Jersey Talking Magazine-November Edition. Introduction by Gordon Young. Beth Lloyd interviewing Harry Patterson about his latest book 'To Catch a King', its historical accuracy, the plot of the book and the true story behind the book involving the plan to capture the Duke of Windsor during the second world war and use him as king once Britain had been defeated. David Bougeard talking to Marion Beech at the Barreau Art Gallery about various pictures including a portrait of Senator Ralph Vibert by Maisie Ryan, paintings by Lisette Le Sueur, a picture of a summer storm by Norman Pallot and paintings of Jersey scenes by Eric Walker. Linda Le Vasseur talking to Jean Dutton about Greenpeace in Guernsey, saving the whales, how it started locally, the links with the anti-nuclear groups, the boat the Rainbow Warrior, problems Greenpeace have run into in Iceland, whether she is hopeful for the future to stop whale killing and the Greenpeace Guernsey market being held to raise money. Cooking Feature-Margaret Jenkins talking about recipes that use apples. In Touch tips for the blind on butcher's skewers. End of Side One. Interview with John Rust, music master at Victoria College Prep including the choir singing. He talks about whether he ever wanted to be a musician, his career, coming to Jersey, visiting Salzburg, teaching pupils at the school, putting on concerts, problems of boys dropping out, the amount of boys in the choir, the excitement of the boys before performing and how he gets them to perform. Joan Stevens taking a tour around St Martin. Talks about the boundaries of the parish, St Martin's Church-the patron saint of the church, records of St Martin's Church from 1042, spire being struck by lightning and a conductor being put up, the age of the spire, finding the broken head of a saint, the perquage leading from the church to St Catherine, La Masseline Dam, Les Ecrehous is part of St Martin-talks about the International Court of Justice Case, the priory, the quarrying of granite from the reef which was used in St Martin, St Catherine's Breakwater-lots of things went wrong, badly planned, harbour was given to the States of Jersey, tower at Fliquet, two prehistoric monuments-La Couperon and Faldouet, Rozel Manor and its alterations, the chapel in the manor which is from the twelfth century-belongs to the Lempriere family, Bandinel Farm-built by 1619 Jean Le Manquais and then passed to the Bandinel family-example of a superior house of the 1600s, St Martin's House-altered a great deal-first owner Gratien Collas in 1490-a breton and a great deal of changes since, fireplace found in which a pottery jar was found-it was a pout-an early version of a safe. Gordon Young tells a humorous story.

Reference: R/05/B/36

Date: October 31st 1979 - October 31st 1979

Jersey Talking Magazine-September Edition. Introduction by Gordon Young. Joan Stevens taking a tour of St Clement talking about the early history of the parish, St Clement's Church including the piscina, the font, the paintings on the wall, the line of the roof, stone seats around the base of the pillars and the priory, the size of the parish, the effects of the sea, prehistoric remains including the dolmens, menhirs and prehistoric graves of the parish. The chapel that was dedicated to St John the Evangelist before the Reformation which was destroyed, Rocqueberg which was used by a witches coven, Jean Mourant and others who were killed for being witches. Talks about 1685 when they received french refugees, Le Hocq Tower-a Jersey Round Tower, Victor Hugo who lived at Marine Terrace from 1853 to 1855, Samares Manor including the fact it took its name from the salt around the manor, the dovecote, a windmill in 1218, the chapel, the families who held the manor who were the de Ste Hilaire's, the Payn's, the Dumaresq's, the Seale's, the Hamon's, the Mourant's and Sir James Knott who renovated the garden. Before that Philippe Dumaresq built a garden, he also wrote an important survey on Jersey in the 1680s. Cooking Feature-Margaret Jenkins giving recipes for desserts. Guernsey Feature-Linda Le Vasseur talking to Joan Stockdale, a Guernsey journalist for a newspaper, asking her why she decided to become a reporter, how she started, how she felt when she started, how it developed, her women's and children's pages, the most interesting people she has interviewed, interviewing Michael Parkinson, Jimmy Saville, Frank Bough, Peter Sellers, Oliver Reed, the most difficult part of the job, coping with a career and a family, her interest in tropical birds, her collection of amber, her favourite books and her advice for the listener who wants a career in journalism. Horoscope feature-Diane Postlethwaite talking about the forecast for virgo for the year. End of Side One. Driving down to Corbiere, on top of tower-radio aerials-home of Jersey Radio, the nerve centre of Jersey shipping communications and run by the Harbours and Airport Committee-describing the structure, talking to Mr Dale about a rescue taking place of a fishing boat, the view from the tower, the wind blowing, the increased need for Jersey Radio, what Jersey Radio does and is told by boats, working with the French, dealing with a rescue, the frequencies used, what's happening with the rescue, the transmissions between the officials dealing with the rescue, the use of air rescue, the frequency and types of emergencies. Story read by Peter Gilchrist about Mike Tetley, a guide dog owner and completely blind, who appeared on This is Your Life and climbed up Mount Everest describing his life, his training and the process by which he climbed the mountain. Quiz-Gordon Young announces the winner from the previous month and sets a new quiz. End of Side Two.

