Typed War Diary of Henry Walter Ernest Gosselin. Recounts his experience of the Second World War as a soldier. Details include his decision to join up and leave his family in Jersey, going to England and training in Cornwall, whilst training he went on leave to stay with a family in Bristol where he met his future wife Hilda Dorothy Noakes. He went on to Liverpool before being shipped to Sierra Leone with HMS Hood and four destroyers. From there he went to Durban, South Africa before moving on to Bombay, India. In India he met up with his brother Joe who was also stationed with The Cornwall's. He trained for mountain warfare before going to Baghdad where he was involved with digging tank traps in the desert. He recalls dealing with sand storms and extreme weather conditions. He became the batsman for a Guernseyman called Captain Brett with the unit involved with escorting convoys through Iraq and guarding hundreds of miles of oil pipelines. He volunteered to be in a platoon as an anti-tank unit. He travelled through the Middle East, arriving in Egypt and on to Libya before going to the frontline. He fought in a battle and was taken as a prisoner of war. He was marched with his unit as a prisoner of war with no water or food across the desert, being attacked by Allied planes on the way who didn't realise they were POWs. He dropped out of the column of prisoners but eventually found the energy to rejoin the march. He found and staying together with his brother Joe once more before being handed over to Italian soldiers. The prisoners were not given any water and were desperate to drink. He arrived in a prison camp in Tripoli and was then shipped to Naples before moving to a prisoner of war camp in Capua. He met up once more with his brother Joe in the camp before being moved once more to a camp near Rome. He describes the terrible conditions in the camp and being moved to the hospital when he was suffering from illness. He recalls prisoners attempting to escape and the entire camp being punished as a result. There was gambling in the camp in order to win cigarettes to barter and the prisoners hunted for fuel everywhere. The camp was later inspected by the Red Cross and conditions improved as a result. He was moved once more and was put to work on rice farms. He attempted an escape but his partner fell ill and so they had to cancel it. When Italy stopped fighting he escaped the camp and went on the run with other POWs across Italy. He met with the mayor of a village called Canale who was also one of the leaders of the underground who agreed to help him and his fellow POWs. They were hidden at a Franciscan monastery before being moved when the Germans heard rumours of this. They joining up with a Partisan group in Italy and were transported to a mountain village in the Alps called Damiani. He was involved in a number of raids with the Partisans and got to know some German prisoners that had been caught before they were executed. Eventually the village was attacked and he was taken prisoner once more. He was about to be executed when he said he was and English POW and was spared by a Ukrainian officer. He was interrogated by the Germans before being transported to Germany to another prisoner of war camp. He mentions the terrible condition in which Russian prisoners were held. He was put to work in a coal mine. He remembers raids on the area by Allied aeroplanes and hiding to avoid being injured. He escaped from the camp when the Allied soldiers were near and was liberated by American troops. He was transported to Brussels where he was deloused and given a new uniform. He was flown back to England, arriving back and staying in Bristol with the family that he had stayed with previously, including his future wife Hilda. He was given notice that he could travel back to Jersey and arrived back on leave, going back to his family's house in Le Breton Lane for an emotional reunion with his family who thought he had been killed. At the end of his leave he returned to his barracks and later got engaged and married to Hilda. He was told that he had to stay in the Army until 1947 and continued to serve. He later found out what had happened to the people he had met in Italy. Includes photographs and copies of letters relating to the experience and a family tree and note on the Gosselin family in Jersey.

Reference: L/C/400/A1/1

Date: 2009 - 2016

Case of Pierre de Lysle who claimed sanctuary in St Helier's Cemetery after stealing a silver cup from Thomas Le Marchat, 3 silver cups from Andrieu Aubyn, 1 silver cup from Jacques Amy and a taffeta cup, he then confessed to the crime and was sent to prison from where he escaped to claim sanctuary. Copied by Sir John Le Couteur

Reference: L/C/68/C7/2

Date: October 23rd 1542 - October 23rd 1542

File concerning Captain Edward Clark, an American prisoner of war who escaped in January 1945. Includes posters regarding his and Lieutenant George Haas' escape, a claim for the boat that they used whilst escaping, a copy of 'The Alpine Avalanche' detailing Captain Clarke's story and an account of the events written by Captain Clark.

