Jersey Talking Magazine-January Edition. Introduction by Gordon Young. Interview with Robert Lacey who wrote a biography regarding Queen Elizabeth II talking to Beth Lloyd about the success of the book, where he got his information from, letting the queen know he was writing the book, going into Buckingham Palace for the first time, meeting the Queen, his impressions of her, the popularity of Lady Diana, his next book about the kingdom of Saudi Arabia, the story of Saudi Arabia, how he was able to talk to the Saudi Arabian royal family, his impressions of the family, the cultural differences between the Arab and western countries and the conflict between the Arabs and the Jews. Dixie Landick and Stephen Lucas singing 'Gloom is Just Around the Corner'. Cooking Feature-Margaret Jenkins giving recipes for what to cook after christmas. End of Side One. Gordon Young visiting Noirmont Command Bunker with John Bouchere of the Channel Islands Occupation Society talking about the bunker, it being closed from 1945, describing the bunkers defences, specifications and different rooms within the bunker, the restoration of the bunker, the different objects found within the bunker, looking out from Noirmont, describing a 15cm gun that was dumped at the end of the war and retrieved by the Channel Islands Occupation Society from the bottom of a cliff at Les Landes and put at Noirmont, defences that used to exist at Noirmont, the number of guns that was controlled by the Noirmont Command Bunker. End of Side Two.

Reference: R/05/B/61

Date: December 31st 1981 - December 31st 1981

Jersey Talking Magazine-March Edition. Introduction by Gordon Young. Gordon Young visiting Schruns in Austria describing the view of the village from the top of a mountain, the ski slope and ski schools, the cable car down the mountain, the scene from the cable car, arriving at the cable car station, walking around the village of Schruns describing the park, the main square, the church with its bells ringing, the school, the streets, houses and the river. Sue talking to Sergeant O'Brian about the drug problem in Jersey, the number of drug addicts in Jersey, how drug addicts start, cannabis, drug smuggling, the customs checks at the airport and harbour, the main number arrests made because of information gained from informants, the people who abuse drugs, the part of the plant that the cannabis drug comes from and the other drugs of concern in the island including amphetamines and solvent abuse and problems in the future. End of Side One. Pat Dubras talking to Beth Lloyd about the first pantomime put on by the Jersey Amateur Dramatics Club called 'Cinderladdin and his Wonderful Cat' by Ken Fletcher about the pantomime, the decision to take the production on tour to different parish halls, the difficulty of moving between different locations, playing to packed houses and singing the title song from the pantomime. Philip Gurdon talking to Roger Pratt who decided the previous summer to join the British Antarctic Survey as a pilot on his decision to go on the expedition, the preparations for the journey, the flight to Antarctica, the equipment used to get to Antarctica, his first impression of the region, the different colours of the ice, the headquarters where they were based at Adelaide Island, 24 hours of daylight, the need for self sufficiency, supplies, the occasion of a storm which resulted in the aeroplanes being blown upside down and being almost completely wrecked, taking the aeroplanes to pieces and salvaging the wreckage, the different countries represented in the region, what people do to pass the time, working in the garage and getting airlifted out by the Chilean Air Force. End of Side Two.

Reference: R/05/B/62

Date: February 28th 1982 - February 28th 1982

Jersey Talking Magazine-April Edition. Introduction by Gordon Young. Philip Gurdon interviewing David Watkins, a private investigator, talking about whether there was any need for a private investigator in Jersey, finding evidence of fraud, the difficult aspects of the job, tracing people who have disappeared, the reasons people disappear, training for the job as a member of the police, cooperation with the police force, the line between police and private investigation work, kidnappings, getting involved in situations outside of Jersey-has an office in London and travelling across the world to carry out investigations. Margaret Jenkins talking about the sense of smell. John Bouchere talking about Jersey and the Royal Mail including details of the Channel Islands, the transport of mail by aeroplanes and mail boats, the signalling of the arrival of the mail boat in former days, the transport of the mail by horse drawn car by Mr Le Couteur, the maintenance of the mail carts, the first real mail van in 1929, carrying the mail to Gorey Village, 1933 saw mail coming by air with the aeroplanes landing on West Park beach, Jersey Airport built in 1937 and a daily service was inaugurated, 1940-arrival of the occupation and the air force raids and the stopping of post between the UK and Jersey, use of bicycles instead of the vans, a telegraph messenger, Eric Hassall was sent to College House and received salutes as he was in uniform, Len Godel-collided with a sand laden german lorry and was charged with sabotage but was released, sometimes the bags of mail from Guernsey were opened for investigation, postal services resumed after the occupation, wide variety of mail received by farmers and the difficulty of finding different addresses in Jersey and driving in the country lanes. Beth Lloyd giving In Touch tips for the blind. End of Side One. Composition called 'Dead in Tune' written for narrator and orchestra and recorded by Channel Television featuring the Jersey Youth Orchestra and Alastair Layzell. End of Side Two.

