Jersey Talking Magazine-October 1983. Introduction by Gordon Young. Beth Lloyd went to the Jersey Airport the day before the Battle of Britain air display to talk to some of the pilots of the aeroplanes. Tony Hogg talks about what he is doing with his helicopter in the display and how the weather will affect the display. The sound of the red arrows and talking to John Blackwell of the Red Arrows about what they will be doing in the air display, when they have time to come up with new displays, the difficulty of thinking up new ideas, how long the team are together-three pilots being changed each year. Flight Lieutenant Rick Watts, the training pilot for the VIP Andover talking about why he is in Jersey for the air display, what he will be doing in the air display, which VIPs are flown around and whether he has been to Jersey before. Chris Topham talking about his solo aerobatics display, winning the Aerobatics Trophy, what is in the display, how he feels when he is taking part in the display, if her feels scared before take off, what he is doing next in his RAF career, taking part in the Krypton Factor on television. Dave Morgan, the pilot of the sea harrier, talking about why a RAF pilot is flying a royal navy plane, being awarded the distinguished service cross for his courage in the Falklands War, being featured on British Heart Foundation advertisements because of his success after being born with a hole in his heart, what he is going to be doing in the display and what he thinks of the sea harrier. Gordon Young interviewing Leonard Cheshire who saw the dropping of the atom bomb and as a result decided to set up the Cheshire Home Foundation for disabled people. Talks about how many Homes have been opened, what started the idea to set up the Cheshire Homes, the help that he gets from local people-voluntary help, whether the Homes will continue to grow, trying to help the process of disabled people living at home and moving out into the community-independent living, the need for residential living and what happens when the Home becomes full-the ideas for extension. Margaret Jenkins with a descriptive piece about autumn. End of Side One. Norah Bryan talking to Mrs Palmer and Janey her daughter, Australians who own a large sheep farm, about the problem of having no rain for four years, living between Sydney and Brisbane in Australia, owning 4000 acres of land and 10,000 sheep, a creek that runs through the land, how the sheep get water, feeding the sheep, how people who don't have water cope with animals on the land, how they manage to fertilise the land-using an aeroplane, going up in the plane to see what the land looks like. Janey talking about flying a plane, shearing the sheep, tar used to stop cuts caused by shearing, how the shearing is organised, when the sheep are sold, keeping track of the sheep and the sheep in Jersey. Beth Lloyd interviewing Harry Hurst, a hypno and psycho therapist who has published a book about reincarnation called 'The Thousand Year Memory', talking about what persuaded him to write the book, the idea of people regressing into past lives, choosing five subjects and his findings from the tests, how far back people regressed, what makes him believe that they are regressing to a previous life and his belief in reincarnation. Joan Stevens talking about early local doctors in the 1800s. Dr George Symes Hooper-equivalent of the Medical Officer of Health nowadays-in charge whilst the cholera epidemic of 1832 took place. Through him and his account we know about the epidemic-we know less about the cholera epidemics of the 1860s. Cholera epidemics-people did now know what caused it-Dr Hooper realised it was down to bad drains, poverty, hunger and drunkenness. He concluded that it was introduced via St Malo and was made worse by a prolonged drought before it came about. Thought there was more drunkenness in Jersey than anywhere else in the world. Plans for drainage in St Helier-in discussion-after outbreak urged authorities forward. The outbreak was partly caused by the lie of the land-lower parts of land getting all of the drainage from all parts of the land. Outbreak started in Cabot's Yard, Sand Street. It was so bad town was divided into 12 districts with different doctors for each, all markets were closed and traffic between St Aubin and St Helier was reduced to a minimum. Cases where population dense were hit worst-St Mary and St Aubin escaped from disease. It was a mystery how St Aubin escaped-speculation that it was because it was richer, thriving and there were less people. Bad outbreaks-south and east of town, St Saviour, St Clement and Grouville-built up areas. North of island almost escaped. 341 fatalities out of 806 case of a population of 36,000-high incidence of deaths. According to the diaries of Sir John Le Couteur he believed the prime cause was the bad water where some of the privies drained. 1849-300 died and 1867 another outbreak-improvements in drainage didn't come immediately-improved after 1867. 1849 epidemic-an entry in a diary of people contracting cholera but not dying displays that not everybody died. Dr Joe Dixon-rhyme written about him. Treatment in 1851 recorded in the diaries of Sir John Le Couteur. He had to get from First Tower to Millbrook with his troops for a militia inspection. At Mont Félard Sir John Le Couteur got kicked by a horse in his ankle but carried on with his review of the militia. When he got home Dr Dixon was called-gave 12 leaches and a purge to the ankle, linseed poultices were put on but the wound went septic. He went to a doctor in England-Dr Brody told him to put on lead ointment and keep living well. Joan Stevens comments that treatments have improved a great deal today. End of Side Two.