Reference: L/D/25/A/16

Date: January 8th 1945 - May 2nd 1985

Newspaper cuttings and photocopies of articles on escapees from Occupied Jersey, 1940-1945. Includes an appreciation of Philip Cotillard, an escapee, order of service's for the interment of Maurice Jay Gould and Peter Denis Hassall, articles on the escape of Barbara Langley, née Hutchings and John Langley, David Blandin, Robert Roger, Donald Le Lievre, Patrick Smith, Peter de Verger and Valentine Goudré, Sir Peter Crill, Roy Mourant and John Floyd, Bernie Turpin and Denis Vibert.

Reference: L/D/25/A/22

Date: October 16th 1944 - May 21st 1999

Documents relating to conditions within the island during the German Occupation including a report entitled 'A few authentic facts relating to the Island, obtained from Mr V Senr' and 2 copies of 'Jersey under German Occupation' a narrative prepared from a verbal account given by escapee Denis Vibert who arrived in England in September 1941

Reference: L/D/25/A/38

Date: November 3rd 1941 - August 28th 1944

An article and research carried out by Margaret Ginns concerning Lieutenant Joseph M Krebs, an American who crash landed in Jersey during the occupation and was taken as a prisoner of war, Belza Althea Turner, a Canadian who helped him in captivity and later failed in an escape attempt with Siebe Koster, a Dutch National. Includes articles and correspondence concerning the story and Krebs' return to the island, photographs of those involved and the places that events took place

Reference: L/D/25/A/39

Date: August 20th 1984 - April 27th 1987

Ring binder of Evening Post and other newspaper cuttings from 1979 to 1983 with articles relating to the Channel Islands Occupation Society and the German Occupation. Includes articles on the meetings, work and events of the Channel Islands Occupation Society, articles on returning German soldiers and prisoners of war, notes on publications relating to the german occupation and other aspects of the german occupation such as the air raids, Organisation Todt workers, entertainments, nursing and escapees.

Reference: L/D/25/B1/24

Date: August 15th 1979 - July 21st 1983

Ring binder of Evening Post and other newspaper cuttings from 1984 to 1985 with articles relating to the Channel Islands Occupation Society and the German Occupation. Includes articles on the meetings, work and events of the Channel Islands Occupation Society, articles on returning German soldiers and prisoners of war, notes on publications relating to the german occupation and other aspects of the german occupation such as the german underground hospital, escapees, sport and red cross parcels.

Reference: L/D/25/B1/25

Date: March 22nd 1984 - July 17th 1985

Ring binder of Evening Post and other newspaper cuttings from 1986 to 1989 with articles relating to the Channel Islands Occupation Society and the German Occupation. Includes articles on the meetings, work and events of the Channel Islands Occupation Society, articles on returning German soldiers and prisoners of war, notes on publications relating to the german occupation, calls by the mayor of Bad Wurzach for greater links between the Channel Islands and his town and other aspects of the german occupation such as the Organisation Todt, the hospital, the German Underground Hospital, Mont Orgueil and escapees.

Reference: L/D/25/B1/26

Date: February 1st 1986 - December 23rd 1989

1) Occupation Part 16: Escapes produced by Beth Lloyd made up of interviews of local people who were in Jersey during the Occupation. Subjects discussed include the escape of Denis Vibert to England in September 1941, tales of different escapes to France by islanders recounted by Eddie Le Corre, Basil Le Brun, Peter Crill, John Floyd, Roy Mourant and their subsequent experiences of interrogations by the Home Forces and arrival in England. 2) Half of the interview with Captain Ed Clarke, an American prisoner of war, talking about his escape with George Haas from the prisoner of war camp in Jersey helped to hide by Bill Bertram and sailing to France 3) Notice about the CIOS Review new issue that celebrates the 40th anniversary of liberation and an interview with Michael Ginns about his article on Operation Nestegg and investigations that took place after liberation 4) Occupation Part 9: From Finance to Farming the Island Keeps Going produced by Beth Lloyd made up of interviews of local people who were in Jersey during the Occupation. Subjects discussed include the occupation currency, depletion of stocks in shops, rationing being introduced, black market and bartering used, farmers being ordered what to grow, the harvest and the inspections made by the Germans, farmers hiding extras from the Germans, investigations into a fuel that would allow tractors to run on something other than petrol-charcoal used, crops that were grown, giving food to others 5) Part 17: D-Day and the Last Terrible Year produced by Beth Lloyd made up of interviews of local people who were in Jersey during the Occupation. Subjects discussed includes the realisation in Channel Islands that D-Day was taking place, aeroplanes going over the island, lack of fuel and food supplies, health in island worsening, Red Cross parcels and the arrival and unloading of the SS Vega, starvation of German soldiers and waiting for liberation.