Reference: R/05/B/63

Date: March 31st 1982 - March 31st 1982

Jersey Talking Magazine-June Edition. Introduction by Gordon Young. Beth Lloyd talking to Maurice Gautier, a beekeeper, about why he doesn't want Queen's Valley flooded, the bees in the valley, the trees and plants that Jersey bees like, the taste of Jersey honey, the different seasons and their effects on the bees, about 80 beekeepers with up to 480 colonies of bees on the island and what to do if bees swarm. Pat Dubras reads the Joyce Grenfell poem 'Time'. Beth Lloyd interviewing Paul Birt regarding a textbook to aid the teaching of Jersey Norman French about how he came to be involved in the language, the textbook helping people to learn jèrriais, the importance of keeping the language, the teaching of jèrriais in schools, the interest in jèrriais outside of the island, working with Dr Frank Le Maistre and the length of time it will take to compile the book. Phil Gurdon talking to Don Lusher about being lead trombonist with the Ted Heath Band, working with Frank Sinatra, his three bands that he runs-the Don Lusher Big Band, the Don Lusher Quartet and the Don Lusher Trombone Ensemble together with the revival of the Ted Heath Band, named as musician of the year by the BBC Jazz Society in 1976, how you differentiate between a great and good musician, holding music clinics for brass musicians, coming to Jersey in June to do a clinic with a brass band and playing a concert, being a faculty member in Belmont College, Nashville for a trombone clinic with some of the greatest trombone players in the world and working as a session trombone musician with Don Lusher playing his own piece of music. End of Side One. Frank Korowoski, a blind man, talking about his holiday in East Germany including entering the country for the first time, the officials checking passports, reaching Berlin, seeing the Berlin Wall, getting off the train, meeting the German Red Cross who were to guide him whilst in the country, his impressions of the country, meeting an East German blind lady who he had corresponded with in Braille, staying in a hotel for western visitors, a description of his room, the cheapness of the meal, the difficulties experienced in East Germany, his journey to Poland by train, people being helpful, meeting his friends and going around Poznan in Poland, discovering the difficulty in getting food in Poland, Roman Catholicism in Poland and a church service he went to, going out for sunday lunch because of the food shortage, the places that he visited in Poland, being amazed at the spectacle of Warsaw, a school for the blind in Poland, visiting Krakow, visiting the black madonna at Czestochowa and seeing the pilgrims going to the shrine, visiting other places in Poland and then to Czechoslovakia, lack of freedom of movement in the country, more prosperity than Poland but the people wanted to live in other countries, discrimination against people believing in religion, his journey back to Britain and his hopes for the country of his father, Poland. Gordon Young with contributions from the readers and answering their questions. End of Side Two.

Reference: R/05/B/64

Date: May 31st 1982 - May 31st 1982

Jersey Talking Magazine-July Edition. Introduction by Gordon Young. Reverend Graham Long, a concologist, an expert on molluscs, talking to Beth Lloyd about how long he has been interested in molluscs, how he became interested in molluscs by finding some snails, the only collector on the island of non-marine molluscs, the interesting molluscs on the island, species we have are generally smaller in size as a result of a lack of chalk on the island, a species was found in Jersey that had only previously been seen in America, a slug of German origin that has been found in St Martin, his theory that it was brought to the island during the second world war, toads eating slugs, over 70 species of gastropods been identified, massive variety of molluscs, majority very small and his decision not eating snails. Joan Stevens talking about a famous Jerseyman who moved away from Jersey and became famous elsewhere. Thomas de Soulemont who died in 1541 and became the Dean of Jersey in 1534 but didn't stay in Jersey. Moved to England and became French Secretary for King Henry VIII, started to collect property across England, held many positions, fiercely upheld the rights of the ecclesiastical courts and took cases for the benefit of Jersey, well respected and scholarly, bought property of Jersey girls who had married Englishmen. Nicholas the brother of Thomas gave a cast iron gun to the parish of St Saviour. Chris and David at Howard Davis Park taking a tour around the gardens with descriptions of the plants and flowers, the rose garden with descriptions of the colours and smells of the roses, the entrance of the park and the beauty of the park. Margaret Jenkins giving recipes for vegetarian food. Gordon Young telling a story. End of Side One. Norah Bryan at the spring town fair which was held in the Royal Square for charity. Talks with a member of the Jersey Society for the Disabled about how the spring fair started, his part in the fair, the stalls at the fair and the amount of money that was raised for charity. Describes the stalls around the Royal Square and the different charities represented. Sue Carr talked to Brian Waites about how he became interested in golf, whether he wanted to become a player at school, becoming a golf professional, his career, the different types of golf professional-looking after a shop at the golf course and giving tuition or playing tournaments, he tries to blend them both together, the number of tournaments he takes part in a year, taking his family to tournaments, playing with Senator John Rothwell and Bill Roache in the Pro Am Tournament and other people that he has played with. Sue Carr interviews Renton Laidlaw, a golf correspondent, whether he always walks around the golf course before a tournament, research for television, the different newspapers, radio and television programmes that he reports for, who pays the expenses for his travel, the countries that he enjoys the most including Switzerland, the Philippines and Hawaii and America, the communications from different countries, the relations between the press and golfers and the younger generation of golfers. At La Moye Golf Course there is a statue of a wooden unicorn-Howard Baker wrote a story around the unicorn which is read by Stewart Lobb. End of Side Two.

Reference: R/05/B/65

Date: June 30th 1982 - June 30th 1982

Jersey Talking Magazine-October Edition. Introduction by Gordon Young. Joan Stevens talking about TB Davis-born in 1866-died 1942. Born at Havre des Pas, went to sea as a young boy and was thought to have been drowned but had been picked up and arrived back in Jersey and walked into his memorial service. Attached to South Africa where he established himself as a stevedore and bought almost all of the stevedore interests in South Africa. He was very generous-gave to England, South Africa and Jersey. Gave University to City of Durban. All things given in memory of his son-Howard Leopold David-devoted local things in memory to him including Howard Davis Farm, the Howard Davis Hall at Victoria College, Howard Davis Park and various scholarships. Daughters continued his generosity giving money in memory of their father. Appeared in newspaper giving a window in memory of their father to St Luke's Church. Gave a room to the Société Jersiaise in memory of the Westward, their father's yacht-he loved sailing and made a great deal of the furniture of the Westward himself. Beth Lloyd interviewing Margaret Law, Assistant Chief Librarian, regarding what the Jersey Library has for partially sighted readers, large print books, the branch libraries large print books, if people cannot get into the library someone can choose books for them, improvements in large print books, the popularity of the books on the island, facilities for cassette recordings of books and advice given by library staff. Beth Lloyd with In Touch tips for the blind talking about the problem of drawing out money on holiday. Mary Phillips, a new member of the staff, introducing herself, describes where she lives and cooking for her son. Jean Le Boutillier sent a report from Malole, Zambia with singing from the children, talking about the building of a new clinic for the people of the Malole region, describing the project, talking to Peter Chileshi [?], a trained nurse, about the amount of people he sees a day, the complaints people come with-malaria, how you know people are suffering from malaria and the difference the clinic will make to the people of Malole. Talks to Pierre Jeunet [?], the foreman of the project, talking about how the building work is progressing, the comparison between the building in Zambia and Jersey, people suffering from the sun, repairing the cement mixer, help from the local people, the standard of their work, confident they will complete the project on time and the benefit of the project to the region. Geoffrey Baker, the leader of the project, talking about the selection process for the project, how the project is affecting the Jersey people working on the project, changes in the group, work done apart from the building-highlights of the visit-seeing the locals working and living in their villages. End of Side One. Beth Lloyd talking to Marion Bickerton about the permanent exhibition of Lillie Langtry memorabilia at the Société Jersiaise regarding when and why it was decided to put up the permanent exhibition, describing the redecoration of the room and the exhibits including her clock, a golden gun, a picture of the town called Langtry in Texas, a wardrobe, photographs of Lillie Langtry's life with description of her life, her travelling case and mirror, a variety of books relating to Lillie, a costume worn by Francesca Annis in the London Weekend Television series regarding Lillie Langtry, notes made by Lillie Langtry for her autobiography, copy of the Jersey Lily picture, advertising for Pears Soap, describing her various homes in Britain which are now hotels, the dresses for television, photocopy of Lillie Langtry's will, her funeral, the falling out of Lillie and her daughter, Edward Pointer's painting of Lillie Langtry and paintings by Ouless. John Boucheré talking about black butter including the milking of the cows, the custom of branchage and other customs of Jersey, black butter-social event of the season, describes where black butter would be made, mixing apples together in a pan, was the centre of a social occasion and describes how exactly it was made. End of Side Two.

