Master Copy of sound recording L/D/25/L/16. 1) Mrs M R Ward, Deputy Head of Bel Royal School, recounting her memories of the evacuation of the islanders of Jersey in 1940. Talks of the assumption that the Channel Islands would be insignificant and left alone, turning of war against the allies started worries, demilitarisation of the island, bulk evacuation organised with panic ensuing in the registration of names and trying to leave, States made public declaration to remain at helm leading to calm. 2) Mrs Betty Remon, a 10 year old at the time, telling her memories of the German occupation including impressions of the german troops, school and german lessons with Fraulein Blochlinger, a Swiss National, and the older girls refusing to learn, difficulties of the lack of books, clothes, shoes leading to improvisation, scarcity of food and fuel, leaving school in March 1945 and freedom on Liberation Day in the Royal Square. 3) Mr Denis Remon, who was attending De La Salle College, remembers being arrested in February 1945 for membership of the Boy Scouts and sabotage, he describes the prison in Gloucester Street and those inside, the food received , getting a message to his parents, being taken for interrogation at Silvertide, Havre des Pas the Headquarters of the German Police, the Chelsea Hotel being used as overspill for the prison, an escape attempt, luck that D-Day had taken place and he could not be transferred to Germany, being released and liberation.

Reference: L/D/25/L/16/1

Three interviews 1) Recording of Harold Le Druillenec, the only British person to survive in Belsen, introducing the King's christmas broadcast after liberation had taken pace. Introduced by the man who chose him to make the speech, it includes references to his time in Belsen, his sister [Louisa Gould] and the thanks that the Channel Islands felt towards the Free World for restoring freedom. Interrupted before the finish. 2) Michael Ginns with Beth Lloyd-talking about his article about the Granville Raid by the Germans. Includes reasons why he wrote the article, the research he undertook, he talks about the raids themselves and the new things that appear in his article. 3) Interviews by Diane Smith of Eileen Le Sueur and John Bouchere, who lived in Jersey during the Occupation, intermingled with musical intervals of music from the 1940s. Subjects discussed include their reaction to Occupation beginning, what made people stay, their employment, how the Island changed physically over the years, lack of supplies, exchange and mart and bartering, fortifications being built, maintenance of the government, changes in home life, social life, listening to the radio, rationing, the relationship between German soldiers and children of Jersey, restrictions on the Jersey population including curfew and radios, the strictness of the Germans, the interrogation of John Bouchere, propaganda in the Island in newspapers and the cinema, country and town life, food, entertainments, concerts held in celebration of the arrival of Red Cross parcels, the arrest of Eileen Le Sueur for having propaganda leaflets, West's Cinema, a list of entertainers, danger on the island including air raids, minefields and being caught out after curfew, resistance in the island, what was missed most, radios, memories, positive aspects of the Occupation and Liberation Day.

Reference: L/D/25/L/29

1) Interview with Frank Keiller on the radio programme 'Conversation Piece' which includes musical interlude. Discusses being a teenager during the occupation, what it feels like to celebrate 40 years of liberation, his background, his reputation as a tearaway, problems at the deportations in which he was involved in riots and was arrested and court martialled but escaped deportation because of his age, his plan to escape from the island, the subsequent failure and his arrest by the Germans, his interrogation in the prison at Gloucester Street, the conditions in prison and his attempt to escape, hiding from the Germans for the rest of the occupation with a new identity, before the escape attempt helping at the hospital under Arthur Halliwell, Ray Osmont and Dr Darling, qualifying as a doctor and surgeon after the war, joining the RAF, his subsequent career in different countries, the stress of surgery, leaving the Royal Air Force, making a new civilian life, moving to Victoria in Australia, retirement plans, hobbies, feelings towards the Germans now and feelings about the government of the States of Jersey during the occupation. 2) Weather and traffic report. Stolen items-police report. Magazine section-new book '120 Years'-History of Jersey Swimming Club-compiled by John Faige explained to Beth Lloyd why club was founded in 1865, about Havre des Pas Swimming Pool, Jersey residents in international swimming and diving competitions in the past and photographs. Paul Fox returning to the island after working on a project for 10 weeks in Southern Chile with Operation Rally to build a bridge. Report on the reoccupation of St Luke's vicarage by homeless families. Report on the hill climb at Bouley Bay. Channel Islands Occupation Society have found in the east of the island an entrance that appears to be the start of a tunnel leading towards France. Michael Ginns explains how it was found, reasons it would have been dug, question of how far it may go, where it leads to. Public Works interest in tunnel expressed by Deputy Don Filleul expressing excitement over the find, possibilities of our own channel tunnel, possible conduit for water and the investigation to continue with a report ready for April 1st next year (April Fool's joke)