Reference: R/05/B/70

Date: September 30th 1983 - September 30th 1983

Jersey Talking Magazine-November 1983. Introduction by Gordon Young. Ideal Homes Exhibition at Fort Regent last month. Beth Lloyd talking to a person on a stand about a talking oven for the blind, how it works and how much it may cost when it is released. Ruby Bernstein telling a story of a dog that followed her and her difficulty in trying to escape from it. Nature Feature-Frances Le Sueur talking about owls including examples of its call. Bob Evans interviewing Group Captain Fred Winterbottom talking about his early life, going on a trip through Canada, Japan, Hong Kong, Australia, New Zealand and India-seeing the Empire as it was before the first world war, returned before first world war began, joined a regiment and became a cavalry man, becoming a fighter pilot during the first world war, getting shot down and captured and was in a POW camp. How he became interested in the intelligence service, built up the air service of the secret service and some of the information he discovered. Paul Brown interviewed Harold MacMillan as a student at Leeds University and asked him who were the great Statesmen in the world that he had met including Jack Kennedy, Charles de Gaulle, what particularly inspired him in a man, who inspires him today and if he was a young man what he would strive towards in the current world. End of Side One. Gordon Young interviewing Jack Worrall at St Mark's Church about how church bells are rung, how he got interested in bell ringing, the ban on bells being rung being lifted in 1943, how bells are rung, the clock installed in St Mark's Church in 1880-dedicated to Charles William Robin, getting to the top of the clock tower to see the bells, the names of the bells, how the bells are hung, what you have to do to get the bells into the ringing position, the stay-can rest the bell on it so as not to have to pull the bell each time and it is a safety feature, the mechanics of bell ringing, the bells being made of copper and tin and the noise of the bell. Jack Worrall talking about the history of the bells in the church, the sally-the place that is pulled on the rope, the dangerous things that can happen, hand ringing bells, a spirit of comradeship between bell ringers-ringing bells for Charles Lovett whose golden wedding anniversary is being celebrated, the physical effort of bell ringing, sequences of bells ringing during a peal including examples on the hand bells, mistakes made during bell ringing and how the bells are played and conducted. Describing how the bells are pulled and talking about how hard it is getting the bell into position. Listening to the peal of church bells. Margaret Jenkins reading a poem by Stanley Holloway. Gordon Young finishing with a joke. End of Side Two.

Reference: R/05/B/71

Date: October 31st 1983 - October 31st 1983

Jersey Talking Magazine-Christmas 1983. Introduction by Gordon Young with christmas carols sung throughout by the Jersey Festival Choir and their Junior Singers and Les Conteurs Singers. Gordon Young describing various christmas lights around Jersey including Bouley Bay, Charing Cross. Beth Lloyd reading a poem by Colin Plummer called 'Christmas Tree'. Gordon Young with a description of the christmas lights in the Childrens Ward at the Jersey General Hospital. Edgar Fryatt talking about previous christmases that he has experienced. Gordon Young describing christmas lights in an electrical shop and the entrance of Trinity Church. End of Side One. A Jersey version of 'The 12 days of Christmas' sung by the Home Chase Choir. Gordon Young describing the christmas lights at the Trinity Arms public house and the Jersey Airport. Margaret Jenkins talking about the origin of father christmas and reading 'The Night before Christmas' by Clement Clarke Moore. Gordon Young describing the light of the moon in Bouley Bay and the christmas lights in St Helier looking from Fort Regent. End of Side Two.