Reference: R/05/B/66

Date: September 30th 1982 - September 30th 1982

Jersey Talking Magazine-December Edition. Introduction by Gordon Young. John Boucheré talking about camping describing what camping is today, what he likes about camping, the monthly meeting of a camping club, advice for the novice camper, meeting people in the camp sites and bad weather camping. Alastair Layzell interviewing Michael Nicholson, the television journalist who covered the Falklands War for ITN, about the Falklands War, the interest in the War, protesting after the war about the lack of cooperation from the Ministry of Defence, the lack of uniforms and equipment for the troops, communication from the ships, finding out for a soldier whether he had a child from HMS Hermes, how journalism has affected his life and how his family feel about him not reporting on any other wars. Joan Stevens talking about early Jersey doctors-no doctors in the earliest records. Gift of healing-became known throughout the community. A rector became known for this-Samuel de la Place-Rector of St Ouen in 1590-died 1651-came of a french refugee family-his services were paid in kind including by wheat, lamb, pork and other food and goods. Cures-purge used a great deal, a plaster for a child, bleeding and vomit. Unknown Account-from Linden Hall, Mont au Prêtre-c1630-probably from the Messervy family-list of cures written in english-different cures read out. Condition in the island-Camden wrote in 1586-that the inhabitants were in good health-no physicians in the island. Beth Lloyd with In Touch tips for the blind. End of Side One. Gordon Young on the train from Paris to Munich-commentating on the train journey with the sound of the train and talking about the other passengers on the train. Arriving in Munich for the beer festival describing the fairground at the festival, going on the ghost train and describing other rides and attractions. Sue Mackin talking to David Langlois, who during a three month stay in South Africa joined an American adventure excursion going down the rapids of the River Zambezi on an inflatable dinghy, describing how the trip started, looking at the first rapids, seeing the Victoria Falls, the guides, the boats, the work they had to do in order to help sail the boat, the requirements for the trip, shooting seventeen rapids and riffles, whether it got easier as the days went on, the different rapids and their difficulties, the feeling of elation once he had finished the rapid, being able to name a rapid, the different names of the rapids, camping at nights, the different animals that they saw, travelling down 105 miles in 7 days, staying on beaches by the river, encounters with crocodiles, defences against crocodiles, other animals they saw on their expedition, going around a waterfall, the number of boats and guides, his travelling companions and unrest between the two different countries-Zimbabwe and Zambia. Cooking Feature-Margaret Jenkins giving recipes for vegetables. End of Side Two.

Reference: R/05/B/67

Date: November 30th 1982 - November 30th 1982

Jersey Talking Magazine-Christmas Edition. Introduction by Gordon Young with christmas carols throughout by St John's Church Choir and Les Conteurs Singers. Poem by Gladys Rogers. Jennifer Grundy at the Met Office being interviewed, talking about what happens over christmas, the number of people on duty for shifts and keeping busy with different duties including weather forecasts. Mr Wileman, the general manager of the L'Horizon Hotel, talking about the hotel over christmas, who stays over Christmas, people going swimming in the sea, Christmas trees in the hotel, guests getting Christmas presents for christmas, going to de Gruchy after it is closed and choosing the presents and staff wrap the presents at a christmas party. David Killip at La Collette Power Station who is in charge on Christmas day describing what he has to do on christmas day, when it will be at is busiest, the number of staff in on christmas day and if there were any power cuts in the past on Christmas day. BBC Radio Jersey producer Peter Gore talking about what will be happening on the station on Christmas day-a Christmas morning programme, messages from the bailiff, the dean and the lieutenant governor on the show, getting in at 6.30, how he is spending the rest of the day and his favourite Christmas record. Quentin Bloxham, curator of reptiles at Jersey Zoo talking about what they do on Christmas day, amusing experiences on Christmas day-pythons go into the public area and his favourite Christmas carol. David Guy-Station Officer with the States of Jersey Ambulance Service-talking about working on christmas day, the staff working at the station on Christmas day, the duties carried out-checking the equipment and vehicles, having breakfast and waiting for call outs. Poem by Colin Plummer read by Pat Dubras. Beth Lloyd interviewing Joan Le Miere, at the telephone exchange, talking about the change in the telephone system, previous years when people had to book times to have a telephone call, if people are more patient on Christmas day, the number of people working on Christmas day and looking after the Christmas day. Gordon Young talking about cooking Christmas dinner. End of Side One. General Sir Peter Whiteley, lieutenant governor, with a Christmas message for the readers of the Jersey Talking Magazine. Harbour Master, Captain Bullen talking about the harbour on Christmas day, the number of people on duty including Jersey Radio, the people at the pierhead, the marina staff, the staff at Fort Regent and the police. The Islander magazine-an article written by Sonia Hillsdon called 'Christmas Past' about christmas in Jersey in previous years. Living in Jersey in past-second half of the 16th Century-islanders were not encouraged to celebrate Christmas because of Ccalvinism-worked as a normal day. 1726 a dead whale was washed up at La Pulec, St Ouen-77 foot long-declared as his by the of Seigneur of Vinchelez de Bas-two jaw bones of the whale was attached to his manor house. 1790-theatre-magic lantern show-shown by Mr Belon from France. 1799-over 6000 Russian soldiers-found all over the island-allies against the French. 19th Century-Christmas came into own-1834-a whole week of Christmas and merry making-Christmas dinner followed by cards. Used to ring the Christmas bells from midday Christmas night to midnight on Christmas day-in St Mary it got out of hand-in the 1850s Reverend Le Couteur Balleine tried to put a stop to it. In 1858 he removed the bell clapper, bell rope and the ladder to the bells and changed the locks on the church doors. A hand bell was circulated-while the door was being kicked in they got replacements for the rope clappers and managed to get in. There was no support from the parish assembly for the rector. Trevor Barette, dairy farmer of St Mary, talking about his Christmas day-milking, feeding, cleaning the cows, the cows going outside, a few hours off and then the feeding and milking the cows again and amusing experiences at Christmas. Tug Wilson, a fireman, talking about the hours he will be working on Christmas day, the duties on Christmas day and emergencies on past Christmases. Alan, a taxi driver, talking about what he does on Christmas day. Chris, an air traffic controller, talking about what he may be doing on Christmas day, being on call and trying to close the Jersey Airport. Sister Moulin, a nurse at the Jersey Maternity Hospital, talking about what she does on Christmas day, mothers, former staff and doctors bring their Christmas babies back, whether people like having Christmas babies, a special crib for a Christmas baby and a favourite Christmas carol. Michel Le Troqueur, a policeman, talking about being on duty over christmas, how he celebrates Christmas, crime over Christmas and a relaxed attitude over Christmas. End of Side Two.