Reference: L/D/25/L/30

Date: April 30th 1985 - April 30th 1985

Frank Keiller talking to Chris Stone on Radio Jersey about his experience during the occupation. Talks about the first trouble that he got in having tried to find some petrol for an escape attempt, punching a couple of german solders whilst the deportations were taking place and running away, being tracked down, arrested, interrogated and beaten over the incident and then being interrogated again at Silvertide, Havre des Pas and courtmartialled although only given probation on account of his age, helping beat of collaborator with Basil Le Brun but escaped being arrested, being warned that he was being watched, forming a group after D-Day aiming to help went the liberation took place, trying to take information on fortifications to the allies when escaping and the consequent failure of the attempt, taken to be interrogated and then to prison, how he felt at the time, resistance, conditions in prison, being court martialled and worrying about charges of espionage, describes escape from prison with friends, hiding out for the rest of the occupation with different residents, other escape plans, talks about acts of resistance and collaboration, feelings about time, his talk to the Channel Islands Occupation Society and the importance of personal stories during the occupation, his lowest point during the occupation, reasons for his resistance and how the occupation should be remembered.

Reference: L/D/25/L/31

Date: January 1st 1999 - January 1st 1999

Interview of Silver Le Riche, St Helier Harbour Pilot 1940-1945, by members of the Channel Islands Occupation Society. Talking about his experience as a pilot bringing boats into St Helier Harbour during the occupation. Subjects covered include the duties that he carried out, his refusal to pilot a boat that was carrying mines and his subsequent questioning at the Pomme d'Or, the boats that used to go out to meet ships, those that piloted during the occupation, how they received orders verbally at the Southampton Hotel, restrictions on movement, presence of german soldiers when they brought the boat in, going to St Malo and being put in prison, the recruitment of the crew of the SS Normand through the Harbour Office, Captain Sowden who skippered the boat, the overloading of ships, shipwrecks, Captain Bennett of the SS Spinel and his death in Guernsey, the biggest ship he brought in, the night the SS Schockland sank, what happened to the SS Robert Muller during the war, Ted Larbalestier, bringing the Lavada (?) in, whether the germans took their advice, how he crashed a damaged ship, the H49, was arrested and put in prison and interrogated for 7 days, reminiscences of german masters down at the harbour, a floating crane, sand runs to Gorey, the size of ships in St Aubin, the bombing of a german ship, air raids, being given german orders by Captain Richmond and going to the Grand Hotel with George Gill, Peter Guiton, Ted Larbalestier and Bob La Cloche, tug trips to Guernsey on the Duke of Normandy, the SS Normand, the position and types of buoys, driving the SS Normand and the captain after Silver Le Riche, passenger services to France, experiences on the SS Diamond, rescuing germans from a shipwreck and number of shipwrecks in the island, Bill Furzer and Captain Richmond's uniform, his fellow pilots, working on Peter Guiton's farm, liberation, the arrival of the SS Vega, they show him photographs of the occupation. He talks about treating with germans after the liberation. They identify the ships in the photos. Asked about aking photographs in Granville, who is alive today who worked at the harbour during the occupation, the most frightening experience during the occupation as a pilot when he had a shot fired at him, restrictions on pilots, buying rations in France, the Duke of Normandy, lights to guide boats into the harbour, a german ship hitting the Dog's Nest, bringing soldiers out of St Malo at the start of the occupation and seeing the loch gates being destroyed, the pilot in Granville, how busy Granville was and if they refused to bring military cargo back to Jersey, his memory of the deportations, the barges collecting sand at Gorey for building works, the arrival of the Russians, attempted rescue of a ship, being sent to the Pomme d'Or for being drunk, his time in prison in St Malo and in the Pomme d'Or for seven days, their uniforms, piloting ships into the harbour at liberation, the SS Vega, when and where the railway stopped and who else to interview.