Reference: R/05/B/72

Date: December 25th 1983 - December 25th 1983

Jersey Talking Magazine-March 1984. Introduction by Gordon Young. Mary Phillips talking about her mother in law making marmalade, where her mother in law lives, her personality, her ninetieth birthday, the reorganisation of her kitchen and her mother in laws reaction to this reorganisation. Ben Fox, Crime Prevention Officer, talking about his job, the prevention of crime, gives advice about crime prevention, must not be complacent, should call the police as soon as a crime is detected, organises exhibitions in order to promote crime prevention, talks about locks for doors, meeting people in the community, supplies new material for the Schools Liaison Officers and the Crime Prevention Panel. Joan Stevens talking about sailors in Jersey who became admirals in the royal navy. The Le Hardy family had 3 admirals, Sir Charles Junior and Senior had no part in Jersey affairs. Sir Thomas Le Hardy-1666-1732 was born in St Martin-north of church. In 1700 he sold all of his Jersey property. In 1693 he commanded a ship called HMS Swallow in Guernsey to protect CI shipping. In 1702 the Spanish fleet came back with vast treasure hoards from South America. The Mediterranean was being blockaded. Beauvoir, a Channel Islander, was chaplain on board Le Hardy's ship. He spoke French and so the people on shore told him where the Spanish treasure ship could be found. Le Hardy chased it and found it and took the vast fleet which contained 13 million pieces of eight amongst other things. The silver was melted down to Britannia silver which was very valuable. Le Hardy took the news to Queen Anne who gave him a gift of 1000 guineas and knighted him. Poor account of character, he was not pleasant according to a contemporary account. Portrait of Le Hardy described. Memorial to him in Westminster Abbey-describes his Jersey ancestors-great deal of information about the Le Hardy family. Admiral Philip Durell-1707-1767 was born in St Helier and was son of the Solicitor General. He entered the navy at the age of 13. By 1745 he was at the taking of Cape Breton from the French and took part in the storming of Quebec by General Wolfe. He helped get supplies to Quebec. Philip Durell-died at sea by eating dolphin. There is a portrait of him by Reynolds. Admiral Philip de Carteret-1733-1796-son of the Seigneur of Trinity, born in Trinity and has been 'ranked amongst the greatest geographical discoverers of his time'. In 1764 he went on a expedition to Pacific. During the expedition they annexed the Falkland Islands which almost caused war with Spain who had claimed them. It was an unsuccessful mission as the admiral in charge came back as soon as he could. In 1766 he was sent out in an unsuitable vessel, the HMS Swallow, and was away for over 2 years and circumnavigated the globe. He named many islands including the Pitcairn Island. De Carteret named one group of islands after the Channel Islands and although these have not survived many of the names have. During the time that they were away they lived in poor conditions. Scurvy was rampant among the crew. De Carteret moved back to Trinity in 1769 and lived in Trinity Manor for 10 years until he was called back into service as a naval reserve for the American War of Independence. He died in Southampton at the age of 63. End of Side One. Beth Lloyd visiting a tea factory in Jersey at the Overseas Trading Corporation. Talking to John King, Managing Director of OTC, about how the firm was started in 1876 by a tea and silk merchant, Thomas Charles Staples Cook from Reading-started as a tea trader, his difficulty in beginning the factory-first factory at Cheapside before moving to First Tower, the size of the firm, how OTC grew, links with other companies, what makes OTC different from the other parts of the organisation-Lyons Tetley. Tour of the factory with production director Chris Sheehan talking about the different processes at the factory, where the tea gets exported to, where the tea comes from, quality control, the selection of flavours and explaining about the flavour of a tea that he tastes. A tea taster from France, Mr Barrer [?], commenting on the flavour of teas. Marketing director, Gerald Harrison, talking about the marketing side of the business, the different markets in different countries, the role of regional export managers, the different tastes in different countries, the increase in popularity of flavoured teas, what the role of marketing director is like, visiting different countries and funny experiences. John King talking about OTC during the occupation-the tea stores of Jersey, supplied tea to island and packing food, looked after control of wood and the future plans of the OTC. Beverley Coleman, the rector of St Saviour, talking about the reason for pancakes being made for Shrove Tuesday, what happened to the eggs that were not eaten during lent, regional variations on this theme, the origin of Ash Wednesday and what people should do for Lent. Gordon Young ends with a humorous story. End of Side Two.

Reference: R/05/B/73

Date: February 29th 1984 - February 29th 1984

Jersey Talking Magazine-April 1984.

