Photographic slide of a display of three diagrams showing Britain and France with the Channel Islands magnified. Part of the Channel Island Exhibition at the Commonwealth Institue

Reference: P/09/A/4066

Date: September 30th 1983 - September 30th 1983

Photographic slide of a display of three diagrams showing Britain and France with the Channel Islands magnified. Part of the Channel Island Exhibition at the Commonwealth Institue

Reference: P/09/A/4067

Date: September 30th 1983 - September 30th 1983

Sound recording of a speech given at the launch of 'All for the King', a biography of Sir George Carteret published by the Société Jersiaise, and the unveiling of a plaque commemorating Sir George Carteret's birth. Recorded at the Post Office, Broad Street, on 14/10/1976. Duration 26 minutes. Good sound quality, with some print-through at the start.

Reference: R/03/C/9

Date: October 14th 1976 - October 14th 1976

Sound recording of a speech in which Lord Coutanche talks to the Société Jersiaise about the consequences of the Norman Conquest on the occasion of the 900th anniversary of Jersey's attachment to the crown. Good sound quality. Originally recorded 1966, copied in 1993.

Reference: R/03/E/1

Date: 1966 - 1966

Personal View of Michael Day, Director of the Jersey Heritage Trust, interviewed by Beth Lloyd. Was not interested in museums or collecting as a child-was interested in collecting train numbers. Got a passion for football-wanted to be a goalkeeper for Aston Villa-played for local league team. Was born in Nottingham-a midlander. Went to Nottingham High School from 8-18-a public school and got the exams he needed to get. Enjoyed part of his school days-got involved in things with enthusiasm-responded to the teachers-struggled at history at school. Enjoyed sport-his father played cricket throughout his life-is interested in all sports. He has a brother who is 2½ years younger than him who is an equestrian competitor. When he went into sixth form he wanted to get into languages but then realised he didn't like them-applied to do English at Leeds University. First Record-Some Kinda Wonderful by The Q-Tips. Enjoys modern rock music. Was nervous about University but when he realised people were feeling the same he was alright. He read English but as an option he took a course on folk life studies which he got really interested in-pursued this interest avidly which led him to museums. Was interested in folk music-in the early 70s he collected songs. At the end of his first year went to Norwich and went to a museum which he was impressed by-at the end of his second year decided to write to museums for work and got a job as a paid volunteer in Bristol on an exhibition project and went back at the end of his third year thinking museums was where he wanted to work. After six weeks of work a job came up in the museum that had first inspired him in Norwich and he applied for it and got it. The folk life studies was a world view with a particularly celtic view-thinks a lot of it has become less relevant to people's lives. People want to get back to their roots and traditions-especially in Jersey. Second Record-Emmylou Harris, Dolores Keane and Mary Black performing The Grey Funnel Line. His life has been full of coincidences that led him to museums and Jersey. People were supportive in the museum profession. He was allowed to do displays, enquiries and tours as a student. At Norwich he started as Trainee Assistant in Social History and then he moved through the museum-he gradually moved towards things he was interested in like trade and industrial subjects. Museums and social history cover a great range of topics-has a breadth of experience. Became particularly interested in urban industrial history which he researched and lectured in-the 1970s was a period that was changing from the Industrial Age to the Post-Industrial Age-factories were being closed down at that time. Museums have changed in the past 20 years-has different ideas from when he started-thinks museums are now more directed towards the users. There are no limits on museums-just need an imagination. Was interested in the Caen Museum-he enjoyed it because it challenged him-there will be a need to connect to people in the future. There's a need to be educational but without being didactic. Has never been a great museum visitor-goes for a professional point of view-many don't appeal to him. In Norwich his career was progressing gradually-knew the city very well-had no desire to leave but his opportunities would have been limited if he had stayed. Was aware of the things happening in Ironbridge and he applied for the job and got it. He was a curator of Social History and manager of Blist's Hill Open Air Museum-a recreated late 19th century town. It was his first experience of management-it was very challenging and threatening-a difficult culture to work in. Third Record-Sylvia Sass singing an opera aria. Ironbridge was one of the most exciting times of his life professionally-built 8 new recreated buildings in his 3½ years working there including a bakery which is what his father did. His experience at Ironbridge will help him when dealing with Hamptonne. He got confidence from the project management training he undertook. Has had some training in management since Ironbridge. Is not very patient but has had to develop it. He is very enthusiastic in his work. Decided to move from Ironbridge to Jersey-was interested in setting up the organisation and a museum. Was interviewed for the job-expressed some concerns about the job and was forthright in his approach and got the job. Has no regrets now although the first year was difficult and frustrating. The new museum was due to have started being built before he arrived but it was caught up in a political debate and was delayed. In Jersey there is a pressure cooker atmosphere because it is a small place-he represented change and was seen as a threat. The people who were arranging the new arrangements between the Jersey Heritage Trust and the Société Jersiaise contributed greatly in solving the situation. There was an agreement meeting towards the end of 1987 at the end of his first year when it was agreed and if it hadn't been he would have left-gradually it started to be turned around. Is very proud for all the people that have helped that the Museum is running. Fourth Record-If I Had a Boat by Lyle Lovett. Sails in order to relax-sails competitively. Enjoys playing badminton and listening to music and likes to juggle. Has ambitions in his personal and professional life but is looking forward to the unexpected. Fifth Record-You Are Everything by REM.

