-used to take part in horse riding and took people's dogs for a walk. Wanted to go to Africa to see the animals. When he left school he went into his father's wine business but he was a bad salesman. Met a person on a cricket tour in Jersey who told him he was going to join the Rhodesia and Nyasaland Staff Corps-decided that he would join in order to see Africa. First Record-Music Maestro Please by Bud Flanagan and Chesney Allen. The Rhodesia and Nyasaland Staff Corps were a small body of trained men that were the regular army of the federation-provided the officers for the Army. His whole objective was to see as many animals as possible. Never can get Africa out of your system. Always had an enthusiasm about animals-was taught by friends in Lusaka. Saw Operation Noah [an operation to save as many animals as possible from an area that was being dammed] in action. Was not a military person-wanted to leave after 3 years although he had enjoyed himself. Was interested in joining the game department but wanted to come back to Jersey and he did in 1958. Second Record-As Time Goes By from Casablanca. Had not heard of Gerald Durrell until his brother gave him 'My Family and Other Animals' in Christmas 1958-was fascinated by the book. Heard Gerald Durrell was going to open a zoo and visited the zoo the second day it opened and wrote to the Superintendent of the Zoo, Kenneth Smith. He was interviewed and given a temporary job during the summer of 1959. He first met Gerald Durrell when he came back from Argentina with his collection on the 9th June 1959. Has gone the whole way through the ranks of the zoo-worked in the bird section for his first 18 months and then the mammals. Important to know what everybody does in a business-good to start at the bottom. The early days of the zoo were exciting and a struggle-had financial difficulty but Gerald Durrell wanted to stay in Jersey. Formed the Trust and gave all of his holdings to it and the proceeds of two books that he had yet to write. He was the founder and director but never got paid for that. Always been interested in primates all the way up to gorillas-his first love at the zoo was Npongo. When a film about gorillas was being shown he took Npongo and held her outside West's Cinema collecting for a mate for her. Third Record-Zambeze. Personal View of Ron Hickman, inventor of the workmate, interviewed by Beth Lloyd. Born in South Africa and he was inventing from an early age. Remembers his first invention was a car that had a bridge over them so cars could travel on the same road. His family thought he was a bit made until he had his first burglar alarm that worked well at the age of 16. Was an outdoor person and he enjoyed music-playing the piano and violin. At 12 he became the local church organist. If he didn't become an inventor wanted to become an engineer. When he was 18 he qualified as an associate of the Trinity College of Music in London. Never got as far with the violin. First Record-Mozart's Piano Sonata in A Minor. When he left school he decided to go into the magistrate's office-moved around in different towns for 6 years-enjoyed the experience. Decided to come to England in order to pursue his desires to be come a car designer. When he first arrived in London he got a job in a music store and studied the organ part time. Talked his way into a job with Ford as a model maker-was rejected several times but eventually gave him a chance. Nine months later was promoted on to the drawing boards as a designer and he stayed with Ford for 3 years. Met Colin Chapman who had created the Lotus Car Company and was hired to help. Soon found himself as chief designer and stayed for 9 years. Got on well with Colin Chapman-respected you if you knew what you were doing. Owns a Lotus now. Bought a 1931 V16 Cadillac the previous year-drives around the Jersey roads in it. Second Record-Windmills Of Your Mind by Noel Harrison. Decided to leave Lotus Cars because of the responsibilities-decided to make a break from car design and tried to invent things. The first two inventions-one was a failure and the other was the workmate. His wife Helen backed him in his decision to leave his job. An inventor's working day is varied-have to have an idea, try it out-it gets a life of itself. Thought up the workmate because he was assembling a wardrobe and cut through a chair. There is a need to patent the invention or it becomes public property. The workmate was rejected by 7 British manufacturers and 3 American manufacturers. Black and Decker turned him down but came back to him 4 years later after he had put it into production himself. Had to put his money into it in order to put it into production. It took 6 years to start making money for him. Third Record-An Die Musik sung by Elizabeth Schwarzkopf. Decided to come to Jersey after he made licensing arrangements with Black and Decker-a nice environment to continue inventing in. Found it easy settling in Jersey-tried to run a Jersey company Techron but it lost money and now he runs it on his own. Is working on two major new inventions but are kept secret. He designed his own house in St Brelade-bought an old house with a good site and then designed his house with his wife and the architect. Have many inventions in the house-all for practical use. Created a fault reporting panel and an error took place without being reported-he discovered it was the fault reporting panel that had gone wrong. His most useful invention is a panel that tells him what doors and windows have been left open. Fourth Record-Morning in Cornwall by James Last. End of Side One. Personal View of Colonel Bill Hall, the Island Commissioner of Scouts who is about to retire, interviewed by Beth Lloyd. He was a scout as a boy-started in 1930. Had an older brother but he wasn't a scout. Joined at 13 and was very enthusiastic. He became involved with the troop after he left school-he was allowed to run the meetings-progressively wanted to start a troop. He persuaded his headmaster to let him run a troop in opposition to the school's troop run by the old boys. Has kept in touch with old boys from the troop. The troop was set up in 1937-he had joined the Territorial Army because he could tell war was coming. In 1938 the scouts were evacuated and when he went off to war the boys carried on running the scout group. Never thought of a career other than scouting-went to a stockbroker's office after finishing school. First Record-Colonel Bogie's March. Was an officer of the Royal Army Service Corps of the Army. Was a captain at the start of the war at the age of 22-was responsible for the supply of ammunition of the defences of the Thames. Later went into the Western Desert-was responsible for carrying ammunition in the second line. The Western Desert was a good place to fight the war-wide open spaces. Met General Charles de Gaulle in Damascus. Later had a similar job in Western Europe-went to Malta for a while and later to France after D-Day. Second Record-The Slave's Chorus from Nabucco. After the war had ended-came out in the Spring of 1946-was given an office in Phillips and Drew and worked there for 25 years. Rejoined the Scouts and became a Commissioner in Camberwell and rejoined the Territorial Army. Got married in 1953. His role as a stockbroker was to advice people what to do with their money. Was involved in magistrate's court and the youth court in London-became a JP. In a court if a punishment is imprisonment they can challenge the decision in a higher court. Realised that deprived children often suffered from a lack of parental control. Third Record-Music recorded at a Greek jamboree. Has been on two jamborees-a jamboree in Greece was exciting-took on the task of a World Jamboree in Marathon, Greece-helped organise the camp, had good fun, Prince Constantine opened the Jamboree. Went to Corfu after the Jamboree. Personal View of Dr Anthony Essex-Cater, Jersey's Medical Officer of Health, interviewed by Beth Lloyd. The role of Medical Officer of Health is looking at the community from a preventative point of view-establish the patterns and causes of diseases. The doctors don't come under his jurisdiction-their help is important to him in his work and vice versa. Medical Officers of Health are long established appointments-go back a 100 years-dropped the name in England in the 1970s reforms. Jersey decided to stick to the old title. Didn't always want to study medicine-his father was a writer and journalist but he also had an interest in medicine and decided to go into that area of work. He was at school during the war and had to make the decision whether to continue. Originally thought of going on a short service commission to Oxford and was interviewed by Wing Commander Cecil Wright who suggested to learn medicine. First Record-A Symphonic Study by Elgar. Was in London at the end of the war studying to be a doctor-was interested in sport, played a lot of rugby. Was a general course for training so didn't have to decide a speciality until later but was interested in paediatrics. Before he qualified he got married-his wife Jane was a student nurse at Charing Cross Hospital and because she married him she was forced to leave the hospital as it was not allowed. He went into the Royal Air Force Medical Branch for 18 months and was stationed in Wiltshire. When he left he got a job in a hospital in Bath. He joined up as part of his national service. His role at Bath was as a house officer and then he moved to London to a paediatric hospital. When he was in London he did a diploma in Child Health. Decided to move from child health to public health because of the lack of prospects in paediatrics. Got a public health job in Croydon. Needed to get further qualification-gained a scholarship for the London School of Hygiene at the University of London. Was there for a year and also studied occupational health. After that year had to refuse an opportunity to go to Harvard University. Second Record-Prelude No 1 by Villa Lobos. Left Croydon and went to Swansea where he was Deputy Medical Officer of Health-very pleasant place to live. His 3 children enjoyed living in Swansea-stayed for 5 years. He then moved to Birmingham in order to progress-began to lecture at the Children's Hospital in Birmingham about the health of children. Interest in anthropology-has been a fellow of the Royal Anthropological Institute of Great Britain for nearly 40 years. Has an interest in races-now medical anthropology is now recognised as an important discipline. Then moved to Manchester to become Deputy Medical Officer of Health-enjoyed the theatre of music of Manchester-the problems were similar to those in Birmingham. He was awarded a Council of Europe Medical Fellowship-gave him an opportunity to travel in Scandinavia to study their health system-looked at port health and child health. After Manchester went to Monmouthshire. He was only one of three Medical Officer of Health in a 90 year period. In 1974 took part in the reorganisation of the National Health Service-he was appointed a Member of the Steering Committee for Wales to work out the details of the reorganisation. Felt there was a failure by the government to listen to the steering committee. Fourth Record-Weber's Clarinet Quintet in B Flat Major