Reference: R/05/B/46

Date: August 31st 1980 - August 31st 1980

Jersey Talking Magazine-April Edition. Introduction by Gordon Young. Philip Gurdon interviewing Ken Ball, an amateur radio enthusiast, about the equipment for his amateur radio station, the regulations involved in broadcasting amateur radio, the Radio Society of Great Britain, the examinations needed to be sat to operate an amateur radio, a blind operator, communicating with people throughout the world on the radio, listening to an amateur broadcaster from London and Malta and talking to people across the world. Joan Stevens taking a tour around St Ouen about it being the biggest parish in the island but one of the smallest population, named after a 7th century bishop of Rouen with a relic that was placed in the church, St Ouen's Church-the date it was built, St Ouen's Bay which is actually in three parishes, La Rocco Tower built between 1796 and 1800-a Jersey round tower-last to be built, was falling apart-during the occupation used as target practice, tower repaired. Vinchelez de Haut and Vinchelez de Bas Manor's-architectural details of the manors, Abraham Le Sueur was killed at Vinchelez de Bas by a falling rock, St Ouen's Manor-biggest and oldest manor in island, parts that date back to 1135 to the de Carteret families, 1490-fortified and crenellated by then seigneur of St Ouen in fear of attack, over years altered a great deal, 1670-restoration, later fell into disrepair-de Carteret family important in England, passed to the Malet de Carterets-Colonel Malet de Carteret-1860s-started large scale restorations until 1880-appearance there is today, Le Pinnacle-important site-centre of pilgrimage for over 2000 years, worry of erosion and vandalism, lovely area of flora, windmills and dolmens in parish-Moulin de la Mare did exist where Val de la Mar exists-a seigneurial mill-used by the public. L'Etacq-name from an old norse name, had a martello tower on it-L'Etacquerel-removed by germans during the occupation, lead found up at L'Etacq, vraic collected from L'Etacq which was used as compost, caves, Les Mielles-being kept as conservation centre, needs to be kept natural so it is not destroyed. Excerpt from a Midsummer Night's Dream, the first time Shakespeare had been performed at the Jersey Opera House for a number of years, featuring Sonia Hamon and Rosemary and Hilary Lissenden. Horoscope Feature-Diane Postlethwaite giving a forecast for the year for aries. End of Side One. Beth Lloyd describing the view from her house and the joys of spring with Gordon Young reading the poem 'I wander lonely as a cloud'. Vicki Stuckey talking to Lloyd Cornish of Elle, who provides wedding dresses asking what brides are wearing nowadays, what they should look for in a wedding dress, the colour and length of the wedding dress, the fashions, the expense of the dress, the style of veil and headdress, the design of Lady Diana's wedding dress. Beth Lloyd talking to Jeffrey Archer about his latest book 'Cain and Abel', the research that went into the book, his university days and running, keeping fit, becoming the youngest member of the Greater London Council, becoming a member of parliament, losing a million pounds with a bad investment, writing his first book based on his experiences, deciding to continue writing, his desire to get back in to politics and his decision to put it on hold, his next book, a sequel to 'Cain and Abel', his plans for the foreseeable future, an invitation to meet the Emperor of Japan and his pride in being published in Braille. Di Weber went to the Mont Felard Hotel asking Steve, the chef, how he copes with cooking for so many people, what he enjoys cooking the most, his hours at the hotel and Renata a waitress about working as a waitress, learning how to serve people, why she likes the job and where she comes from and Jill, the receptionist talking about her duties, difficult customers and living in the hotel. Gordon Young tells a humorous story. End of Side Two.

Reference: R/05/B/53

Date: March 31st 1981 - March 31st 1981

Jersey Talking Magazine-December Edition. Introduction by Gordon Young. Joan Stevens taking a tour of St Peter talking about the size of the parish with the sea on two sides, St Peter's Church which is mentioned in records before 1066, in 1053 it is referred to as St Pierre don la dessert because of the exposed sandy soil. Where Jersey Airport is now used to be rich corn land with massive harvests. Down near St Ouen the sand dunes are with diverse wildlife-Les Mielles is being preserved as a result. St Peter's Church-tallest spire in the island and has been hit by lightning at least 3 time, it dates from 1400s and there are some initials on some of the stones. In the church an incised tombstone has been built into the wall-marks of a blacksmiths grave. Over 100 years ago the church was too small for congregation-an extra knave was built as a result of the garrison being stationed at St Peter's Barracks. Barracks built in 1811 until 1927-they were removed to make way for Airport. Bell in church has a name incised on it, a piscina in the church was found in Les Bois when it was knocked down and was installed in church. A priory in St Peter was on land called La Flocquetterie-now Philadelphie Chapel stands on it. On the corner by Oak Walk there was a leper house. St Anastase-in Coin Varin-was a school house which was founded in 1496. Children attended from 6am-6pm and had lessons in latin and were taught latin, the classics and divinity. La Hague Manor-now changed to school, the colombiers was changed into the school library. The house itself was built in 1634, rebuilt in 1733 and in 1871 by Colonel Le Cornu. St Peter's House-originally home of Robin Family-burnt in 1754 and rebuilt-greatly altered since-used to be home of Sir William Venables Vernon-bailiff. The Rectory-moved 3 times in the parish-used to be next to La Hague Manor then moved nearer church to north of La Flocquetterie-1800s and then moved beside there and then modern rectory moved close by church. Mills-more mills than every other parish-Quetteville has been restored by the National Trust for Jersey-working mill, Tostain Mill-did belong to a lame priest. St Peter had a windmill in 1837-turned into restaurant. Parish gun-1551 at Beaumont Hill-all parishes had guns-only one that survived-made by John Owen and inscribed, in 1839-Sir John le Couteur found it in England and returned it to the parish. St Ouen's Bay-a great deal of it in St Peter-famous battle-commonwealth defeated royalists during civil war-Sir George Carteret defeated by Admiral Blake-Carteret fled to Elizabeth Castle. Jersey Airport-started 1937-extensions since. Germans dug into St Peter almost more than any other parish-headquarters at Panigo [?]-underground constructions and strongpoints in the parish. Beautiful houses in St Peter. St Peter's Valley-crowning glory of parish-Queen Victoria-visit in 1859 taken by Sir John Le Couteur for a drive there. Rachel Pirouet singing a song that she sang in the Jersey Eisteddfod followed by the presentation of the John Lobb memorial goblet to the Jersey Eisteddfod. Phil Gurdon talks to Beryl Jordan about how the Jersey Eisteddfod was going, the judge of the competition, the number of people who had entered, no class for the Jersey Norman French, how long the Eisteddfod had been going in Jersey and when they start preparing for the next years competition. Pat Dubras and Brian Le Breton singing a duet from the play 'Free as Air' performed at the Jersey Opera House. Beth Lloyd paying tribute to David Scott-Blackwell who used to present In Touch tips for the blind including quotations fro his poetry. End of Side One. Chris and David at a steam fair in Trinity in the sheds of Lyndon Charles Pallot with a steam engine threshing corn describing the scene and how the engine and the threshing machine works, what the engine is used for, looking at the steam machines in the shed, hand threshing being shown and the man being interviewed [with a Jersey accent] about the process, the threshing machine, when it would have been last used and a corn measure. A man being interviewed about bread being made and the process involved, cabbage loaves and how they are made. Description of a petrol engine and a smaller threshing machine with the noise of the machine and interviews about the machine including with Jim Purvis, description of a tractor, interview about a machine that rolls oats for the horses. Describing model steam engines made by Harold Taylor of St Ouen with the noise of the engines. Mr Pallot talking about the different machines that he owns, working with them and the steam fair. Description of different engines on display. Cynthia Reed interviewing Robert Farnon, a composer and arranger who lives in Guernsey, asking whether he came from a musical family, what musical instruments he played when he was young, having professional training, when he wrote his first piece of music, his first job in the professional world-playing in his brother's band, how he starts composing music, conducting, when he moved to Guernsey, his favourite piece of music he wrote, how much he enjoys arranging music, the music he listens to, his favourite artist to work with -Tony Bennett and what he is doing next in his career. James Clayton reading a story about 'Dinah-the Dog with a Difference'. End of Side Two.