Reference: L/D/25/L/15

Date: 1985 - 1985

1) Interview with Frank Keiller on the radio programme 'Conversation Piece' which includes musical interlude. Discusses being a teenager during the occupation, what it feels like to celebrate 40 years of liberation, his background, his reputation as a tearaway, problems at the deportations in which he was involved in riots and was arrested and court martialled but escaped deportation because of his age, his plan to escape from the island, the subsequent failure and his arrest by the Germans, his interrogation in the prison at Gloucester Street, the conditions in prison and his attempt to escape, hiding from the Germans for the rest of the occupation with a new identity, before the escape attempt helping at the hospital under Arthur Halliwell, Ray Osmont and Dr Darling, qualifying as a doctor and surgeon after the war, joining the RAF, his subsequent career in different countries, the stress of surgery, leaving the Royal Air Force, making a new civilian life, moving to Victoria in Australia, retirement plans, hobbies, feelings towards the Germans now and feelings about the government of the States of Jersey during the occupation. 2) Weather and traffic report. Stolen items-police report. Magazine section-new book '120 Years'-History of Jersey Swimming Club-compiled by John Faige explained to Beth Lloyd why club was founded in 1865, about Havre des Pas Swimming Pool, Jersey residents in international swimming and diving competitions in the past and photographs. Paul Fox returning to the island after working on a project for 10 weeks in Southern Chile with Operation Rally to build a bridge. Report on the reoccupation of St Luke's vicarage by homeless families. Report on the hill climb at Bouley Bay. Channel Islands Occupation Society have found in the east of the island an entrance that appears to be the start of a tunnel leading towards France. Michael Ginns explains how it was found, reasons it would have been dug, question of how far it may go, where it leads to. Public Works interest in tunnel expressed by Deputy Don Filleul expressing excitement over the find, possibilities of our own channel tunnel, possible conduit for water and the investigation to continue with a report ready for April 1st next year (April Fool's joke)

Reference: L/D/25/L/30

Date: April 30th 1985 - April 30th 1985

Frank Keiller talking to Chris Stone on Radio Jersey about his experience during the occupation. Talks about the first trouble that he got in having tried to find some petrol for an escape attempt, punching a couple of german solders whilst the deportations were taking place and running away, being tracked down, arrested, interrogated and beaten over the incident and then being interrogated again at Silvertide, Havre des Pas and courtmartialled although only given probation on account of his age, helping beat of collaborator with Basil Le Brun but escaped being arrested, being warned that he was being watched, forming a group after D-Day aiming to help went the liberation took place, trying to take information on fortifications to the allies when escaping and the consequent failure of the attempt, taken to be interrogated and then to prison, how he felt at the time, resistance, conditions in prison, being court martialled and worrying about charges of espionage, describes escape from prison with friends, hiding out for the rest of the occupation with different residents, other escape plans, talks about acts of resistance and collaboration, feelings about time, his talk to the Channel Islands Occupation Society and the importance of personal stories during the occupation, his lowest point during the occupation, reasons for his resistance and how the occupation should be remembered.

Reference: L/D/25/L/31

Date: January 1st 1999 - January 1st 1999

Talk to the Channel Islands Occupation Society by Frank Keiller about collaboration and resistance during the occupation. Discusses the Island during the occupation in terms of a prison, deals with criticism of occupation especially with Madeleine Bunting's book, talks about his background, his experience at a conference that made him confront his experiences, the need to talk about it, the need to write about personal stories and not just 'bricks and mortar' of occupation, the lack of recognition for those who resisted, the false emphasis by the media on collaboration and the lack of acceptance that resistance did take place, his viewd on the States during the occupation, what constitutes resistance, the differences in Jersey that made fighting resistance impossible, other forms of resistance that took place, what constitutes collaboration and cooperation, illegitimate births, black marketering, profiteering by farmers only happened on a small scale, things being blown out of proportion, what constitutes working for the enemy, the evil of informing, intelligence gathering groups common in Jersey, spreading of news, escapes, the possibility of trials after the occupation to put the matter of collaboration to bed, talks his life during the war and how the island should be proud of how the majority behaved. Questions about records that were opened early which accentuate the negative side of the occupation, books about the occupation, trying to forget the occupation after it had finished, collaboration, people helping escapees and the comparison of prisoner of war camps with Jersey.