Reference: R/07/B/16

Date: June 28th 1992 - June 28th 1992

Personal View of Leslie Sinel, former Jersey Evening Post employee and occupation historian. Born in St Helier in 1906. Involved with people around you-knew everybody in the district-different today. His father was a saddler-used to do jobs at different farms-got to love horses. Not many vehicles around-1920 no one on the Jersey Evening Post owned a private car. Newspaper was distributed by horse-1910-got two delivery cars with open sides so delivery people could throw the paper out of the car. Went to the Jersey National School-church school-difficult but accepted it. Jersey french not taught in schools-French was taught-headmistress Miss Bennett was tough but she taught everybody how to read and write. First Record-The Trumpet Voluntary by Jeremiah Clarke-used to listen to it during the occupation on crystal radio sets. Childhood-holidays coincided with the potato season-worked at T & J Moor and the Great Western Railway. At 14 joined the Jersey Evening Post-father got him the job-started as an apprentice printer-Wolfdale printing machines. Newspaper only means of communication at the time. Jersey Evening Post used to be distributed by horses-1910 got first car. Newspaper printed at 3.30 so people could catch the train from Snow Hill to Gorey at 4 o'clock. 1920-took 3 hours to print 7,500 newspapers, today can print 23,000 in three quarters of an hour. Newspapers dropped off at each station both east and west. Exciting to go on the train as a child-sad but inevitable that the railways went when buses were brought in. Tourism in the summer of the 1920s and 1930s-not comparable with today-people used to stay longer. St Brelade popular for tourists. Second Record-the Radetzky March by Strauss. Radio-what he used to listen to. 1930s-became a proof reader at the Jersey Evening Post and wrote some articles-never had an ambition to become a journalist-worked mostly from the printing side. Newspapers today good quality but reporting is 'muck raking' now. Media today-good variety-modern way of life. Spent 15 years as a Constables Officer and Vingtenier in St Saviour and 21 years in St Helier as a churchwarden and on the Welfare Board and on the Battle of Flowers' Association and Jersey Eisteddfod-always involved in something. Honorary policeman-got fed up with job at the time of the prowler-stayed out watching farms at nights. Queen came-did Government House duty all night. Mostly traffic duties. States Police and Honorary Police can work together. Never wanted to leave Jersey-some travelling on the Continent. Has lived in St Helier and St Saviour. Not the same parochialism today. First buses here-used to run through Bagot-used to call it the 'Orange Box'. The JMT and Red Band Bus-opened up the island-created more movement in the island. 1925-1930s-motor cars increased in number. Third Record-Zadoc the Priest from the Coronation Anthem. Second world war-Germans swept across France getting closer to Jersey-hoped nothing would happen but thought it would. Government realised it was impossible to defend and pulled out. Germans took the island-no alternative-no question of resistance-couldn't have sabotage during the occupation-where could you go? Repercussions on other islanders. Had a guilt complex-felt if he'd gone away he may have been able to do something but if everybody had left the island it would have been destroyed. Decided against evacuation-two of his family left but the rest stayed. Continued to work at the Jersey Evening Post-censored by the Germans but the staff used to resist. On the surface looked to be agreeing with them but were resisting. Was asked to put an article in the newspaper but he took three days off and burned it. Fourth Record-Vidor's Toccata and Fugue. During the occupation worked on a farm in the afternoon-used to get some extra food-learned how to make sugar beet syrup. Meat was scarce-used to get some on the black market-used to be expensive but nothing on the price today. Used to listen to the radio every morning-every hour on the hour-would listen until 9 in the morning-used to leave the house and people would tell him the news-everybody knew it. Used to type out 3 copies of the news-took one to Captain Robin of Petit Menage, one to the Jersey Evening Post and kept one. Many people listened to the radio-he would have been prosecuted for disseminating the news. Used to find out news from German soldiers. Fifth Record-To be a Pilgrim. Liberation-can't talk about it without emotion. Enjoyed life since the war-is retired but very active. Enjoys writing-historical and local events. Would have liked to have been a teacher. End of Side One. Personal View with Jack(John) Herbert interviewed by Beth Lloyd, the war time Airport Commander. Enjoyed working at the Jersey Airport. Was born in Bath and went to Green Park College in Bath. Was part of the choir in Bath but gave up his music-difficult to choose music for the programme. Came over to Jersey at 11-his father was an engineer on a ship-his mother wanted him to stay on shore. Worked in Bath and the Piers and Harbours Committee of 1923 advertised for a harbour engineer. Was learning about law but ended up sailing instead- helped the fishermen Tommy and Charlie King and helped the pilots in St Helier Harbour. First Record-Underneath the Arches by Flanagan and Allen. After leaving school joined his father at the Harbour Office. Worked as clerk dealing with harbour dues-counted the passengers coming in. On the Albert Pier with Captain Furzer-a ship collided with the Albert Pier-harbour had to be dredged. Mr Bill Thurgood visited the island-decided to set up an aeroplane route-administration of the aeroplanes were placed under the auspices of the Piers and Harbour Committee-staff had to check beach. First flight took place on the 18th December 1933 from Jersey to Portsmouth. The beach was cleared of people-a great local event. Had a refueler and a coach for the office work. Had to be an English customs officer, Bill Ivy, and a Jersey customs officer, Harold Robins. No aeroplane dues-the aeroplanes used to pay harbour dues. Aeroplane had a tragic accident-a little boy was sitting on the beach and was killed and a coach got trapped on the beach and was swamped by the sea. Second Record-Stranger on the Shore. Used to create a weather report at the Harbour Office by letting a balloon go into the air and timing it going in to cloud cover. Sites inspected to build Jersey Airport-a site at Grosnez turned down. Site at St Peter decided-problem with fog. No other suitable place in the island for it. Jersey Airport-Piers and Harbour Committee was put in charge of the Airport being built-plans were approved-there were four runways-Jersey Airways ran from Jersey to Portsmouth and Jersey to Heston. Air France went from the Jersey Airport. Third Record-Glenn Miller and American Patrol. Second world war-all messages came in code. Bill Lawford-an air traffic control officer came over. Had to camouflage the airport. Jersey Airways staff evacuated-was in charge of the evacuation-no panic at the Airport to get off the island-between 400-600 left by the Airport. Was ordered to stay at his post, Chris Phillips, an air traffic controller, was called back to the royal navy. Late May some French air force plane with two highly ranked officers and a ground crew. The morning of the 1st June in his office when he saw a german plane fly over and dropped a container-it was addressed to the Bailiff of Jersey. German landed and spoke to the Bailiff-wanted the island to be handed over later that afternoon-put up white flags. Jack Herbert told to cut off the electricity supply-had shipped all their radios to Bristol. Fourth Record-Luftwaffe March. Jack Herbert was transferred to the Transport Office in Bond Street during the occupation-converted some vehicles to use gas as fuel-had to improvise to create fuel as it was in such short supply. Fifth Record-It Must be Him by Vikki Carr. Liberation-transferred back to the Jersey Airport on May 10th 1945-airfields were mined and booby traps-were cleared. German officer detailed to cut the grass at the Airport. Royal air force officer was in charge of Airport and it was handed over 2nd October 1945. Civil aviation picked up between 1948 and 1952. The airport was tarmacked in 1952-the material came from the excavation of the Jersey Underground Hospital. The Jersey Airport became the second busiest airport in Britain in the 1960s. Was presented with an MBE by the Queen in 1974 and retired in 1975.

