Publication entitled 'Wisbech at War' by Michael Burrell, published by the Wisbech Events Forum on behalf of the Town Council to commemorate the 60th anniversary of the end of the Second World War. Contains an account of Jack and Ada Willmott's evacuation from Jersey just before the German Occupation.

Reference: L/F/389/1

Date: 2005 - 2005

Copy photographs of Jack and Ada Willmott working on the potato harvest for an unknown Jersey farmer. The photos also include their young son Dennis and various other workers.

Reference: L/F/389/2

Date: 1940 - 1940

Audio Cassette containing 2 separate sound recordings. 1) Interview with an unidentified doctor regarding his experiences of the German Occupation. Includes: intended to leave the island and join the RAF - went back to the island to see to patients and was then caught by the occupation; petrol rationing; car requisitioned - used a bicycle; had little contact with German troops; German authorities were fairly cooperative in obtaining medical supplies; didn't interfere with his practice; all calves born in the island had to be turned over to the Germans; relates how one of the narator's cows had a calf, he and a friend took it to the surgery, killed it and distributed the meat to friends; communication by Red Cross letter erratic; talks about medical matters; when it was clear that Jersey would be occupied, diabetics were advised to leave island - most did, some didn't; when insulin became scarce all diabetics were put in one ward on a strict diet; most died from lack of insulin; later on a case of insulin was shippped over but on opening the box it was empty - it had been stolen for sale on the black marked; all the diabetics died; no operations were performed unless absolutely neccessary; talks about drugs supplied; most of the General Hospital taken over by Germans; trading on the black market - cornered the snuff market; when that ran out dried cherry leaves and other things were smoked; managed to obtain tobacco seeds and harvested tobacco for sale; food very scarce; tea made from sugar-beet pulp or bought on the black market; helped to hide an escpaed russian prisoner, George [George Koslov?] - got him an identity card from a dead patient; propaganda films shown at the cinema; no light for the last 2 years of occupation - no electricity, no oil for lighting, candles too expensive; anecdote about a farmer at Mont au Prêtre who escaped being caught with the carcass of a pig by hiding it under a sheet and saying it was the body of his dead mother; russian prisoners stealing from houses - one was run through with a pitchfork by a farmer named Le Gresley; brutal treatment of Russian prisoners; rationing, bread, butter, milk, other foods and shortages; livestock kept in houses to prevent theft; food traded on black market. 2) Narration by Captain Scott-Cole (?) regarding the Second World War and occupation. Includes: was a serving soldier, not in Jersey during the occupation; mother and sisters barely left the island in time; family silver was buried in the garden but it was never found again; house had been broken into and looted the day they left; honorary policeman stopped a man stealing a chest from the house and it was stored in the Parish Hall uintil the end of the war; house taken over by the Germans, used as a small regimental hospital; furntiture listed; the house was damaged after the Germans had left; animosity between islanders who had been in the occupation and those who had not; information on goods looted from the house, including a large number of brass and bronze hindu idols, some of which reappearred when the narrator's sister told neighbours that it was unlucky for anyone other than the owner to keep them. Poor sound quality. Recorded by Sue Scott Cole circa 1973, cassette copies made by the Jersey Heritage Trust in 1993. Duration 21 Minutes.