Reference: L/D/25/L/32

Date: January 21st 1999 - January 21st 1999

Norman Le Brocq, founder member of the Jersey Communist Party and former Deputy of the States of Jersey, talks to the Channel Islands Occupation Society about his occupation experiences. Introduction by the CIOS President. Talks about his personal situation at the start of the occupation, his decision not to be evacuated, his political ideas, becoming a methodist lay preacher, meeting Leslie Huelin, a member of the Australian Communist Party, in 1941, forming a discussion group that later became the Jersey Democratic Movement to talk about ideas for Jersey after the war, the formation and growth of the Jersey Communist Party, the recruitment of Warren Hobbs, names of young people that they had recruited, making sketches of German military installations, organising aid for escaped Ukrainian forced labourers, Mikhail Krohin, an escapee taught english by Mrs Metcalfe who acted as a distribution messenger, the acquirement of a printing duplicator to create illegal leaflets for the Jersey Democratic Movement, copying BBC news bulletins for camps, help they received, methods of obtaining supplies and identity cards, Dr McKinstry who helped them, the setting up of an OT Hospital being at Girl's College, contact between Ernest Perrée, a porter at the hospital and the Spanish workers who were mostly communists, the meeting between three spanish workers and three from the Jersey Communist Party, the passing of leaflets in the camps by the Spanish, the duplicator being hidden in a cottage in Sand Street, his wrongful sacking from the Jersey Gas Company for leaking information, working for the libraries and the George Hutt's bookshop and lending library in Broad Street, Feodor Burrij and Louisa Gould, a meeting with Paul Mullbach, a german soldier part of a group [part of or inspired by the Free Germany Movement] attempting to start a mutiny in the garrison, agreement to produce leaflets for him, being nominated as liaison with Mulbach and meeting in Burger's Bookshop in the Parade to hand over the leaflet to print, being helped by Rosalie Le Riche, Mr Le Brocq's soon to be wife, Mulbach's desertion and the cottage bought for him to live in, Mulbach's attempt to blow up the camp and plans for the mutiny being curtailed as the result of liberation. Questions asked about what happened to Paul Mulbach, the people involved in resistance movements that existed and Mr Holmes, a shopkeeper who was alleged to be a spy for both the Nazis and the Allies, Polish soldiers in the German army, the camp at the bottom of Jubilee Hill, known as Lager Immelman, the return of the forced worker, Mariam Polski (?) to the island after the occupation, Russian bishops, visit to Ukraine, the experiences of the German prisoners of war and forced labourers after the occupation, whether he's thinking of writing his memoirs, whether he was ever picked up by the Germans, he talks about a member of the feldgendarmerie, Billy Mace, who warned Louisa Gould a search was coming but she was unable to get everything out, the experience of Harold Le Druillenec and the efficiency of the Nazis. [Same recording as items R/03/C/7 and R/03/C/8]

Reference: L/D/25/L/36

Date: April 13th 1988 - April 13th 1988

Talk by Bob Le Sueur to the Channel Islands Occupation Society entitled 'Foreign Workers of the Organisation Todt'. Introduction by the CIOS President with notices. Talks about his friendship with a number of Spanish and Russian foreign workers. the lack of facts in official records and distortions post liberation, the need to look at the occupation objectively, how the Russians were treated as slaves but other national groups although forced were paid, how the spaniards came to be in Jersey after the Spanish Civil War, the relatively high wages that they received which led to inflation of prices on the black market, the worth of reichsmarks, the currency used in Jersey during the occupation, Spaniards having suits made for them, where the Spaniards worked in St Brelade and their camps on either side of Route Orange, Mr Le Sueur socialising with the spanish labourers, Spanish men who lived in Longfield Avenue in St Brelade, going to Brown's Café with the Spaniards, the rations received by the Russians, tells the story of a Ukrainian who became an adopted Spaniard in France and from then on moved around with them, the description of the arrival of the Russian slave labours, tells the story of a Russian he got to know and his journey to Jersey, the camp at the bottom of Jubilee Hill, the story of Feodor Burrij he was punished after attempting to escape and was then successful and lived out the occupation being sheltered by various locals such as Louisa Gould, who was deported for it, and a flat in town, Nazi racist policy, the brutality of the Soviet regime and Stalin's directive that no Russian should be taken as a POW, the deaths of the Russian labourers in Jersey, the account of Peter Bokatenko, a Russian POW who after liberation told of Russian's being killed and buried by the roadside, interrogations ater the war by Major Hargreaves and a colleague at the British Hotel and the fact that the slave labourers talked of murder but were unable to offer evidence of this relying on hearsay, Russian POWs after the occupation and the reaction at home, what happened to them after the occupation and the experience of a particular Russian POW. Questions asked on the attempts by the OT to find their escaped prisoners, the story of Mr and Mrs Woodhall who sheltered two russians in a flat above the soldatenheim at the Mayfair Hotel for 18 months and what happened to Feodor Burrij. Michael Ginns talks about the condition of Russians and how Bob Le Sueur was given an award by the Russians for his bravery.