Reference: R/07/B/9

Date: 1983 - 1985

BBC Radio Jersey-Occupation Tapes. Told by the people who lived through it produced by Beth Lloyd. Part 12: Brushes with the German Authorities. Eye witnesses talking about being interrogated at Silvertide, experiences of confrontations with the german soldiers, being arrested and beaten, court martials and trials of local residents, listening to the radio and experiences in the prison at Gloucester Street. See R/06/3.

Reference: R/07/F1/12

Date: July 1st 1990 - July 1st 1990

MS volume 'Scottish Historical Miscellanies' possibly work of David or Daniel Cambell. List of contents in later hand at beginning. Correspondence on provenance of volume pasted in at beginning (Bears bookplate of Macdonald of Ulva) 'A relation of the Civil and Political Estate of the Island if Jersey'

Reference: Rh13/14

Date: 1640 - 1640

Microfiche copy of the Rôles Ecclésiastiques, Volume One pages 1 to 55

Reference: S/03/1

Date: 1557 - 1568

Microfiche copy of the Rôles Ecclésiastiques, Volume One, pages 56 to 112

Reference: S/03/2

Date: 1557 - 1568

Microfiche copy of the Rôles Ecclésiastiques, Volume One, pages 113 to 168

Reference: S/03/3

Date: 1557 - 1568

Microfiche copy of the Rôles Ecclésiastiques, Volume One, pages 169 to 224

Reference: S/03/4

Date: 1557 - 1568

Microfiche copy of the Rôles Ecclésiastiques, Volume One, pages 225 to 248

Reference: S/03/5

Date: 1557 - 1568

Letter to Samuel Whitbread from Thomas Schreiber: King's writ does not run in the Islands, but the Kings commission under the great seal. The local court made a law that an Englishman can be arrested for bond or bill, but this was not santioned by the King in Council. Writer intends to appeal on this to the House of Lords. Will ask Allen to draw out his case. Hopes for support. 24 September 1814.

Reference: WI/5796

Date: 1814 - 1814

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