Reference: R/03/D/3

Date: 1941 - 1945

BBC Radio Jersey-Occupation Tapes. Told by the people who lived through it produced by Beth Lloyd. 1) Part 1: Preparing for the Inevitable. Alexander Coutanche talking about the surprise in the island when it was realised the island was not going to be defended and the evacuation was offered to the public. Eye witnesses talking about the panic of evacuation and the dilemma of whether to go or not, queuing to register, worry that the island was to be occupied, putting down of pets, Lord Coutanche being told to stay at his post and simplify the machinery of government, the potential blowing up of public utilities and the air raid on the island. 2) Part 2: The Germans Arrive. Eye witness accounts on seeing German planes flying low over the island and landing at the airport to begin the occupation, sending a message to the bailiff at the airport, meeting the germans for the first time, putting out white flags, demanding surrender, handing over the island, removal of the Union Jack from Fort Regent, BBC radio report on the start of the occupation, first impressions of the soldiers, germans buying food from the shops and the beginning of the paper war. 3) Part 3: Curbs on personal freedom. German orders being read out. Eye witnesses remember the losing of freedom, restrictions on vehicles, use of money paid for comandeered goods on essential supplies from France, orders against the use of coastal areas, changing side of the road to drive on, introduction and the experience of the curfew, life at the Evening Post, permits and other regulations. 4) Part 4: Food or the Lack of It. Poem on hunger. Eye witnesses talking about difficulty of lack of food and the improvisations with food, difficulty of feeding baby, difference between town and country people, suffering of women from malnutrition, children not knowing what food looked like, what people did to get by, food as subject of discussion, problem of lack of sugar and salt, use of potato flour, eating of seaweed, different methods of cooking and fuel, soup kitchens, bartering, farmers trying to get extra meat, getting extra eggs from chickens and keeping rabbits 5) Part 5: The wireless-Jersey's link with the outside world. Report by the BBC. Michael Ginns talking about eventual confiscation of radios. Eye witness accounts of v-signs at Rouge Bouillon, patrolling of district by islanders, confiscation and storage of radios, taking of radios from the parish hall, keeping of radios on threat of death, use of crystal radios sets, listening to the news, spreading of newsheets, the threat of being caught with radios and listening to tunes that had not been heard before the occupation 6) Part 6: Through the Eyes of a Child. Eye witness accounts of children and teenagers suffering a great deal, the fun children had, being hungry and cold, being without parents, relationships with german soldiers, schools continuing, difficulty of shortages of uniform, german lessons, soup kitchens, drilling on Victoria College playing fields, playing of sports, the Caerarean Tennis Club, riding on the german railway, mischief children got up to and scavenging for supplies.