Reference: R/05/B/60

Date: November 30th 1981 - November 30th 1981

Personal View of Florence Bechelet [with jersey accent] interviewed by Beth Lloyd talking to her about the Battle of Flowers. She has been making floats since 1934, she decided to start when she saw a float in 1928, noticed a carnival class was being held-decided she wanted to take part in it, she made a watering can costume and showed it to a neighbour who said that she'd done very well, was going to walk in with it but it would have been too heavy. At 15 she found an old pram, which she tied with string planks and put a tower shaped clock and vases with flowers on it. With two friends she went to the Battle Of Flowers at Springfield and won 3rd Class in the class with 10 shillings prize money. She was determined to do better next time. She was not artistic at school, she put the floats together by looking at picture of animals to get ideas and cutting a piece of wire bigger than the animal and shaping it. For the first 3 years she made it with hydrangeas. She found out there was a prize for best exhibit in junior class and senior in wild flowers. In 1937 she made a weather house in heather and won first in her class and the junior wild flowers prize, which was 6 solid silver tea spoons. First record-a March from the Band of the Welsh Guards. Battle Of Flowers at Springfield was a smaller scale than today but had beautiful floats. They used a lot more hydrangeas in those days. There was more of a team effort in the past, young people used to put together exhibits, most young people were in the Battle. Springfield-used to hold up to 10,000 people who were mostly islanders but there were a few tourists. Local bands used to play. The outbreak of war stopped the Battle Of Flowers. Her family had a farm but they couldn't export produce and cattle kept being taken by the germans. They were left with 2 cattle, a severely depleted stock, in St Ouen. The Germans took 12 vergees of land in Les Landes. She didn't really deal with the Germans. Food was scarce-a lot of people were saved by the Red Cross parcels. She had planned for the Battle Of Flowers before the outbreak of war but didn't do it until 1951. It was a hunting scene, which won first prize in its class with a prize of £15, first in the junior wild flowers which was a prize of a silver tea set, the prix de merit, which was a prize of a refrigerator which still works today and the best exhibit of the whole show by an individual, which was a prize of a radiogram worth 160 guineas. Second record-Sound of Music. Battle Of Flowers started again in 1951 and went to Victoria Avenue which was a better venue and had a smooth road. She didn't know why it changed back as it started on Victoria Avenue. There hasn't been a Battle at the end of the Battle of Flowers for 7 or 8 years. At the end of the parade she used to have to protect her own float. She has started a Battle Of Flowers Museum through her interest in the event, it has proved popular after the first three years of difficulty. It was opened on 16th June 1971 with one building and then a second, third and fourth with sixteen models from the Battle Of Flowers in total. She has made 40 exhibits for the Battle Of Flowers and 13 exhibits for other fetes including on Grouville Common, St Ouen's Fete, Villa Millbrook and St Andrew's Park-in competition. Her favourite float was made for the Queen and Duke of Edinburgh's visit in 1979 with an exhibit of 40 flamingos, took it to Howard Davis Park and were introduced and talked to the Queen and Duke of Edinburgh who were easy to talk to. The President of the Battle Of Flowers' Association gave her permission to show it before the Battle Of Flowers took place and she used it in the Battle Of Flowers that year although it didn't win a prize and the Association said they couldn't give her a guarantee for it because it had been shown before but it was sorted out although she was upset and didn't exhibit for the next 2 years. Had an exhibit that became a design for a stamp, which was a float of ostriches. She later became allergic to glue. Told by Philatelic Bureau that her design was being used as a stamp-1s 9d. Third Record-Blue Danube. She makes a float by getting a book on animals, making a scene, for example, a jaguar with llamas, keeps the design in her head rather than drawing it, no help given to her-all individual work. She picks the grasses as soon as they're ready. Used to pick them at the sand dunes and now grows her own. Has to sew them each year. She makes her mind up on what the theme will be on christmas day and doesn't change her mind. The float is made from three quarter inch mesh chicken wire. On a horse and bison float-84,000 pieces of grass were used on each horse and 11,000 bunches of approx 20 each on the bison. All her spare time is spent doing things. She is not normally a patient person but enjoys doing it and never gets bored. She dyes the grasses before putting them on the float in a bucket on her gas cooker. Prefers making animals to human figures. She was especially careful when making a Jersey calf figure as she was asked to do so by the Société Jersiaise and she wanted to make sure it was right and kept checking. Fourth Record-Jimmy Shand-chose it because it has a good rhythm. She talks about her exhibits that went to Exeter for Jersey Tourism and Leeds. She went with them and got a good reaction from people as there is nothing like it in England. She went to Guernsey with the Pied Piper of Hamlyn and got first prize. Brought humour into her exhibit, the funniest was a donkey derby. The Battle Of Flowers is not as good as it used to be-early 50s used to be 80 or 90 exhibits-a lot more than today. The young people not interested. The parochial classes not as popular as they can't find a leader. Miss Battle of Flowers is a good idea and provides an extra exhibit. Visitors still very keen. New set up with the arch ways on the Victoria Avenue good. Pictures hanging in museum. Fifth Record-Mary Poppins-Chimchiminy. Went to the ball at the West Park Pavilion as a chicken and won first prize and the tortoise and the hare but she collapsed due to lack of air in the costume. She was unable to compete in the Battle Of Flowers this year because she has been in hospital, told to rest but she has an