Reference: L/D/25/L/39

Date: October 13th 1993 - October 13th 1993

Recording from the BBC 1 South West TV broadcast entitled 'The Lonely War' with Bruce Parker, a former Guernsey resident, looking back at the occupation of the Channel Islands with people who experienced it. 1) Part 1: Battleships of Iron and Steel. Introduction to the islands, the reason that they were invaded and the realisation that they were defenceless. Subjects discussed include the decision to demilitarise the islands, the dilemma whether to be evacuated or not, the fact that the boat to Sark did not arrive, the evacuation of Alderney and Daphne Pope's decision to stay, the air raid on the harbours and the arrival of the Germans, newspapers printing german orders, the first impression of german soldiers, the situation in Sark as recounted by Dame Sybil Hathaway, restrictions being introduced, Raymond Falla, the President of the Agriculture Department and a member of the Controlling Committee telling of the job of the government in Guernsey, the experience of Frank Falla, a journalist on the Guernsey Star newspaper, resistance in the islands, the relationship with the german soldiers, Jerry Bags, the sending of Hubert Nicolle to Guernsey on an intelligence gathering raid and later raids, the execution of Francois Scornet, escapes from the islands, trying to get supplies, entertainments the confiscation of radios and the secret listening to the BBC and disseminating information, the sinking of HMS Charybdis and HMS Limbourne prompting thousands to go to the funerals, the deportations and the internment camps, the terrible conditions of workers brought in by the Organisation Todt, the arrival of the D-Day and the expected liberation which took a year to actually occur. 2) Part 2: Our Dear Channel Islands. From 1944 the increase of hardship as a result of being cut off from mainland Europe as well as Britain. Subjects discussed include Alderney and the exoeriences of Gordon Prigent, a Jerseyman who had been sent to work on the island and Daphne Pope, who stayed on the island, their relationships with the Germans, the conditions in the Organisation Todt camps in Alderney, the death of Daphne Pope's 2 year old son, Gordon Prigent being caught listening to the BBC, being put in the concentration camp and having to cope with the conditions, a report on HMS Rodney's attack on Alderney, Pope making friends with German soldiers and the question of collaboration, the difficulty of rationing and having to improvise for food and fuel, worsening health of old people as witnessed by Pearl Regan, the running out of medication and the onset of famine and disease, red cross messages, red cross parcels arriving with the SS Vega, Harold Le Druillenec's memories of deportation and liberation at Belsen camp, the celebration of liberation on the islands, an extract of Churchill's speech, a contemporary report by the BBC on the surrender of the German forces, Rex Ferbrache, a Guernseyman, being welcomed home, the disarming of German troops and being shipped out as POWs, investigations into the events in Alderney during the occupation and punishment, collaboration, the royal visit, rehabilitation and the effect occupation had on islanders.

Reference: L/D/25/L/40

Date: June 27th 1980 - July 4th 1980

Original audio cassette recording - see file description.