Reference: R/06/2

Personal View of Senator Reg Jeune, President of the Education Committee. Born and brought up in Jersey-remembers difficult days of the late 1920s and 1930s-early life. Remembers a home with little money but very happy. It was a strict methodist home and his parents gave him a good start in life. His father had two hobbies-his garden and prize poultry. He got involved in his father's hobbies-he got involved with prize bantams in the local agricultural show. Has carried methodism throughout his life-has been a methodist local preacher for 40 years starting in 1942. Remembers the weather being nicer in his childhood-spent a lot of time on the beach and cycling around the island. Played tennis, watched cricket matches at the Victoria College Field when some of the top cricketers came to the island. Lived in Don Road and then in Georgetown as a child. He went to the De La Salle College-he was always encouraged to read books. He remembers going to the junior library with his mother where a Miss Priestley worked-never lost that interest. Thought that he may become a teacher but it was difficult getting grants at that time. His parents were ambitious for him-gave him a lot of encouragement. First Record-The Hallelujah Chorus from Handel's Messiah. Used to sing the piece of music in a choir-enjoyed being a chorister. At school-was interested in sport but was never particularly good. Left school to go into a bank-in waiting he went into Hill Street and then fell in love with law and took that up. Many of his fellow pupils went into a bank-it's much easier now. Studying was a struggle-graduated as a solicitor of the Royal Court of Jersey in 1945-a great deal of the examination was in French-was very difficult. Learnt French in order to be a solicitor. He was an office boy in Hill Street at first-used to collect rentes and write out contracts on parchment. Still sees the contracts that he used to write out. The occupation arrived-they were looking after people's affairs who had left the island-he started taking an active interest in cases after the second world war. It could take several years to study to qualify as a lawyer-took 6-8 years. Church took up quite a bit of time-choir and lay preaching. After he'd qualified he married in 1946 to Monica Valpy. Second Record-Flight of the Bumblebee by Rimsky-Korsakov. Hill Street was quiet during the occupation-had little to do-didn't experience hassle from the germans-helped look after people's affairs who had evacuated. He became a partner in a practice with two other men Helier Mourant and Clifford du Feu and created a company called Mourant, du Feu and Jeune-built up a substantial partnership. Started as a family practice until the financial scene came to Jersey-he became involved. It started around the early 1960s-he got interested when he got asked advice and he gradually became interested. He became chairman of the Youth Movement in 1947 and was involved in other organisations such as the Rotary Club-was interested in politics. Has always been interested in education and youth services. At one point thought that he may have gone into the church-if the occupation hadn't come along he may have done. Hadn't travelled much at this time-he'd been to Guernsey in England and that was all-after he qualified the opportunities to travel increased. He has now made many travels including extensively around the United States of America. Third Record-The Grand March from Verdi's Aida. Has been involved as much as possible with his family-his eldest son is a partner with him who has two daughters, his second son is London and has become an actor and his daughter is a jewellery designer who has come back to Jersey. Encouraged his son to read law. Tried to become a States member of St Helier No 2 District in the late 1950s but was unsuccessful. In 1962 he was successful in a by-election of St Helier No 3 District. Wasn't put off going into the States when he didn't get in the first time. Strange to go into the States especially in a by-election-the house was already set. Was nervous and excited the first time he spoke in the States despite having done a lot of public speaking in his job and church. After six months became president of the Public Works Committee-he had attacked the spending of money at the time especially for the tunnel-the money got thrown out and as a result two committees resigned-the Island Development Committee and the Public Works Committee and he became president of the Public Works Committee-he had been president of major committee ever since. Investigated the traffic problems in St Helier and eventually decided there should be a tunnel built under Fort Regent. Fourth Record-Le Rocquier School Band with Rock Around the Clock. Has a great love of music and books-still reads a lot despite working hard. The law firm has grown-he has become detached from the day to day business of the firm-tries to get there as much as possible-misses it. Became involved with the Trustees Savings Bank-joined the local board about 25 years previously and then became chairman of the Jersey Savings Bank, chairman of the Channel Islands Savings Bank and then elected to the board in London. Goes to two meetings a month in London. Received the OBE for his services to the savings banks-was very thrilled. Enjoyed going to Buckingham Palace to receive the award. Wants Jersey to retain its character but not to be insulated-he's chairman of the Executive