idea for next years float already. End of Side One. Personal View of Major John Riley. Born in Trinity Manor in 1925. His grandfather came to Jersey in 1908. His ancestry is from Yorkshire and later his grandfather moved to Cornwall and London and came to Jersey in 1908. He had an interest in islands and tried to buy Sark and move to Alderney but moved to Jersey. He was interested in architecture, by profession a theologian but had a love of architecture and took time and money rebuilding the manor which was near derelict when he moved in. The roof had to come off and it was reconstructed in a French style. The architect was Sir Reginald Bloomfield, a London architect. The manor goes back to 1550. It was the seat of the de Carteret family and was successfully restored and enlarged by de Carterets in 1660 and the 19th century. First memories of the manor were of his grandfather who was an imposing and a great church man-morning and evening prayers were in the chapel and many people lived there including 3 uncles and his father but mother died in an accident in 1928 but he had a largely happy childhood. In the 1930s he travelled around England as his father was in the army. It was a contrast to living in manor but it only struck him as odd later in life. Being brought up in a large house was not restrictive, the children had good fun and he had affection for certain parts of house. First Record-Carmen Jones. Schooling-he went to day school in Jersey, preparatory school in England and then school in Winchester when war broke out in 1939. He didn't enjoy school, he was not academic and not good at ball games but it was a good education. During World War 2 his grandfather was allowed to live in the Manor for the first 2 years, the grounds were used as an ammunition dump, later the garrison moved into the house and his grandfather moved to one of the lodges. House undamaged and well looked after. When he arrived back in the island day after the liberation the germans were cleaning the manor. Felt worried about being separated from the island and the only contact was red cross letters which were only 28 words long-had to be careful. Was registered by mistake as an enemy alien card in England. Ambitions-had it not been for World War 2 he may have had an academic career-unsure. Couldn't think of any other profession he would have done apart from the army. His grandfather wanted him to have a classical education, he was an academic man and had stood for parliament but didn't get in. Ended up in the Coldstream Guards-his father had been a member, he has no regrets as he lived with marvellous people. He joined in 1943 and was commissioned in 1944 and joined the forces in North West Europe as a platoon commander. He wasn't frightened of getting killed, the idea of coming home as a wounded war hero appealed, but he had a fear of being frightened. In general the sergeant runs the platoon as they have massive experience and the officers, who had more training, did the planning. He went to North West Germany and saw action for 9 days before he was wounded on 9th March 1945 and evacuated to a hospital in Nottingham 48 hours after. It was the last he saw of the second world war. After he went out to Palestine. They had been earmarked to go to Japan but the bomb was dropped before he had to go. Second Record-Underneath the Arches. He stayed in army for 20 years, working with nice people who trust in each other. He was in a brigade of guards and had a really varied time. Later he was involved in the administration of the army. When he was in the Coldstream Guards he talks about how they felt in full uniform, being very hot whilst on parade, standing still was tiring, he took part in the vigil when the king died. He served in Palestine between 1945-48, then back for 3 months then went out to Malaya for 2½ years which was exciting. As company commander he led a patrol of 14-20 men for a week-10 days in the jungle. His father was still in Jersey at this time and became a jurat in the Royal Court. He came back on leave from time to time. The Manor was not in working order till the mid 50s. When he came back he helped around the Manor. In his army career he became an instructor-dealing with officers in their early 30s who were destined for commanding positions. During the Seven Day War there was both an Israeli and Egyptian who were called back into service. Third Record-Glen Miller. Took the Coldstream Guards Band to America in 1954-for 12 weeks. 160 men would move into a hotel, play a concert, have dinner, go to bed and then move around-strenuous. He left the army in 1963, he was sad to leave but had two young children, schooling was a problem for serving officers. He came back to Trinity Manor, didn't know what he wanted to do, determined to find plenty to do. He took the dairy farm back and got involved in companies and then stood for the States. He decided to go in to politics because he felt he had a responsibility to the island and wanted to give something back. His experience outside of the island was of value. He had no ambitions as a politician-the States was more like local administration. Fourth Record-Noel Coward. Politicians work hard-especially becoming president of a major committee which holds almost a ministerial responsibility, you need to be able to communicate with people. Life going to become more difficult for people in politics. You could run the island with 20 people but would have to pay them, which is against what the island politics is about. Became President of the Defence Committee-linked to his background. Wilfred Krichefski asked him to join the committee and he was able to help because of his military background. It was not like the Ministry of Defence-more like a Committee of Public Safety. Decided to finish in politics last year as he had done 18 years and didn't want to go stale and stand in the way of other people. He wanted to clear the way for other people to be promoted and hopes people don't stay on too long. He has been able to develop Trinity Manor for people to have seminars as he has moved himself in to one end of the house and through this he meets interesting people through the functions and it keeps the Manor occupied. For relaxation he goes sailing during the summer and rides horses in the winter.