Reference: R/05/B/74

Date: March 31st 1984 - March 31st 1984

Jersey Talking Magazine-May 1984. Introduction by Gordon Young. Beth Lloyd interviewing Philip Forster, the Promotions manager at Fort Regent, talking about the 'Kingdom of the Sharks' display-how the display works and a description of the display, the Victor White Model Aircraft Collection with a description of the items held and a description of a display of spaceships, the exhibit called SAVE-with a description of what it is. Joan Stevens continuing her talk on admirals. Charles Bertram-1777-1854-joined navy under d'Auvergne and took part in 1795 at Quiberon. He was taken prisoner at that time and remained in prison for some years until exchanged for other prisoners. He was put on press gang service where he had to abduct men to serve in the navy. Well-loved and recognised at home. In 1808 a newspaper wrote a poem greeting him home. At the museum there are his portrait, cutlass, some of his commissions and his court martial in 1813 when he was honourably acquitted. The court martial was an enquiry and not what we'd consider a court martial which took place when any sailor lost his ship. Henry Dumaresq is not as well known. Born 1808-1877, the son of Sir John Dumaresq, and was born in St Peter's House. In a French Revolution of 1848, when France became a Republic, the French Royal family fled and some of them came to Jersey in order to get to England. When they contacted Sir John Le Couteur he organised getting them to safety in England on the naval ship HMS Cuckoo, which was stationed in Gorey Harbour under Captain Henry Dumaresq. Sir John arranged for Henry to transport them. The night before they left they had roast beef and plum pudding on board of HMS Cuckoo. A couple of years later Henry Dumaresq was in charge of HMS Cuckoo when it was wrecked in St Helier Harbour. It struck Oyster Rock and sank and it was his guidance that led to no loss of life and she was later salvaged and repaired and went back into commission. In 1875 he became an admiral. Beth Lloyd talking about the Talking Newspaper Association of the United Kingdom who have formed the National Newspaper and Magazine Tape Services for the blind. A pilot project set up in 1983 which was very successful and led to 15 national newspapers and magazines now being available on tape. A permanent production unit has been set up with funding and Beth Lloyd talks about how to become eligible, how long you can have them for and how to subscribe. Collectors Corner- in St Brelade where there is a large collection of china, glass and books, relating to the royal family, at the home of Peggy Dollop. She talks about how she started collecting in 1940, the range of her collection, the book that started her collection, the latest book in her collection, the china, portraits of Queen Elizabeth, descriptions of various pieces of her collection, the oldest piece of her collection, her cabinet and its contents. End of Side One. Gordon Young talking about the production of Annie at the Jersey Opera House by the Green Room Club. Interviewing Lloyd Cornish talking about having to shave his head for the role, how the show is going, whether it has come up to his expectations, the performance of the dog and whether he would like to go on to a bigger production after the end of the run. Interviewing Sadie Marshall about how the show is going, working on her accent, whether the hard work was worth it, how good the children are to work with and the dog. Talking to the children of the production about whether they are enjoying themselves, what the show Annie is about and singing for the show. Talking to Diane Powell who plays Annie about what it is like taking part in the show, what the show is about, whether she enjoys the singing and dancing and whether she has taken part in a show before. Talking to the dog. Ben Fox, Crime Prevention Officer, talking about callers to the house, not allowing strangers into your house, getting a door chain fitted, the importance of being vigilant, who might call at a house, alarms and the fitting of a new door chain. Gordon Young talking through the Lionel Richie video for the song 'Hello'. Ken Kirk-Bailey talking about broadcasting on amateur radio, how they call people up, Tony Hancock playing an amateur radio enthusiast, describing the machines from which they broadcast and the distance over which they can communicate and the difference between ham and CB radio. St Clement gave them a lease for Le Hocq Tower and they made it into a club headquarters. The Philatelic Bureau issued a stamp of Le Hocq Tower which is now a collectors item and the new penny has a picture of Le Hocq Tower, the world's first amateur radio station to be on a penny. They are spending a week talking to the amateur radio hams in New Jersey to promote the island and he talks about their reaction, making personal friends of people they have never met in their life and a special week in july when they are going to promote the Durrell Wildlife Conservation Trust. End of Side Two.