Reference: R/05/B/68

Date: December 25th 1982 - December 25th 1982

Jersey Talking Magazine-January 1983. Introduction by Gordon Young. Beth Lloyd interviewing Katie Boyle, the television personality who has written two books-Boyle's Law and her autobiography 'What this Katie did'. Talks about why she had written her autobiography, her early life was harrowing-was imprisoned and put in a mental institution-the book was a release, whether she likes her image, her father and her childhood, her book called Boyle's Law which is a tribute to her relationship between her and her readers, her heritage-born in Italy and her father was part Russian and part Italian, her ability with languages, her ability to seem calm on television, working on the Eurovision Song Contest, coming to Jersey for her honeymoon and enjoying her holidays in the island. A guide by Lloyds Bank Limited for the blind and visually handicapped presented by Malcolm [?]. Kevin Mulhern talking about the difficulties that banks can offer for the visually impaired. Peter Thomas, chairman of the Amersham and Chesham Talking Newspaper and manager of Lloyds Fenchurch Street Branch, giving advice for visually handicapped people when using a bank including ringing in advance and using the same cashier. Kevin Mulhern cashing a cheque and talking about how welcoming the bank is, how much help he needs to complete the cheque, his routine when he comes into a bank, a member of staff helping him complete the cheque and getting out his money. Kevin Mulhern interviewing Peter Thomas about the possibility having a deposit account without a cheque book, writing that you are visually handicapped on the cheque book. Ernest Watson, a customer at the Great Portland Street Lloyds, talking about how long he has had his bank account, not to be worried when coming into the bank, what the staff do to help, what he uses the bank for and having no worries about withdrawing money. Peter Thomas and Kevin Mulhern talking about the facility of standing orders, statements and guides issued in Braille and large print, being able to talk to the bank manager, the services that the bank offers and the costs of the services. Kevin Mulhern talking about if he could live without a bank account. End of Side One. Group Captain Fred Winterbottom talking about Adolf Hitler, the Nazi party in the 1930s, getting to know Alfred Rosenberg-third in power in the early Nazi party. The Foreign Office had forbidden the embassies to talk to anyone in the Nazi Party so he went to Germany to see if he could find out any information, he talks about getting to know Hitler in 1934, his cover was that he was a supporter of the Nazi regime, they wanted him to be an unofficial contact with members of government in England. Had an interview with Hitler for an hour and quarter-was told Hitler's plans for the future world and heard Hitler rant about communists. When they found out who he actually was through Italian information in 1938 Rosenberg told him not to come back to Germany again. By that time he had established number of the German Air Force, the blitzkrieg strategy of the German tanks and the dates that the russian war was due to start and he knew the mentality of the people at the top. The quality of intelligence was so good that it was difficult convincing the Allied forces that it was real. He was involved in code breaking and details tricks used, 1942-43-built the first ever computer which could run all of the possibilities quickly to break the codes. His first book-'The Ultra Secrets' says some of the Allied commanders thought it was unfair that they knew what the enemy were doing-Montgomery especially. He had to brief the commanders about the intelligence-Montgomery was the only one who was uncooperative. The intelligence was essential for the victory of the Battle of Britain. He talks about the lack of credit for the code breakers of the second world war, whether it is possible to create an unbreakable code and experimenting with aerial photography. Joan Stevens talking about Jersey doctors. 1700s-quite a number of doctors were in the island including Solomon Journeaux, Dr Sabir [?] and Dr Forbes. In 1746 Dr Forbes attended Mr de Sausmarez and charged him for 'Peruvian bark' which was a precursor to quinine and was used for fevers in the late summer. There is mention of Dr Seale who was a physician and a surgeon. In 1745 Dr Richard Smith, visitor to the island, advertised 'scurvy grass' as a cure for scurvy. Dr Philip Choué de Vaumorel was born in Jersey in 1726 and died in 1789. He was a son of french refugees from Normandy. Choué means a screech owl and Vaumorel was their home. Once in Jersey he became known as de Vaumorel. Lived in Hue Street with a garden as far as Old Street and was an island character. He married Constance Charlotte Le Hardy, daughter of the attorney general, who acted as her husband's secretary. A bill survives from 1759 signed by her for 2 years of treatment for Mrs de Sausmarez. In 1773 Dr de Vaumorel offered to attend the poor at the Hospital for no charge. He was frequently quoted in newspapers of time. The medical treatment of the time mostly consisted of vomiting, bleeding and purging. Gordon Young taking a tour around the Sacre Coeur Cathedral in Paris describing the cathedral. End of Side Two.