Reference: R/07/B/1

Date: 1982 - 1982

Alfred Pierre Laurent, a social reformer and basket-maker, talks about his Norman father who was known as one of the finest workers in Jersey-there was only one other person who was up to his standard and workmanship of basket-making-Mr Le Cornu. He could do anything in basket-making. He was very quick tempered-once some six pences went missing-his younger brother had taken them. His father said he'd prefer to see his children dead than dishonest. Feared his father-he spoke French-his father wouldn't allow him to speak jèrriais. His father loved the British people but he wouldn't allow his children to speak jèrriais or english. He came from a large family-life was hard-his mother was a good cook and could make a good meal out very little. His mother was a breton and his father a Norman-it was unusual for the two to marry. He lived in town as a child-used to be drinking problems in town-used to charge 1d a pint. You had to make do when you were poor-he had his first cup of tea when he worked at Averty's the butcher when he was 9. A lot of children worked then-used to eat a lot of meat. In his spare time used to read second hand books and newspapers-spent all his money in book. Didn't enjoy school-some of the teachers were not very nice-children used to be beaten with a leather strap. Remembers the start of the soup kitchens in Victoria Street-a lady was making porridge in a tureen-remembers seeing Dean Falle who helped make the kitchens possible and thinking that he was God. In the age that he was brought up in there was more cruelty and interest in money-good people suffered and the richer people often took advantage. Today he thinks it has gone too far the other way-there is a lack of discipline. Ada Prouten [with a Jersey accent] lived in St Ouen all her life in later years at Ville Bagot where her husband farmed for many years. She was born Ada England 81 years ago when her father leased a farm at Vinchelez and she and her sister went to Les Landes School but she was expecting to do her bit on the farm when they got home each day. She used to pick potatoes in the summer and in the winter used to scrape the roots for the cows. On Saturdays they had extra work to do as nobody worked on Sundays. Life was hard for her mother-there were two days butter making a week, one wash day, a baking day on Friday. All the people her father employed ate at the same table as the family did. Had lunch at 9.30 in the fields, 12.30 had dinner and in the afternoon had coffee and cake in the field and at the end of the day had tea. In October her sister and her worked until 10 o'clock in the lofts. Her mother made jam, bread and cakes-never bought anything. Wash day-used to put the clothes to soak the day before, would boil water in a bath on a tripod, would then hang the clothes up. Hard work cleaning the house-there were no hoovers. Reused flour bags for various purposes including for pillow cases and aprons. Went to Les Landes School-enjoyed school-was always near the top of the class. When they were putting up St George's Church they were told not to go to the Church-she climbed up to the top of the church-she got in trouble with her teacher. Left school at 15 when the teacher was told a false story about her and when she didn't believe her she left school. Decided to help her father on the farm and used to go vraicing down at L'Etacq. Used to lease the farm-the lease was finished at 12 o'clock on christmas day-could be hard. Her sister and her were not paid-they had money when they wanted some and clothes when they wanted some. Her husband and her didn't have a very large farm. Had her first daughter a year after she was married but coped with it well-had to do your own work because you couldn't pay for anything else. She enjoyed her young life-people were friendlier in her childhood. Philip Le Troquer was born in 1896 at Le Pont, St Martin-when he was 4 his mother died-remembers being called to his mother's deathbed and her final words were 'carry on being a good boy'. Six years later his father died leaving 4 children under 10 as orphans-they went to Sacre Coeur Orphanage. His father died in April 1906 and he entered the orphanage as a 10 year old in May. He had a sister Selina and two brothers John and Frank. Life was nice but disciplined at Sacre Coeur-went to a church service first thing in the morning, had breakfast and went to school for 9 o'clock. Went to St Thomas' School-had their three meals at the orphanage. After school did his homework and cleaned the orphanage-had a rota for cleaning. The nuns were good to him. Had an uncle still alive-they were allowed out on their own once every quarter and they would go and visit him at that time. Used to visit his aunt in St Aubin once a year. Had to be back by 6 o'clock on the days they were allowed out. He left school at 13 and he decided he wanted to become a gardener. Used to have lessons from Mr Nouvel from Highlands College every night throughout the winter. Was always interested in gardening-Sacre Coeur Orphanage had a large garden. It was good training to become a gardener-trained for 4 winters. Received a certificate for finishing the course. When he finished training the first world war started-he was mobilised-was drafted to India and went through South Africa. There were about 20 boys from Jersey-stayed in India for 3-4 months then went through the Persian Gulf towards Turkey. When he returned he visited Reverend Le Grand and talked to him about his experiences-he was like a father to him. He has now worked 60 years as a gardener without a break. Enjoyed his time in the orphanage. Frank Noel [with a Jersey accent], 86 this year, has lived in Gorey all his life and is a plumber. His father worked on big racing cutters for Miles Kennedy. Frank did some work on TB Davis' yacht Westward. His father worked on the Southern Railway mailboats but they never moved from Gorey and he still lives in the same house as he moved to when he was 10 in 1908. Life in Gorey Village was quiet, some fishing took place. Gorey Pier was busy with sailing cutters but not as busy as today. Coal was brought in to Gorey by schooners for the Farmers Union that had a stall in Gorey. There was a windmill at Gorey to pump water for the train. As a child used to go to town on christmas eve as a treat and had Marett's sausages. Used to go on sunday school outings on horses and carts. Used to transport vraic using carts. After school and on Saturday he delivered beer for a shop in Gorey Village. Left school at 15 and went to Grandins to work as a plumber. He had wanted to go to sea but his father told him to learn a trade. Used his bicycle to get into work bought his mother. Joined up in the first world war-his parents were upset but proud. Landed back in Jersey on a Sunday morning-waited for the 1 o'clock train and when he got home it was one of the greatest days of his life. The first world war was frightening-not like the movies. Fought in the trenches and mountains-the worst was Belgium. Went back to Jersey on leave during the war-most of the boys in Gorey joined up. Loves low water and boat fishing-caught a 9lb lobster low water fishing and caught a conger of 40lb-it was hiding in a shipwreck. Professor Albert Messervy was a vet in Jersey for many years before, in 1953, he was invited to the chair