Reference: R/05/B/75

Date: April 30th 1984 - April 30th 1984

Jersey Talking Magazine-Mid-summer 1984. Introduction by Gordon Young. Beth Lloyd visiting Le Brun's the Bakery, which was founded 180 years ago in Hansford Lane but it wasn't until 1938 that the present managing director's Brian Le Marquand's family took it over when his father bought in. Brian Le Marquand talking about why his father bought the bakery, how much it cost, in 1938 the business was 5% of the island trade but by 1950 it had been built up to 15% of the trade when it was moved to Brighton Road, joining the company in 1958 and buying 50 % of the shareholding in 1960, how the company has changed, it now has 85% of island trade, taking over three other island bakeries, problems in putting sell by dates on the bread, trying to bake bread for when people need to use it, retail trade only one side of the business, they also serve the hotel, guest house and cafe trade and now cater for private parties. David Parmiter, the Production Director, talks about the bread bakery, the process of making bread, the people who work in the bakery, how to tell when the bread is ready, slicing and packing the bread, a new machine detecting metal in the bread, the decorating room-used for making and decorating cakes, meat preparation room-high standard of hygiene, meat delivered fresh daily, how they make and roll their pastries, the roll bakery which involved the same process as bread, 60,000-70,000 rolls made a day, half baked products been brought in and are selling well, wholemeal bread has risen tremendously. Frank Todd, Commercial Manager, in the dispatch area talking about delivering goods, the amount of deliveries a day, how long a delivery takes, the part weather plays in orders, the risk of waste at the end of the day, getting the weather forecast so they can guess how much food is going to be ordered, not freezing orders and dealing with an order-in radio contact with the drivers. Tricia Jones, a tele-sales girl, talks about ringing customers every day to ask them their orders for the next day. Nick Le Couteur, the Sales Director, explaining what happens to the orders after phone calls by the tele-sales girl in order to prepare the food, how many products Le Brun's manufacture-over 500 products, many thousands of products produced each day, modern trends, the movement towards wholemeal breads, cakes still popular, the introduction of croissants, different outlets and the use of computers within the company. Brian Le Marquand talking about future plans for the company. John Boucheré talking about coach trips-in 1946-47 there were a dozen coach companies of various sizes, he trained as a motor engineer-in the early 1950s he decided to drive a coach around the island, he was painfully shy, driving relatively easy but it was difficult to answer questions in front of everybody. He talks about the different people who he encountered on his tours, the way people used to sing after lunch, dealing with drunken passengers, carrying people on poignant journeys-parents of a soldier who died and helping a blind passenger. Stan Birch, a jazz pianist, playing a piece with Wendy Shields singing. End of Side One. Philip Gurdon taking a tour of the German Underground Hospital with Joe Mière. Joe Mière talking about the construction of the tunnels, the different workers, when the work began in 1941, Organisation Todt and the fact that it was planned as an artillery barracks but in 1943 its use was changed to be a bunker. Commenting on the exhibits, talking about ghosts in the tunnels, changes they are making to the tunnels, rock falls in the tunnels, a rest room, the dispensary-was never used, a ward with a description, the equipment in the rooms of the tunnels, an escape shaft, what happened to the Hospital at the end of the war-the company buying the tunnel and becoming more successful, a closed tunnel that has now been opened. Museum-letters by Walter Gallichan-taken to Alderney, survivors of Alderney having a reunion. Describing the exhibits in the museum, newscuttings from the newspaper, the Stranger's Cemetery, reunions with the Russians and a bouquet of flowers put up by Maud Otter. Beth Lloyd telling a story about her cat. End of Side Two.