Reference: R/05/B/69

Date: December 31st 1982 - December 31st 1982

Jersey Talking Magazine-May 1977 Edition. Introduction by Gordon Young. Nature, Gardening and Cooking Features with Frances Le Sueur, Chris and David and Margaret Jenkins-all talking about the use, growing, cooking and types of herbs. Island Administrators-Graham Pitman interviewing Senator Reg Jeune, President of the Education Committee about the responsibilities of the Education Committee, the differences between Jersey and the UK education committees, the problems for Jersey in the future, the problems of over crowding and the time that States work takes up. Eileen Le Sueur telling a humorous story of being caught for being drunk in charge in Jersey French. Gordon Young talking about the humorous story from the last edition. End of Side One. June Gurdon reading a poem by Reg Grandin about the queuing during the occupation. Interview with Molly Parker, a local artist who paints in the Chinese style. Talks about her art style, how she got into painting, different forms of Chinese art, being invited to display her art in an exhibition in Taiwan and she describes some of her painting and talks of her future plans. Di Weber visits HMS Jersey describing the ship, the activity on the ship. Talks to Mr Philips from Radio Lions about the outside broadcast that they're holding and the captain of the ship about the ship, her crew, the duties of the ship and a presentation of a bell to the ship by the island. Continues on the tour and talks to a sailor about the working of the ship, his time on the ship and his duties. Continues to describe the ship and talks to A V Tinning about the navigation and radar system on the ship and his duties. Talks about the gun on the ship, the view from St Helier Harbour, the flag, the quarter deck, the dinghies used to board other fishing vessels, the accommodation on the ship and the food. Gordon Young tells a humorous anecdote.

Reference: R/05/B/7

Date: April 30th 1977 - April 30th 1977

Jersey Talking Magazine-October 1983. Introduction by Gordon Young. Beth Lloyd went to the Jersey Airport the day before the Battle of Britain air display to talk to some of the pilots of the aeroplanes. Tony Hogg talks about what he is doing with his helicopter in the display and how the weather will affect the display. The sound of the red arrows and talking to John Blackwell of the Red Arrows about what they will be doing in the air display, when they have time to come up with new displays, the difficulty of thinking up new ideas, how long the team are together-three pilots being changed each year. Flight Lieutenant Rick Watts, the training pilot for the VIP Andover talking about why he is in Jersey for the air display, what he will be doing in the air display, which VIPs are flown around and whether he has been to Jersey before. Chris Topham talking about his solo aerobatics display, winning the Aerobatics Trophy, what is in the display, how he feels when he is taking part in the display, if her feels scared before take off, what he is doing next in his RAF career, taking part in the Krypton Factor on television. Dave Morgan, the pilot of the sea harrier, talking about why a RAF pilot is flying a royal navy plane, being awarded the distinguished service cross for his courage in the Falklands War, being featured on British Heart Foundation advertisements because of his success after being born with a hole in his heart, what he is going to be doing in the display and what he thinks of the sea harrier. Gordon Young interviewing Leonard Cheshire who saw the dropping of the atom bomb and as a result decided to set up the Cheshire Home Foundation for disabled people. Talks about how many Homes have been opened, what started the idea to set up the Cheshire Homes, the help that he gets from local people-voluntary help, whether the Homes will continue to grow, trying to help the process of disabled people living at home and moving out into the community-independent living, the need for residential living and what happens when the Home becomes full-the ideas for extension. Margaret Jenkins with a descriptive piece about autumn. End of Side One. Norah Bryan talking to Mrs Palmer and Janey her daughter, Australians who own a large sheep farm, about the problem of having no rain for four years, living between Sydney and Brisbane in Australia, owning 4000 acres of land and 10,000 sheep, a creek that runs through the land, how the sheep get water, feeding the sheep, how people who don't have water cope with animals on the land, how they manage to fertilise the land-using an aeroplane, going up in the plane to see what the land looks like. Janey talking about flying a plane, shearing the sheep, tar used to stop cuts caused by shearing, how the shearing is organised, when the sheep are sold, keeping track of the sheep and the sheep in Jersey. Beth Lloyd interviewing Harry Hurst, a hypno and psycho therapist who has published a book about reincarnation called 'The Thousand Year Memory', talking about what persuaded him to write the book, the idea of people regressing into past lives, choosing five subjects and his findings from the tests, how far back people regressed, what makes him believe that they are regressing to a previous life and his belief in reincarnation. Joan Stevens talking about early local doctors in the 1800s. Dr George Symes Hooper-equivalent of the Medical Officer of Health nowadays-in charge whilst the cholera epidemic of 1832 took place. Through him and his account we know about the epidemic-we know less about the cholera epidemics of the 1860s. Cholera epidemics-people did now know what caused it-Dr Hooper realised it was down to bad drains, poverty, hunger and drunkenness. He concluded that it was introduced via St Malo and was made worse by a prolonged drought before it came about. Thought there was more drunkenness in Jersey than anywhere else in the world. Plans for drainage in St Helier-in discussion-after outbreak urged authorities forward. The outbreak was partly caused by the lie of the land-lower parts of land getting all of the drainage from all parts of the land. Outbreak started in Cabot's Yard, Sand Street. It was so bad town was divided into 12 districts with different doctors for each, all markets were closed and traffic between St Aubin and St Helier was reduced to a minimum. Cases where population dense were hit worst-St Mary and St Aubin escaped from disease. It was a mystery how St Aubin escaped-speculation that it was because it was richer, thriving and there were less people. Bad outbreaks-south and east of town, St Saviour, St Clement and Grouville-built up areas. North of island almost escaped. 341 fatalities out of 806 case of a population of 36,000-high incidence of deaths. According to the diaries of Sir John Le Couteur he believed the prime cause was the bad water where some of the privies drained. 1849-300 died and 1867 another outbreak-improvements in drainage didn't come immediately-improved after 1867. 1849 epidemic-an entry in a diary of people contracting cholera but not dying displays that not everybody died. Dr Joe Dixon-rhyme written about him. Treatment in 1851 recorded in the diaries of Sir John Le Couteur. He had to get from First Tower to Millbrook with his troops for a militia inspection. At Mont Félard Sir John Le Couteur got kicked by a horse in his ankle but carried on with his review of the militia. When he got home Dr Dixon was called-gave 12 leaches and a purge to the ankle, linseed poultices were put on but the wound went septic. He went to a doctor in England-Dr Brody told him to put on lead ointment and keep living well. Joan Stevens comments that treatments have improved a great deal today. End of Side Two.