Reference: L/D/25/L/40/1

Date: June 27th 1980 - July 4th 1980

Occupation-BBC Radio Jersey tape. The story of the occupation of Jersey during World War 2 told by the people who lived through it produced by Beth Lloyd. 1) Part 13: The Todt Organisation and their Russian Slave Labourers. Eye witnesses talking about the background of the Organisation Todt, the arrival of the Russians on the island, the condition they were in, the brutality of their overseers, begging and stealing food, concentration camps, the Jersey Communist Party and other people giving shelter, food, clothes, false papers and english lessons with Mrs Metcalfe to escaped prisoners, the story of Louisa Gould, Harold Le Druillenec and Feodor Burrij and the experience of other residents who harboured escapees. 2) Part 14: Entertainment. Eye witnesses talking about the difficulties of the first show during the occupation put on by the Jersey Amateur Dramatics Club, cinemas and the films that were shown, variety entertainment at the Opera House, West's Cinema and out in the parishes, finding musicians, public dances, the Amateur Variety Band, the Green Room Club productions including pantomimes, easter productions and shows, improvisations with costumes and scenery and censorship of the shows. 3) Part 15: We Are At War. Eye witness accounts of feelings of isolation, seeing and hearing British and German aeroplanes, feeling and seeing bombing raids on the coast of France, leaflet raids, members of the royal air force being taken as prisoners of war, commando raid on Egypt, sabotage, the v sign campaign, resistance and reprisals, youth groups against the Germans, the British Patriots group and Norman Le Brocq and Leslie Huelin working with the Free Germany Movement represented by Paul Muelbach calling for a mutiny in the garrison. 4) Occupation Part 16: Escapes produced by Beth Lloyd made up of interviews of local people who were in Jersey during the Occupation. Subjects discussed include the escape of Denis Vibert to England in September 1941, tales of different escapes to France by islanders recounted by Eddie Le Corre, Basil Le Brun, Peter Crill, John Floyd, Roy Mourant and their subsequent experiences of interrogations by the Home Forces and arrival in England. 5) Part 17: D-Day and the Last Terrible Year. Eye witnesses talking about the realisation that D-Day was taking place, aeroplanes going over the island, lack of fuel and food supplies, health in island worsening, Red Cross parcels, the arrival and unloading of the SS Vega, starvation of German soldiers and waiting for liberation. 6) Part 18: Liberation. Eye witnesses including the bailiff talking about the change in the high command of the german administration and listening to Winston Churchill's speech, release of political prisoners, celebrations, surrender of Germans and arrival of royal navy officers. See R/06/4.

Reference: L/D/25/L/44

Occupation-BBC Radio Jersey tape. The story of the occupation of Jersey during World War 2 told by the people who lived through it produced by Beth Lloyd. 1) Part 15: We Are At War. Eye witness accounts of feelings of isolation, seeing and hearing British and German aeroplanes, feeling and seeing bombing raids on the coast of France, leaflet raids, members of the royal air force being taken as prisoners of war, commando raid on Egypt, sabotage, the v sign campaign, resistance and reprisals, youth groups against the Germans, the British Patriots group and Norman Le Brocq and Leslie Huelin working with the Free Germany Movement represented by Paul Muelbach calling for a mutiny in the garrison. 2) Part 10: There's Good and Bad in all Races. Eye witnesses talking about collaborators, Jerry Bags, informers, the actions of the Post Office to destroy anonymous denunciation letters or warn those who had been denounced, searches by german soldiers to follow up anonymous letters, relationships with and attitudes of the german soldiers. 3) Part 11: Government and God, How the States and the Church Survived. Eye witnesses talking about dissatisfaction with the local authorities, the difficulties faced by the bailiff Alexander Coutanche, confirming legislation in Jersey, rectors and Jurats members of the States, meetings of the States, rectors remaining in the parishes and services continuing, Canon Cohu being taken by the Germans for passing on the news from the radio, praying for the men who were fighting, banning of the Salvation Army and Jehovah Witnesses. 4) Part 12: Brushes with the German Authorities. Eye witnesses talking about being interrogated at Silvertide, experiences of confrontations with the german soldiers, being arrested and beaten, court martials and trials of local residents, listening to the radio and experiences in the prison at Gloucester Street. 5) Part 13: The Todt Organisation and their Russian Slave Labourers. Eye witnesses talking about the background of the Organisation Todt, the arrival of the Russians on the island, the condition they were in, the brutality of their overseers, begging and stealing food, concentration camps, the Jersey Communist Party and other people giving shelter, food, clothes, false papers and english lessons with Mrs Metcalfe to escaped prisoners, the story of Louisa Gould, Harold Le Druillenec and Feodor Burrij and the experience of other residents who harboured escapees. 6) Part 14: Entertainment. Eye witnesses talking about the difficulties of the first show during the occupation put on by the Jersey Amateur Dramatics Club, cinemas and the films that were shown, variety entertainment at the Opera House, West's Cinema and out in the parishes, finding musicians, public dances, the Amateur Variety Band, the Green Room Club productions including pantomimes, easter productions and shows, improvisations with costumes and scenery and censorship of the shows.

Reference: L/D/25/L/47

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