of veterinary surgery at the University of Bristol. He was one of 6 children brought up in Trinity where his father was a farmer. He was 6 years old when the first world war broke out but he can remember the day. His brother and he were living at Stonewall, Mont au Prêtre with his Aunt Martha because his mother was seriously ill. They used to go to school in Trinity but on thought morning his Uncle George came in and said that war had been declared-he was horrified because their sunday school was due to have tea at Trinity Manor the next day but that had to be abandoned. Remembers in 1912 when the aircraft came from Dinard to Jersey in a race and was at West Park-remembers the pilot-on their way back to Trinity it started to thunder and lightning and somebody sheltering under a tree at Oaklands, St Saviour was killed when it collapsed on him. In 1915 they made some black butter-remembers the different kinds of apples added-in the evening a chimney caught fire-a photograph was taken which is now in Jersey Through the Lens. Was always interested in animals-especially horses. Fed ducklings foxgloves once not knowing that they were poisonous and when they died they got disciplined by their father-12 years later when he was studying to be a vet he was asked about in an examination about the effect of foxgloves on animals and he was able to answer fully. Also had a goat which had twins but she died choking on the afterbirth. The goats used to run into the house. During his childhood there was a fire at Trinity Manor-remembers horses pulling the fire engine to the manor. At the end of the first world war there was a Peace Fete which he managed to go to-his uncle bought fireworks from G D Laurens and Company-some of the fireworks didn't work properly. Jersey suffered little during the first world war-was some rationing of sugar and tea but it had no effect. After the war the farming community was hit-a depression took place and some people emigrated to find work. End of Side One. Personal View of Jurat Clarry Dupré who spent 24 years in the States of Jersey. Is retired but keeps the name jurat. Is enjoying his retirement. Was born in Jersey in 1914-had a happy childhood. Was born in Simon Place and at 6 years old he moved to Beresford Street where his father ran a fish and poultry business and lived there for the next 60 years. His father had 4 brothers and 1 sister but he only had one brother who he has worked with in the fish and poultry business for 40 years. He went to De La Salle College at 6 to 16 and then he spent a year in London learning about the fish and poultry business. After that he worked in Beresford Street from 17 to 24 until the time of the occupation when joined up with the army. He and his family are roman catholics. Played a lot of sport at school. Was the Jersey squash champion in 1938 and played for the Junior Muratti football in 1930 and 1931. First Record-Vera Lynn's 'We'll Meet Again'. When the second world war broke out he was 23/24-he evacuated from the island in June 1940 ad joined up as soon as he got into Weymouth. He was attached to the 11th Battalion of the Hampshire Regiment-he went to the Royal Military Academy at Sandhurst from where he was commissioned to the Middle East with the Cheshire Regiment. Saw active service from Alamein to Tunisia, Egypt to Sicily for the D-Day landings in Sicily. Returned to England in 1943 ready for D-Day in Normandy. Went to Sandhurst for 7 months and left as a second lieutenant and he eventually became a major. He was awarded a military cross-felt he was in the right place in the right time. Was not married when he left the island-left his fiance in Jersey and they got married in July 1945. His brother joined up and spent 4 years of his service in Malta. After he got married in 1945 he signed back with the army for two years and was stationed in the Middle East at Palestine. When he came back his son was 10 months old. Second Record-Lily Marlene with 'The Girl Underneath the Lantern'. Came out of the army in 1947 and worked with his brother for 10 years until 1957 when he went into the States. Entered as a deputy in St Helier No 1 District-was elected unopposed but three years later came second in the election and went into the States-Terry Sowden was first. A year later he stood for senator in a by-election against Senator John Venables but lost and a year after that he stood for election for senator and topped the polls and was a senator for nine years before being re-elected for six years and then losing the election as senator but became a deputy in St Helier No 1 District again before not being re-elected and retiring from politics. After not being returned as a senator decided he would stand as a deputy and was elected as the President of Tourism making it 21 years. He was also Vice-President of the Defence Committee and Finance Committee. Follows the States on Radio Jersey-felt he was getting too old for the States. Believes people are still out there who could be politicians-wouldn't like to see party politics. Wouldn't like to see States members paid. Has served on the Tourism Committee for 24 years and as President for 21 years-it has increased massively in that time. He was elected on to the Executive of the Commonwealth Parliamentary Association-saw over 20 different countries on conferences as a result. As President of the Tourism Committee was always a great supporter of the Battle of Flowers and when he retired he was made an honorary Vice-President of the Battle of Flowers' Association-hasn't missed a Battle of Flowers in 30 years. Used to go to Battersea Park and run an exhibit in the park. Third Record-Stuart Gillies with Amanda. Stuart Gillies spent many seasons in Jersey-is a character. When he retired from the States he became a jurat-had been out of the States for only 6 months and he was asked to fill a vacancy-he filled the vacancy for 4 years until he had to retire because of his age. You keep the title of jurat for the rest of your life. Jurats sits with the bailiff in the court-they are judges of fact-they decide on the sentences-they also sit on various boards-he sat on the Prison Board for 4 years. Didn't enjoy going to the prison but found it worthwhile. Jurats are responsible in the parish for elections. Attended the assize d'héritage and the swearing in of new jurats and advocates. Still goes to the honorary occasions such as the swearing in of new people but doesn't have the power of jurats anymore. Used to wear robes as a jurat and now hats are worn. Still worked in the fishmonger because it was early mornings-especially Friday and Saturday. The business was opened by his father in Beresford Street in 1921and he closed it 2 years after his brother died 4 years previously. His father died in 1924-when he was 10-his mother ran the business until he joined it. He has never done any fishing. Enjoyed meeting people in the business. Was a very small business-had 5 staff and 2 girls in the office-there was some competition with the fish market. They didn't do any wholesaling. Fourth Record-Pretty Woman by Roy Orbison. Has an understanding wife for 41 years of marriage-has one son and two granddaughters. Used to play squash until his 40s but didn't really have many hobbies. Feels he's been very lucky-doesn't regret anything. Fifth Record-Walking in the Air with Aled Jones.