Reference: R/05/B/70

Date: September 30th 1983 - September 30th 1983

Jersey Talking Magazine-November 1983. Introduction by Gordon Young. Ideal Homes Exhibition at Fort Regent last month. Beth Lloyd talking to a person on a stand about a talking oven for the blind, how it works and how much it may cost when it is released. Ruby Bernstein telling a story of a dog that followed her and her difficulty in trying to escape from it. Nature Feature-Frances Le Sueur talking about owls including examples of its call. Bob Evans interviewing Group Captain Fred Winterbottom talking about his early life, going on a trip through Canada, Japan, Hong Kong, Australia, New Zealand and India-seeing the Empire as it was before the first world war, returned before first world war began, joined a regiment and became a cavalry man, becoming a fighter pilot during the first world war, getting shot down and captured and was in a POW camp. How he became interested in the intelligence service, built up the air service of the secret service and some of the information he discovered. Paul Brown interviewed Harold MacMillan as a student at Leeds University and asked him who were the great Statesmen in the world that he had met including Jack Kennedy, Charles de Gaulle, what particularly inspired him in a man, who inspires him today and if he was a young man what he would strive towards in the current world. End of Side One. Gordon Young interviewing Jack Worrall at St Mark's Church about how church bells are rung, how he got interested in bell ringing, the ban on bells being rung being lifted in 1943, how bells are rung, the clock installed in St Mark's Church in 1880-dedicated to Charles William Robin, getting to the top of the clock tower to see the bells, the names of the bells, how the bells are hung, what you have to do to get the bells into the ringing position, the stay-can rest the bell on it so as not to have to pull the bell each time and it is a safety feature, the mechanics of bell ringing, the bells being made of copper and tin and the noise of the bell. Jack Worrall talking about the history of the bells in the church, the sally-the place that is pulled on the rope, the dangerous things that can happen, hand ringing bells, a spirit of comradeship between bell ringers-ringing bells for Charles Lovett whose golden wedding anniversary is being celebrated, the physical effort of bell ringing, sequences of bells ringing during a peal including examples on the hand bells, mistakes made during bell ringing and how the bells are played and conducted. Describing how the bells are pulled and talking about how hard it is getting the bell into position. Listening to the peal of church bells. Margaret Jenkins reading a poem by Stanley Holloway. Gordon Young finishing with a joke. End of Side Two.

Reference: R/05/B/71

Date: October 31st 1983 - October 31st 1983

Jersey Talking Magazine-Christmas 1983. Introduction by Gordon Young with christmas carols sung throughout by the Jersey Festival Choir and their Junior Singers and Les Conteurs Singers. Gordon Young describing various christmas lights around Jersey including Bouley Bay, Charing Cross. Beth Lloyd reading a poem by Colin Plummer called 'Christmas Tree'. Gordon Young with a description of the christmas lights in the Childrens Ward at the Jersey General Hospital. Edgar Fryatt talking about previous christmases that he has experienced. Gordon Young describing christmas lights in an electrical shop and the entrance of Trinity Church. End of Side One. A Jersey version of 'The 12 days of Christmas' sung by the Home Chase Choir. Gordon Young describing the christmas lights at the Trinity Arms public house and the Jersey Airport. Margaret Jenkins talking about the origin of father christmas and reading 'The Night before Christmas' by Clement Clarke Moore. Gordon Young describing the light of the moon in Bouley Bay and the christmas lights in St Helier looking from Fort Regent. End of Side Two.

Reference: R/05/B/72

Date: December 25th 1983 - December 25th 1983

Jersey Talking Magazine-March 1984. Introduction by Gordon Young. Mary Phillips talking about her mother in law making marmalade, where her mother in law lives, her personality, her ninetieth birthday, the reorganisation of her kitchen and her mother in laws reaction to this reorganisation. Ben Fox, Crime Prevention Officer, talking about his job, the prevention of crime, gives advice about crime prevention, must not be complacent, should call the police as soon as a crime is detected, organises exhibitions in order to promote crime prevention, talks about locks for doors, meeting people in the community, supplies new material for the Schools Liaison Officers and the Crime Prevention Panel. Joan Stevens talking about sailors in Jersey who became admirals in the royal navy. The Le Hardy family had 3 admirals, Sir Charles Junior and Senior had no part in Jersey affairs. Sir Thomas Le Hardy-1666-1732 was born in St Martin-north of church. In 1700 he sold all of his Jersey property. In 1693 he commanded a ship called HMS Swallow in Guernsey to protect CI shipping. In 1702 the Spanish fleet came back with vast treasure hoards from South America. The Mediterranean was being blockaded. Beauvoir, a Channel Islander, was chaplain on board Le Hardy's ship. He spoke French and so the people on shore told him where the Spanish treasure ship could be found. Le Hardy chased it and found it and took the vast fleet which contained 13 million pieces of eight amongst other things. The silver was melted down to Britannia silver which was very valuable. Le Hardy took the news to Queen Anne who gave him a gift of 1000 guineas and knighted him. Poor account of character, he was not pleasant according to a contemporary account. Portrait of Le Hardy described. Memorial to him in Westminster Abbey-describes his Jersey ancestors-great deal of information about the Le Hardy family. Admiral Philip Durell-1707-1767 was born in St Helier and was son of the Solicitor General. He entered the navy at the age of 13. By 1745 he was at the taking of Cape Breton from the French and took part in the storming of Quebec by General Wolfe. He helped get supplies to Quebec. Philip Durell-died at sea by eating dolphin. There is a portrait of him by Reynolds. Admiral Philip de Carteret-1733-1796-son of the Seigneur of Trinity, born in Trinity and has been 'ranked amongst the greatest geographical discoverers of his time'. In 1764 he went on a expedition to Pacific. During the expedition they annexed the Falkland Islands which almost caused war with Spain who had claimed them. It was an unsuccessful mission as the admiral in charge came back as soon as he could. In 1766 he was sent out in an unsuitable vessel, the HMS Swallow, and was away for over 2 years and circumnavigated the globe. He named many islands including the Pitcairn Island. De Carteret named one group of islands after the Channel Islands and although these have not survived many of the names have. During the time that they were away they lived in poor conditions. Scurvy was rampant among the crew. De Carteret moved back to Trinity in 1769 and lived in Trinity Manor for 10 years until he was called back into service as a naval reserve for the American War of Independence. He died in Southampton at the age of 63. End of Side One. Beth Lloyd visiting a tea factory in Jersey at the Overseas Trading Corporation. Talking to John King, Managing Director of OTC, about how the firm was started in 1876 by a tea and silk merchant, Thomas Charles Staples Cook from Reading-started as a tea trader, his difficulty in beginning the factory-first factory at Cheapside before moving to First Tower, the size of the firm, how OTC grew, links with other companies, what makes OTC different from the other parts of the organisation-Lyons Tetley. Tour of the factory with production director Chris Sheehan talking about the different processes at the factory, where the tea gets exported to, where the tea comes from, quality control, the selection of flavours and explaining about the flavour of a tea that he tastes. A tea taster from France, Mr Barrer [?], commenting on the flavour of teas. Marketing director, Gerald Harrison, talking about the marketing side of the business, the different markets in different countries, the role of regional export managers, the different tastes in different countries, the increase in popularity of flavoured teas, what the role of marketing director is like, visiting different countries and funny experiences. John King talking about OTC during the occupation-the tea stores of Jersey, supplied tea to island and packing food, looked after control of wood and the future plans of the OTC. Beverley Coleman, the rector of St Saviour, talking about the reason for pancakes being made for Shrove Tuesday, what happened to the eggs that were not eaten during lent, regional variations on this theme, the origin of Ash Wednesday and what people should do for Lent. Gordon Young ends with a humorous story. End of Side Two.