Committee of the Commonwealth Parliamentary Association and involved with the French side of the parliamentarians. Fifth Record-Treorky Male Voice Choir. Has been involved in bringing an ombudsman into the States-succeeded-there is now a Review Tribunal. Doesn't have many more great ambitions in the States-is at the service of the States. Thinks it would be almost impossible to set higher education up in Jersey-Highlands College and what it offers with further education is about the limit that Jersey can expect. End of Side One. Personal View of Senator Ralph Vibert, interviewed by Beth Lloyd. Is the father of the house and president of the Finance Committee. At school-pictures that he would be a teacher-went to Victoria College in the 1920s-was captain of the football and head prefect. Didn't get a scholarship to Oxford University-Lord Coutanche was reorganising the States departments and set up the Law Officers-he became a secretary for the Attorney General-decided to become a lawyer. Was secretary to Lord Coutanche during the day and studied law in the evening. Was called to the bar in 1933/34-set up a private practice on his own. First Record-Welcome Song of the Maori People of New Zealand. Has not been to New Zealand but his daughter has. Has travelled a great deal-enjoys it. Had a law practice in Hill Street in the 1930s-business was quite slow-people paid on time. His first client was the late Senator Edward Le Quesne who was trying to get compensation from a shipping company when a boat broke down travelling to France. In the 1930s became interested in the movement of Moral Rearmament-was given a new conception of Christianity-it enables Christians to work with other people of faith throughout the world. Moral Rearmament took part in the bringing of democracy to Zimbabwe. Second Record-Unofficial National Anthem of all of Africa. He is well known in the Swiss village of Caux because it is the world conference centre of Moral Rearmament. Believes that when people work together good things come of it. His wife and he went to Zimbabwe to help friends-they had met Alec Smith-the son of a prime minister and a drug addict-through the attention of Kit Prescott, a friend, he stopped being an addict and became a leading statesman. During the occupation he evacuated in order to enlist-his wife was undecided-in the end she decided to leave. His wife had a baby and he joined up-got into a school of cipher breaking-60 pupils were in the first ever course held on this and only 3 were good enough-he didn't make the grade but they wanted people who could speak french and could teach ciphers to people in the field who were behind enemy lines. Later moved to India to become instructor training people to work behind enemy lines. Worked for the Special Operations Executive-met Maurice Buckmaster who was head of the French Section. His brother Denis escaped to England during the occupation and then joined the Royal Air Force. Third Record-Beethoven's Fifth Symphony. When the war was finished he helped clear up with the courts and then he got back in late 1946. Went back into his law practice. He became solicitor-general in 1948 until 1955-decided not to continue to become bailiff-had differences with the attorney-general Cecil Harrison and decided to leave. Believes those years were wasted years-he could have built up a practice at that time. Went back into private practice with his younger brother. Decided to go into politics because he wanted a hand in running the island. Fourth Record-Mozart's Piano Sonata No 11. His wife, Muriel Vibert, née Le Gros, has been a big support all his life. Became a deputy for St Brelade in 1955 and 2 years later became a senator in an uncontested by-election. Has always been invited onto committees-the sudden death of George Troy led him to become President of Defence, the collapse of the Establishment Committee led to him taking it on and the sudden death of Cyril Le Marquand led to him being President of Finance. Also was President of the Common Market Committee. Constant change of personnel in the States-new wave of people coming to the States typified by Senator Shenton who have brought new life to the States and a desire to do things quickly. Thinks more businessmen should be in the States but it's difficult as they are often too busy to get to States sittings. Dislikes important decisions being rushed through without due consideration. Likes the Jersey system-believes it's a very democratic system. Likes the tradition of the honorary system. Instigated the concept of a minimum income for States members-people could become members of the States without fear of financial difficulties-wouldn't like to see all the States members becoming professionals. Believes the parishes should keep their autonomy. Fifth Record-Manhattan Beach by Sousa. As a hobby he enjoyed playing tennis, likes to garden and play with the grandchildren. One of his daughters is a freelance photographer-became interested in photography. Was awarded the OBE in 1977 and became father of the house in 1980-has no more political ambitions. Believes Jersey's political future should be secure. Sixth Record-An Anglican Hymn. Commentary on the Battle of Britain Red Arrow display by Squadron Leader Henry Ploszek. Talks about the distance that the Red Arrows stay away from each other in the display, the training for formation flying, as manager he organises the administrative duties. End of Side Two.