Reference: R/07/B/3

Date: 1982 - 1982

Visit of His Royal Highness the Duke of Edinburgh to the St John's Youth and Community Centre to open the Billy Butlin Memorial Hall commentated on by Mike Vibert on 29/03/1983. Description of the visit of the Prince, a description of the youth centre, children playing badminton, all the St John's School pupils at the event, Le Rocquier Band playing the national anthem. The main building of the centre was open on September 7th 1980 by Wilfred Tomes. Diane Smith commentates outside the centre waiting for the Prince to arrive describing the crowd. Famous visitors to the opening. Cost of the centre-£300,000. Mike Vibert-Duke's 6th visit to the island-describes the other visits. Diane Smith-Prince Philip's car just pulled up-accompanied by Sir Peter Whiteley and Sir Frank Ereaut, the Lieutenant Governor and Bailiff. Welcomed by Constable John Le Sueur and Lady Sheila Butlin, Mrs Le Sueur, Deputy Fred le Brocq, Senator Reg Jeune, head of the Education Committee-unveils the plaque. Prince being guided around the centre. Sees squash being played by Gillian Ferguson and her father and coach Doug Ferguson. Doug Ferguson talking about coaching his daughter, the championships she holds, how she feels about playing in front of Prince Philip. Prince Philip then making his way to the scout room to see demonstrations by the scouts. Beth Lloyd commentating on the Prince's visit to the scout room, Prince Philip meeting Colonel Bill Hall, the Scout Commissioner, talking about the different activities the scouts take part in, looking at tying knot demonstrations, first aid demonstrations, trip to Kenya to build a community building there, Duke of Edinburgh leaves the scout room. Mike Vibert-Duke of Edinburgh viewing a game of badminton, Barry Smith says who is playing in the demonstration games and the badminton club. Famous guests Morecambe and Wise, Dickie Henderson and Danny La Rue. Diane Smith-Prince entering club room, describing the club room. Mike Vibert-Prince standing on the balcony looking at the hall watching the men's badminton. Diane Smith-Prince introduced to the president and chairperson of the Jersey Flower Club Leah Samson and Viola Trenchard who helped decorate the centre. Diane Smith talking to Leah Samson and Viola Trenchard about the amount of members involved in arranging the flowers for the decoration, the time it took, the kind of flowers used and the theme of the decoration, the club which has been going since 1960 with almost 200 members, raising money for charity, organising flower and church festivals and fundraisers and the Woman's Institute of the island deciding to set up the Jersey Flower Club. Prince Philip leaving the club room-heading to the Billy Butlin Memorial Hall. Mike Vibert-waiting for the royal party to enter, La Rocquier School Band play the national anthem. Prince Philip being introduced to the officials of the Centre including Centenier Carl Hinault and Daphne Hinault, Mr and Mrs Angus Spencer-Nairn, Mr and Mrs Richard Dupré. Prince Philip meets officials of St John's School Ron Smith and David Rogers and meeting the school's football team. Meets celebrities and the Committe of the Centre, the Duke of Edinburgh award scheme winners. Speech made about the Duke of Edinburgh award scheme and each person is called up to collect their awards including Russell Gibaut, Steven Davidson, Duncan Gibaut, Steven Rondel, Alan Cadoret, Lloyd Pinel and Collette Le Riche. Constable of St John, John Le Sueur making a speech about the centre. Prince Philip making a speech about the Duke of Edinburgh award scheme and the opening of the centre. The Royal Party departing and an overview of the rest of the programme being undertaken by the Duke of Edinburgh. The bailiff giving a speech about the islanders leaving to take part in the Falklands War wishing them luck and a safe return. Recording of Winston Churchill's speech announcing Victory in Europe including the liberation of 'our dear Channel Islands'. End of Side One. Personal View of Joan Stevens interviewed by Beth Lloyd. Talking about her love of history. Had a happy childhood-was an only child. In the early years moved around a lot as her father was in the army-moved wherever her father's regiment was sent. Moved back to Jersey when she was 12. Jersey became home quickly-lived in Les Pins in Millbrook. Went to school at Jersey College for