Reference: L/D/25/L/38

Talk by Bob Le Sueur to the Channel Islands Occupation Society entitled 'Foreign Workers of the Organisation Todt'. Introduction by the CIOS President with notices. Talks about his friendship with a number of Spanish and Russian foreign workers. the lack of facts in official records and distortions post liberation, the need to look at the occupation objectively, how the Russians were treated as slaves but other national groups although forced were paid, how the spaniards came to be in Jersey after the Spanish Civil War, the relatively high wages that they received which led to inflation of prices on the black market, the worth of reichsmarks, the currency used in Jersey during the occupation, Spaniards having suits made for them, where the Spaniards worked in St Brelade and their camps on either side of Route Orange, Mr Le Sueur socialising with the spanish labourers, Spanish men who lived in Longfield Avenue in St Brelade, going to Brown's Café with the Spaniards, the rations received by the Russians, tells the story of a Ukrainian who became an adopted Spaniard in France and from then on moved around with them, the description of the arrival of the Russian slave labours, tells the story of a Russian he got to know and his journey to Jersey, the camp at the bottom of Jubilee Hill, the story of Feodor Burrij he was punished after attempting to escape and was then successful and lived out the occupation being sheltered by various locals such as Louisa Gould, who was deported for it, and a flat in town, Nazi racist policy, the brutality of the Soviet regime and Stalin's directive that no Russian should be taken as a POW, the deaths of the Russian labourers in Jersey, the account of Peter Bokatenko, a Russian POW who after liberation told of Russian's being killed and buried by the roadside, interrogations ater the war by Major Hargreaves and a colleague at the British Hotel and the fact that the slave labourers talked of murder but were unable to offer evidence of this relying on hearsay, Russian POWs after the occupation and the reaction at home, what happened to them after the occupation and the experience of a particular Russian POW. Questions asked on the attempts by the OT to find their escaped prisoners, the story of Mr and Mrs Woodhall who sheltered two russians in a flat above the soldatenheim at the Mayfair Hotel for 18 months and what happened to Feodor Burrij. Michael Ginns talks about the condition of Russians and how Bob Le Sueur was given an award by the Russians for his bravery.

Reference: L/D/25/L/39

Date: October 13th 1993 - October 13th 1993

BBC Radio Jersey-Occupation Tapes. Told by the people who lived through it produced by Beth Lloyd. 1) Part 7: Deportation. BBC Report on the deportations from the Channel Islands. Alexander Coutanche's difficulty in having to accept the order. Eye witnesses reports of discovering the order for the deportations in the Evening Post, discovery that some deportee's houses being looted, preparations for deportation, being served deportation notices, deciding what to take, going to the Weighbridge, people being turned back because the ships were full, the crowd singing the ships off, the journey to St Malo, fighting at the third deportation leading to arrests. 2) Part 8: Not a Lot of Anything. Eye witnesses talking about the lack of essential supplies such as soap, a great shortage of drugs and medicines by Dr John Lewis and others, lack of clothes, shoes and the need to mend things, improvisation with clothes, bartering economy, wood collecting, what was used for fuel and reusing razor blades. 3) Part 9: From Finance to Farming, The Island Keeps Going. A BBC Report on the currency used in the island. Eye witness accounts on the lack of english currency and the use of reichsmarks, the conversion necessary for records kept in banks and auction houses, the creation of new notes by Edmund Blampied, stocks in the shops diminshing leading to rationing control, the black market, exchange and mart in the Evening Post, farmer's experience of being told what to grow, harvesting and the inspections made by the Germans, farmers hiding extras from the Germans, investigations into a fuel that would allow tractors to run on something other than petrol, getting by, crops that were grown and giving food to others. 4) Part 10: There's Good and Bad in all Races. Eye witnesses talking about collaborators, Jerry Bags, informers, the actions of the Post Office to destroy anonymous denunciation letters or warn those who had been denounced, searches by german soldiers to follow up anonymous letters, relationships with and attitudes of the german soldiers (Poor sound quality) 5) Part 11: Government and God, How the States and the Church Survived. Eye witnesses talking about dissatisfaction with the local authorities, the difficulties faced by the bailiff Alexander Coutanche, confirming legislation in Jersey, rectors and Jurats members of the States, meetings of the States, rectors remaining in the parishes and services continuing, Canon Cohu being taken by the Germans for passing on the news from the radio, praying for the men who were fighting, banning of the Salvation Army and Jehovah Witnesses. 6) Part 12: Brushes with the German Authorities. Eye witnesses talking about being interrogated at Silvertide, experiences of confrontations with the german soldiers, being arrested and beaten, court martials and trials of local residents, listening to the radio and experiences in the prison at Gloucester Street. See R/06/3.