Reference: R/07/B/13

Date: 1984 - 1987

Microfiche of the 1901 Census for Guernsey, Public Record Office reference 3+ RG13/5320. St Peter Port (part of) District 10. Boundary of Enumeration District from bottom of Rouge Rue upon the right, Amherst Road, Guelles Road, Upper Vrangue, Vrangue Road [La Vrangue?], through Bouet all on the right & back to Rouge Rue. Contents of Enumeration District - all within the above named boundary, including Norman Terrace, Guelles Road, Upper Vrangue, Vrangue Road, Brickfield Cottages, Orangeville, Arculon Farm & Mont Arrivé. St Peter Port, District 11. Boundary of Enumeration District from the Brick House Long Store going through Bouet Gas Works on the right including Elim Chapel as far as Hougue à la Perre taking in the First Tower along the Banks back to the Brick House all on the right within these limits. Contents of Enumeration District - all within the above boundary including Long Store, Gas Lane, Bouet, Grande Bouet, First Tower Lane, Hougue à la Perre Banks, First Tower, Elim Chapel and Gas Works. St Peter Port, District 12. Boundary of Enumeration District - Red Lion Corner, Grand Bouet on the right to Vrangue Lane, Vrangue Lane right & left, Vrangue on the right to Vrangue Manor & from Vrangue Manor to end of road both right & left, Amherst, Fosse Landry [La Fosse André?], Couture & Ramée Road [La Ramée?] to Parish Boundaries on the right - Coutanchez Road [La Route des Coutanchez?] from Parish Boundaries to Vrangue Manor right & left. Islands of Herm, Jethou & Berhou Tower, Dictrict 13. St Peter Port. Sub-district Hospital and Asylum.