Girls-was smaller in those days-arrived with French being her worst subject and left with it being her best thanks to Miss Holt. After leaving school went to a family in Lausanne, Switzerland to practice her french. When she came back she got a job at the Société Jersiaise Museum as a secretary typist-became fond of the museum. First Record-Scarlet Ribbons by Kenneth McKellar. Went to West Park Pavilion as a girl and went surfing. Met her husband, Charles Stevens, soon after starting at the museum. He was about to go to Africa with the Administration Service. Met five times before they got engaged and then he went away for 3 years-was love at first sight. Knew he was coming back and so didn't mind that he went away-got married as soon as he got back and then went straight back to Zambia. He travelled around the country-went with him on tour but after having children didn't go with him. Had a number of servants. Enjoyed life in Africa in retrospect but longed for Jersey. Was out in Africa during the occupation. Second world war-was worried about everybody in Jersey-was 18 months before they discovered there second son was born. Heard from them through the red cross messages. War didn't touch them directly in Zambia but saw a great deal of troop movements-was a transit camp-helped the troops as they passed through. Second Record-Impatience by Schubert. Came back to Jersey on leave after the war to see her family in 1947. Came back for good in 1949 so the children could be educated. Her time was taken up with bringing up the family. Took part in some farming on their farm in St Mary on a modest scale. Started researching into old Jersey houses and decided to write a book on the subject. Researched by talking to people in Jersey. Wrote Old Jersey Houses and then 'Victorian Voices'-the Sumner family had papers in their house Belle Vue-gave it to the Museum and was asked to catalogue it. It was made up mainly of the diaries and letter books of Sir John Le Couteur and his family. Books about Jersey don't traditionally sell well but her 'Short History' sold well. Third Record-Silver Swan by Orlando Gibbons. Interested in Jerseymen from the past but wouldn't write about it because it has been covered by Mr Balleine's Biographical Dictionary. Her favourite historical Jersey figure is Sir John Dumaresq who was the lieutenant bailiff-an important figure of the time-was Sir John Le Couteur's grandfather-was the head of the liberal party in Jersey-was a great orator-was sent to plead for the island on 23 occasions-kept diaries in the late 1700s and showed a very human side. Had a large family that he brought up after his wife died when his family was still quite young. Collects a lot of information about individuals and then puts it together to form a picture. Fourth Record-The Gondeliers with 'Take a Pair of Sparkling Eyes'. Balleine's History-it had been out of print for 20 years and nothing had replaced it so they decided to rewrite Balleine-decided to reprint it with additions-things that have happened since Mr Balleine had written and the need to emphasise certain aspects of the book. Marguerite Syvret and her worked together-good to work as a team. Added a great deal but it was woven in to the text. Mr Balleine was not very good at listing his sources and so they had to find all of the sources that he mentioned. Brought out a book with Richard Mayne called 'Jersey Through the Lens' with photographs and explanations. She is working with Jean Arthur on the place names of Jersey. Has three sons in England and a daughter in Jersey-one son is an architect, one is in the Homes Office and one is a freelance cabinetmaker-she tries to see her grandchildren as much as possible. Fifth Record-Danny Kay with Inch Worm. Her daughter lives with her in Jersey-she teaches riding. Jersey has changed a lot-the pressure of population. Believes there is a need to give something back to the community. At the Société Jersiaise Museum-goes to a lot of meetings-very alive in the community-trying to get younger people involved. Involved with the National Trust for Jersey-has the same aims of as the Trust in Britain but is autonomous. Is unhappy that the Queen's Valley flooding has gone through the States with a small majority-would like to see an alternative. Doesn't like the fact that the land is going to be bought by compulsory purchase. Sixth Record-Mario Lanza with Ave Maria.