Reference: L/D/25/L/43

Occupation-BBC Radio Jersey tape. The story of the occupation of Jersey during World War 2 told by the people who lived through it produced by Beth Lloyd. 1) Part 15: We Are At War. Eye witness accounts of feelings of isolation, seeing and hearing British and German aeroplanes, feeling and seeing bombing raids on the coast of France, leaflet raids, members of the royal air force being taken as prisoners of war, commando raid on Egypt, sabotage, the v sign campaign, resistance and reprisals, youth groups against the Germans, the British Patriots group and Norman Le Brocq and Leslie Huelin working with the Free Germany Movement represented by Paul Muelbach calling for a mutiny in the garrison. 2) Part 10: There's Good and Bad in all Races. Eye witnesses talking about collaborators, Jerry Bags, informers, the actions of the Post Office to destroy anonymous denunciation letters or warn those who had been denounced, searches by german soldiers to follow up anonymous letters, relationships with and attitudes of the german soldiers. 3) Part 11: Government and God, How the States and the Church Survived. Eye witnesses talking about dissatisfaction with the local authorities, the difficulties faced by the bailiff Alexander Coutanche, confirming legislation in Jersey, rectors and Jurats members of the States, meetings of the States, rectors remaining in the parishes and services continuing, Canon Cohu being taken by the Germans for passing on the news from the radio, praying for the men who were fighting, banning of the Salvation Army and Jehovah Witnesses. 4) Part 12: Brushes with the German Authorities. Eye witnesses talking about being interrogated at Silvertide, experiences of confrontations with the german soldiers, being arrested and beaten, court martials and trials of local residents, listening to the radio and experiences in the prison at Gloucester Street. 5) Part 13: The Todt Organisation and their Russian Slave Labourers. Eye witnesses talking about the background of the Organisation Todt, the arrival of the Russians on the island, the condition they were in, the brutality of their overseers, begging and stealing food, concentration camps, the Jersey Communist Party and other people giving shelter, food, clothes, false papers and english lessons with Mrs Metcalfe to escaped prisoners, the story of Louisa Gould, Harold Le Druillenec and Feodor Burrij and the experience of other residents who harboured escapees. 6) Part 14: Entertainment. Eye witnesses talking about the difficulties of the first show during the occupation put on by the Jersey Amateur Dramatics Club, cinemas and the films that were shown, variety entertainment at the Opera House, West's Cinema and out in the parishes, finding musicians, public dances, the Amateur Variety Band, the Green Room Club productions including pantomimes, easter productions and shows, improvisations with costumes and scenery and censorship of the shows.

Reference: L/D/25/L/47

Talk by Mr T Riley to the Channel Islands Occupation Society. (Very faint at some points) Talks about his experiences during the occupation and the different jobs he undertook including working at George D Laurens shop in Queen Street, being called up by Theodor Elsch to help build sea walls at La Braye slip wall but refusing to work, being put into prison in Gloucester Street for not complying, given a month in prison, when he got out was put to work on the sea walls but started registering in the morning and then going home, put to work on the German Hospital in St Peter's Valley but stopped going after a rock fall, got sent down the Victoria Pier cleaning the walls of tanks but didn't want to work there either, put to work in a german store but was eventually arrested, interrogated by the police at Silvertide, Havre des Pas and was offered the choice of doing 5 months prison in France or 5 weeks solitary confinement in Jersey, decided on staying in Jersey, was classed as an 'undesirable', talks about the reduced rations they received in prison, a plan whereby he got increased rations, a job at the Homestead in Vallée des Vaux when he was released, got extra beer by delivering beer from Ann Street Brewery, getting a letter saying he was to be deported but avoiding it as his name was late in the alphabet, becoming friendly with a german he was living next to and being allowed off the next deportations, working for the States down St Helier Harbour unloading supplies, the stealing that used to take place of German goods, being arrested by the Germans for stealing and being sentenced by the local police court as it was States goods to four weeks hard labour, breaking stones in the prison, getting shingles in prison and was given light duties, got married and was living in town, got a job looking after and grave digging at the Stranger's Cemetery, got fired for only going to work every other day and pulling down a hut to burn for fuel, sent to Midvale Road to work in OT offices as a cleaner, taking fuel from the offices, picking berries from a mountain ash for his boss who lived in Clarendon Road to distill into alcohol, opening a room at the office which had a great deal of food inside and taking supplies, moved to St Brelade and worked at knocking down trees for people's fuel, used to fill bins with sea water and extracted the salt, taking weapons and binoculars from a store and looking in the bunker at La Pulente and finding a motorbike. Comments made by the audience about their dealings with the germans at the Harbour and taking food, the need for policemen as so much was being taken. Riley tells how he was caught out after curfew 52 times, he had to go to Bagatelle House to explain himself, dealing on the blackmarket for an old lady who lived in Colomberie, the ships that transported essential commodoties the SS Normand and SS Spinel their captains, the arrival of the Russian POWs, taking butter from the germans, the arrival of the SS Vega and the red cross parcels, the fact that things for babies were never touched and how they always tried to steal from the Germans. Questions asked and comments made concerning his arrests and whether it was recorded in the press, the Painters, listening to radios and an American airman who crashed and was saved by John de la Haye.