Reference: R/05/B/76

Date: May 31st 1984 - May 31st 1984

Jersey Talking Magazine-June 1977 Edition. Introduction by Gordon Young. Nature Feature-Frances Le Sueur talks about wild garlic and the cuckoo with its bird call. Interview by Gordon Young of the television naturalist David Bellamy talking about what drew him into botany, his interest in flowers and the conservation of animals and plants in the garden. Cooking Feature-Margaret Jenkins talking about what recipes you can make with cheese. Beth Lloyd talking to a doctor about the use of vitamin supplements. Island Administrators-Graham Pitman talking to John Lees of Controller of Social Security about the functions of the Social Security Department, the differences between Jersey and the UK, future developments in social security, how awareness is raised of the department's work to the public. Tim giving hints on bath aids for the blind and elderly. End of Side One. June Gurdon reading Reg Grandin's poem 'Little Treasured Joys'. Commander Cruisarr from Guernsey talking about the evolution of Talking Books for the blind. Beth Lloyd talking to Frank Walker, Managing Director of the Jersey Evening Post, about the moving of the newspaper offices from Bath Street to Five Oaks, the printing of the newspaper, going on a tour of the building with descriptions of each room and the printing process. Roy Fauvel tells the history of a gold snuff box recently presented to St Helier by Eric Young which was presented to Edward Nicolle, the Constable of St Helier in the 1820s, who was censured by the States after comments made but received the box as a vote of confidence from the parish. Gordon Young with a story about the muratti.

Reference: R/05/B/8

Date: May 31st 1977 - May 31st 1977

Jersey Talking Magazine-July 1977, Jubilee Edition. Introduction by Gordon Young. Children from Mont Cantel School talking about they think the queen does, Beth Lloyd reading a reply from the queen regarding the Jubilee Edition of the Jersey Talking Magazine. Island Administrators-Sir Frank Ereaut, the Bailiff, talking to Graeme Pitman about the island's loyalty to the crown, the history of the island's link to the crown and with a message to the readers. Feature finding out where members of the radio team were on Coronation Day twenty five years previously. Di Weber talks to Mrs Hibbs at the Glory and Majesty Flower Festival at Grouville Church which was held to celebrate the jubilee with a description of the flower arrangements and their significance within the church. Gordon Young talking about the beacon of bonfires set alight to celebrate the jubilee. End of Side One. Poem on the queen read out by a child. Experiencing the events of the jubilee celebrations at Howard Davis Park for the multi-denominational service celebrating the occasion with descriptions of the surroundings and the parade taking place, the equestrian events at the People's Park with horse and carriage displays put on by the Coach Drivers Association and the Multina Riding Centre, a tug of war competition, Richard Spears talking to Beth Lloyd about the yard of ale competition and a description of the firework display. Gordon Young finishing with a humorous story.

Reference: R/05/B/9

Date: June 30th 1977 - June 30th 1977

BBC Radio Jersey-Occupation Tapes. Told by the people who lived through it produced by Beth Lloyd. 1) Part 1: Preparing for the Inevitable. Alexander Coutanche talking about the surprise in the island when it was realised the island was not going to be defended and the evacuation was offered to the public. Eye witnesses talking about the panic of evacuation and the dilemma of whether to go or not, queuing to register, worry that the island was to be occupied, putting down of pets, Lord Coutanche being told to stay at his post and simplify the machinery of government, the potential blowing up of public utilities and the air raid on the island. 2) Part 2: The Germans Arrive. Eye witness accounts on seeing German planes flying low over the island and landing at the airport to begin the occupation, sending a message to the bailiff at the airport, meeting the germans for the first time, putting out white flags, demanding surrender, handing over the island, removal of the Union Jack from Fort Regent, BBC radio report on the start of the occupation, first impressions of the soldiers, germans buying food from the shops and the beginning of the paper war. 3) Part 3: Curbs on personal freedom. German orders being read out. Eye witnesses remember the losing of freedom, restrictions on vehicles, use of money paid for comandeered goods on essential supplies from France, orders against the use of coastal areas, changing side of the road to drive on, introduction and the experience of the curfew, life at the Evening Post, permits and other regulations. 4) Part 4: Food or the Lack of It. Poem on hunger. Eye witnesses talking about difficulty of lack of food and the improvisations with food, difficulty of feeding baby, difference between town and country people, suffering of women from malnutrition, children not knowing what food looked like, what people did to get by, food as subject of discussion, problem of lack of sugar and salt, use of potato flour, eating of seaweed, different methods of cooking and fuel, soup kitchens, bartering, farmers trying to get extra meat, getting extra eggs from chickens and keeping rabbits 5) Part 5: The wireless-Jersey's link with the outside world. Report by the BBC. Michael Ginns talking about eventual confiscation of radios. Eye witness accounts of v-signs at Rouge Bouillon, patrolling of district by islanders, confiscation and storage of radios, taking of radios from the parish hall, keeping of radios on threat of death, use of crystal radios sets, listening to the news, spreading of newsheets, the threat of being caught with radios and listening to tunes that had not been heard before the occupation 6) Part 6: Through the Eyes of a Child. Eye witness accounts of children and teenagers suffering a great deal, the fun children had, being hungry and cold, being without parents, relationships with german soldiers, schools continuing, difficulty of shortages of uniform, german lessons, soup kitchens, drilling on Victoria College playing fields, playing of sports, the Caerarean Tennis Club, riding on the german railway, mischief children got up to and scavenging for supplies.