Reference: R/07/B/7

Date: 1982 - 1983

JEP Newscutting - Temps Passé articles on a collection of essays on aspects of Jersey history by Alec Podger, entitled 'That Nest of Vypers' and on a cold winter in 1895 when the Central martket fountain iced over - 19/12/2007

Reference: US/391

Date: 2007 - 2007

JEP Newscutting - Article about the auction of specialist books detailing the Island's history, by the Société Jersiaise - 08/11/2008

Reference: US/529

Date: 2008 - 2008

Salvation Army centenary brochure and a brief history of the Salvation Army

Reference: US/55

Date: 1879 - 1979

JEP Newscutting - Article about La Moye School teaming up with Jersey Heritage to learn about the Ice Age - 24/01/2009

Reference: US/566

Date: 2009 - 2009

JEP Newscutting article on a Sates survey into public opinion on matters including history, identity and heritage - 10/07/2009

Reference: US/619

Date: 2009 - 2009

JEP Newscutting - Temps Passé article about the effects of the War of Roses on Jersey - 28/08/2009

Reference: US/633

Date: 2009 - 2009

Jersey Evening Post Obituary : Mary Phillips

Reference: US/645

Date: 2009 - 2009

Details relating to the BBC Millennium Oral History Project entitled 'The Century Speaks'

Reference: US/71

Date: 2000 - 2000

Brochure containing the first 25 years of Channel Television

Reference: US/72

Date: 1962 - 1987

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