Reference: R/05/B/73

Date: February 29th 1984 - February 29th 1984

Jersey Talking Magazine-April 1984.

Reference: R/05/B/74

Date: March 31st 1984 - March 31st 1984

Jersey Talking Magazine-May 1984. Introduction by Gordon Young. Beth Lloyd interviewing Philip Forster, the Promotions manager at Fort Regent, talking about the 'Kingdom of the Sharks' display-how the display works and a description of the display, the Victor White Model Aircraft Collection with a description of the items held and a description of a display of spaceships, the exhibit called SAVE-with a description of what it is. Joan Stevens continuing her talk on admirals. Charles Bertram-1777-1854-joined navy under d'Auvergne and took part in 1795 at Quiberon. He was taken prisoner at that time and remained in prison for some years until exchanged for other prisoners. He was put on press gang service where he had to abduct men to serve in the navy. Well-loved and recognised at home. In 1808 a newspaper wrote a poem greeting him home. At the museum there are his portrait, cutlass, some of his commissions and his court martial in 1813 when he was honourably acquitted. The court martial was an enquiry and not what we'd consider a court martial which took place when any sailor lost his ship. Henry Dumaresq is not as well known. Born 1808-1877, the son of Sir John Dumaresq, and was born in St Peter's House. In a French Revolution of 1848, when France became a Republic, the French Royal family fled and some of them came to Jersey in order to get to England. When they contacted Sir John Le Couteur he organised getting them to safety in England on the naval ship HMS Cuckoo, which was stationed in Gorey Harbour under Captain Henry Dumaresq. Sir John arranged for Henry to transport them. The night before they left they had roast beef and plum pudding on board of HMS Cuckoo. A couple of years later Henry Dumaresq was in charge of HMS Cuckoo when it was wrecked in St Helier Harbour. It struck Oyster Rock and sank and it was his guidance that led to no loss of life and she was later salvaged and repaired and went back into commission. In 1875 he became an admiral. Beth Lloyd talking about the Talking Newspaper Association of the United Kingdom who have formed the National Newspaper and Magazine Tape Services for the blind. A pilot project set up in 1983 which was very successful and led to 15 national newspapers and magazines now being available on tape. A permanent production unit has been set up with funding and Beth Lloyd talks about how to become eligible, how long you can have them for and how to subscribe. Collectors Corner- in St Brelade where there is a large collection of china, glass and books, relating to the royal family, at the home of Peggy Dollop. She talks about how she started collecting in 1940, the range of her collection, the book that started her collection, the latest book in her collection, the china, portraits of Queen Elizabeth, descriptions of various pieces of her collection, the oldest piece of her collection, her cabinet and its contents. End of Side One. Gordon Young talking about the production of Annie at the Jersey Opera House by the Green Room Club. Interviewing Lloyd Cornish talking about having to shave his head for the role, how the show is going, whether it has come up to his expectations, the performance of the dog and whether he would like to go on to a bigger production after the end of the run. Interviewing Sadie Marshall about how the show is going, working on her accent, whether the hard work was worth it, how good the children are to work with and the dog. Talking to the children of the production about whether they are enjoying themselves, what the show Annie is about and singing for the show. Talking to Diane Powell who plays Annie about what it is like taking part in the show, what the show is about, whether she enjoys the singing and dancing and whether she has taken part in a show before. Talking to the dog. Ben Fox, Crime Prevention Officer, talking about callers to the house, not allowing strangers into your house, getting a door chain fitted, the importance of being vigilant, who might call at a house, alarms and the fitting of a new door chain. Gordon Young talking through the Lionel Richie video for the song 'Hello'. Ken Kirk-Bailey talking about broadcasting on amateur radio, how they call people up, Tony Hancock playing an amateur radio enthusiast, describing the machines from which they broadcast and the distance over which they can communicate and the difference between ham and CB radio. St Clement gave them a lease for Le Hocq Tower and they made it into a club headquarters. The Philatelic Bureau issued a stamp of Le Hocq Tower which is now a collectors item and the new penny has a picture of Le Hocq Tower, the world's first amateur radio station to be on a penny. They are spending a week talking to the amateur radio hams in New Jersey to promote the island and he talks about their reaction, making personal friends of people they have never met in their life and a special week in july when they are going to promote the Durrell Wildlife Conservation Trust. End of Side Two.