Reference: S/07/B/13

Date: 1901 - 1901

Microfiche of the 1901 Census for Guernsey, Public Record Office reference 2+ RG13/5318.St Martin - Part of District 1 - Boundary of Enumeration District, bounded from Fermain's Bay to Carrefour au Lièvre to Blanches Cross, from Blanches Cross to Moulin Huet Bay to Fermain's Bay. Contents of Enumeration District; Blanches Cross down to Fermain Bay. Blanches Cross to Calais and Jerbourg. Jerbourg and Mont Durand to Moulin Huet. Moulin Huet to Ville Amphrey. St Martin - District 2 - Boundary of Enumeration District, is bounded from Moulin Huet Bay to Blanches Cross, from Balnches Cross to Mr J G Le Patourel's house, near the Rectory, from Mr J G Le Patourel's house to Saints Bay, from Saints Bay to Moulin Huet Bay by the sea. Contents of Enumeration District; from Ville Amphrey to Moulin Huet from Moulin Huet to Fosse, from Fosse to Les Camps [Les Camps du Moulin?], from Les Camps [Les Camps du Moulin?] to La Bellieuse, from La Bellieuse to Saints Bay. St Martin - District 3 - Boundary of Enumeration District, is bounded from Saints Bay to the Rectory; from the Rectory to Les Hanieres; from Les Hanieres to Petit Bo [Petit Bôt Bay?], from Petit Bo Bay [Petit Bôt Bay?] to Saints Bay by the sea. Contents of Enumeration District; Les Cornus to Les Hanieres, from Les Hanieres to Rebouquets, Petit Bo [Petit Bôt?], from Petit Bo [Petit Bôt?] to Icart and Saints, from Saints to the Rectory, from the Rectory to Les Cornus. St Martin - District 4 - Boundary of Enumeration District, is bounded from Les Hanieres to the Naftiaux Abreuvoir; from Naftiaux Abreuvoir to the Carrefour de la Ville du Roi; from the Carrefour de la Ville du Roi to the Carrefour at the South West angle of the Rev F J Jeremie's residence near the Hubits, from the Carrefour at the South West of the Rev. F J Jeremie's residence to Guerin's Cross by the centre of the Traudes road and Beilleuse Road. Contents of Enumeration District; from Croix Guignon to Les Hanieres, from Les Hanieres to Les Huriaux, from Les Huriaux to Vauquiedor, from Vauquiedor to top of Ruettes Brayes, from the top of Ruettes Brayes to Rue Poudreuse, from Rue Poudreuse to Merriennes; from Merriennes to Grande Rue, from Grande Rue to Bellieuse, from Bellieuse to Guerin's Cross, from Guerin's Cross to Les Cornus, from Les Cornus to Mouilpied, from Mouilpied to Croix Guignon. St Martin - Part of District 5 - Boundary of Enumeration District, is bounded from the Carrefour-au-Liévre to Guerin's Cross, from Guerin's Cross to the Carrefour at the south west angle of the Rev F J Jeremie's residence by the Traudes and Bellieuse Roads, from the Carrefour at South West angle of the Rev. F J Jeremie's residence to the Carrefour de la Ville Au Roi, from the Carrefour de la Ville au Roi to Pont Renier, from the meeting of the streams at Pont Renier to Hubits road, up Havilland stream, from the crossing of Hubits road by the Stream to the Carrefour au Lievre. Contents of Enumeration District - Ruettes Brayes to Pont Renier, from Pont Renier to Havilland, from Havilland to Bellieuse, from Bellieuse to the lower Hubits, from the Lower Hubits to Guerin's Cross, from Guerin's Cross to Higher Hubits, from Higher Hubits to Carrefour-au-Lievre, from Carrefour-au-Lievre to Saumarez Manor [Sausmarez Manor?], from Saumarez Manor [Sausmarez Manor?] to Guerin's Cross.

Reference: S/07/B/5

Date: 1901 - 1901

Microfiche of the 1901 Census for Guernsey, Public Record Office reference 3+ RG13/5318.St Martin - Part of District 5 - Boundary of Enumeration District, is bounded from the Carrefour-au-Liévre to Guerin's Cross, from Guerin's Cross to the Carrefour at the south west angle of the Rev F J Jeremie's residence by the Traudes and Bellieuse Roads, from the Carrefour at South West angle of the Rev. F J Jeremie's residence to the Carrefour de la Ville Au Roi, from the Carrefour de la Ville au Roi to Pont Renier, from the meeting of the streams at Pont Renier to Hubits road, up Havilland stream, from the crossing of Hubits road by the Stream to the Carrefour au Lievre. Contents of Enumeration District - Ruettes Brayes to Pont Renier, from Pont Renier to Havilland, from Havilland to Bellieuse, from Bellieuse to the lower Hubits, from the Lower Hubits to Guerin's Cross, from Guerin's Cross to Higher Hubits, from Higher Hubits to Carrefour-au-Lievre, from Carrefour-au-Lievre to Saumarez Manor [Sausmarez Manor?], from Saumarez Manor [Sausmarez Manor?] to Guerin's Cross. St Mary de Caste dit Câtel [Castel Parish] - District 1 - Boundary of Enumeration District, north boundary District No2, East Boundary St Andrews parish, South, St Andrews Parish,West, District No3 and 4. Contents of Enumeration District; from the Cross Road 'La Houguette' by the 'Mont de Val' [Mont D'Aval?], to La Planque, from the cross road of La Planque to the Varendes to join the boundary of St Andrews, then following said boundary to the lane known as la Petite Câche [La rue de la Cache?], round by the Church [Castel Parish Church?] to the Ponchez, to the Jardin by the Niaux, then by Talbots and the lane du Vallee to the Eturs and Tuzees to the cross road of La Houguette with every house within and bordering said boundaries. St Mary de Caste [Castel Parish] - District 2 - Boundary of Enumeration District, north bounded by the sea, East by the Vale Parish, South by No1 and No4, West by the sea. Contents of Enumeration District; From the cross road de Cobo, near the back of the Varendes to join the boundary of the parish of St Andrew, then following the said boundary by the Friquet and the Landes road to join the boundary of the Vale Parish, then by the Houge Du Pommier to the Mielles [La Clos des Grande Mielles?], from the Mielles along the seaside to the cross road 'de Cobo' with every house within and bordering said boundaries. St Mary de Caste [Castel Parish] - Part of District 3 - Boundary of Enumeration District, north bounded by No4, East by No1, South by St Andrews and St Saviour's, West by the sea comprising from the cross road de la Houguette to Vazon Martello Tower along the sea side to join the boundary of the parish of St Saviour's near the Hamel, then following said boundary of St Saviour's Parish by the Wind Mill Du Mont Saint, the Wind Mill Les Hougues to the Hechet by the Grantez and Fauxquets road to the Valinguet, then back by the Friquet Road and Videclins, road to Petites Vallee, to the Groignet estate and the King's Mills, to the cross road de la Houguette with every house within and bordering said boundaries.

Reference: S/07/B/6

Date: 1901 - 1901

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