File containing a note relating to the zero job growth policy. Topics covered include: limiting the growth in the number of jobs, economic growth, increasing productivity, registered beds in hotels and guesthouses, encouraging resident employment, the construction industry, jobs for school leavers, seasonal or temporary workers, impact on business, new working patterns, training, and retention of staff

Reference: D/G/A1/6/1A/2

Date: March 21st 1990 - March 21st 1990

Registration card of Amy Priscilla Willoughby, née Romaine, of Ty Anna, High Street, St Aubin, born 16/03/1892

Reference: D/S/A/1/A3159

Date: January 20th 1941 - January 20th 1941

Photograph of Mr Bertram Le Maistre, and photographs of three gentlemen employed by Hotel and Home Furnishing Company Limited: the Manager Mr Gordon Young, carpet formean Mr George Pell and the administrative director Mr Tony Hardy.

Reference: L/A/75/A2/POR/68/4

Date: October 24th 1969 - December 13th 1969

Subject: Portraits

File number: 68

Page number: 4

Images of staff at Longueville Manor, Longueville Road, St Saviour with a certificate confirming that the hotel was awarded four Red Stars by the Automobile Association (AA) in recognition of outstanding merit within its classification during 1976.

Reference: L/A/75/A3/1/2513A

Date: November 19th 1976 - November 19th 1976

Photographer: Ron Mayne

JEP Photographic Job Number: 1976/2513A

Images of the Claymore Hotel on The Esplanade for an advertisement. Images include group shots of members of the hotel staff, the interior of and food prepared at the hotel's seafood restaurant called the Restaurant Mussel, staff working at the reception desk and bars, and the snooker and darts area of the bar.

Reference: L/A/75/A3/1/518

Date: March 10th 1976 - March 10th 1976

Photographer: Bob Ritchie

JEP Photographic Job Number: 1976/518

Images of a clinic for hotel workers at the Transport and General Workers' Union (TWGU) offices on New Street. Includes images of Sergio da Silva, the chairman of the hotel workers branch of the TGWU, sat at his desk [A-C]; Mr da Silva holding the flag of Madeira with shop steward Carlos Pontes [D-F]; Mr da Silva with Mr Pontes and Antonio Spinola [G-H]; and Mr da Silva, Mr Pontes and Mr Spinola listening to a complaint [I-J] [from JEP 15/05/1981 p 14].

Reference: L/A/75/A3/6/7330C

Date: April 27th 1981 - April 27th 1981

Photographer: Reg Cridland

JEP Photographic Job Number: 1981/7330C.

Personal View of Rene Liron, official of the Jersey Transport and General Workers Union, interviewed by Beth Lloyd. Represents 6,000 people in the union in all different industries. Not as political as UK but did protest over the pensioner's bonuses getting cut-no party politics in Jersey. Never had a political strike. Workers better off in Jersey compared to the UK-higher wages. His relationship with management-some rows. First record-The Strawbs with Part of the Union. Born in Grouville and went to school and left at 14. Occupation-had to earn his living as a baker's boy for Tom Gilbert-delivered bread. Not enough flour to do the baking-bread was rationed. People used to buy bread from the black market. Occupation-people were very friendly-made his own fun. Lack of freedom-angry and patriotic. Was caught out after curfew with Gordon Rabet and 7 other friends and had to go to Bagatelle House-were fined. Was summoned to College House and asked if he wanted to work in Alderney as a baker but refused. Thought about escaping but decided against it. Second Record-Louise by Maurice Chevalier. Joined the Royal Air Force after the occupation-wanted to get away. Was trained at Greenham Common. Came back to Jersey as his mother was dying of cancer. Was in the RAF for three years but didn't go abroad. Took up a variety of jobs-parish of St Helier-introduced to the trade union-become a shop steward and chairman of the district committee. Monty Purse retired as official of the TGWU-didn't think he had a chance-was interviewed in Southampton by Jack Jones and was named as successor a fortnight later. Gave up his job and became the official. Third Record-Roses of Picady. The union has grown since he took over through hard work. Less disputes in Jersey than in the UK because we are an island and know each other better. Difficulty in seeing everybody's point of view-some people don't tell him the truth. Strikes are a calculated risk-people need to have the right to strike. The union is still as important today as ever-people need protecting. Needs protection in the weaker areas-hotel workers. Interested in the Portuguese community-were treated badly-now they're member of the union. Doesn't think the freedom of movement in Europe will make a difference to people. Fourth Record-Nine to Five by Sheena Easton. He doesn't visit the UK to meet other officials-they run the island without outside interference. Two Labour MPs visited the island on a fact finding mission-he told them to deal with their problems in the UK. Ran for senator and deputy but didn't get in-learned a lot from the election-an opportunity to say what you want. Room for improvement in the States of Jersey. May run for the States again. Fifth Record-'The Heat Is On'. Never wanted to leave the island to further his career. Hasn't decided how long he is going to stay as the representative of the trade union. Fishes on his boat in his spare time. Tries not to show it when he loses his cool. Sixth Record-You by Andy Williams. Gets satisfaction from working and satisfying his members and then handing over to somebody else. End of Side One. Personal View of John Stebbings, 'Mr Sea Link'. Came from Yorkshire-son of a railwayman-used to ride and drive the steam engines. Born in Thornton outside of Bradford and moved to the outskirts of Bradford until he got married. Joined the railways when he was 14. Remembers going to work in short trousers. Used to take the chain horse down to the bottom of the hill-happy days-beginning of the second world war. Then moved over to be a messenger boy. Worked short hours-the railway unions were good-used to work an 8 hour day. As a porter-train loads of traffic came into the shed in the morning and was then sorted and delivered and as a messenger boy he took letters about. First Record-Love Divine all Loves Excelling. Never wanted to become an engine driver. Always believed he'd achieve what he wanted to do-went into management. Joined the Royal Navy-was a stores assistant-looked after the food and drink and then went on to an aircraft carrier-HMS Ocean-joined after the second world war. Was in Palestine when the Jews were moving in. He enjoyed his time in the Royal Navy a great deal. Second Record-The Brighouse and Rastrick Brass Band with 'The Solitaire'. His love for brass bands. After he left the Royal Navy in 1947 he went back home and got married in 1950. Worked as a station master at Alverthorp and then Haig-used to get up at 4 o'clock to open the station-was the youngest station master in Britain at this time. Wore a station master uniform. Had a station master's house in 1950-was his first step in railway management. Changed the region he was working in. Duties as a station master-attending trains, selling tickets, budget control of the station and getting involved with the trains. Third Record-Billy Cotton with the Dam Busters March. Had 170 staff under his control working at South Bank-the steelworks area-marshalling trains. Assistant to the divisional manager of sales in Middlesbrough. 1966-came to Jersey to look after the sea links with the island. Similar to his old job but on ships rather than trains. Had intended to leave after 2 years but fell in love with Jersey. Fourth Record-The Anvil Chorus. He settled into Jersey quickly-he was prepared to work hard-got involved in the community. Believes in the honorary system. The boss of Sea Link-get knocked but you learn to deal with it-loves dealing with people. Was excited when the roll on roll off links were brought in-saved the route. Fifth Record-The Brighouse and Rastrick Brass Band with 'Melodies from the Merry Widow'. Helps with the Battle of Flowers-helps with the administration and loves the exhibits. Has a great community spirit-a family event. Was chairman of the Battle of Flowers' Association-takes up a lot of time. Work starts for the Battle of Flowers on the day after the Battles of Flowers from the previous year. Two daughters-one in Southampton and one in Jersey. Enjoys working on houses and DIY.

Reference: R/07/B/4

Date: 1982 - 1983

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