Reference: R/07/B/11

Date: 1982 - 1982

Personal View of Deputy Jean Le Maistre interviewed by Malcolm Gray. Was born in Millbrook at the maternity hospital and lived most of his life in St Ouen. He is called Jean and his brothers have French names-François and Edouard. His family took part in farming. Had a fortunate and happy childhood-had lots of space to play and a good community and family spirit. St Ouen has a strong community spirit but so do the other parishes. His father's life has been devoted to the recording of the Jersey language-was brought up speaking jèrriais. Went to school at the age of 5 not knowing a word of english. Jèrriais is a dying language-is a shame because it's part of our identity. There are parish variations of the language-have evolved over the centuries-the language is very rich. First Record-'Going Home' by The Shadows. Got involved in youth club work-was a member of a youth club at St George's Church. Moved on to help in youth clubs-became a youth leader in St Ouen at 17 and then moved to youth work in town at the Cellar Club in Hope Street-worked there for about 5 years-led on to his involvement in the Jersey Youth Movement-became statutory in 1973 and became its first chairman. The Jersey Youth Movement was the precursor to the Jersey Youth Service. At that point there was a lack of facilities. Got to know Cliff Richard through his church work-met him in 1969-came to his wedding. Met him in Israel in 1972 through his overseas aid work. Second Record-'Help it Along' by Cliff Richard. Religion has played a large part in his life-never considered becoming a minister but has always been involved in the church. Believes you should go to church to be a christian-you need to share your faith. Lay people are more involved in services now-he has taken part in some services but doesn't believe that is his role-was an almoner at St George's for 17 years. Second Record-Roy Castle with 'The Bread of Life'. Has travelled a great deal-had a prayer breakfast with Ronald Reagan in Washington. Has visited the Middle East especially Israel-Israel is a very enjoyable place-has organised trips to Israel-has been 14 or 15 times. Israel has had problems but he is quite happy to go because he feels safe. Third Record-'We Have Brought You Greetings'-a traditional jewish greeting song. Has been in the States of Jersey for 15 years-has enjoyed being in the States-wanted to get into the States to help with the youth service and agriculture. Agriculture has been in a difficult state-served on the Agriculture Committee for 6 years under Senator Binnington. Has been President of the Postal Committee and served on the Education Committee. Working in the States takes up a lot of time-your family have to be understanding. Is worried about the States members workload-has lodged a proposition to try and solve this. Wants to keep the honorary system but wants it to be easier for people to come forward and stand. Was born in St Ouen but has always represented St Helier as a deputy-has always worked in St Helier and has served No 3 District where he lived for 8 years. Has not thought about coming a senator at the moment. Fourth Record-Tune from a visiting African choir. Has been president of the Overseas Aid Committee for about 9 years-important to send money and good will. Loves Africa and the African people-they suffer difficulties not of their making-couldn't help but feel emotionally affected. Took the media on a trip in order to experience the conditions in Africa. Fifth Record-Born Free. End of Side One. Personal View of Deputy Jack Roche interviewed by Malcolm Gray in his garden and at Fort Regent. Was born in Jersey in 1924 in Providence Street. Had one brother and three sisters-lived in Charles Street for many years-had a brother Lewis who has passed away and three sisters called Ena, Mavis and Dorothy. His father died 6 months after he was born-was a financial struggle-his mother used to run a shop in Charles Street. Schooled at St Mark's at La Motte Street-one of the teachers was Deputy Arthur Carter. Left school at 14 and then about a year later they evacuated as war broke out. First Record-String of Pearls. His first job was at Bisson Cycle Shop which was then in Halkett Place-worked there for 12 months when the evacuation took place. Travelled as a family except his brother who had just started a business-mainly cargo boats took them across-the journey from Jersey to Weymouth took about 36 hours-it was a very difficult journey. They moved to Bury, went into some brand new houses and they were treated very kindly by the people of the north. Spent the rest of the work years in Bury-got into a reserved occupation-he joined the Air Training Corps and then the war ended. Six weeks after the island was liberated he came back home. Second Record-'A Man and a Woman'. Worked with his brother after liberation-was an electrician by trade but during the war he had invented a machine to process tobacco so he started to work on that. Once commercial cigarettes started coming into the island he was offered a job by W A Nichollas on Commercial Buildings-started work on 3rd February 1946-still with them-started as an office boy and is now the boss. Has become the Jersey Coal Distributors-used to store coal at Fort Regent-he is now the President of the Fort Regent Development Committee. His brother used to work from home in St Clement. The States of Jersey wanted Fort Regent back so a number of companied decided to build a coal store and from this they became one company. Met his wife Joan Norman at the office when he joined in 1946-they were married in 1950 and have one daughter Patricia and one granddaughter Rebecca. Decided to go into the States after getting rid of the business at Commercial Buildings-at first he spent a lot of time gardening. An opportunity came when Len Nightingale retired from the district and he and John Le Gallais, his next door neighbour, decided to stand and both got in. States work takes up enough time as members allow it-if you have spare time you can fill it in the States but if you work you can work it to fill your schedule. He sits on Finance and Economics Committee, the Prison Board, vice-President of the Housing Committee and President of the Fort Regent Development Committee. Is also a States appointed director of the Jersey New Waterworks Company and is chairman of the Joint Advisory Council. Has been vice-president of the Public Works Committee under Senator John Le Marquand Public Health Committee under Senator Gwyneth Huelin. Was Vice-President and then President of Jersey Telecoms, President of the Gambling Control Committee and Etats Civil. During his nearly 12 years he has sat on Agriculture and Fisheries, Tourism, Legislation, Establishment, Broadcasting, was a member of the Executive Committee of the Commonwealth Parliamentary Association. Before joining the States sat on the Agricultural Loans Board. In 12 years he has sat on a number of committees-believes members should move around as much as possible in order to see the way the States run. People are invited onto a committee by the president but they can express a desire to go onto that committee. Believes that people who work in the States from businesses will be able to cope with the work and that employers should be sympathetic. Some people would be able to become a full time member of the States in the future. Believes in the honorary system-thinks it could be problematic if people give up their jobs and don't get elected and as a result get in financial difficulty. Third Record-The Waltz from Masquerade by Khachaturian. Jack Roche and Malcolm Gray go to Fort Regent and are greeted by Humphrey, the mascot of Fort Regent. Go into the Rotunda of the Fort-he has been President of the Fort Regent Development Committee for 4 years-appointed a new chief officer Graeme Pitman. Fort Regent has been renovated in the piazza and the funfair and now in the rotunda. Great shows have been put on in the piazza. Fort Regent is sports orientated. Some big names have performed in the Gloucester Hall. Used to use the parade ground as a coal store and he has now gone in a complete circle and finds himself as the president of the facility as a whole. People's attitudes have changed towards the centre-there are 18,000 members. Fourth Record-Shirley Bassey singing Goldfinger. When the rotunda is completed it will become a multi purpose hall for sport and entertainment. There is more than one level in the rotunda-the roof covers 3 acres in total. The cost of the refurbishment will be £1.8 million for the rotunda. Have recently had the 10 millionth visitor to Fort Regent. Fifth Record-Tchaikovsky's 1812 Overture.