Reference: L/D/25/L/54

Date: April 8th 1981 - April 8th 1981

Photocopy of a letter from Ellen Louisa Alice Hodgskin, née Norton of 3, The Denes, Grève d'Azette relating to her experiences during the occupation. Includes details of discovering that Jersey had been demilitarised, deciding not to evacuate, the air raid, the arrival of the Germans, panic in the island, encounters with the German soldiers, food, deportations, receiving deportation papers, not being deported, her husband being interrogated by the Germans, forced labour, crashing of a German plane, destruction of the Palace Hotel, living conditions, curfew, confiscation of wirelesses, St Luke's School, de la Salle College, the Girls' Collegiate, communal kitchens and her pet dog

Reference: M/36/A1/1

Date: May 18th 1945 - June 6th 1945

BBC Radio Jersey-Occupation Tapes. Told by the people who lived through it produced by Beth Lloyd. 1) Part 7: Deportation. BBC Report on the deportations from the Channel Islands. Alexander Coutanche's difficulty in having to accept the order. Eye witnesses reports of discovering the order for the deportations in the Evening Post, discovery that some deportee's houses being looted, preparations for deportation, being served deportation notices, deciding what to take, going to the Weighbridge, people being turned back because the ships were full, the crowd singing the ships off, the journey to St Malo, fighting at the third deportation leading to arrests. 2) Part 8: Not a Lot of Anything. Eye witnesses talking about the lack of essential supplies such as soap, a great shortage of drugs and medicines by Dr John Lewis and others, lack of clothes, shoes and the need to mend things, improvisation with clothes, bartering economy, wood collecting, what was used for fuel and reusing razor blades. 3) Part 9: From Finance to Farming, The Island Keeps Going. A BBC Report on the currency used in the island. Eye witness accounts on the lack of english currency and the use of reichsmarks, the conversion necessary for records kept in banks and auction houses, the creation of new notes by Edmund Blampied, stocks in the shops diminshing leading to rationing control, the black market, exchange and mart in the Evening Post, farmer's experience of being told what to grow, harvesting and the inspections made by the Germans, farmers hiding extras from the Germans, investigations into a fuel that would allow tractors to run on something other than petrol, getting by, crops that were grown and giving food to others. 4) Part 10: There's Good and Bad in all Races. Eye witnesses talking about collaborators, Jerry Bags, informers, the actions of the Post Office to destroy anonymous denunciation letters or warn those who had been denounced, searches by german soldiers to follow up anonymous letters, relationships with and attitudes of the german soldiers (Poor sound quality) 5) Part 11: Government and God, How the States and the Church Survived. Eye witnesses talking about dissatisfaction with the local authorities, the difficulties faced by the bailiff Alexander Coutanche, confirming legislation in Jersey, rectors and Jurats members of the States, meetings of the States, rectors remaining in the parishes and services continuing, Canon Cohu being taken by the Germans for passing on the news from the radio, praying for the men who were fighting, banning of the Salvation Army and Jehovah Witnesses. 6) Part 12: Brushes with the German Authorities. Eye witnesses talking about being interrogated at Silvertide, experiences of confrontations with the german soldiers, being arrested and beaten, court martials and trials of local residents, listening to the radio and experiences in the prison at Gloucester Street.

Reference: R/06/3

BBC Radio Jersey-Occupation Tapes. Told by the people who lived through it produced by Beth Lloyd. Part 12: Brushes with the German Authorities. Eye witnesses talking about being interrogated at Silvertide, experiences of confrontations with the german soldiers, being arrested and beaten, court martials and trials of local residents, listening to the radio and experiences in the prison at Gloucester Street. See R/06/3.

Reference: R/07/F1/12

Date: July 1st 1990 - July 1st 1990

BBC Radio Jersey-Occupation Tapes. Told by the people who lived through it produced by Beth Lloyd. Part 16: Escapes. Subjects discussed include the escape of Denis Vibert to England in September 1941, tales of different escapes to France by islanders recounted by Eddie Le Corre, Basil Le Brun, Peter Crill, John Floyd, Roy Mourant and their subsequent experiences of interrogations by the Home Forces and arrival in England. See R/06/4.

Reference: R/07/F1/16

Date: July 29th 1990 - July 29th 1990

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