Reference: R/06/2

BBC Radio Jersey-Occupation Tapes. Told by the people who lived through it produced by Beth Lloyd. 1) Part 7: Deportation. BBC Report on the deportations from the Channel Islands. Alexander Coutanche's difficulty in having to accept the order. Eye witnesses reports of discovering the order for the deportations in the Evening Post, discovery that some deportee's houses being looted, preparations for deportation, being served deportation notices, deciding what to take, going to the Weighbridge, people being turned back because the ships were full, the crowd singing the ships off, the journey to St Malo, fighting at the third deportation leading to arrests. 2) Part 8: Not a Lot of Anything. Eye witnesses talking about the lack of essential supplies such as soap, a great shortage of drugs and medicines by Dr John Lewis and others, lack of clothes, shoes and the need to mend things, improvisation with clothes, bartering economy, wood collecting, what was used for fuel and reusing razor blades. 3) Part 9: From Finance to Farming, The Island Keeps Going. A BBC Report on the currency used in the island. Eye witness accounts on the lack of english currency and the use of reichsmarks, the conversion necessary for records kept in banks and auction houses, the creation of new notes by Edmund Blampied, stocks in the shops diminshing leading to rationing control, the black market, exchange and mart in the Evening Post, farmer's experience of being told what to grow, harvesting and the inspections made by the Germans, farmers hiding extras from the Germans, investigations into a fuel that would allow tractors to run on something other than petrol, getting by, crops that were grown and giving food to others. 4) Part 10: There's Good and Bad in all Races. Eye witnesses talking about collaborators, Jerry Bags, informers, the actions of the Post Office to destroy anonymous denunciation letters or warn those who had been denounced, searches by german soldiers to follow up anonymous letters, relationships with and attitudes of the german soldiers (Poor sound quality) 5) Part 11: Government and God, How the States and the Church Survived. Eye witnesses talking about dissatisfaction with the local authorities, the difficulties faced by the bailiff Alexander Coutanche, confirming legislation in Jersey, rectors and Jurats members of the States, meetings of the States, rectors remaining in the parishes and services continuing, Canon Cohu being taken by the Germans for passing on the news from the radio, praying for the men who were fighting, banning of the Salvation Army and Jehovah Witnesses. 6) Part 12: Brushes with the German Authorities. Eye witnesses talking about being interrogated at Silvertide, experiences of confrontations with the german soldiers, being arrested and beaten, court martials and trials of local residents, listening to the radio and experiences in the prison at Gloucester Street.

Reference: R/06/3

BBC Radio Jersey-Occupation Tapes. Told by the people who lived through it produced by Beth Lloyd. Part 11: Government and God, How the States and the Church Survived. Eye witnesses talking about dissatisfaction with the local authorities, the difficulties faced by the bailiff Alexander Coutanche, confirming legislation in Jersey, rectors and Jurats members of the States, meetings of the States, rectors remaining in the parishes and services continuing, Canon Cohu being taken by the Germans for passing on the news from the radio, praying for the men who were fighting, banning of the Salvation Army and Jehovah Witnesses. See R/06/3.

Reference: R/07/F1/11

Date: June 24th 1990 - June 24th 1990

BBC Radio Jersey-Occupation Tapes. Told by the people who lived through it produced by Beth Lloyd. Part 5: The wireless-Jersey's link with the outside world. Report by the BBC. Michael Ginns talking about eventual confiscation of radios. Eye witness accounts of v-signs at Rouge Bouillon, patrolling of district by islanders, confiscation and storage of radios, taking of radios from the parish hall, keeping of radios on threat of death, use of crystal radios sets, listening to the news, spreading of newsheets, the threat of being caught with radios and listening to tunes that had not been heard before the occupation. See R/06/2.

Reference: R/07/F1/5

Date: May 13th 1990 - May 13th 1990

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