Reference: R/07/B/12

Date: 1987 - 1987

BBC Radio Jersey-Occupation Tapes. Told by the people who lived through it produced by Beth Lloyd. Part 1: Preparing for the Inevitable. Alexander Coutanche talking about the surprise in the island when it was realised the island was not going to be defended and the evacuation was offered to the public. Eye witnesses talking about the panic of evacuation and the dilemma of whether to go or not, queuing to register, worry that the island was to be occupied, putting down of pets, Lord Coutanche being told to stay at his post and simplify the machinery of government, the potential blowing up of public utilities and the air raid on the island. See R/06/2.

Reference: R/07/F1/1

Date: April 15th 1990 - April 15th 1990

Numbers of evacuees from the Channel Islands to Bickerton Church of England Primary School.

Reference: SL 433/5030/2

Date: 1939 - 1940

JEP newscutting about some letters written during the occupation to Alice Le Quesne, including one from her sister who was an evacuee and one from a friend in an internment camp - 08/05/2009

Reference: US/586

Date: 2009 - 2009

JEP Newscutting - article about an Occupation evacuee Gordon Housman's visit to Jersey - 12/08/2010

Reference: US/715

Date: 2010 - 2010

JEP Newscutting - article about an Occupation evacuee, Florence Alice Humphrys, née Searle, who delivered a baby in the hold of one of the final boats to leave Jersey before the German invasion - 06/08/2010

Reference: US/716

Date: 2010 - 2010

Jersey Evening Post Newscutting: A book entitled 'Jersey Evacuees Remember' recalls the experiences of Island families fleeing the occupying Nazi forces.

Reference: US/922

Date: July 1st 2011

Jersey Evening Post Newscutting: Pat Dubras is one Islander who recalls her experience as a wartime evacuee.

Reference: US/923

Date: July 7th 2011

Jersey Evening Post Newscutting: The book, 'Jersey Evacuees Remember', which contains the memories of children evacuated from the island with their parents in June 1940, is launched t the Town Hall.

Reference: US/924

Date: June 28th 2011

Jersey Evening Post Newscutting: In Stockport a commemorative plaque has been errected remembering children from Jersey and Guernsey who were evacuated to the area during World War II . Eric Bath from Stockport studied at Belmond Secondary School with some of the students. He would very much like to meet any of the evacuees still living in Jersey when he visits the island.

Reference: US/940

Date: August 17th 2011

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