Reference: R/05/B/75

Date: April 30th 1984 - April 30th 1984

Jersey Talking Magazine-Mid-summer 1984. Introduction by Gordon Young. Beth Lloyd visiting Le Brun's the Bakery, which was founded 180 years ago in Hansford Lane but it wasn't until 1938 that the present managing director's Brian Le Marquand's family took it over when his father bought in. Brian Le Marquand talking about why his father bought the bakery, how much it cost, in 1938 the business was 5% of the island trade but by 1950 it had been built up to 15% of the trade when it was moved to Brighton Road, joining the company in 1958 and buying 50 % of the shareholding in 1960, how the company has changed, it now has 85% of island trade, taking over three other island bakeries, problems in putting sell by dates on the bread, trying to bake bread for when people need to use it, retail trade only one side of the business, they also serve the hotel, guest house and cafe trade and now cater for private parties. David Parmiter, the Production Director, talks about the bread bakery, the process of making bread, the people who work in the bakery, how to tell when the bread is ready, slicing and packing the bread, a new machine detecting metal in the bread, the decorating room-used for making and decorating cakes, meat preparation room-high standard of hygiene, meat delivered fresh daily, how they make and roll their pastries, the roll bakery which involved the same process as bread, 60,000-70,000 rolls made a day, half baked products been brought in and are selling well, wholemeal bread has risen tremendously. Frank Todd, Commercial Manager, in the dispatch area talking about delivering goods, the amount of deliveries a day, how long a delivery takes, the part weather plays in orders, the risk of waste at the end of the day, getting the weather forecast so they can guess how much food is going to be ordered, not freezing orders and dealing with an order-in radio contact with the drivers. Tricia Jones, a tele-sales girl, talks about ringing customers every day to ask them their orders for the next day. Nick Le Couteur, the Sales Director, explaining what happens to the orders after phone calls by the tele-sales girl in order to prepare the food, how many products Le Brun's manufacture-over 500 products, many thousands of products produced each day, modern trends, the movement towards wholemeal breads, cakes still popular, the introduction of croissants, different outlets and the use of computers within the company. Brian Le Marquand talking about future plans for the company. John Boucheré talking about coach trips-in 1946-47 there were a dozen coach companies of various sizes, he trained as a motor engineer-in the early 1950s he decided to drive a coach around the island, he was painfully shy, driving relatively easy but it was difficult to answer questions in front of everybody. He talks about the different people who he encountered on his tours, the way people used to sing after lunch, dealing with drunken passengers, carrying people on poignant journeys-parents of a soldier who died and helping a blind passenger. Stan Birch, a jazz pianist, playing a piece with Wendy Shields singing. End of Side One. Philip Gurdon taking a tour of the German Underground Hospital with Joe Mière. Joe Mière talking about the construction of the tunnels, the different workers, when the work began in 1941, Organisation Todt and the fact that it was planned as an artillery barracks but in 1943 its use was changed to be a bunker. Commenting on the exhibits, talking about ghosts in the tunnels, changes they are making to the tunnels, rock falls in the tunnels, a rest room, the dispensary-was never used, a ward with a description, the equipment in the rooms of the tunnels, an escape shaft, what happened to the Hospital at the end of the war-the company buying the tunnel and becoming more successful, a closed tunnel that has now been opened. Museum-letters by Walter Gallichan-taken to Alderney, survivors of Alderney having a reunion. Describing the exhibits in the museum, newscuttings from the newspaper, the Stranger's Cemetery, reunions with the Russians and a bouquet of flowers put up by Maud Otter. Beth Lloyd telling a story about her cat. End of Side Two.

Reference: R/05/B/76

Date: May 31st 1984 - May 31st 1984

Jersey Talking Magazine-June 1977 Edition. Introduction by Gordon Young. Nature Feature-Frances Le Sueur talks about wild garlic and the cuckoo with its bird call. Interview by Gordon Young of the television naturalist David Bellamy talking about what drew him into botany, his interest in flowers and the conservation of animals and plants in the garden. Cooking Feature-Margaret Jenkins talking about what recipes you can make with cheese. Beth Lloyd talking to a doctor about the use of vitamin supplements. Island Administrators-Graham Pitman talking to John Lees of Controller of Social Security about the functions of the Social Security Department, the differences between Jersey and the UK, future developments in social security, how awareness is raised of the department's work to the public. Tim giving hints on bath aids for the blind and elderly. End of Side One. June Gurdon reading Reg Grandin's poem 'Little Treasured Joys'. Commander Cruisarr from Guernsey talking about the evolution of Talking Books for the blind. Beth Lloyd talking to Frank Walker, Managing Director of the Jersey Evening Post, about the moving of the newspaper offices from Bath Street to Five Oaks, the printing of the newspaper, going on a tour of the building with descriptions of each room and the printing process. Roy Fauvel tells the history of a gold snuff box recently presented to St Helier by Eric Young which was presented to Edward Nicolle, the Constable of St Helier in the 1820s, who was censured by the States after comments made but received the box as a vote of confidence from the parish. Gordon Young with a story about the muratti.

Reference: R/05/B/8

Date: May 31st 1977 - May 31st 1977

Jersey Talking Magazine-July 1977, Jubilee Edition. Introduction by Gordon Young. Children from Mont Cantel School talking about they think the queen does, Beth Lloyd reading a reply from the queen regarding the Jubilee Edition of the Jersey Talking Magazine. Island Administrators-Sir Frank Ereaut, the Bailiff, talking to Graeme Pitman about the island's loyalty to the crown, the history of the island's link to the crown and with a message to the readers. Feature finding out where members of the radio team were on Coronation Day twenty five years previously. Di Weber talks to Mrs Hibbs at the Glory and Majesty Flower Festival at Grouville Church which was held to celebrate the jubilee with a description of the flower arrangements and their significance within the church. Gordon Young talking about the beacon of bonfires set alight to celebrate the jubilee. End of Side One. Poem on the queen read out by a child. Experiencing the events of the jubilee celebrations at Howard Davis Park for the multi-denominational service celebrating the occasion with descriptions of the surroundings and the parade taking place, the equestrian events at the People's Park with horse and carriage displays put on by the Coach Drivers Association and the Multina Riding Centre, a tug of war competition, Richard Spears talking to Beth Lloyd about the yard of ale competition and a description of the firework display. Gordon Young finishing with a humorous story.

Reference: R/05/B/9

Date: June 30th 1977 - June 30th 1977

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